17 Burst results for "Late Seventies Eighties"

"late seventies eighties" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

07:02 min | 3 weeks ago

"late seventies eighties" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Just go to WBZ 10 30 dot com Also, you can catch all of my stuff. Lot of it anyway, uh, canisters corner and now streaming and, uh, the upside and all the features that I do as well. In the podcast section of WBZ 10 30 dot com. The number 617254 10 30. We're still talking about The crime wave, and it is a wave. There's no question about it. Statistics don't lie and they are pretty shocking. Let's go to Tom and Tom. Welcome to night side in the nine o'clock hour. Hi, How are you? Yes, sir. The number one place where laws get broken is on our southern border. Nobody's enforcing it. Biden has the border wide open. Um these people broken laws in their own country. They're not going to change just because they're in a new country. Well, you're talking about a very, very serious problem, and when you don't enforce your own border, you've got chaos. And that's what's happening now. And you also have the fentanyl, uh, epidemic coming directly from the cartels. Down there and they they're they're using the the open border. Period to spread their evil. So you're right. Absolutely right. And, uh, we don't even call it illegal immigration anymore. You're not allowed to refer to it as illegal. So that certainly paints the picture that it's uh legitimized. Comment, Right? Um, you know, I don't think I'm any better then. Those people crossing the border, but they have their own home and they have their own homeland. That's the point. Well, uh, I said earlier, and I don't know if anybody agrees with me or not. I'd love to know what people think. But I believe it's not just One thing it's It's a whole sort of Milan judge of stuff in culture that has been Chipped away whether it be music or art or sports. Hollywood Certainly Academia when crimes things that are patently wrong. Are maybe not forgiven totally, but are brushed aside and not considered serious anymore. I think we start to see a real problem that happened in New York. Uh, last year when they passed the bail reform, which basically lift A lot of these, um Not necessarily super violent criminals, but certainly assaults and batteries, stalkers, robbery, breaking and entering, Uh, pretty much easy access. Once they're arrested, they're back out again in no time. And I don't know if that really helps curb crime. You dig? Right. We had a president who did enforce the law, but the Democrats got him out. Well, we don't have to even go there because that always brings up a whole can of political worms. But It's been proven time and time again that uh and and Giuliani did it in New York when in New York was a successful in the late seventies eighties, and he affectively cleaned it up in one of the things he did was Institute, a program called Broken Windows, the Broken Windows program, which basically said Tom, that you don't just laugh off cheap petty theft and vandalism and all that. You tackle that. And and everything leads to bigger crime Ultimately, and I think he's right. I think he was ready. He was proven right. You may have problems with Giuliani today, but he was proven right and he cleaned up New York City. So we need that. I think we need that kind of leadership, Not him. But that kind of leadership today, Tom. Thank you. So much for the call. And, uh, very interesting perspective. I don't think Lot of people would argue that there's a real mess on the border. So we're talking. If you're just joining us about the crime wave, I'd like to segue into something, then it's absolutely related. If you ask me And that is the behavior. Of People. Most of them in this case, particular story, young people, but it's not just young people. It's middle aged people as well. And it may be a few. Older ones, but, uh I think by the time you you reach your elder years, you're too tired to want to cause a ruckus. But maybe I'm wrong. A group of local Winthrop High School students graduates. Or were blamed for a day long delayed American Airlines flights scheduled to fly from Charlotte. Which is Charlotte Douglas International to the Bahamas. Note. They were On board to celebrate graduation. There was a, uh, some kind of professional chaperone service that I don't know it. It sounded like there was only one chaperone. And that was a 22 year old according to what I read, but be that as it may, American Airlines claims the students defied federal face mask requirements. Not only that, but they were disruptive, playing loud music shouting foul language. And repeatedly ignoring requests from the flight crew. So These, uh, students caused the plane to be delayed for quite a while, They finally got on another plane and took off for the Bahamas. God help the Bahamas. That's the point. One of the mothers of the students. Claimed that it was totally blown out of proportion that it was only one student. Who was acting up and everyone else was blamed. Uh, be that as it may, I mean, there's always another point of view. But the question is If you're a passenger on a plane, and I haven't been on a plane in a while, I'm I'm soon to be again. Uh, what gives you the right to thwart The law, the rule the federal regulation when you actually check off on your ticket that you will obey the rule. And then you decide. You just want to be a free spirit and you just want to screw it up for everybody else. And it's one thing to Play your music loud and and ruin somebody's backyard barbecue. It's another thing to do anything that's unruly in a in an airplane and a and a jet. That's basically carrying thousands of pounds of explosive fuel and your life is in the hands of the flight crew. So Two questions..

New York Tom Bahamas Giuliani New York City 617254 10 30 Charlotte Democrats Two questions American Airlines Winthrop High School last year thousands of pounds nine o'clock hour WBZ 10 30 late seventies eighties today One one student one chaperone
"late seventies eighties" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

First Class Fatherhood

07:20 min | Last month

"late seventies eighties" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

"Well it's actually a long. It's a long story. But i'll keep it short Was born again believer. Ever since i was eight years old Never forget sitting in church. And i was in the balcony. The pastor was preaching and adjust. It sound like god was talking directly to me about everything i needed to know and I never forget as young boy getting up out of the balcony and walking all the way down front. I was baptized later. that week. That wednesday service of my faith is my compass. It gives you It gives you morals. It gives you strength. it gives you stability. It gives you all of those things that we're talking about that. Make that make us who we are and You know growing up in church. It was like my my thing was i always thought about. Somebody's watching right. Even in the generation that we grew up in the in the late seventies eighties nineties. Somebody's always watching. And you know it so evident today that everybody's watching all the time now in the world and we live in today with camera phones and everything so it's just that it's just that competence. My faith was always my compass. It helped me make decisions. It helped me navigate the bad decisions that i made. It helped me say no to a lot of things that could have derailed our career derail my life in general and it's just that that inner voice man if you're close to yourself and you understand what's going on around you and you're connected with things closely like that being my faith it's always help me. Guide guy that straight narrow well stated as i mentioned earlier about the father the crisis. Also god's been removed from so much of our society and those things Parlayed or really you know having a devastating result And barely i wanted. I wanted to ask you. Because i i've had Aj mclean nick. Carter on the podcast here. Aj talk highly of you. what is it like for you. he called you like almost like a big brother or like a protector when the kids all get together from the band all the band's kids what is your relationship like with the other members of the band in their kids i would say my relationship with the guys is is pretty close For the most part definitely aging kevin have been a huge role in my life Aj always was one of my biggest supporters. And when i went on tour with the boys two years ago aj and cabin were definitely. I just say hey yes. Let's do this. Let's give him a shot. My whole life. Aj's ben He's been a part he's been ugly j. so thank him so much for that in kevin being my cousin which great to have family and On the road with you leg during those times is amazing. And i would have to say on. I'm obviously close closest to mason Which is the second oldest out of all. The kids is insane to see the second. All this be as old as he is now and growing up video from play soccer a couple of weeks ago when i was just i was blown away And age as kids a lyric. I i mean this is like quick story. I saw them about two years ago at staples center And it was the first time. I'd seen him in a hot minute so they've grown so much since i've seen about so i saw eva and i was like. Hey hey i'm good for you in lyric lyric teensy and i'm sitting there and i go. Hey lear but sergey goes high. And i was like she was talking full citizen. I was like man. Like how much of i missed already like. I mean she's got this. She's got this like commentator voice to i am the jets. Are the thirty five yard walk. I you know the they've been a big part of my life and and yes. I do feel kind of like the big brother and on tour now even now have to round up the cattle. Make sure they're all doing all right. But you know i just i love them all and they are family so i have to say that. Yeah very cool and brian. I have four kids. My oldest is fifteen. My youngest is my only girl. She's six she's got a while ago yet for this but my older guys about to get just about to get into this now. One of the things. I as a dad i want. My kids hit this dating scene. I want whoever. They're going to date their family to feel comfortable knowing that they have a good man. A good young man coming to date their door. That's important to me what you're right here with baileigh eighteen. He's he's a grown up now. What kind of advice did you give him when he became old enough to start hitting that dating scene I'm just gonna. I'm gonna use his own words that he used just a few minutes ago. You know it's it's about respect How you know honoring you know. Honoring your partner in every way Being gentleman Being respectful Just just helping in any any way you can I think that's important As as a father as we grow and and we have our family and we get to share these things with our kids. That's you know it's like what would you wanna pass down other than that you know I tell bailey. All the time. Like a baleen his running joke about time we go out to eat Hill like him. And i we will race to the car to open. Mama's door is like he always liked tries to push me out of the way i like. Hey son look over. There is magic johnson. And he's like. I'll take off running to open moms door so these are just these things that we've instilled in him. I'm sure you've done that in your boys because you know you've got you've got to send them out to the wall sooner or later and they've got they've got wanna come back home and i think just like you said this fatherless society that we've grown up in i mean everything starts at home in those values are so important to be passed down and i think not a lot of kids get that opportunity not a lot of young men today. Get that and Maybe we shouldn't. We should start a company or a foundation or something that you know us has grown men as fathers can can be mentors to those young kids and just get personal advice. Maybe we do something like that. Yeah listen it's definitely needed. That's why i'm here doing this. I bring on a lot of highly successful people like yourself and they will testify that despite always amazing accomplishments they've had it's really experienced. Becoming a father that's giving them a sense of fulfillment in life. So those are the messages trying to put out there. I love what you say about your wife opening the door for her. Because i do that with my kids and sometimes my wife's about how us the the key fob and locked doors so she can't one of us can get over here to get it. you know. that's what we do we do. They beat me. And i'm like i'm like man you're silly because i got the keep it was like so i keep it locked. Well this i. I know i'm running up here so i want to start closing this out. bailey. I want to ask you your obviously got your music. Career started here. This game as we mentioned has changed the way we can enter. The music industry has changed. Since your dad's been coming up in it. What kind of advice do you have out there for for a young kid or the parents of young kids that wanna get involved in the music industry and start a music career.

kevin six fifteen four kids two years ago Carter thirty five yard one first time today wednesday late seventies eighties nineti second brian baileigh eight years old Aj couple of weeks ago second oldest that week
"late seventies eighties" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

05:58 min | 5 months ago

"late seventies eighties" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"It's totally different than who you see. And what you see now today. How different is he? Oh, very different When I was actually coming along the system was the system and I was so rigid in the system now, you know, I see that there's other ways of handling things, especially in the law enforcement community. That doesn't necessarily call for law enforcement. We can actually use acting use this agency. In a better way. Okay, how we can come back out and reconnect and try to rebuild. Trust out here in the communities were you know that there's a lot of distrust, especially in the black and brown communities. So you know, like I said, my experience Wasps. Very negative experience. But you still have people today here 2020 2021 that is still having those same negative experiences with law enforcement. So you know, it's not up to me to be rebranded and make sure that those, uh, those those those situations are different. Let me just say this, and then I let you get on to your next question. And I don't mean just dominate. No, you're good. This is what this is for. Have your say. You know all them talk about now. I felt like when I was policing and I became a major. I was the first and on Lee Black Major in the Gwinnett County Police department at that time at the time when I retired, okay. That is something to be said about being the first and it's something to be said about being the only because you're the only voice at the tape. Okay? And so what? You have to realize what I came to realize is Did I really have a voice at the table? Was I really being heard? Even though if I said anything, how strong was my voice? So when I came back in, you know, and I made the decision to run for sheriff. I'm like, I'm not gonna be the voice at the table. I'm gonna be the table. When I invite other voices to the table. I'm gonna listen to those voices, and we're gonna make sure that those voices are included in what we do. So when we go out here, and we talk about some of the things that we're putting forth Today in the Gwinnett County Sheriff's Office. These are not all just keep Oh, Taylor's ideas. Okay, uh, my staff, especially my executive command staff, man, I have black. Males on their black females on there. I have a Hispanic male on their have white males on there. Have someone from the lbgt community. That is one of my direct section managers over here over my PS you unit here and so you know, I look for that diversity. Okay. And I appreciate that diversity. But when you get it, you gotta be willing to listen to it. And you know, and allow these people to do the jobs. You can't paint on that. You also campaign that if elected, you were going to end the 27 G program. Um you want You are the only sheriff to do that. I had a conversation not too long ago with another sheriff about that. Why was that so important for you to want to discontinue that program? One thing that I said about the 27 G problem is, is that on day one One of the first things that I was gonna do was in that program and held true to that on the first day in office. You know, I couldn't order that day in in our participation in the 2 80 70 program, you know if I could just sum it up and not be long winded on it. 27 G program is a very discriminatory program. And what I saw when I started to look into that program and really get to understand what that program WASP. It reminded me so much of the discriminatory practices that black people went through back in the eighties, you know, late seventies eighties and even into the nineties before they actually started to Take a look and understand that blacks was actually being racially profiled out here on traffic stops and how we were being disproportionately, you know, sentence into the criminal justice system. So I see the same thing with this 27 G program and may not be affected black people in that way, but it definitely affects the Hispanic community and other communities of people of color here. That are here that are undocumented here in the United States that U S Immigration and Customs enforcement program that Ah lot of counties did partner with as far as Gwinnett County was their contract where you all I'm assuming you are able to get out of it. Did you hear any feedback from ice asking to reconsider or how Cooperative. Were they in saying, Okay, Well, just in this this partnership Well, we have some conversations, and I'll just leave it that bad. Oh, We did have conversations, you know, And I mean, and I applaud anybody for doing the job. You know, That is their job. That's their mandate. Then you know, by all means, you know, do your job, right? Um, but, you know, sometimes we have to come to the to the agreement to agree to disagree. Okay? And as they say, you know, you know, I wish you well in your business as long as your business doesn't affect my business, so You know, that was what we had to leave it at is is that you know, whatever it was that they need to do on their mandates. You know, I wish them the best, you know, And I pray for their safety, just like anybody else out here. Law enforcement that I would pray for, Um, you know, the those men and women go home safely to their families, but, you know, it's just could not be a situation where we continue to interact under those types of agreements. If you're just joining us, I'm joined by Gwinnett County Sheriff Ki Bo Taylor. We're talking about some changes Does he's already made since he's been in office..

Taylor United States Ki Bo Taylor today Gwinnett County Sheriff's Offi eighties Lee Black Major nineties first late seventies eighties Gwinnett County Police departm Today Sheriff one day one One thing first things 2 80 70 program 27 G program One
"late seventies eighties" Discussed on Feminist Frequency Radio

Feminist Frequency Radio

04:48 min | 6 months ago

"late seventies eighties" Discussed on Feminist Frequency Radio

"That will only cause more trouble And obviously she says it in a much better way than i just articulated but but she emphasizes the importance of of not telling ally emit the fact that this kind of hurt and pain is. It's an understood fact among these black women you know. It doesn't need to be explicitly stated what has occurred or who is responsible but instead we will gather around you and support you and tell you what we feel is the best way to handle it and maybe it isn't the best way but this is the way that we have dealt with it and i think it's so interesting that it is yellow. Mary who has this conversation her. Not you know. Viola not nanna present not one of the other women because the fact that yellow. Mary is called villa. Mary and that she has a lighter. Skin tone encourages me anyway. Perhaps not everyone else to think like what is yellow mary's providence. She has talked about how she was left alone and she raised herself on the island. It makes you wonder who her parents were. How she got here. Why she looked so different from other members of the is she. In fact the child of you know a sexual assault of it and then the fact that her lover true la is also also has a much lighter. Complexion is not fair skinned. But you know certainly fair skinned than many of the other people on the island you know it. There's there's so much at play here. And just the fact of their existence. You know That that demands that we ask what is not being said here. Have we understood it. And how have we allowed certain wounds to be like scabbed over but still festering beneath an unhealed. Yeah back on on. This movie are a lot going on ally hours. I the article that i shared him. I think he's going to be in the show. You know one of the reviewers says the phone feels like it's three or four hours not in a bad way but just because it is just immense tapestry it is it is it is not it is no small thing and once you are in it it is like being sucked under by the undertow of the ocean ocean. That's you know is right or in this on the borders of this land but once you are you are in and you will be there for a while. Yeah it's such a shame that chilly dash hasn't made another feature since then it's a crime. Yeah rumor or not rumor. I mean she has spoken about the fact that she is working on an. Angela davis bio-pics. So i don't know what the if it's scott financial backing of studio support. Or what have you know if it's what have you what what state it's end but certainly that would be that. Sounds like a great a meshing of subject matter and filmmaker and so. I certainly hope that that we do actually that. That project does see the light of day. I before we wrap up. I doing say that Julie dash is part of what's called the l. a. rebellion which was a group of black filmmakers. Roughly like you know late seventies eighties and many of them coming out of ucla but doing experimental independent fiercely independent work in cinema and ucla. Archives has an online repository of information about the film filmmakers within the la rebellion. Where you can find out more information. Find out more about their films. But i really as we do this month long salute on a black cinema. I i really encourage Those of you who would like to check some of the stuff out to to go. Check out for on the la rebellion. Hell yeah and that. That's really exciting. I wanna look at. Ucla archive is a treasure trove. Seriously y'all the ucla library film and television archive it. Their collections are absolutely killer. And there's so much that is available online. Just go spend some time dipping around there. You'll be amazed what you say. Cool l. i think based on this conversation all highly recommend that you watch this movie until all of your friends to watch this movie every did you wanna talk at all about Lemonade i'll talk about in the bonus. Oh the eliminate section will be in the bonus us. Let's do that all right. We'll.

Angela davis three Mary four hours late seventies eighties Viola ucla library one Ucla mary month one of the reviewers ucla rebellion Julie dash Archives la Lemonade scott
"late seventies eighties" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

James Wilson Institute Podcast

05:02 min | 6 months ago

"late seventies eighties" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

"So i actually took a chunk out of this already long book. On burke burke shoes on slavery and i turned into a separate article actually fall Followed response to someone who was criticizing my first article as well on this issue. So burke oppo first burqa post lavery meszaros chocolates of humanity in his thought. It violated the natural law. The moral law he also thought however that immediate abolition would be counterproductive and wreak havoc. There was a time period and Late seventies eighties or seventy days in which. He did support immediate abolition but he reverted after that when he thought that that would provoke social upheaval reverted back to his prior position. Which was at the gradual. The grad gradual. Abolition was a pathway for a ten slavery in the slave trade in a should add that incident around seventeen eighty. He drafted a sketch of nego code which was perhaps the first comprehensive detailed plan for the graduate abolition of slavery in the bush pyre in i mean people are aware of that that aspect of slums well And i wrote my piece on this issue he. I think it's safe to say. He influenced later debates about abolition in the nineteenth century Oversleeping throughout the british empire but for him trafficking human beings the moral law. human beings are rational beings And they were not even though the time period There were more than a few slave owners who did think that They should be treated as cattle and Had the same souls as englishman and this leads to difficulty hovering burks thought if sleeves if africans shopping treat us commodities but he defended the headed price system which inevitably to some extent does treat humid labor as labor as commodities right. Yeah right house. He he house able to reconcile these two positions and Because he he did not draw these treatises. he's not sufficiently do so in in my judgment but one can connect the dots and and provide this. I think this explanation. I also touch upon in his calm turn french revolution. These relations can be commodified and so far has won. The liberty of the.

nineteenth century first article Late seventies eighties first around seventeen eighty british seventy two positions ten days more than a few slave africans burke burke first burqa french
"late seventies eighties" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"late seventies eighties" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"To use hypnosis Jim white apple fell well well well good morning everyone good morning and happy March twenty ninth happy Sunday morning rise and shine have your wide awake and alert I hope so I know we got shift workers out there we got people that couldn't sleep last night I know we're we're we're already as we have today yes we are wide awake this is how to use your help this is as you heard or say the beginning of the program talk radio six eighty WCBS we have again the other interesting program for you and you might want to talk about these compromise conditions and cigarettes as as as as this virus is making its way around tells a little bit about that well you know people are understanding more and more about the when people get in their late seventies eighties like myself and worked a high stress well people that have lung problems and heart problems you hear that all the time well I want to take a minute and tell you you've been smoking for two years one pack a day one hundred percent of the people one hundred percent I've already started with coronary artery disease cardiovascular disease and emphysema well now we know that from the surgeon general's report what they did hi I'm still really little reluctant a little bit tell people about the but I think it's come time to hello how we get the statistics we're going to go back to the second World War we're going to go back to Korea and Vietnam mainly Korea and Vietnam when our soldiers went into the military and if you guys out there are you women out there went into the military during this time specially Vietnam when you went into the service for three days you could leave the company area you got your clothes you got your food CA you got everything all right and you got your physicals call god bless the needles okay one time they took you on a section down at the table they said now listen do not put your name on this form just your service number is your mother alive or dead do you know how she died your father live or dead brothers sisters cousins that that that that that have you ever had the measles mumps chickenpox I don't know all kinds of stuff instead for many years I've been in but I remember this all right you're writing down all these things and at the very bottom of the page it says do you smoke how much do you smoke how long do you smoke big deal they want it all man will make sure to get enough cigarettes for me no we want to look at your dead bodies and they did well you won't know what pretty much everybody knows that when your soldiers get killed nobody is saying that they over Air Force base it's called the Morgan a military yes what you might not know is they're sliced and diced and their body parts are sent to colleges and universities across the nation for autopsies in nineteen eighty five the Surgeon General gathered up the reports all these opportunities and he published it and the Surgeon General report of nineteen eighty seven before two years of smoking one pack a day.

apple Jim white
"late seventies eighties" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

05:24 min | 2 years ago

"late seventies eighties" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Are you going to be is the plan to be in this home for the next twenty years? Uh-huh. I don't know if I would I there's the problem is is to pay this. You're not gonna get mortgage paid off by using your 4._0._1._K three. And you can't if you put it out now. If you put out while you're working, it's disastrous because you already got two hundred thousand dollars a year of income plus your other pension, plus. But if she doesn't even if you AT retire. Yeah. The taxes are going to be. Right. So I was going to wait until I retired. But we still have to pay taxes on it. Craig? Correct it and it won't it won't help the situation much. What's your mortgage payment, excluding taxes and insurance about twenty five hundred? I don't think I'd do a thing. Just leave it where it's at Scott. You're. Taking money out of your 4._0._1._K to pay it off. It's not pay. It down is just not even if you got to pay down. You're not going to get it paid off. Right. But the mortgage would be less. Well, we hear someone strategy. We could look at you got pensions. You get that's going to your pension and social security coming. You could look at saying what if you took twenty five hundred dollars a month out of your 4._0._1._K? How long is that going to last with some assumed rate of return on your asset your 4._0._1._K at that point? What would then be the mortgage balance, and and look at using a reverse mortgage fifteen years now, or whatever it is when that fifteen years from now, but the, but I'm saying is used the 4._0._1._K to make the mortgage payment knowing that you're going to be drying down someone that 4._0._1._K while pain down that mortgage fifteen years out, or whatever the timeframe is going to be mortgage. Balance would be lasted that period of time presumably the home values gone up at that period of time. You do you. Do you have heirs that you wanna leave money too? I have three children. Yes. And you and you want to leave them something. I would hope so. Yeah, not everyone feels the way you do specifically about your children but about their own. I mean, they don't have to have a huge amount. But it would be nice to lead them something. I wouldn't do thing. So just continue. I wouldn't do anything between now and retirement, but it retirement that the issue is going to be looking at how do I? I I hear what you're saying is God. But like what's my standard of living because she's used to it? I I wouldn't I would wait and get their in and live six months in retirement with that income to see how I was managing before. He decided anything, right? I would just test drive it. So Scott's idea is a good idea. Which is what happens if we start a distribution from the 4._0._1._K or four zero three b in order to make the mortgage payment. But the reality is you'll be which you're you're you're not gonna earn enough. In those accounts to generate odds, are you're not gonna earn enough for that account remain intact. The next thirty years. Correct. So you got to draw down. How about yours you have left on your mortgage? Well, I refinance because I put solar in live on six and a half acres. Okay. And I remodeled the house. That's why the house is worth what it is. So and so because when I moved in there was totally dated this is nineteen Seventy-six house, and it had never been remodeled and a new roof, etc. So Kelly, so here's all of this information, actually, what you just told me six and a half acres. You're sixty four years of age leave me even more to the fact that you shouldn't be trying to pay this thing down. Okay. Right. And the reality is, and we can talk about maybe are different. But the real and we have over six thousand clients that we work with from the ages of. Most of my most of my retirement age of retirement age. But what we see is when they when you get here late seventies eighties. If you've got acreage, it's very very rare for you to stay on that acreage. That's just the reality of it. And you've got six and a half acres. I I don't I I would like idea. Don't do anything. Don't do anything retired. And see what the cash flow looks like for the first six months, if you needed supplement it with a thousand dollars or fifteen hundred dollars a month out of your 4._0._1._K, then some plans on that too because. Yeah. But there's nothing you can't pay. You can't pay. He took two hundred thousand out of it. Or let's say took the four hundred thousand out today to pay it off. You're gonna be left with the half of that. And then it's still owe three hundred thousand on your mortgage taxes are gonna clobber you. Okay. Because it's added onto the all the additional income all like he made it in that one year. Don't do anything right now. Retire. See with cash flow looks like and then. After six months if you need to supplement your income your pension income by taking money out of the 4._0._1._K. You can give us a call. And we'll look at that. Okay. Glad you called. Thanks very much. We're gonna take a quick break. Stick around. For more Hanson mcclain's money matters..

Kelly AT Hanson mcclain Craig Scott fifteen years six months two hundred thousand dollars twenty five hundred dollars fifteen hundred dollars sixty four years thousand dollars thirty years twenty years one year
"late seventies eighties" Discussed on Boston Herald Radio

Boston Herald Radio

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"late seventies eighties" Discussed on Boston Herald Radio

"In his heyday when he you know in the late seventies eighties i am on my show when i was sixteen years old doing a weekly show on local origination station in have to say to you i said get the hell out of the business you sucked he was very good now he was great fact we had to reschedule the first time he was gonna do it chuck fairbanks got fired so that was the big story but then he came on a couple months later and he was he was a guest in studio with me it was great it was awesome i it was that was a pretty cool show actually because it was in ten cities it wasn't just like public access i work with a bunch of people that went on to work you know local stations here national stations you know one kid that worked there ended up directing let's make a deal or one of the shows like that so but glendon come on yeah just listening to them you just learn so much but anyway coward has his top ten most valuable franchises let's not we'll just value like branding branding or sell it what you sell it i mean that makes some sense because it's different right and what's more powerful brand but versus what you could sell the team for make the most money to kind of go hand in hand though i mean a lot of that has to do with some teams have nicer facilities in the cowboys number one on cowards less because the cowboys not not just they've jerry's world and then they've got this practice facility that are both in excess of two talking about all that stuff then cowboys brand is eugene i and you and i were talking about this a little bit off air yesterday and we'll we'll give our top tens or whatever but i have the yankees won because i think their brand is more powerful than the bigger brand national they don't even own.

cowboys jerry yankees chuck fairbanks glendon sixteen years
"late seventies eighties" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"late seventies eighties" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Stra work you had to do back in the late seventies eighties and nineties to get this type of information and the schools the college so schools were great they were tremendously opened the sending anything that they had on the players and trying to get those kids drafted a little higher standpoint be hard for you to be able to find those channels unless you had to go out and kind of move the satellite dish over to get mountain west games are pac twelve games they moved to south awake jesus move that dish i had all these different areas ago you would just turn dial inside and the fish would move automatically go to whatever satellite guys like twelve satellite coordinates to go to and it was all said and you go off you can find one usually go to the next one and then they go all over the place i go back and forth off the satellite dish so that was that was phenomenal to have i had that i think that was started with that and like the around nineteen eighty three and had that satellite dish all the way up probably in nineteen ninety two and nineteen ninetythree in that area is really awesome at three thirty right there and i'd love to watch as we talked to mel kiper junior with jonathan hood on espn one thousand and the espn app mel there's a couple of schools of thought with the bears you know the situation right now to team that's trying to get on the rise here come out of the basement of the nfc north what do you think is best for chicago and trubisky well i think there's a couple of schools the thought that you do do you worry about you know helping mitch you know later on from the second round orders you try to do it i love a defense that helps out the quarterback to there's roquan smith linebacker from georgia gonna be there going to be clinton nelson the guard from notre dame with directions you wanna do you wanna go offensive guard go.

jonathan hood espn chicago mitch mel kiper nfc georgia clinton nelson
"late seventies eighties" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"late seventies eighties" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"So be realized how much extra work you had to do back in the late seventies eighties and nineties to get this type of information and the school the college two schools were great they were tremendously opened the sunning anything that they had on the players trying to get those kids drafted a little higher standpoint enemy hard for you to be able to find those channels unless you had to go out and going to move the satellite dish from vertu get mountain west games or pac twelve games we they they moved to south i had a awake visas move that dish all these different areas ago and you would just turn dial inside and this would move automatically go to whatever satellite guys like ten twelve satellite coordinates to go to and it was all set and you go off you couldn't find one to the next they go all over the place go back and forth off the satellite dish so that was phenomenal to have i had that i think that was started with that and like the around nineteen eighty three and had that satellite dish all the way up probably in nineteen ninety two and nineteen ninetythree in that area that sounds really awesome that's thirty for thirty right there i'd love to watch as we talked to melkite virginia with jonathan hood on espn one thousand and the espn app mel there's a couple of schools of thought with the bears you know the situation right now to team that's trying to get on the rise here come out of the basement of the nfc north what do you think is best for chicago and trubisky well i think there's a couple schools of thought there you do do you worry about you know helping mitch later on from the second round orders you try to do far as i love a defense that helps out the quarterback to ios roquan smith linebacker from george going to be there and it's going to be clinton nelson the guard from notre dame directions that you want to go do you like go.

vertu virginia jonathan hood espn chicago mitch george nfc clinton nelson
"late seventies eighties" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:51 min | 3 years ago

"late seventies eighties" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Seventy miles an hour on the jane addams backup to seventy i don't know if it's backed up to has it ever been seventy i remember when seventies highways and freeways were seventy five miles an hour back when i was driving to and from sl you so that was pre nineteen seventy gas shortage yeah they they did not go the speed limits didn't get dropped down to sixty miles an hour until i think after seventy five seventy eight something like that well when i was growing up fifty five was the max just about anywhere now will you get out on the highways yes it was seventy five seventy seventy five yes it was now when i was growing up i'm sorry okay young whippersnapper in the late seventies eighties yes max was fifty a long time right yeah they dropped it from seventy or seventy five yes and now the jane addams just this week went up seventy and i'm gonna make a little confession i did ninety down here whoa whoa whoa there's no traffic it's awesome it's like the audubon is there any construction out where you are no not right now the tiny there was no i don't think there was like anything on the way down tonight i think that as long as people are smart about driving then i'm okay with it and i know we we don't really trust people and their driving skills but and some people already go seventy even when most everyone is going thirty or forty zipping in and out of traffic i had one today on this on the side street heading towards the outer drive to come here and there was a spot it's on ridge and it turns into hollywood and if you're familiar with the far north side i'm not so it.

audubon hollywood jane addams
"late seventies eighties" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

The mindbodygreen Podcast

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"late seventies eighties" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

"Spiritual teacher who's been alive in the twentieth century on youtube most of them have videos on youtube you can experience the great teachings of these spiritual heavyweights everywhere and it's an amazing time because of that the the role of a leader has changed just like we're what we're talking about an i really take it very seriously that i'm an artist and and david bowie said at then of his life i only did one thing wrong and that was i played to the audience which i think is the big interesting yes he said the one thing i ever did wrong in my whole career was instead of satisfying and cultivating and it's stimulating my own creativity i played to the audience and that was my one mistake at times you know he didn't say like that wasn't but the only time he did something wrong was when he would do that and i really like i was thinking about that in the way that his death was mourned bigger than i think any public death i've ever seen mourned was david bowie's death and why because of the even more really than prince i think which is weird because you know what a heavyweight of art he brought onto the planet but so i really i take my leadership role as an artist i think that's the role of the teacher in this time in this new age that we're in is what can what do i create how do i create original thought in original art in icy rama's a movement of art we have all these incredible artists documentary filmmakers and and and painters and and you know our one of our women who teaches at rama just was shown at moma from club fifty seven which was a movement of art in the eighties late seventies eighties in the east village and she was an artist during that time we're talking about how we feel that that will be what happens with the movement of rama just in terms of the aesthetic and the and the the conversation and the stimulation of of so i really look at that that is.

youtube david bowie
"late seventies eighties" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"late seventies eighties" Discussed on Triangulation

"Feminists from south india and i was born in silicon valley but i spent a lot of time as as a young kid in india and travelling to different parts of the worlds my parents are educators so it was a pretty natural thing to think of myself as someone who wanted to go into education and teaching and maybe even research on my dad taught at stamford in the business goal and my mother is a kindergarten teacher so it was just something that is really in greens in me but i think what was also in greens and me is just the love of travel the love of diversity the love of our worlds one one of the coolest things about being a professor as you have freedom to pursue what you care about an hour what you love and one of the you know one of the aspects some my father's lifestyle that was exciting for me was the opportunity to live and be in different parts of the world so silicon valley at that time had like orange tree orchards and it wasn't quite the valley that will be no of today you know as we all know it's gone through different waves of peaks and valleys send um and you know i grew up i actually went to the high school in a wasn't a very good high school in my experience some but the same high school as steve jobs and steve wozniak so it had this kind of mystique about it um and um i think increasingly like at when i went to college and after college i started to realise and this is what a lot of my work as about is that technologies not simply defined by how we created it's also defined by the places and peoples that it might greats too so until now that technology is part of our worlds right now an you know it's everyone's world a unit you don't ask someone like how did you get interested in technology his growing up today but you know for those of us who grew up in the late seventies eighties.

india stamford professor steve jobs steve wozniak
"late seventies eighties" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

1170 The Answer

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"late seventies eighties" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

"The things that has been very well confirmed in their eyewitnesses n multiple witnesses about a dozen of them saying that he was had created a problem years ago in a newly opened shopping mall in gadsden alabama and that he had been made on welcome at the the mall or at least the security people have been told watch out for him because he was west so well known to be predatory into the hitting on teenage girls and this is when he was a district attorney any was fairly wellknown in town now all of this has led to some comments my one of his potential senate colleagues who it's not eager to serve with a groin more if he gets elected to the senate which i think is increasingly unlikely that he will be lindsey graham the senior senator from south carolina i was stopped by reporters and a whole way and he had this to say one more people in the ball and if you'd get kicked out of the mall less thirty that situation planned herself them i just after the evidence is pretending overwhelming that he had a profit that people are now can afford say hit back in the late seventies eighties he was on the nofly this for which two minutes studies its credibility delegations visa yes and you know betray and says the vote than than really has been held account for behavior that was it it at the minimum creepy and i have no reason to i think.

alabama district attorney senate senator south carolina gadsden lindsey graham two minutes
"late seventies eighties" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

02:07 min | 4 years ago

"late seventies eighties" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

"You could get and i don't even know what how much more was a color i remember i never bought film we never had a camera so my dad had a camera bus by balls about constantly your debt fifty cent per frame for the film 250 appropriate at it i remember that the s or the late seventies eighties so it's very expensive yeah and and it may have gotten less in the name ragsdale on the gas eighty nine sent yeah and black of what it was like a dime early their tents at summing way less way less so big different yeah all right let's see correlation hey gillian thirty virginia i pay it's going on guys i'm so excited as the listening and i was in high school uh it's in virginia nice um so i am calling because i'm thirty which has led to a lot of interest action blah blah blah and i'm a little bit frustrated with my physical health um i feel like i do a lot of shit that a lot of people my age with not as you know i don't have really that much longterm bullshit going on i really comes pick a lock um um i trying to talk about it because it's annoying even to me um and i i know about the case for the eighth tax the talked about your childhood and all of that the experience right and this was in line and their too so rather reasons they were doing those studies glee noticed that everyone that it was sick in hospital and they had medical problems with the had hyon said it's of high probability being uh ever shall experience what would give us some adverse childhood experiences i mean we know at bangor mulled it is but what else whatever gillian but neglect abuse physical abuse i look i will be on.

ragsdale hyon bangor virginia gillian
"late seventies eighties" Discussed on KELO

KELO

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"late seventies eighties" Discussed on KELO

"We saw the third stores who were who yeah okay that's good and then we waited years for the next three and they pass this over a year after year after year and then he came out with these three new star wars movies were all like going wait a minute star wars is ours but lucas said no this is star wars shredded other generation and our generation and quite understand it we knew it was star wars we go with our kids but we didn't understand it we didn't know anything or carry leaving about judge are beaks that's what's happening right now we are we are the original star wars crowd we like original star wars things were wondering what happened with that other there's another generation out there but they think that what we did was darker and worse and bad and racist and and i don't know where they got that information got those ideas but they should at least should actually go through history and realize that it was our generation the generation it was raised in the late seventies eighties and into the nineties that brought together people through music and art we were the music in our kids that's what we were i know we we we really gone backward i mean i i don't understand it i really don't get because they they they look at us as the enemy more than anybody else in this world generation above them yeah it will some of these teaching them that our generation for some reason was racist and intolerant no no we weren't in fact many of the fashions that we warren high school were influenced by by the american blacks and much of the music was influenced by by public mainstream yeah i mean they call calm the call the map for afroamericans back banner african americans back then these are the things that you know we learned we also learned about other cultures like you remember the cultures in new york or or the the cultures in san francisco that we're gay we learned about that we learned we and we learned and it was.

lucas african americans new york san francisco warren high school
"late seventies eighties" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:33 min | 4 years ago

"late seventies eighties" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Scientology since l ron hubbard seth in 1980 sex in his rise to power in the first person they interviewed was this thirty two year old scientology thirty two years scientologists he's probably in his fifties pain jb bruce who laugh after the scientology in 2010 but he was our un's hubbard's personal driver like in the late seventies eighties and later a right hand man dimissed coversion who and he just said i saw him dismantling taking everyone who had been around l ron hubbard including including how ron hubbard sister and how he was getting them out of the heart of power said he could be the only one and he he also talked about shelly missed conversion aware we shall not been seen in public since two thousand and five and also about the a whole and he helped like come up with the design of that in how of course the church says it doesn't exist and which the whole where you and people four infraction been up high who have to go in like his do menial work and never be heard from and it's nice spanned did in complete darkness he's the one who put the is so is the guy who put the bars on the doors of the whole block the windows from ever being able to open he said i was like the security i did everything i was the driver yelm this give azure l ron hubbard they would tell me what to do and he.

Scientology ron hubbard seth scientology ron hubbard windows shelly thirty two years thirty two year