35 Burst results for "Late Seventies"

Vincent, Robinson lead short-handed Heat past 76ers 101-96

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Vincent, Robinson lead short-handed Heat past 76ers 101-96

"He he gave gave this this is is not not the the point point basket basket with with thirty thirty nine nine seconds seconds to to go go in in regulation regulation to to enable enable to to hate hate the the hold hold off off a a late late seventy seventy Sixers Sixers rally rally angle angle on on the the wall wall one one on on one one ninety ninety six six win win Philadelphia Philadelphia trailed trailed by by ten ten when when used used a a thirteen thirteen three three run run that that was was capped capped by by a a three three point point basket basket but but Tobias Tobias Harris Harris to to tie tie the the game game with with one one twenty twenty four four to to play play the the game game winning winning three three by by Vincent Vincent was was his his seven seven three three point point basket basket of of the the game game he he had had twenty twenty six six points points Duncan Duncan Robinson Robinson added added twenty twenty one one Tyrese Tyrese Maxey Maxey had had twenty twenty seven seven for for the the Sixers Sixers Michael Michael Luongo Luongo Philadelphia Philadelphia

Sixers Sixers Philadelphia Tobias Tobias Harris Harris Vincent Vincent Duncan Duncan Robinson Robinso Tyrese Tyrese Maxey Maxey Sixers Michael Michael Luongo Luongo
"late seventies" Discussed on X96

X96

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"late seventies" Discussed on X96

"Side for me, ans perfect. Yeah Example. You know, I think if you made it kinda like a porno kind of vibe where you have, like porn music, kind of that golden lighting almost like in the era of the golden Age of porn in the late seventies, and you just have like someone just with with us is syringe slowly approaching someone's arm. And you suspect Oh, yeah. You know you wanted I'm gonna give it to you. Are you ready? Oh, yeah. Give it to me, baby. There's gonna catch a little bit. Roll up your sleeve. I don't need to have a shirt on what I mean. I don't know about you. I'm ready for a booster radio from hell on X 96. All right, Let's award boner of the day and that's brought to you, in part by a really delicious bacon, lettuce, tomato. A mozzarella cheese and, uh, sandwich on about. Oh, man. It was good. That almost sounds too big to like. Fit in your mouth. It was huge, huge. And the blocks is downtown Salt Lake, come see what's happening around the city get the latest on performances, exhibits, music, murals and events on the website. The blocks slc dot com Boehner, candidate number one Our patronizing legislature. They need to sit down and have a talk with Donovan Mitchell because this young black man You know, I don't think he really understands critical race theory in well, we we can white Splain it to him, essentially.

Donovan Mitchell late seventies Boehner Salt Lake one golden Age porn X 96
Beyond the Language Wars: R & Python for the Modern Data Scientist

DataFramed

02:17 min | 1 year ago

Beyond the Language Wars: R & Python for the Modern Data Scientist

"Can you describe the set of events that led to our by thon becoming the primary data science today and how this translates into what we call the language war between armed by phone and something that we talked about ready to very beginning of the book is kind of a little bit unusual that we will begin a book on unarmed python by giving this whole history of languages. But i want to that way because i thought that it's important to help you understand the cranks and how we got to where we are and so one of the first questions be blast when they're trying to decide. I learn our show. I learnt python is. What's the difference between aren't python and you'll see a lot of post on stack overflow or different a message. Boards rented where people talk about What are the basic differences between these languages in wash use one versus the other and nobody comes to a clear consensus or a clear. Understanding the differences tried to do in the first chapter is just outline the history of the which is to give an idea about the different ethel's and how things work differently between the two languages so so are was there kind of at the very beginning of scientific computing in academia in the late seventies early eighties in bell. Laboratories was really developed as a programming language for doucet's analysis and within the book i call it a fubu language so who is a street where clothing company from new york. That I used to love when i was a teenager. And is it stands for four as by us. And i like this forest by his attitude is very much a four the community by the community. Kind kind of those in this very much. What are is right is forced decisions by statisticians in. It's just meant to just get statistics that get dot announces his work with down and just just get it done into program language in his own right. But it's first and foremost used for doing that. Analysis and that really shaped all of what kim afterwards in r. and python kind comes from a different direction python originated as a generalist polka me language to make just entry into programming easier with a nice syntax and An easier access to managing all kinds of different tools and system administration and building applications and web development so e cat. It's fingers everywhere. Generalist programming language and then came. That assigns later on so python. Wasn't that a science. I and programming second was kind of the other way

Doucet Academia New York KIM
How Trifecta is Hacking the American Diet With Trifecta CEO Greg Connolly

Entrepreneur on FIRE

02:44 min | 1 year ago

How Trifecta is Hacking the American Diet With Trifecta CEO Greg Connolly

"Let's be honest. The vast majority of americans their overweight. they're obese. we're talking not just like over fifty percent. We're talking the vast majority so what specifically is wrong. And how are you setting about to fix it. It's a great question. And getting into the business being savvy entrepreneurs i'd i i always encourage people to look deeply at the problem. You now think thinking through the obesity of damage. Most people are like. Oh it's personal choice. People just need to pick a salad instead of a mcdonald's big mac and if you look back over history going back to the eighty seventies and even sixties. We didn't have this problem in the united states. It's relatively new problem for us. And the transition that happened in society Which was a fantastic Transition that all of us are in full support of Was that women. Entered the workforce so there was no longer one major member of the household at home cooking three meals a day. Like leave it to beaver style You now have women working right alongside men fifty sixty plus hours a week like like my wife That created a environment in the economy. Where getting food quickly became the key. Thing that americans focused on and that in the late seventies and especially in the eighties and nineties led to the rise of fast food ultimately time became the big factor for people to eat and as that happened You know we started focusing less and less on You know on the health aspect cooking from home and all of those types of things when it comes to eating and more and more on the convenience of food so that was our fix with trifecta as we said how can we be more convenient than fast food. And you know unless you're in puerto rico. Sorry john You know we we shipped the food fully cooked directly to your door. You don't even have to go through the drive through That was our market solution to out compete fast food in the marketplace So that that really was our whatever you wanna call. It are better mouse trap or solution. excetera is we shortened. The supply chain By cutting the the retailer and the distributor out of the equation so you don't you don't go to the grocery store to pick up trifecta you ordered on the internet we ship it directly to your house

Obesity Mcdonald United States Puerto Rico John
Imprisoned 'Dating Game Killer' Alcala Dies in California

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Imprisoned 'Dating Game Killer' Alcala Dies in California

"The man they called the dating game killer has died on death row in California Rodney James Alcala may have killed as many as one hundred thirty people across the country say authorities he was sentenced to death in twenty ten for five murders in California in the late seventies he appeared on TV's the dating game in nineteen seventy eight the following year he killed a twelve year old girl prosecutors say he raped one woman with a claw hammer and would repeatedly strangled and resuscitate his victims to prolong their agony a prosecutor in Orange County city killed people because he enjoyed it a caller was seventy seven he died of natural causes at a hospital in California according to prison officials I'm Rita Foley

Rodney James Alcala California Orange County Rita Foley
Robby Steinhardt, Violinist and Co-Lead Vocalist of Kansas, Dead at 71

Mornings on Maine Street

02:58 min | 1 year ago

Robby Steinhardt, Violinist and Co-Lead Vocalist of Kansas, Dead at 71

"Guess this is this is partly personal. But I have a feeling that I'm not the only one who is interested in this story. So I'll share it with my fellow fans of rock music. And especially back when I was really, you know, getting into it back in the seventies. And I've been I've been a radio listener as a kid from Cali. I can't remember 56 years old, uh, listen to a lot of great music of big fan of top 40 radio back in the late sixties. The Motown sound. Then, as we got in the early seventies, I got my little transistor radio and got into more of the Beatles. The Eagles as they came on in the mid late seventies, especially but also, uh, Kearney and wings and triumph and yellow yellow was probably one of my favorites. But this band also held the spot. The band's Kansas. You probably remember this song dust in the wind, Give a listen to this violent solar. Really quick man who did that Robby Steinhardt. The original violinist for Kansas, Also, a co lead vocalists actually sings Believe vocal on this song as well. Backup vocal Well, we lost Robbie over the weekend, he died from acute pancreatitis. The founding member of the band and a rarity. I mean, a violin player in a rock band. How did that all come about? My parents asked me to play the violin, I guess made me play as of island would be more accurate. I was the first chair in my high school orchestra. My junior high school orchestra in my grade school orchestra. Remember when Philly heart call me and he said, I heard you play and I wanted to find out if you wanted to get together and form a band. I remember being in Lawrence, Kansas and seeing him playing and singing, and I just thought that is a guy that I need to be in a band with. I've never seen anybody else like that guy. I've never heard anybody play like that guy and I've never heard anybody sing that way, Robbie said. Do you guys have a tape? So I sent him a reel to reel and he called back. He said. Awesome. I'm in that piece Audio from the documentary Kansas Miracles out of nowhere. Robby Steinhardt was unusual. He played the violin. Yeah, we have fiddle players. But this guy was a true classical violin player in a rock band and just totally helped to, you know to to forge a new sound, of course. As we mentioned dust in the wind, but carry on my wayward son, another favorite of theirs that I love playing the game tonight like that one as well point of no return. So the list goes on and on just some great music. Romney Robby Steinhardt dead at the age of 71 from pancreatitis, So it's a little sad news there for you, and I'm like I say, partly personal. I wanted to put that on the air, but I'm sure that I'm not the only one Alan checking in with me saying Thank you. You're welcome, Ellen. I just Couldn't let let that go by

Robby Steinhardt Kansas Robbie Cali Kearney Acute Pancreatitis Eagles Lawrence Romney Robby Steinhardt Pancreatitis Alan Ellen
"late seventies" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"late seventies" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"It's fine if you don't Choose to get vaccinated. You may not come to work. You may not have access to a situation where you're going to put my grandchildren In jeopardy where you might kill them where you might put them in a situation where they're going to carry the vet the virus to move someone in a high risk position. That was Kathleen Sebelius on CNN Earlier this week, she was the former Obama administration's health and human services secretary. And what's scary about that is that she should know. And my hunch is she probably does, but she should know that Children, small Children If they get covered, they have zero symptoms doesn't affect them. This is more, uh, an older person disease. You're much more likely to get sick with it and have a bad outcome. If you are older, but I I saw a statistic. People who were hospitalized with Covid about 80% of them are obese. That's your biggest co morbidity right there. Obesity. You can be older, have covid and have no symptoms. I know someone who didn't and she's got she's in her. Late seventies. She knows she had covid. She had to go for a blood test should go for some testing testing like you've covid. She's like, Wait, wait. She'll fine. Um So listen, there are a lot of people have negative outcomes. And I'm not denying that people died from Covid. Of course they did. It was so new. We didn't know anything about it. We didn't know how to treat it. Um, but this idea you know, she mentioned, she said, you may not be able to work. I know people who are going college now who are young, who have very sensitive very little chance of having a negative outcome from Covid. Who are being forced to get the vaccine just to get an education. There are people who are being told that if you want to work here, you have to get the vaccine. I don't know what I would do if I was in that situation. And there were a lot of people, you know, I think we're gonna be faced with that. I'm just curious what you do. Or maybe you've had that experience. 8664087669 now the center. I want to go gonna jump ahead here. Eric. Wanna go to cut three and Dr Fauci? Excuse me, the sainted Dr Fauci on Sunday. I mean, he's he's ministers taken more of a lower profile since we now know a little bit more about what he knew. And what he did, You know, um That our odds and at odds with each other he again once he's echoing the same thing he wants these vaccines mandated. I have been of this opinion and I remain of that opinion. But I do believe at the local level, Jake. There should be more mandates. There really should be. We're talking about life and death situation. We've lost 600,000 Americans already and was still losing more people. So he wants your local government to mandate it again. This is going to separate Americans more with people picking up and moving to red states because they like the freedom. Just hope they don't vote for. You know Democrats when they get their 8664087669 let's go to Florida. ST Cloud Carol. You're on the Brian Kilmeade show high. Hi. I did have the people come to my door and I was out waiting and they were very aggressive and they wanted to know whether or not I had gotten the shot or not, And I told them there was no solar sitting in my senior neighborhood and that if they didn't leave, I was calling the police and they said, Well, we're going to assume that you did not get the shots and she won't answer us. And we're going to put you down as a no. And that was that. Wow. Wow. Very aggressive. Very they came. Came like within a few feet of me very aggressively. There was two of them. That's interesting. Uh, so BBC, and this is what I think they're going to do If you refused to answer their questions the way they want them. Answer. You go down as a no. And this is the problem with this. Because I don't talk about my status. I don't think it's anyone's business. I don't talk about my other medical history. So why would I run around telling, telling its total strangers about my medical history? You wouldn't do it for anything else. And yet we're expected to do it freely for this And and to me. That's a problem. I won't get tested for anybody's. I think I was very sick in the beginning of March of 2020 like right In the beginning, I had like the flu, but like a moderate flu for three days. My husband's like, Well, you want to get tested for anybody's and I said No, because I don't want the government to have any information on me One way or the other. I just don't. Um, and that's just more information that I'm going to have to give them. I've given them enough already. I don't want to give them more. So good for I mean, good for you, Carol, if you have a non solicitation, um, rule in your community, good for you saying, you know, No, You can't do this. Let's get arrested because Rusty has a good idea. And I was just going to say this to Carol Rusty in Dayton, Ohio, listening in wh ao Rusty. You're on the Brian Kilmeade shall high Hey, Good morning. So what do you think? Well, everybody go ahead. No, no, no, I was gonna say Tell us what your ideas because I think it's I think it's a good idea. Think what everybody needs to do. You need to be ready to do this. You can get an app on your smartphone..

Kathleen Sebelius Carol Rusty 600,000 Brian Kilmeade Carol BBC Florida Eric two Rusty three days Sunday Dayton, Ohio Fauci Jake 8664087669 Covid Democrats CNN Earlier this week
"late seventies" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

04:50 min | 1 year ago

"late seventies" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Were with Ken Malik and Josh Smith from Universal Roof and contracting. And guys, we've gotta call her. We've got Brian on the line. Morning, Brian. Right? Brian, Go ahead and talk to them about your pipe question. All right. So I had a home inspection done, um, in the midst of selling the home, and, uh, The inspector came back and said that the pipes in the home are polybutylene in there. Um it's a cement home, so all the plumbing comes up from underneath. I'm trying to figure out how would I find out about If they are polybutylene, and then find out if I'm like How difficult is it to be typed this home? If need be, Uh, so two great questions. Party polybutylene pipes where you know, kind of a big next generation piping back in the seventies late seventies. Hottest thing to hit the market. This is going to be great. Uh And then it turned out that, um I from what I remember The history is that the disinfectants and our water supply basically react with the pipe over time they cracked and they rupture. So, uh, For instance, if you're going to buy a house and you find out that it has polybutylene, a lot of insurance companies won't cover that they'll put you know something in there about or they just won't even cover it because we know that Polly Googling will crack over time and rupture. That's a big problem to have a pipe rupture, especially if you're not home on vacation. Whatever the case may be, So, um your second question is about re piping if you have a concrete home. If you reach out to the community, find a licensed plumber that has done re piping, and that's their big thing is re piping. It's not a major issue at all, because a lot of Homes. A lot of plumbers. They'll just go up through the attic. They run the pipes along the attic. Um, I I think a lot of them are using packs now, which actually packs is in my home. It's a great solution. They put the pecs in, and they basically just discontinue the entire polybutylene system. And you know if you're selling your home or whatever the case may be, you can bring the inspector back out showing that you now have packs. And they should give you a clean bill of health. So could I ask one more question. Yeah. All right, So the house was built in 1990. I believe that this pecks on here I've been here for 20 years and that had plumbing stuff done here, and I was told back in the day that it was Tex plumbing that I have So packs and Polly Beauty line looks similar, Uh, you're going to want to look at the pipe itself, and if it's if it has a P B on it, I think that's the easiest way. To actually, uh, denote it from pecs because it does look similar to packs. So if it's PB if there's a P B on there, that's polybutylene, um, otherwise you can always call and get another. Um, I wouldn't call another home inspector. Maybe I would call a plumber out and just say and say, Hey, I was told I had polybutylene pipes. Do you mind? Come take a look and and Maybe they can write up a letter and say No, This is not polybutylene. It's actually packs. It could just be that someone you know they could have looked under a sink and salt with a flashlight and just kind of missed, you know, misdiagnosed it. Yes, sir. 1990. Were they using that polybutylene piping? Believe by the nineties, we were done with polybutylene piping. I thought the house was built in 1990. Yeah, a lot of the okay then. Yeah, Lot of it was the late seventies. Um, if it was built in 1990, I think maybe the early part of the nineties they were still using Poly Beauty Lane because, like I said the The reaction in the in the rupture of the pipe is an incident. It takes a It's a long process of decay. So, um, if it was early nineties, there's a chance you had you had polybutylene. And if that's the case, just call the service plumbing to tell you. Yeah, let the pipe tell you and then get a plumber out there and they will They could take care of that for you. Thank you for your call. Brian. We really appreciate it. That does leave a line open for you. You can call us right now. 8445809326. This is the in the House radio show. It's brought to each and every week by universal roof and contracting and renewal by Andersen windows and doors if you have any questions about roofing Or windows and doors. You please. Or any home improvement. You can give us a call right now. The number to call 8445809326 well, and I know Brian was just tuning in. Maybe he missed the first segment of the show, so I want to bring this up again. Major announcement for Veterans Day, which is November November 11th this of this year Veterans Day.

Polly Josh Smith Ken Malik Brian 1990 November November 11th 8445809326 20 years Veterans Day late seventies first segment second question Universal Roof one more question nineties this year two great questions early nineties seventies late seventies each
A Look Into the Case of the Oakland County Child Killer

My Favorite Murder with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark

02:06 min | 1 year ago

A Look Into the Case of the Oakland County Child Killer

"Four kids were murdered. In oakland county michigan in the late seventies and this whole case was called the oakland county child killings and fucking awesome already right so they found a twelve year old boy kidnapped and raped in smothered and that was the first one and Then like a week later of these. I didn't write down. I didn't do my super accurate. Homework are coming here for facts. That are in the wrong place. Yeah and also i. It's all off wikipedia. So you can get and really really. Enjoy it for yourself firsthand. But essentially all eleven twelve year old children and so goes a boy and a girl. A twelve year old girl was found kidnapped not rain. Right bathed fed and then shot point blank and left in the snow. How was the first kid. Killed stir rate smothered smother that. So those aren't the same murder. probably well right they. They don't they probably didn't connect them then. Okay but then the third kid who was an eleven year old boy who was kidnapped and so he was gone for like he disappeared and so on say the seventh day or whatever they went on the parents went on the news and said please You know bring him home so we can give him his favorite jenner kentucky fried chicken and you know the thing they do to personalise and the next day. They found his body. Don't tell me how kentucky fried chicken and valley rate smothered with kentucky fried chicken left in his belly. Exactly what you didn't wanna hear. Oh my and he was also washed like the girl was. His nails were trim his closed spotless. They were washed pressed and his body was still warm when they found so. That's when they knew something. Super terrible was

Oakland County Michigan Kentucky
"late seventies" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"late seventies" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"In each of the now approaching 100 Fisher houses near via an active duty military hospitals. There is a bust of Zachary and Elizabeth Fisher. It was their inspired vision that led to the birth of the Fisher House Foundation, supporting our military veterans and their families when they need it. Most Here's their great nephew, Ken Fisher, now the chairman and CEO of the foundation with a fascinating history of how it came to be. Zack and Elizabeth. So Zach, uh and his brothers Larry, my grandfather and Martin, please for the founding brothers of Fisher Brothers. And around World War two. Zach wanted to enlist in the Marines and you know, because they were construction contractors. General contractors in the early days before they, you know, built what they built Zack and actually suffered an accident and hurt his knee quite badly. And so he couldn't serve. And so the brothers you know, wanted to help out and they built coastal fortifications. Around the World War two for for the country. But Jack never ever forgot about. You know the fact that he couldn't serve and and really wanted to do something, and so back in the late seventies, there was a group of guys that Zack kind of hung out with that. Told Zach's story about the USS Intrepid and the Intrepid was going to be decommissioned around 1974 and basically cut up and sold as scrap. And this was a unique piece of history that occurred 270 sailors who lost their.

Zachary Zack Ken Fisher Fisher House Foundation Elizabeth Fisher Zach Jack Elizabeth Larry Martin World War two 270 sailors 1974 late seventies USS Intrepid Intrepid each 100 Fisher houses Fisher Brothers Marines
"late seventies" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

Gucci Podcast

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"late seventies" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

"Know and i. I saw that regardless of the fact that i didn't look like the people around me and i didn't fulfill the expectation of what a fashion editor should look like are even at the time. Fashion assistant should look. Like i knew that i was really passionate about this industry. I just i adored close. I adored style. I i loved the idea that our presentation was so layered beyond taste. You know being a fashion editor to me was seeing the world around us metabolising it and translating it for those who don't see themselves in magazines so it felts alienating at times to almost represent this entire unspoken an unseen and unheralded demographic of black women but it also felt very much like a calling and in response to your question of kind of how did i go from feeling like i didn't fit in to fitting in. I think the answer is. I still don't feel like i fit at most times but i think the fact that i stand out is an asset and to take it very to go all the way back to the very beginning. I fell in love with fashion. Initially because my aunt my auntie rowsley. She is the most glamorous. Most beautiful woman i've ever met. I was so enamored with her from a very young age and she spent in the late seventies and early eighties a chunk of her young adulthood modeling and she was like this very rebellious s like vibrant creature. She's just so magnetic. And i would go through her old books and look at all of contact sheets and she is very thin and beautiful and classically fits into kind of the more accepted ideal of beauty within the fashion industry but she was also a west african woman. Walking fashion shows in paris in the seventies and eighties and it sounds so contemporary. But even at that time it was a sight to behold and she really stood her ground in made herself known and when she couldn't walk salon she walked essay miaki..

seventies eighties paris late seventies west african early eighties rowsley
"late seventies" Discussed on Talkhouse Podcast

Talkhouse Podcast

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"late seventies" Discussed on Talkhouse Podcast

"And just because i keep thinking about that project so we said yeah be great. We went to london met with. Tim presented him with a little ipod at the time. Just have a nice little presentation with all the music on it. He said kip great. Let me go away. I you know a couple of days. Listen to this and soak it in and he got back to busy. Made is exactly what i remembered it to be. I love it. let's do it. He said but you know something. I liked to work fast. So let's get going on the of okay. Let's work fast. So after sitting around for whatever it was fifteen years or something for but yeah. We'll work fast so then we never heard another thing about the project. After that after working fast he got in touch with him and he got in touch with us. But it was you and kind of working on some stephania. No i really wanna anyways. Here's the happy ending to the story. I'm just going to project are into the universe timber and watches the sparks. Brothers documentary a gets to that bit wary talk about martha psych ago No coming together. And he says. I gotta give ron and russell a coal and third time lucky. My the psych ago guys into production. I can feel in my bones okay. We're having that. I'm writing it down now okay. I have another question with the music that you've done for projects. Have you ever re purposed something written for something else that was then on in and said you know what like that. Film's not going to happen. Let's turn that song into spark song. Have you ever let down that repurpose something. You've already written good question. I mean a lot of the times we kinda once we've done something. We always feel that when a fresh project your period comes along. We kinda hate recycling songs. Because you kinda feel even yourself at. It's sort of old news even though no one's even heard the song to us. It sounds like old news and it kinda reminds you of that period were is. It's like a second sale. You know where you know. It's like damaged goods for some reason. You know it's not really damaged because no one's heard of it. So i can't remember too many instances where we had repurpose anything. Do you remember anything. No no no. I got a story. Did you ever heard this story about jerry. So in the late seventies he's asked to do an italian star off stock crash. And i think he takes the money sign on the scene. He doesn't see the movie and maybe he's in sort of italian style. I think any america needs to do this alone as well like wrote the score before maybe the made so he writes this stirring like amazing fame for this film stock crash and i think he sees it once on the scoring stage and says this is a piece of ship. It's done what can i do like. That's the music for stock crash..

london Tim fifteen years late seventies ron russell third time second sale ipod martha psych jerry italian once america
"late seventies" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"late seventies" Discussed on Broken Record

"Well as like eighty iou or evelyn. Champagne king or Lisa lisa i haven't i haven't thought of lisa leeson such easily swimming cult jam because it was like she had roughly the same acronym. Ll cool j. But it's funny that you mention a i owe you by eba knows because i just recently rediscovered that song in video. If you're bored go take a look at it and read the lyrics. I would posit the strangest song in western pop. Music history like the lyrics are so phenomenal and they make absolutely no sense. It's like a grad student dissertation on semiotics while a guys about trying to pick up a girl at a cafe amazing. I had completely forgotten about that song. It's just it's but that you're right that that weird incubator of new york that so much so much music so much art so much culture came out of because it was just everybody was influencing everybody else and it was kind of like every was open to everything. Yeah it was break-dancing music before rap music. That was the music that would people would break dance with. I want to say with because you don't really break dance to music. You break dance with music. Yeah you know. I mean think of blondie you know coming out of that scene as well going back a little bit more into the late seventies but yeah. I'm really grateful that i grew up within driving distance of new york and i could be exposed to the or also within radio distance. It's also interesting that another thing that we share is that we're both suburban kids who had access to york city.

lisa leeson new york Lisa lisa late seventies eighty york city both evelyn Champagne king iou
"late seventies" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

Sci-Fi Talk

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"late seventies" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

"Yeah i would see the tricks you could see the seeds on the you could see the why is holiday. Those fly bagels lay driver. You couldn't see the dalai lama's the daily news like side effects. I'll give this looks like he's happy laws because he style especially the fast and seeing especially now located Tubby by this by those on. He i think really create the tricks of how to how Sifi blast granted to dr leads to say. Probably the best donnelly scifi two of the best fullest. Tonia will what. Under god's achieves is something that was started by ridley and alien and even george lucas star wars where they created universes. That weren't what. I call kubrick clean like in two thousand one but rather universes that look lived in. There's dense some of the ships are not first class and i mean there's acid rain and blade runner constant i. They create a future. That was not so far off in utopian as we as we have gone in the past. And i think under god's kind of plays in that playground to be Probably down that you say out yet. A up greet which exactly i those those. Those both both just look at some spilling they create that idea of these war. Doubts ward outside of this mega keyed kind of infused those with a level of realism dot audiences. They've never been exposed to before. Nineteen thousand a game changer. I guess the way. That's what i was trying. Especially besides those sifi cities. I would like i really wanted to make the architecture feel real. I what. I hope that this this be so. They look like we really bummed out locations. Where is the euro rather doubt something that we created the post so he was definitely the also was reading a lot of go. I always read cobbles from the late seventies early eighties on this alert. Great on those comic books both Judge luca's wa- heavy through a audiologist of those stunts. And i think daddy off of these leaks need these guys Salat a really what he was making a blade toronto so i think it i think i think not that also came from those those specially Autists may you're comfortable from the late seventies eighties. They were quite greeky. Dads.

late seventies eighties Tonia both Nineteen thousand dalai lama Judge luca Sifi utopian george lucas late seventies early eighties first class two thousand toronto Tubby ridley two one
"late seventies" Discussed on GayBarchives Podcast

GayBarchives Podcast

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"late seventies" Discussed on GayBarchives Podcast

"You know how it is that so many of the bars have been integrated over the years or not integrated and you had bars. That were almost exclusively men and went exclusively women. And i'm not sure if this has been your experience but when i first came out which was the late seventies. I came out. My circle of friends was ninety. Nine point nine percent white gay males wasn't planned but it just happened that way that if you lived in a certain area and went to a certain bar you met white gay males yeah didn't meet lesbians. You didn't meet people of color. You didn't meet straight people and so back in those days when we were still struggling even war for our our right to exist we kind of bonded in those kinds of groups and a lot of the bars you would walk into would have been an all white male or you know all blackmail or all lesbian. but there wasn't a lot of integration like there is now and i think that was a factor that kind of propelled the popularity of gay bars tax centers. Because you went there to see your own kind whereas now like you said you know everybody has a straight friend. Gay friend a lesbian friend. A pan friend a trans friend and they go out of the group to who knows where could be applebees. They don't care in or could be some trendy little bohemian bars somewhere. Coffee shop Budgets the opposite which is also kind of controversial in our community which is sometimes they all descend upon the gay bars so especially in l. a. The abbey in always been a cornerstone in. And and it's you know it. It creates controversy because more and more straight people including women that are celebrating their their bachelorette parties would show up there and have a you know. Want to celebrate and a lot of a lot of gay men have felt strongly about that. A lot of them felt that that was not okay and that they they wanted it to be. So you know when you when you not to debate that issue but when you see the way the the demographics are going you see the young people are in especially we have gen z. Starting to go out and so forth. You can't fight that trend..

ninety nine percent late seventies first bohemian Nine point gay lesbians
Potato Cakes (MM #3719)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Potato Cakes (MM #3719)

"The Maison with Kevin Nation. I know I shouldn't be upset. I know what the first world problem, but I saw the news the other day that I've been dreading and actually do me and reading off. This is announced, they're getting rid of their famed. Potato cakes. They added the crinkle fries, a while back, and I had a feeling potato cakes would be going soon. I don't know why I'm so enamored with them. I can actually remember the first time I ever had, Arby's Plato kicks out. Is that on vacation in Anaheim? California in 1974. That was the first time I'd ever encountered an Arby's and it was love at first bite, my mom went to work at an Arby's when we lived in Norfolk back in the late, seventies into the early eighties. And so, I'd always be able to go over and see Mom and grab. Either a beef and cheddar or regular roast beef, an order of potato cakes, and a jamocha shake. And that, pretty much tells you why. I'm as big as I am today, but I've loved the potato cakes and I think every meal I ever had an Arby's has always included, potato cakes. And I know there's nothing I can do at least, I'm not the only one upset and I know it's silly to be upset but well they kind of teased that they may be coming back on a limited basis down the road. That's still not good enough job.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Anaheim Norfolk 1974 California Today First Bite First Time Early Eighties Arby's First Kevin Nation Seventies The Maison Arby Plato
Potato Cakes (MM #3719)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Potato Cakes (MM #3719)

"The Maison with Kevin Nation. I know I shouldn't be upset. I know what the first world problem, but I saw the news the other day that I've been dreading and actually do me and reading off. This is announced, they're getting rid of their famed. Potato cakes. They added the crinkle fries, a while back, and I had a feeling potato cakes would be going soon. I don't know why I'm so enamored with them. I can actually remember the first time I ever had, Arby's Plato kicks out. Is that on vacation in Anaheim? California in 1974. That was the first time I'd ever encountered an Arby's and it was love at first bite, my mom went to work at an Arby's when we lived in Norfolk back in the late, seventies into the early eighties. And so, I'd always be able to go over and see Mom and grab. Either a beef and cheddar or regular roast beef, an order of potato cakes, and a jamocha shake. And that, pretty much tells you why. I'm as big as I am today, but I've loved the potato cakes and I think every meal I ever had an Arby's has always included, potato cakes. And I know there's nothing I can do at least, I'm not the only one upset and I know it's silly to be upset but well they kind of teased that they may be coming back on a limited basis down the road. That's still not good enough job.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Anaheim Norfolk 1974 California Today First Bite First Time Early Eighties Arby's First Kevin Nation Seventies The Maison Arby Plato
Potato Cakes (MM #3719)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Potato Cakes (MM #3719)

"The Maison with Kevin Nation. I know I shouldn't be upset. I know what the first world problem, but I saw the news the other day that I've been dreading and actually do me and reading off. This is announced, they're getting rid of their famed. Potato cakes. They added the crinkle fries, a while back, and I had a feeling potato cakes would be going soon. I don't know why I'm so enamored with them. I can actually remember the first time I ever had, Arby's Plato kicks out. Is that on vacation in Anaheim? California in 1974. That was the first time I'd ever encountered an Arby's and it was love at first bite, my mom went to work at an Arby's when we lived in Norfolk back in the late, seventies into the early eighties. And so, I'd always be able to go over and see Mom and grab. Either a beef and cheddar or regular roast beef, an order of potato cakes, and a jamocha shake. And that, pretty much tells you why. I'm as big as I am today, but I've loved the potato cakes and I think every meal I ever had an Arby's has always included, potato cakes. And I know there's nothing I can do at least, I'm not the only one upset and I know it's silly to be upset but well they kind of teased that they may be coming back on a limited basis down the road. That's still not good enough job.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Arby Kevin Nation Anaheim Norfolk California
 "Blind Laughter" Interview & set with Alex Valdez  Show #66  - burst 1

Standup Comedy "Your Host and MC"

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"Blind Laughter" Interview & set with Alex Valdez Show #66 - burst 1

"Your partner jim. O'brien was with a different comic in a comedy duo cold of brian and severa and they had actually worked my club a couple times and then we the way i recall it us. Avera said hey. I don't wanna do this anymore. And my future's not in comedy. And then the next thing we knew it was o'brien vow dez and you guys were terrific together soon. And i think stronger than o'brien and severa. I don't want to step in any toes but that was my personal thinking. Did jim approach you about being his partner. Yes he did. Yes he certainly did and i wanna talk about a couple of things that you brought up their number one. Yeah jimmy and kenny were together for about eleven years. Oh yes. They had some really strong road. Experience day open for a lot of. They became very very popular on the college circuit. Remember back in the late seventies early eighties holidays were booking comedians. Right left to do concerts and being also booked on the open for major rock bands. You know right right. So so jimmy and kenny. They did a lot of that in the late seventies and early eighties. And then you're right. Can you decided to Jump out of comedy he had had enough. I think of the road and everything. And and maybe jimmy and then And thank you. Thank you and Well for all the comics that listened to your podcast they product to. They're they're they're rolling around on the floor right now and and jim approach to me and and jim really honestly approached me. He told me later he said you know. I'm the headliner right now. And if i go back to being a solo act on gonna step back and have the be a feature or an opener for a while. And i don't wanna do that but if i team up with a blind guy that may the team pretty unique and We can step right into headline so at that time i was just an opening up and you know every now and then i featured so i forget but so we really. Yeah you guys were goods but there was some marketing thought behind it Jim jim was trying to maintain his success path as a comedy duo in needed. Fill kenza veras position because you guys had already worked together. He was pretty aware of you and who you were. Because let's be honest for the podcast audience if you hadn't thought about it when you're comedy team that's actually more stressful than a marriage because you're not only sharing so much of your lives and and being blind just makes it exponentially harder but still It's it goes beyond the relationship because it's also business relationship and comedy teams. Don't historically last that long. Obviously there's a few that have done really well. You know a laurel and hardy and in some of the classics but in the modern comedy age there has not been a lot of comedy duos that lasted very long because of the difficulties and u. n. Jimmy made it last. I didn't realize it went till two thousand thirteen. That's a long

Smirnoff Coulier Sagat Leno Carvey Seinfeld Nightclub Stand-Up Comedy Severa Brien JIM Jimmy Kenny Avera DEZ Brian Jim Jim Kenza Veras
"late seventies" Discussed on The Gratitude Podcast - Stories That Inspire Positive Thinking

The Gratitude Podcast - Stories That Inspire Positive Thinking

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"late seventies" Discussed on The Gratitude Podcast - Stories That Inspire Positive Thinking

"Guest today is Therapist and spiritual scientist growing up in ashram. She was immersed in deep spirituality from an early age falling asleep to the sound chanting in her parents. Yoga classes in the late seventies because of the world of yoga spiritual awakening and mindfulness. She work with integrating that part of herself and science with research and All of the things that have to do with eastern and western philosophies who would has created a full practice with the week waiting lists year round and the government of taiwan heart to train their doctors and psychiatrists in meditation therapy. She's also a certified international she's also certified internationally in yoga and meditation instruction in her book. The stress list brain madman webster. Our guest today trawls on the wide array of scientific studies spiritual traditions and her own twenty two years of professional experience to share practical actionable ways. In which you can shaped your thinking change is yourself and strengthen your self esteem just to name a few mother. Welcome to the graduate podcast. Thank you so much for having me here. My pleasure so let us know little bit more about you about What you're passionate about. And what does spiritual scientists even mean. It's not a great great term So i've been as used mentioned. I've been doing therapy. Psychotherapy for twenty two years and I came into this profession. Because i really love helping people. I love connecting to people stories. And i really love giving people tools to enhance and change and move forward in their life. And ironically. before. I was a therapist. I was actually studying to be international..

twenty two years late seventies today taiwan yoga
"late seventies" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"late seventies" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Of human bizarre. Sometimes ricardo says shelters bunk room is filled with shouts as the men have nightmares reliving the trauma they've experienced up to this point. That's why ricardo is glad. His dad is here with him Book a consolidate around based on. When i fail to cross and i'm sent back and my feet are covered in blisters. His dad has been there Muscular this my money sometimes what you want more than anything is a pat on the back and someone to tell you. Everything's gonna be okay. Ricardo the quotes a line from spanish poet antonio machado look windows coming lombardi you make your own path by walking the last time we carded left the shelter. He didn't come back he made it into the. Us and his dad afonso got on a plane home to central mexico. Both father and son pray that they are the last generation to have to make this journey in order to support their families for the world. I'm on adler stein. In salita sonora mexico cyprus the island nation in the mediterranean for decades. It's been divided along ethnic lines since the nineteen seventies. You enforces air. I've watched over the two sides turkish-cypriots and their government on the north side of the island and greek with a separate government in the south only. The greek side is recognized internationally in geneva today. The un is hosting talks about the future of cyprus previous efforts to reunify the island have failed. And as the world's lydia mana leader reports many cypriots don't have high hopes for this round of talks either by the time. Epic barman was born in the late seventies. Cyprus was already divided. Bormann grew up in the north with other turkish cypriots at school. Her teachers and textbooks taught her that greek-cypriots were bad and tall. They were the others at home. Her parents would tell her stories about what things were like. Before when greek and turkish cypriots were living in the same neighborhoods. She says their stories were full of pain. But also an astrologer you hear from your parents many stories. You know some glitz memories with the greek-cypriot some bad memories with the greek-cypriots bormann's parents grew up in the fifties when cyprus was a british colony cypress ruled by britain for nearly eighty years but overwhelmingly greek in population hits the headlines again. In the fifty s greek-cypriot nationalists.

ricardo Bormann Ricardo antonio machado nineteen seventies geneva Cyprus turkish late seventies central mexico bormann Both today spanish mediterranean s two sides fifty cyprus adler
"late seventies" Discussed on GayBarchives Podcast

GayBarchives Podcast

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"late seventies" Discussed on GayBarchives Podcast

"And maybe the last time i don't know maybe op is now the natural next step but So it was odd to me that there was that dichotomy going on for music that was created by black people often and then excluded right. Yeah but it was an interesting evolution. back then because a another thing that a lot of people don't and i think the generations that are have come after us Back in the late seventies and the eighties. The gay bars were everything to us. They were our social centers. There are safe havens. They were the places. We had political conversations and organized for either protest or some kind of mild or even severe activism Anything enjoyed get drugs and drug just saying particularly noted by the bars that had huge flashing signs that said no drugs. Tolerated manage their pride. I usually meant that there was probably you know a line of code going down the middle of the bar down but You know is a completely different situation. Than and i really felt like unity. I mean when you walked into a bar whether it was a small bar like bulldogs or medium size bar like far library or large bar like backstreet. You walked in there and you felt like the people that were there where your friends in a you felt like you had a connection to them on some level because we were all. They're trying to do what you know the kids today. Call being your authentic self. And that's what we were trying to do. Because we could not do that at work. We could not do that at the restaurant. We could not do that at the bank or the beach swimming pool. So that was the place where we could proverbially and literally let our hair down and be the people that we felt that we were. Yeah there was no judgment and really a today. At large degree that continued for quite some time i know backstreet had a controversy that became two straight and that it was too many bachelor parties going on People coming to drag shows that.

late seventies today eighties two straight of people
"late seventies" Discussed on Fusion Patrol

Fusion Patrol

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"late seventies" Discussed on Fusion Patrol

"Donna a day but it is this idea that you can. You can take current technology. You can extrapolate it to solve the day after tomorrow when it will do cool things. It's almost like the stuff that will become commonplace. Put at the minute. It's so special is not even in in mass production. Yeah tomorrow as well. basically. I'm like kind of like consent. I would never have classified the avengers as sci fi. But you say there are a few episodes that are could be genuinely called scifi. I would call the avengers and qualifications the showed reinvented itself every few years and You know again towards the end towards the part of the avengers. That is far more familiar to me. I think you could safely call it. A sort of fantasy spy caper It just it does not take itself quite quite fun tested. It doesn't take itself seriously enough to be the real running you know. Let's go down to the recording of clowns and find all the eggs that have their registered makeup stored on. You know it's a. It's a very bizarre. It's a surreal world that it happens him and so i'm cheaper than them fancies. You could make the argument. That james bond is fantasy. All fiction is in a way is a fantasy is is not real but in other words it is. It is existing idiots existing in a world that is not meant to approximate the real world. Anyway but the new avengers lost that and i. That's part of the reason that i i would never think of the new of injuries. Is science fiction despite hitler coming back and you know it just it isn't it. Isn't they. pulled that aspect out of it and grounded it more. So i wouldn't have called the new. I wouldn't have gotten fantasy. I mean they're definitely fi elements in in new avengers. Remember i haven't seen it since the late seventies you know they. There is a giant rats in the sewers because some often pulled down his his magical formula. That is the exception than the rule though. Well no every some sleeping gas puts a whole section of london sleep there. There's a there's an entire building that is controlled by artificial intelligence..

london james bond late seventies Donna hitler avengers day tomorrow
Culture Myths and a New Science of Culture  Dr. David White - burst 04

A New Direction

05:14 min | 1 year ago

Culture Myths and a New Science of Culture Dr. David White - burst 04

"At the top. Okay david. Help me out here wool. You mean culture doesn't are you saying culture doesn't start at the top so the prevailing wisdom is that the leader says the culture right. This has been true. And it's the most complicated mantha one eyed about the most inc to Because it's the one that's most pervasive is most entrenched in our in our society and for good reason right. I go into a lot of his historical lot of it. Is this country. America founded on this sort of faith of the individual of pia rugged individualist myth right Quaker cavernous Protestant settlers from europe in england. Who came over in the seventeenth century. You know believed firmly in the in the power of the individual leader to make change happen. All that carried forward into our society today The problem is that there is almost zero evidence in anthropology and other related social sciences. That supports the idea. The leaders somehow set culture create culture cultures. Form perfectly well without leaders. Any group tasked with any any task though cultural form generally speaking of the former around the task. The the the thing that you're doing now i as i get into in the book. The this myth about leadership came became super prominent in the late seventies early eighties. Because corollary to that. I mean along What was going on that time. Is that Folks in the business schools were discovering researching that this idea that basically humans in organizations are unmotivated people. Basically don't need you know need to be directed and manipulated in cajole to work to get work. Done that idea which had been around. Since you started the twentieth century was debunked in the late late sixties early seventies mid seventy s by researchers at mit and other universities in the idea the new idea of management. Was that essentially. If you could unlock the human potential of the individual you know and let them flourish in organization. Great things will come. You don't need to sort of manipulating coercing control and direct people to do work because people actually need their creativity unleashed so that was the famous so-called theory of motivation of organizations talk. The douglas mcgregor stuff like three x three x theory. Why right was the was the whole idea. So theory why. When theory y became the de facto new way of thinking about management in organizations culture became the convenient vehicle to enable theory y so in other words if you just let if you just create the right culture in the organization good things will happen and that's the simplest way of saying the most most predominant Myth that has lived with us to this day. That if you just make make the right. Climate make the right environment. Good things will happen in the organization. A very compelling myth. It's very well intended and got a lot of. There's a lot of good to there's no question there is. it doesn't support it right so huge you list five problems with why this myth that culture starts at the top is an issue problem. You leaders of overestimate thrown influence problem. Too complex change is not happy through individual influence problem. Three for leaders beliefs take hold in the organization. They have to be there to begin with and four cultures not the summer personalities and problem five language alone does not change culture and your research the research that well not just your research with research. That's been done here in cognitive anthropology has kind of blown open this idea that you know as leaders. We probably don't have nearly as much influence as we think we do. When it comes to culture because culture is going to exist with the leader. That i am i in that well said Because i think i think i consult businesses to and every because we need to change your culture. You change you your culture your culture you. You didn't create it. It happened right. It's kind of an organic thing. Isn't it in reality. Well as i as. I write about the book. It culture is as we'd like to say culture follows task right. The common way of thinking about it is that castles culture might just set. The culture in the task will actually goes the other way around what you do. This is the cognitive science of culture in on the brain. What you do shape how you think and to some extent you know. We talked about this cognitive science and culture being kind of academic kind of newfangled but in some ways. It's incredibly intuitive. You know this is culture shapes how you think so.

Company Culture Myths Mantha Douglas Mcgregor David England MIT Europe America
"late seventies" Discussed on Capes and Lunatics

Capes and Lunatics

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"late seventies" Discussed on Capes and Lunatics

"Because that like around this like. I think like the early eighties. They said that was like the big war between marvel dc like the to like. I think if there was the most popular votes but like the two big box that battled in the eighties new teen titans and x. Men yup yup really why they were able to make taking night way was because the book was so popular using titans was selling to interesting fascinating. How you know south wax ways because now we're definitely in. An era of batman has been very popular own financially powerhouse for a long time. But it wasn't always mean. It used to really superman and detective comics cancelled in the late seventies. That's why they combined it with. Batman family bama family selling better. Oh yeah i mean. I mean i mean. The the main batman book always sells better. But yeah i mean yet. Detected was in bad shape back then but Oh yeah anything. Patty announce the best. Yeah yeah but a cool in always but this i mean you have such good care gers and good good writing the classic more wolfman and george perez team. Yeah i mean. Just think of how much i mean. Not that i want. I don't want to imply that the you know. Artists nowadays are working hard. But i mean this is an insane up drawing that he was like george perez georgia. I mean he. I mean he still works. I mean especially back. Then i mean. He was like the go-to guy especially for team bulky. He worked on the avengers for awhile. Course he's in new teen titans crisis on infinite. Or i mean basically every character. Who's in dc at the time made an appearance in that miniseries. He he knew because like you that he was like at the time he was like the best guy for like big group shots and stuff. Were i mean. Just look it. I mean this a law of drawing. Oh yeah so many panels envisat crazy amount word like those first couple pages were star fires escape in her Her jailers there. Or a i mean or the page where dick is talking to raven and then he leaves..

eighties george perez first couple pages late seventies early eighties Batman george perez georgia Patty two big box raven superman marvel wolfman group x. Men bama batman
"late seventies" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

06:42 min | 1 year ago

"late seventies" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Um, it's probably from the early eighties late seventies, but it's ajar and You put like spices or garlic or whatever you wanna do that small. And then you twist the thing back on in a Scott, a metal button that you keep pushing down and down until however you want it. Placed or grown, too, that it's like a It's like a chopper like ajar, child. Yes, Colleen was looking a little confused, and I think I've seen this thing before. But you mean like it's like one of those slap chopper's almost Yes, yes, but it was it was. I mean, this is old. This is like from Wait when I was little. E. I love it, have it, And I love it. And it hasn't broken yet and have not broken yet. Think. Thank you for your call Jody. Thanks, Joe. Um, I wish we knew what to call that thing. I think I have a similar version of that We call it the choppy, but that's not what it's actually called. It's the Vidalia onion slicer. Okay, but we call it the choppy. It's not the same thing at all. But yes. Is that yours? No. What's yours? Well, I don't know. See, because then once you said the castor and skill that I kind of wanted to steal that one, but one of the ones that I like one of my favorite Non plugging Any tools in our kitchen is the beater. The thing that we have one of those egg beaters like the old school one that you crank. I love that thing, man. I love that thing. Do you just You just can't you? You're like beaten something with a fork and we're gonna happen. Yeah, well, I mean, like you could use a fork or you can use a whisk all that is fine. But that thing is way more fun. So I appreciate that a lot. Yeah, Like when I make eggs and stuff, which I do You know you like that. You wanna have a good amount of air and eggs? That's what makes for a fluffy, er egg experience. So when you whip that thing real fast It puts the air and there it gives it a little body. Yeah, Okay. All right. Okay. Fine. Apparently, you don't use yours very often. I don't have one of those don't have. Ah, it's called a whisk. I don't know if you've heard of it. Who's next telephones also have an automatic beater and like to let other people do the work that you do, Holly, who do we have on the line telling you is on the line low, Tonja Tanya, What is your favorite kitchen tool that can't be plugged in. Hi, Tania. Hi. How are you guys today? How are you? I indeed I am in love with my girl like press and I am super protective of it. Like when my husband uses it like did you clean that garlic press? Yeah, I get that because you don't want anybody else mucking that thing because you It's your favorite, and you're like you might not use it right and I hear you if you don't clean it right away. Garlic gets stuck. Yeah, And it's gross. And also like let's be real like guard. You probably use garlic every day, right? Pretty close, right? Thank you for your call Tanya. Think of the last time. Well, I swear. Use garlic everyday. Can I tell you about something? I discovered? My husband hates this, but I don't care. Because he likes to die scarlet like he likes actually work with the garlic. I do, too. I actually was going to say I chopped garlic more than I put it through the garlic. Susie. Is that what it's called This? I don't know. I was gonna ask to Does anybody else call it because I have always called it The garlic, Susie, I'll be like, hand me the garlic choosy. And I get weird looks so Yeah, I don't know. We call it a press in our house. Why do I call it a suit? Don't because when you put sus I garlic press. That's a thing. Wait. What? Like Put it in Go. Oh, ok. Not like the name, Susie. But yes, I my God, Where did I come up with them? Maybe it's because it said, Susie on the garlic President just have always called it. A garlic sissy. Oh, my God. Okay, We learned something about yourself. At target. You can buy like pre diced or pre pressed garlic and it like comes in a blister pack with like 12, and it's frozen. And I love it because I don't have ain't nobody got time for the garlic sometimes. Get it, But yeah, but when I'm trying to be quick about it, I don't want to mess around with the garlic. And so I just take that thing that sucker out and I just pop it. And like if I'm putting it in the crock pot, I'm like it'll mix up later. I don't need to worry about it. I love it. I love it. Well, straight online. Holly Journeys on the line. Trudy Trudy. What is the kitchen tool that can't be plugged in that you love the most. It. It's that it's the hamburger breaker, upper thinking No, no, no Shirking about hand mash sorta. It's like it has like. It's flat on the bottom and has kind of three. Wrongs that come out from it. I don't I don't know. But I thought it was a joke until I used one. And I ran out and bought one immediately. It is the best thing ever trying to get it around for chicken. Did you get it from like pampered Chef for Tupperware? Something I may have bought it it target because it was cheaper. OK, but, yes, Pampered Chef has one. So it kind of thank you for your car. I see. This is not what I was thinking. I thought she was singing like a met potato masher because, like It almost looks like a starfish kind of thing. I don't know. It's got like it looks like a cookie presser of, uh What would you call that? Even I don't know. See that Something's trying to explain what this thing looks like. It looks like it's got a wand. And then there's just like a looks like a toilet toilet plunger without the fuzzy thing. Yeah, was she part? And you just use that to break up the hamburger. I have never seen you. Oh, it's genius. Don't I guess I don't use a lot of hamburgers, but, uh I could see the value. Yeah, that's what I love about. Kitchen tools is like there's something literally for real. Like I had no clothes that I needed one of those When we come back on the Colleen and Bradley show, Paul Maguire Grimes, from Paul's trip to the movies is going to tell us his favorite kitchen tool. Just cos got one just he probably does. But that's not why we called him. He's going to tell us what we should be watching this weekend. After this on the Colin and Bradley showing my talk one of 71 Colleen and Bradley, and we're pop culture detectives with a podcast called Go deep in the shallow.

Susie Colleen Tonja Tanya Holly Journeys Go Bradley Jody Scott Joe Trudy Trudy Tupperware Tania Paul Maguire Grimes President Colin
"late seventies" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"late seventies" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Since Daddy Niles in our late seventies, We got to go after the medical workers you go in. And then you could you get the shot that you have to sit in the bleachers for 15 minutes to make sure your head doesn't explode or you fall down. But after that, it was enormous amount of relief. When I tell you what. I've never felt this well, how can I put it? I'm happy to go to sleep remain unconscious for a little bit. My name is Jennifer Danish. I'm the head of school at Grace Episcopal Day School in Kensington, Maryland. And I was able to get the vaccine this past Saturday, and I felt a lot of Anxiety about even being there. We were in line with mostly 75 years old and over, folks I've been carrying for my husband, who has cancer this year, and I'm the head of a school that's been trying to open. And so when I saw my colleagues come out, vaccinated and then knew that I was about to go in myself, I was honestly just overcomes tears. My name is Darryl Banks. I live in the Greater New Orleans area. I'm in the modern, a research study. I was un blinded today. I found out that my first shot was a placebo. So today they gave me the real vaccine and honestly getting the shot. I wasn't really thinking about myself. I'm anxious for my mother to get the vaccine said I could go visit her my name from a coma 25 years old. Because of in Colorado Springs. I volunteer for a local hospital and through their allocation of vaccines for all of their employees. They included volunteers in that which you know was really, really cool. And I'm so grateful that I got a vaccine. The main feeling I got was just like a huge sense of relief. To know that you know, I am personally protected. The also have another layer of protection for the people immediately close to me and and also that I could be contributing to herd immunity..

Darryl Banks Daddy Niles Grace Episcopal Day School Jennifer Danish New Orleans Colorado Springs Maryland cancer Kensington un
"late seventies" Discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

PodcastDetroit.com

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"late seventies" Discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

"Don't know crap wait you would you would you do you want to. Hr hr case misunderstood you. Where do you meet her. Depending on how you handle that that's not it's not an hr case but yeah but you know you just meeting someone for the first time in all my gosh. The most beautiful woman. I've ever met in my life and can i take you out to dinner just one time. She's not used to that snow. Nobody does it. I don't know. I don't know blast. Chivalry is dead but it is then. I don't know if if i don't. I don't know if the independence of women has contributed to the deficit. Chivalry what maybe sometimes you won't. You might wanna let me open a door for you. You might want to let me hold it for you. You might want. Let me offer to buy that coffee for because dad's actually how was raised assault. My dad take care of my mother saw my brothers take care of their wives. i saw. that's that's me. I'm i'm elise seventies born in the late seventies. I'm not that young. i'm young. But i'm not like crazy crazy glue. I've seen gentlemen. I've seen men in his sixties and salvage. That was the youngest around a lot of older guys so my approach is still old school. Even though i'm relatively young and just going off what you're saying china. Leave that legacy. I'm with you one hundred percent but my thing is would even find it to start you know but could got the great idea about what is award day. And there's the question is do you want to leave a legacy. 'cause not all legacies are good hip. Hiller left a legacy trump trump's gonna have legacy Doesn't necessarily mean. That's the one that you want. Answers need like there's life the somebody tell me this life for a.

Hiller trump china seventies first time one hundred percent one time elise sixties late seventies
Sex Pistols Series Directed by Danny Boyle Coming to FX

Colleen and Bradley

00:19 sec | 2 years ago

Sex Pistols Series Directed by Danny Boyle Coming to FX

"Pistols has been ordered at effects with Academy Award winner Danny Boyle directing an executive producing the project. Now the Serious is set to begin production on March 7th the Sex Pistols, the famous punk band from the late seventies featuring vocalist Johnny Rotten. They have quite the story so ready for man. All right, good to know. Right?

Danny Boyle Academy Award Johnny Rotten
CelebrateMercy, with Tarek El-Messidi

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

05:51 min | 2 years ago

CelebrateMercy, with Tarek El-Messidi

"I am. I am really psyched about this episode. Is i knew. I'd say that about everything but We have a guest on today of that is tarek on mri muslim american speaker activists social entrepreneur on you probably know him best from The celebrate mercy of project which he founded dark is. I'm just citing excited because it was really kind of like ven diagram if we were to compose a ven diagram of where i think a lot of guests that we've had on the show and a lot of People that we consider to be mentors influencers on us are the same people who have been on not only in celebrate mercy's programming but also You know have been mentors and thought leaders that i know therapists As as as also has has been has made an indelible impact on the work that arctic does and so Without really further ado dark. I mean i know. We'll get into a lot of Not only your own background at as well as of course celebrate mercies while we have you on mike. So i'll i'll keep the introduction short. Because i want to do true justice to you and the work you do so welcome to the show. Thank you for having me. It's an honor to be here in the mushroom you've had such great Thought leaders scholars activists. You know On this show so it's definitely an honor thank you yeah and You know and i you know we always get. We always start with an origin story. Dark and and i know i know eventually you'll get this particular point in your own story but where i think. Our paths crossed Was years and years ago. I wanna say oh. I'm terrible with dates. But it had to have been in the late nineties I mean you could probably place it better better because you were. I believe of msa president at the time. But i visited the university of tennessee. Knoxville For a weekend with lectures and and i think i was just one of the speakers that was Was in attendance. But i think that's probably the first time we met. I don't know if you remember that. I i i remember that trip. Very very fondly So in fact. What now i remember. It had to been like two thousand and two two thousand three two dozen three because on one of the partying presence that the msa gave was my wife. And i were expecting our first our eldest daughter and so we were pregnant. And i think i mentioned that and it was like this. Beautiful little The volunteers onesie I remember that ryan for right. Yeah it's a great little parting gift at the. Msa gave me in so it had to been yet. It does not was like Maybe the year. After i i was president of the year after i graduated undergrad. That was still there in knoxville. But i definitely remember when you visited. I definitely remember that although our paths. Have i think across over the years in fact it was a mutual friend. An old friend of yours but again going back to the knoxville. Msa days iran. Kodi she who i want to mention his name on on air as as putting it sort of in touch in together and Iran is a listener of this show. We're honored to have folks. Like ron listening. So dan high school together. Actually wow saturday at high school. So yeah i guess Like i said we like to dive into kind of an origin story so tell us about You know growing up in tennessee of all places. That's really where your origin story begins. Yeah this manasseh so My parents were both immigrants. From egypt's that's where the story begins. That coming over in the late seventies mom Not too much later after that and he came for grad school and just has been his state ever since from egypt. Civil engineer And we moved around quite a bit. I was born in houston. Actually i think you're early. You're from houston right. I am. I was born in texas. Although it's spent most of my young life in in any in houston and Omar also overlapped in houston for a little bit on and was born in new orleans so help another southern boy. I actually the only sibling not born in texas. That's liar yeah. I still have relatives there. Actually in we moved around a bit new mexico. Pennsylvania eventually settled in knoxville with my dad's work. You know moving moving around So since the second grade. I grew up in east tennessee Near the smoky mountains in knoxville tennessee. The third largest city and it was really then that we became active with the local muslim community. I remember you know. I vaguely remember them like bill building their first mosque from scratch. You know i i. It was like a rented home. And then i remember like in the early eighties mid eighties when they were building. That first mosque purpose built mosque and sunday. School was really like where. I began to learn about my faith. And that's where everything began. I think like where. I where i really became know growing up in like a ninety percent white very evangelical out bipolar belts City in tennessee. Although is you know it's it's a university city But you know where where. I grew up in west knoxville. You know the the baptist and and people are often trying to convert you who you know. Sometimes you know you classmates.

Knoxville Tarek Dan High School Houston Arctic University Of Tennessee Kodi Mike Egypt Tennessee Manasseh Ryan Iran Texas RON Omar East Tennessee Smoky Mountains
Russia moves to protect Putin from prosecution

Monocle 24: The Briefing

08:26 min | 2 years ago

Russia moves to protect Putin from prosecution

"We start in russia. Where the duma has backed a bill which grants the country's rulers and their families immunity from criminal prosecution after they leave office and it has set tongues wagging about president putin's political future putin's allowed to stand for two more terms in office when his current stretch ends in twenty twenty four. But is there any need for him to do so if he can retire sooner without fear of prosecution or we're joined for more on this by the russia analyst and regular monocle twenty four contributor. Stephen deal welcome back to the briefing. Stephen always good to hear from you. Tell us it's funny if we if we look back. I don't know a quarter of a century almost now to the sort of an days a of yeltsin now was lots of talk about potential prosecutions and of course putin Gave him immunity as soon as he took over. Is that something Will be very much john on. Putin's mind as well right now. I'm sure his the yeltsin when he stepped down on the thirty first seven nine hundred ninety nine the one thing he'd been looking for in that second term since he's been president since the middle of ninety was someone who would guarantee him immunity from not only him in fact his his blood family and also his wider political family immunity from prosecution for the rest of their lives and the very first decree of then acting president vladimir putin on the last day of ninety thousand nine when he took over as acting president was to grant yeltsin and his coterie fact that immunity and on one thing. We're surprised that this hasn't been done before. But if you think back much closer to to where we are now this year of course we were talking about putin being being able to be president for the rest of his life because of course they changed the constitution earlier this year in russia and it means that the is white cane he can stand again for president in two thousand and twenty four and then if he wants to he can stand again in twenty thirty. They've overturned the previous idea. That president couldn't have more than two consecutive terms. But what this does. I think this is even more significant than and giving him that. Johnston president for life. It means that truly fall ill or something then. This means that he can. He can step down and not be prosecuted at the moment. The russian president compu- prosecuted while he's in office but until this is passed he can be prosecuted if he if he were down. Well it's really interesting statement. I guess it's sort of fun to speculate in a way. What appeals to vladimir putin most is it to just stay in office To sort of become superannuated president be there for decades as it will turn out or is he more concerned about protecting as you said his nearest and dearest and in the immediate coterie from from what we understand and we know about him. What do you think is most appealing to him. In the here and now is the consolidation. Is that endurance that longevity or do you think he'll be drawn to just melting away into the shadows. The shadows putin is someone who doesn't really have friends. He doesn't really trust anyone. That's his whole background as a street ladd in petersburg when he was growing up and even more so when he was kgb officer and so what he feels is that he he can never be sure he always reminded of sort of you know to broussais. And julius caesar and and that that to me is where putin stands that. He's always afraid that someone were to step down. Someone might change things and then drawing prosecute him and there's a number of things that they might want to prosecute for most not be now if we thinking well it's got to be after he's president. What does the state of the russian economy at rome. It's pretty awful. There are some very few at the top who are just unbelievably wealthy. Russia has nine thousand nine billionaires in the country at a time when thirty eight percents of the country at least according to official fingers are living below the poverty line. Russia is still very much dependent on oil and gas. And it's very interesting today. We have the news. That britain is saying no more petrol cars with diesel cars from twenty thirty. You know the world is going away from those fossil fuels and russia's not really doing anything about it and rushing. Business is is is not in a good position and so you know you could say one of his worst legs could be the state of the economy if you want to choose to step down but if this is passed in the duma has has given it its nods so far it has to go to the federation council. The house and then ironically putin himself would have to sign it off which. I have no doubt he would do. I mean i just wonder what do Russian pro democracy activists Putin's opponents have to say about the sorts of moves. Stephen because presumably there would be appetite in certain limited quarters to say look. We can't have a situation where people are protected in perpetuity from their alleged misdeeds. Particularly if it's a question of. I don't know following the money this sort of thing. Do you think that there will be a a counter. Lobby is ernie president to being able to sell it. We can review these These rulings down down the track or is that just a nonstarter. Right now is a non-starter. The doom is heavily stacked with putin supporters. Then indeed the federation council houses to. There's being talk over the is of of election. Rigging putin generally has a lot of popular support out in the country not so much in moscow some of the other big cities but those who are in power now would definitely know passes laura have no doubt it will become more and because what putin were he say to foil in five years time and so having been reelected in twenty four finally can't carry on steps down if this law is not in place then what frightens him is the idea. Is that in fact with. He's the hub of the wheel and he's taken out. Then we'll spokes collapse will then a real opposition which does exist. but it's very small and sat on very hard when it raises his voice. That actually stopped means something in which case could be a threat of prosecution. So he's he's trying to cover every base. I think it's very interesting that this is come on top of the idea that he could serve the rest of his life. This gives him the get out. I'm not well or on board. I want to step down. But i can still be secure. Won't be prosecuted prompts. The question stephen wh what does any eventual succession. Like i appreciate this. Very very speculative and it could be twenty four. It could be twenty thirty indeed but do we have any better sense of what putin's own Mission is you know he. He wouldn't want to melt into the shadows of you as you suggested but is there any hints of sort of you know a dynastic succession or do you think he's more interested in in the here and now i wonder if we can speculate even about what happens after he takes his hand from the tiller right now to be honest tom. I wouldn't want to name a name. Because i have no doubt that he will stand again. Twenty twenty four. So we're looking ten years since two twenty thirty two elections after that and because he can't stand again if he's still in good health and he's generally a fit man he's you know he's still does his judo and he's sixty eight years old now. But as we've seen in america being in your late seventies doesn't preclude you from standing for president so if he carries on fit. Well no reason why in twenty thirty he wouldn't stand again so you know. There's a whole generation of politicians would come up behind him. Then they may be the ones that maybe twenty thirty six fact we may be looking at three. Fold as a israel change. I'm if there is a change. Before that i can't really see it happening if health matters. Don't intervene before two thousand thirty so really as standing where we are now looking ahead. Ten years that famous phrase in brisbane week is a long time in politics. Ten years off it on.

Putin Yeltsin Russia Stephen Vladimir Putin Monocle Duma Federation Council Johnston Julius Caesar Petersburg John Rome Stephen Wh Britain Ernie Moscow Laura
Space has a trash problem -- and its getting worse

The 3:59

05:03 min | 2 years ago

Space has a trash problem -- and its getting worse

"With me. Is johnson skillings. One of our copy cheese and the of our latest package on satellites titled signals from earth. Welcome john hey roger so we sometimes take for granted. Space has well allow space. But there's actually a huge amount of trash orbiting earth and that's the subject of the first story in a series way exactly is floating up there a lot and stuff. I mean we think about space is being infinite and it is but then there's our neighborhood right around earth And there are several layers orbit and everything not everything from the beginning the space age but a lot of stuff from the sixties and seventies eighties is still up there and we're talking about rockets satellites and big things like the international space station and then little tiny pieces that have broken off from all those things and so how big of a problem is this. The the sheer amount of stuff. That's up there. Yeah it's it's really big because it's all just spinning around eight skates controlled release trapped by different space agencies by not we do dubai right now and things are going to bump into each other and that could be bad yet. Tell me a little bit about that. Why why is it bad thing as it. Just the potential damage. I mean how big of a problem is it for these existing satellites. Give me a sense of actually. How many lives are up there right now. Year right now. There are a roughly twenty eight hundred live satellites and perhaps three times that many defunct satellites still floating around and not a lot of human traffic there right now going in and out of the space station and for the people for too long there might be some space tourists going out there. So you know. There are people who get into trouble but also a lot of machinery and they're more more salads coming up all the time if there's a sense of how may more we expect. 'cause feels like we're say launching new satellites will explore on your services running off these satellites. What what exactly is sort of the the expected volume of satellites over the coming years. It's a lot. It's hard to put a number to it. You have more and more countries all the time starting own space agencies or saying rockets up then you have commercial space traffic which is not done by the likes of nasa the european space agency. You have private. Companies like yuan musk's space x Jeff bezos and amazon. And all his money going into Rocket projects on its own in space x in particular. They have a new system called starling which is going to provide broadband service to the earth. Eighteen beta right. Now there are about six hundred or so satellites And they're going to be a lot more i mean. Musk has filed paperwork to send up as many as forty thousand of these Satellites are not not be car sized space station size but you know a chunk of metal floating around of their forty thousand is eight a huge number no matter how big or little that satellite is reading this piece and this is by jackson ryan one of our colleagues out of australia. Who is fantastic. These worth reading if the another chance. He talked to nasa researcher. At least cited a nasa researcher who fled the doomsday scenario. Tell me about that right. The researcher is donald kessler in the work. He did start in the late seventies. It's called kessler syndrome named after him in the basic idea. Is that the more satellites or anything else who have floating around in space. The greater the chance of a collision more collisions. You have you're going to get debris more debris brief floating around the maurice floating around and we're chance collisions and you get into this cycle of more and more trash spinning around and just really out of control. So what's being done about this problem. A lot of worrying a lot of thinking about how to handle it but there aren't really a lot a good solution to right now. So some satellites and rockets sly back in earth's orbit they burn up and you know some that can be directed on purpose. Some satellite skid spun into a higher higher orbits andrew out of the way By the are no good systems for dragging satellites space. Picking can't send trash trucks since tweet street. Sweepers around growling. They've been some experiments With things like Basically a big fishing net to grab satellites And even space harpoon to grab him but again you have to be careful because you don't want to fragment you one nice big clean satellite and make it into a bunch of little tiny satellite pieces. That just adds to the problem.

Johnson Skillings John Hey Roger Nasa Jackson Ryan Dubai Jeff Bezos European Space Agency Donald Kessler Musk Amazon Kessler Australia Andrew
Coke Cans Tab, to the Dismay of Host David Brown

Business Wars Daily

04:25 min | 2 years ago

Coke Cans Tab, to the Dismay of Host David Brown

"Wondering I'm David Brown, this is business wars daily on this Wednesday October. Twenty eight. And this time it's personal. You guys know me I'm a pretty upbeat guy but the news from Coca Cola earlier this month while I just have to admit twenty twenty keeps throwing those punches. Decades after TAB became America's most popular diet drink coke is killing it. Loan fact I am one of the drinks maybe last remaining diehard fans there just aren't enough of US though which is why coke and its desire for efficiency and growth. Has, made a sad decision. To Stop. MAKING IT TURNS OUT TAB accounts for only point one percent of all diet soda sold in the World Right. Now despite my purchases that's according to research firm Euromonitor. But Oh Of that point one percent, it was a real relationship tab was invented in nineteen, sixty three the Diet Cola sweetened with Saccharin and targeted to women and Cokes I Diet Soda. It took off in the late seventies with ads like this one equating drinking tab with, of course, being thin and sexy one apocryphal story goes at the name Tab keeping tabs on your ways. Car. There was just nothing else like this snap of that can. Up around Atlanta. My parents always knew what time I got home from a night out because as quiet as I would be sneaking into the house. was just too impatient for Swig that tab to cover my noise popping open tab became. So iconic that Mardi nick fly played by Michael J. Fox attempted to order one at a nineteen fifties drugstore in the hit movie back to the future. It didn't go well. Sixteen Forty rivers you're gonNA artist, something kid. GimMe Gimme. Tab can't give you a tablet she orders. Right Comedian Pepsi free. You WanNA PEPSI POWDER YOU'RE GONNA pay for it. Looks can be something without any sugarman pay Mardi Good Luck finding that tab in the future coke launched diet coke in nineteen eighty, two tabs started its long slow decline today is only one of hundreds of products that coke is retiring. It's cutting its line of five hundred brands by half the company says it was streamlining before the pandemic. But when the pandemic hit and supply chain issues became more complex, they sped up their plans to focus on big sellers like diet, coke and coke zero. In addition to canning tab coke already bid goodbye to underperforming brand. Douala. Juices it's winding down its Zico coconut water operations as well but it's the loss of tab that hurts to the bone Coca Cola kept it alive only because some of US love it so much people like yours truly wrote letters made phone calls and signed petitions to keep tab coming and the company complied until now as far back as two thousand, one, The Wall Street Journal reported that coke all but ignored it. The company hadn't spent any money to market it since the early nineties, the paper reported for decades it's only been available here and there depending upon which bottlers decided to make and sell it. On even distribution led to thousands of tab fans going to great lengths to get our favorites soda. The Journal tells the story of Katie Tram Oh memphis resident who when traveling would routinely pick up cases of TAB, in Mississippi and Alabama for herself and other tab lovers back home, and then there's the anger. The decision is turning some Tabah Alex away from the company altogether and toward coca-cola's most famous rival, you know the one. On facebook to such devotees valid to switch to Pepsi as a matter of principle, I bought tabs for over forty years and nobody checked with me about this decision one wrote. Already TAB is showing up on Ebay at wapping prices. A new twelve pack is listed for one hundred, fifty five. Me Well, there are enough digits in an ebay price counter justify parting with my precious last ten cases of the eighty six I purchased in Vicksburg Mississippi and truck back to Austin in late August. With all that's going on in the world I. Know It's a bit hard to empathize but picture this a ban on coffee with no way around it. That's why TAB drinkers mourn its passing TAB has been my breakfast dessert lunch comfort food. Yes. I know life will go on Brown. But maybe. A little. Less sparkle.

Coca Cola United States David Brown Pepsi Coke Mississippi Euromonitor America Michael J. Fox Douala Ebay Facebook The Wall Street Journal Atlanta Sugarman Zico Alex Katie Tram Mardi
Jerry Jeff Walker, Texas singer and songwriter, dies at 78

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

Jerry Jeff Walker, Texas singer and songwriter, dies at 78

"Musician Jerry Jeff Walker has died of cancer according to a family spokesman he was seventy eight I marches are a letter with a look at his career Jerry Jeff Walker said the events he described in his most famous song Mister Bojangles were true the nitty gritty dirt band had a top ten hit with it in nineteen seventy one to nineteen seventy three live album viva Terlingua that Walker recorded with the lost gonzo band is a classic of country rock was part of the outlaw movement in country but cleaned up his life of access in the late seventies Jimmy Buffett calls Walker's death a hurtful moments but he credits Walker is the guy who drove profit to Key West that launched Buffett's career

Jerry Jeff Walker Mister Bojangles Jimmy Buffett Key West
Congress releases scathing report on Boeing 737 Max

Startup Showcase with Scott Kitun

04:47 min | 2 years ago

Congress releases scathing report on Boeing 737 Max

"Words, deception and basically disturbing both words used In a scathing report from Congress on their investigation into the Boeing 7 37 max development. It's re sort of its certification and maybe even it's re certification and about its relationship with the FAA. Pretty damning stuff. Right, John? By far the report that came out of the House Transportation Infrastructure Committee. Really highlights of very really damning picture of how Boeing and the FAA went about certifying the 7, 37, Max and All the missed opportunities to alter course and I think that you know, really spells, you know? Ultimately, a process breakdown about how this whole thing proceeded seemingly normally. But again going back in retrospect and looking at all these different opportunities to change course on DH account for this. The design of the 7 37 different way really is you see that over and over and over again in the house ended up collecting over it's over teaching of investigation. And it's my It's my guess that some people might actually go to prison on this because the actual behavior in my estimation was criminal. You know when you talk about criminal negligence It's written all over this, but it goes back to the basic relationship that the Federal Aviation Administration has with both manufacturers and with airlines. Two areas. They're supposed to regulate their not their clients. They're not. They're partners. I remember John being an immediate United Airlines. You may have even been there that day. I think you were When one of the operation guys, you know that stood up and said, You know, we are going to get the plane recertified. We're working with our partners at the FAA. And I stood up immediately and raised my hand and said, Excuse me. Did you just defined the Federal Aviation Administration as your partner? Isn't that the root problem here? And, uh, I didn't get a good answer. Because if you go back to the history of the FAA, we're talking decades. The people that actually certify any airplane, whether it's Boeing or in the old days, McDonnell Douglas or Lockheed or Convair. The people who certify that plane is airworthy. Or actually, on the payroll of the manufacturer. They're called FAA designated inspectors. Now, if that doesn't scream conflict of interest, I don't know what does The amazing thing is that that discussion is not new mean you like you just said that this this goes back decades. I mean, when when you hung it at you know what happened when the MacDonald does. DC 10 was ground back in the late seventies. There was all this discussion around delegated authority and how and how they're not. The FAA was able to act as an adequate regulator of Of those they were tasked with regulating And by the way, and by the way, John in that particular case, I know it so well. American Airlines maintenance guys figure out they could save four hours per engine change in maintenance by violating the maintenance manual and using a forklift truck instead of doing it with with pulleys and levers. Which violated the maintenance man, and they actually want told the FAA. They're gonna violate it. And the FAA said Okay and in the plane that crashed American flight 1 91 in Chicago, which, by the way, still ranks As the worst aviation disaster in this country in history. Up on the plane in question they were putting on a new engine. They have to fasten it with special bolts, and they had two of the bolts in two of the four bolts in when the when the lunch whistle blew So they went to lunch, and during lunch, they forklift lost pressure. Which is the reason why McDonald Douglas didn't want him to use a forklift truck. It bet one of the bolts and broke the other, but they didn't know it came back and install the other two bolts. They flew the plane empty to Chicago on the Friday of Memorial Day weekend, Back in 1979 and They took out a full load of passengers for Los Angeles. We know what happened next. So this we knew this. You know you're absolutely right. This this is this is or 40 years ago, just about Yeah, and you know, And when you look at the DC 10 I mean, I've spent a lot of time in the last two years looking at the history of it because it is so similar to the 7 37. You know a lot of the new Certainly the root causes were different around the maintenance. Of the engine and how it was attached the aircraft, But there are there were definitely issues around around looking at the same core issues as your craft manufactures, which is how do humans interact with their technology? And how do How did an aircraft respond to damage and it's never just one thing

Federal Aviation Administratio John Partner Boeing House Transportation Infrastru American Airlines Congress United Airlines Mcdonnell Douglas Mcdonald Douglas Macdonald Chicago Los Angeles