35 Burst results for "Late Eighties"

Dr. Craig Stanfill Defines Artificial Intelligence

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:47 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Craig Stanfill Defines Artificial Intelligence

"Welcome day frames to very special discussion here. In america i with the man who knows about things that people discuss. But i think they don't know what they're talking about. It see sexy concept of summits a concept. It is artificial intelligence. He is dr. Craig stanfield the author of a new fictional work. That has i think iran a factual message if not more than one. That's called terms of service subject to change without notice stock stanfield. Welcome to america. I well thank you for having me on. Dr gorka a pleasure to be here. So can i just start with the basics. I'm not a techie guy. This is a science fiction kind of dystopia in future. I am a science fiction. Guy loved science fiction. Philip k dick bladerunner all that stuff star wars you name it. But let's start with the factual state of the art. What is the truth about artificial intelligence. What does it mean and right now. Twenty twenty one where all we in terms of artificial intelligence. What is going on right now. Is that artificial. Intelligence is being used by technology. The start the beginning. What is artificial intelligence for lehman. Can you define the term. What what is it is it is that you know thinking machines. What is that artificial intelligence. A professor of mine in grad school settings whatever the artificial intelligence says and that's always historically had a rather flexible definition in the present day. What mostly means is what i would call data science database artificial intelligence which is an area of research that are acted in the early nineties late eighties and the basic idea is this. You've got a routine decision that needs to be made and the way you get a computer to make it. Is you get a human. To look at a bunch of data and transcribe the data into what you want the to do. And so very powerful machine. Learning algorithms have been developed that will across a wide variety of topics replicate what that person would have done. And so we all know that that alexa and so forth and other services can transcribe voice and very good job of it and the way they did that was. They took a bunch of people speaking. And then somebody would transcribe it at eventually. The ai learns what it what it is that you said the same thing with translation from english to german whatever that some of the automatic translators do and it's all based on a monkey. See monkey

Craig Stanfield Dr Gorka Philip K Dick Bladerunner America Stanfield Iran Lehman Grad School
A Chat with Former La Cosa Nostra Mobster, Bobby Luisi

Gangland Wire

02:30 min | 1 year ago

A Chat with Former La Cosa Nostra Mobster, Bobby Luisi

"Bob as you know. We've talked a little bit. That i was in law enforcement and i worked to mob in kansas city. We had our own coast. Knows your family. The savelli family next valley had been the boss since god says before fifty seven he was at the app alaskan meeting in one thousand nine hundred fifty seven with a real old timer who brought him there to introducing so we were kinda subservient to chicago. And you're on the other side during those days. Especially when i was working this in the seventies and early eighties so all the way up to really to the start of the nineties so i find it fascinating talk with you guys but i tell me a little bit about your time with the boston family. How did you first get involved with that. While i grew up in the north enemies foshan and then that lately in boston. That was headquarters for the mob. Debbie the koneohe on that was made guy. Scott does bosses whatever it was always around us and influenced us at the age of eleven. I went to work for the gangsters. They have vending machine number roll. Bending and i was eleven years old as the wife the school and go out with the guys and load the cigarette machines. Embalming she's of money and savage. We used to go out and while the machines and was eleven twelve years old. It was a fifty dollars a week and everything was great. And you don't even realize. I'm only a kid. I mean the jewel family really owned the company never was around them. Jerry was the boss boss brain on the raymond patriarca. But i was around all the rest of the wise guys so my father in an early you know i guess as early twenties. Hope up with these old. My father was always involved with them and i up around him rubber wrong koppel's and may guys and they're great guys and i think maybe the age of sixteen seventeen. The other side of my family were all out of this. I really enjoyed that. So i kinda sway away from that. And i wanted to go into the construction business and i did that for awhile up on my thirties but i still had a little evolving on the street knowledge. Yeah so now. I was building homes on. Martha's vineyard very popular place. Everybody knows about a mother's venue. Yeah in the late eighties. The market crash and i lost my house on the second houses down for o.'hare developing and i lost everything. I lost my gondola house in boston. I lost everything from positive. So i came back with two kids and no money. That's i hit the streets early nine thousand nine hundred ninety nine thousand nine hundred after the

Savelli Boston Raymond Patriarca Kansas City BOB Debbie Chicago Scott Koppel Jerry Martha
Founding a Company on Mission With Tim Eaton CEO of NutraMedix.Com

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:36 min | 1 year ago

Founding a Company on Mission With Tim Eaton CEO of NutraMedix.Com

"Did you decide to really you know to leave quote unquote ministry ministry and to bring your faith into a company first off thanks. Eric was finally great to meet us. Well thank you for having us here today Well i Served as a missionary pilot in peru. The late eighties early nineties Met my wife down there and We had been there once. I was there five years and i. I saw poverty hardship that had never seen before and i Once again met my wife. I also began to learn about medicinal plants from the tribal groups down there that i spent a lot of time with and so after about five years My wife and i were talking. Look what's you know. Why don't we go up to. The united states will start a company. Doing something in we do will send fifty percent of the prophets back to peru to fund these ministries or these That we're very passionate about in at that time rescuing Kids That were orphaned. A lot of terrorism improve a lot of parents were killed but also Helping to train and support like national pastors peruvian pastures in the jungle that obviously would be able to communicate the gospel much better than i could as a gringo speaks spanish my wife's peruvian but it's a whole different culture So we decided back in that was in nineteen ninety one that we would start a company. Neutra medics wasn't born yet. Both you know. I can actually say the purpose was there. It was purpose driven in that. Whatever we do. We're going to send fifty percent of the prophets down to peru to fund these ministries in and we just felt like no we can make a bigger impact for the gospel Sharing jesus with people that had never heard of jesus before Meeting the needs Feeding drilling wells medical relief etcetera so as nineteen ninety-one long long long answered your question

Peru Eric Neutra United States
"late eighties" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

06:36 min | 1 year ago

"late eighties" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"In Portland, A riot broke out in downtown overnight in the one year anniversary of George Floyd's murder by a Minneapolis police officer. KFBK is Michael Kastner reports around 200 people gathered outside of the Multnomah County Justice Center, some lighting fires and fireworks. Others vandalizing the center and city hall. Police say demonstrators yell burn the building down in reference to the Justice Center. They also say some through frozen water bottles and eggs of police. Demonstrators later broke windows at some stores and restaurants downtown Michael Kastner news 93.1 kfbk When that leads us nicely into this hour's featured audio clip, we're coming up on 605 would do this five minutes past every hour and our program we bring you a perspective that maybe you did not see or hear on a network newscast or local newscast. While most national media outlets spent a significant amount of their coverage yesterday, marking the one year anniversary of the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Few of them covered this angle. Since the death of George Floyd, nearly 200 Minneapolis officers have left the force here is what a former Minneapolis police officer named Steve Dykstra told Fox News. It is our featured audio clip this hour. Well, this goes back. Before George Floyd. Sense around 2015. I know the city. Minneapolis has been backpedaling, taking tools away from police to enforce the law and keep the streets safe. I see that George Floyd Advantis Tragic is awas as Kind of a build up of years of backpedaling by the police. When when police don't have any tools to use anymore, they They feel pretty helpless out there. Um, you take away loitering laws. Pursuit ability of pursuit vehicles. You don't have to stop for the police in Minneapolis anymore. Thanks to Mayor Fry in the city Council, that is Mark, wait. I have to get frustrated. Wow. And you see is chaos. Violence and real curtain crime. 200 officers have left that force since George Floyd's death and in a lot of mother good cops, you know, the good ones are leaving. Well, I understand his point about officers feeling helpless, but You know, you can't excuse what happened? No, no, no, no, no, no, no. Nobody's excusing the bad behavior. But the reality is is that officers are leaving. They're not feeling the support another good cops. And then and then we just had the story in Sacramento. They're going another different direction at a time in places like Saint Louis or de funding officers. They're adding more police officers in Sacramento. You know, it seems like which is a good idea to add the police officers and also at the programs to assist the police officers handled the situation, of course, like the mental health issues and that sort of thing. Absolutely. I mean, those those programs where they have combined the two to go out have been successful so far. Well, we wanted to bring you that aspect of the story because much of the reporting yesterday did not. Clued that which is a full as a full picture of the whole story. Exactly. So okay, I'm gonna give you three things. And you tell me what decade there from? Okay. Acid washed jeans, Uh, scratches and Newt Gingrich. Eighties. Close, like late eighties early nineties, right, so new. Gingrich is back on the scene, apparently, and he is sitting down with former president Trump also the Trump's former chief of staff, Mark Meadows, and Senator Lindsey Graham. They all got together and Mar a Lago. And, you know, maybe you played some golf. I don't know, but they're coming up with a new contract. For America. Oh, you're kidding. Contract with America. Remember Newt Gingrich in the contract with America? It turned out to be a wildly successful for Newt Gingrich his political career. They're all sitting down to talk about what a new version of this would look like. That is very interesting. So there especially when we talk about the makeup of the Republican Party and the fight for control, Right, right. I mean math Vitus, still yet to be won by either side is not manifested itself. Yeah, but that is what's going on, apparently behind the scenes. In the Morrow lock that is a brand new development and it's a very interesting one of new contract for America. I wonder what they would call it like two point. Oh, that's what everyone ever nice to call things to point on. All right, they're using that template that OK time now for the top national stories. From ABC News. I'm Sherry Preston, the Manhattan district attorney's office, announcing that a special grand jury has been ceded to decide whether criminal charges are warranted against the Trump Organization. ABC News has learned that witnesses have already been contacted about appearing before the grand jury, which is set to meet three days a week for up to six months. ABC News chief Washington correspondent Jonathan Karl It's the kind of step that a prosecutor takes when they have evidence of a crime. And are preparing to move forward with charges. Of course. Ultimately, it'll be up to that grand jury to decide whether or not those charges are pursued in a statement, the former president calls it a witch hunt being driven by highly partisan prosecutors. At the White House. President Biden and Vice President Harris met with the family of George Floyd on Tuesday, the Police Reform Act named in Floyd's honor, however, it's still stalled in the Senate. Floyd family described this is a really personal meeting with the president and said bite and renewed his promise to push for real reforms. The president had hoped to get this done by yesterday's anniversary of Floyd's murder. Washington obviously missed that moment. But the president is sounding increasingly optimistic, saying he's hopeful that they can now get this done sometime after Memorial Day, maybe see senior White House correspondent Mary Bruce. According to the CDC. Half of all American adults have been fully vaccinated at this point to get more people the shot Brown University's doctor, She's just as companies should help out. We talk a lot about a hesitancy. I think that's the wrong way to think about it For a lot of working class people, it's not easy to take time off. To figure out where to go. So we've got to make it as easy as possible and give people a chance to recover after they've had their vaccine. If they need a day off fish you wanted to get that day off. Former Virginia Senator John Warner has died. He was a World War two that a former Navy secretary served on the Armed Services Committee of the Senate was married at one time to Elizabeth Taylor. He was 94 James Bond, head of Elector Thelma and Louise, a few characters now owned by Jeff Bezos. Amazon's made it official signing agreement to acquire MGM. This is ABC News. Another local D, a. Fighting the governor's plan to release prison inmates early. That's news from your neighborhood in three minutes. But first we're gonna get the traffic.

Steve Dykstra Michael Kastner Mark Meadows George Floyd Elizabeth Taylor Jeff Bezos Floyd Amazon Mary Bruce Tuesday Sherry Preston Portland Sacramento Police Reform Act Gingrich Republican Party 200 officers Trump Organization Jonathan Karl Fox News
The Swedish Clown (Bjrn DAHLMAN, Clowns Without Borders)

Mosaic of China

03:30 min | 1 year ago

The Swedish Clown (Bjrn DAHLMAN, Clowns Without Borders)

"Today's guest yearn is a professional clown which might make it one of those subjects that can be a polarizing. Love hate situation. If you love clowns please listen. You will learn something and if you detest clowns and wish you could vaporize them all with the press of a button i promise you also enjoying this compensation. It shouldn't take you long to realize that at least for some people. It takes a surprising amount of thoughtfulness and intelligence to make yourself the object of stupidity. Thank you so much beyond you are a professional clown. If that right yes that is right and here is what our mutual friend maple said about you. His name is beyond. He's from sweden. Matt him on eighty. He's very funny clown and then later on we work together in a charity hospital and talk more and i feel like he's very warm hearted and he's very professional. Yeah how did you and maple. I get to know each other. What's your story. well there was. This new comedian accrue for comedy and she was absolutely hilarious and it also turned out. She was super nice person. Simple as that. So i am guessing what object you have brought today. That in some way exemplifies your life here in china. But why don't you explain what you've brought. Well why don't we do this. I will put it on and you tell me what you see you like this. This this is my red clown nose than those that are wearing. When i'm doing shows and i wouldn't take off now because i think women are scared this way. I just did a tour. Because in sweden kindergartens kept right and we were allowed to do shows for about ten kids. Well you mentioned that you are in sweden. You are one of the people in this series. That i am interviewing remotely which is a shame. But i'm very grateful that we can still do this. Whereabouts in sweden. You're right now. I'm in my hometown. it's called uppsala. The fourth biggest city of sweden. I came to consider it a very very small town. It's a different life to what you normally would have been used to in shanghai. I hope that you can come back as soon as possible. How long have you actually lived in. Shanghai considered shanghai my base since two thousand fourteen. When i started studying chinese at shanghai theatre academy and then not being you know student. The business of i finally got my working visa. And now i couldn't even enter with it because of the pandemic process all over but yes six years. But that's not where you're china story started right. You had a connection long before they didn't you. Yes so. I guess it started with my hippie parents so i grew up in a house where you know they would talk about. My mother started doing tai in the late eighties. And then my father started doing taichi and they were these kind of parents. I remember i was fourteen years old and i came home from school and i just feel horrible and i felt so stressed about everything and mother gave me this book that's called the tau of pu as winnie the pooh and that was my interactions. It thousand som.

Sweden Maple Matt Shanghai Theatre Academy Shanghai China Uppsala Taichi PU Winnie
When DNA Research Doesn't Benefit All of Us

The Pulse

01:30 min | 1 year ago

When DNA Research Doesn't Benefit All of Us

"When pulse reporters journal. A heavy has a question about her family history. She knows exactly where to turn her. Mother and some of that history is on display in their house. In fact at the entry of our home we you come in. Our home is all the ancestors on the wall. That's my mom octavia mcbride. She got her knack for sleuthing when she was a news reporter in the late eighties and every time i had an assignment for school that involve family history. Choose the person i went to. Yeah i was excited. Because i felt like i was passing the baton to you because i was always sort of liked the person collecting the pictures and the stories. So i i get great strength and pride from knowing my family stories sharing them and passing them along to my own children and my nieces and nephews and sojourner does your mom do her research with paper records or how does she go about it. Yeah it's been a mix of paper records and story. She's heard over the years from relatives so for example. My mom was able to piece together. The story of her grandmother della mae. She had my mother. Sally by a white man and of course nineteen thirty one those types of relationships and the children that came from them. You know they were legal. So the white family who was pretty prominent place. My mother and the home of a sort of fair skinned family where my mother would would not stick out

Octavia Mcbride Della Mae Sally
A Brief History of Data Warehousing

Software Engineering Daily

01:39 min | 1 year ago

A Brief History of Data Warehousing

"I'd like to start by talking a little bit about the domain of data warehouses. So we've done a bunch of shows recently and in the past about data. Warehouses snowflake redshift and google big query. Can you just tell me about the history of the data warehouse and what role. It plays today sure. I think that's a great question. So the did warehouse. History goes pretty far back. It really began in the eighties when people began to design systems like teradata and sybase iq. So these were systems that began to address. What was turning into a new breed. Va- -plication where people needed to scan large quantities of data to answer open ended questions and by open ended. I'm meaning that you had for example sales data or customer data or some other kind of interesting information about your company and you wanted to ask strategy questions about it which would mean that you would come in. You wouldn't know exactly what you're going to need to know in order to answer your question and then you you'd like to play around with it. These are promised the traditional relational databases of the time which would be late. Eighties early nineties. For just not very well suited to solve so this new breed of application developed and has evolved over a period of decades so for example the first products like teradata introduce things like paralyzation across nodes extending to things like verdict With very efficient column storage and compression and then of course the cloud data warehouses that we see today. Which are things like redshift. Which was really the pioneer here. And then snowflake

Teradata Sybase Google VA
Hollywood Icon and Chicago Native Kim Novak On Her Relationship With Art

Q

01:53 min | 1 year ago

Hollywood Icon and Chicago Native Kim Novak On Her Relationship With Art

"That is the opening theme to the 1958. Hitchcock thriller Vertigo, starring Jimmy Stewart. And Kim Novak came out of what's known as Hollywood's golden age, but for many studio actors working at that time Things weren't always so golden. Kim Novak was one of Hollywood's top box office stars, which meant she faced a grueling work schedule. The studio system put huge pressure on her and she suffered abuse. Luckily, she had a coping mechanism. Hurt. Until one day. She left. Chemist now in her late eighties, And earlier this year, she put out a book of her paintings called Kim Novak, her art and life. I was so delighted. Get the chance to talk to Kim Novak from her home in Oregon. Kim, How are you? I'm five dogs. Thank you. I'm excited to talk to you today about art because people know you as a movie star, But I know art was your first love and you'd won scholarships to study fine art at the prestigious Chicago Art Institute. Wanted art give you growing up? Well, it gave me many things. But I would say mostly courage because I felt confident in my ability for one thing, but I felt confident. And being able to forge ahead with my own and trust my feelings and my instincts. And for me, it was always about feelings, because I I need to get that out of me. I don't like keeping in feelings locked in. I want them expressed. And every time I get a feeling a strong feeling, I'm at my easel. I've got Three easels going at one time, because sometimes I've got more feelings going on that one time I mean it For me. It has become such a wonderful experience, because no, I'm not in films. I could dedicate my whole life to it because it seems like you were on the

Kim Novak Hollywood Jimmy Stewart Hitchcock Chicago Art Institute KIM Oregon
How Chris Wilson Went From Life In Prison To A Life Of Meaning And Purpose

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

05:21 min | 1 year ago

How Chris Wilson Went From Life In Prison To A Life Of Meaning And Purpose

"Chris. Welcome to the unmistakable. Creative thanks so much for taking the time to join us. Thanks for having me. It is my pleasure to have you here. So i actually came across your story up because of an article that you wrote on medium about the books that change your life in prison and i remember reading through that and my first reaction was jesus this guy Learn to speak multiple languages. Read all these books for hey. I went to berkeley. And i didn't do anywhere near that in four years of college So we'll get into that. But i think i want to start with what i think is a fitting question that i tend to ask a lot of people and that is what did your parents do for work. And how did that end up. Impacting the choices that you ended up making throughout your life in your so gr growing up. My mom started her career as a nurse. How after she graduated from college and then she went back to school and she got a couple of certifications became a paramedic and pretty much work in the medical field. Emergency response feel for For like the rest for life and so. My dad was Electrician so he worked for electric company. So that's what they did. What what impacted they end up having you in terms of the direction you end up going well. My mom Had raised me by ourselves because my dad and my mom got divorced when i was eight months. No my father wasn't really a part of my life growing up but the impact of my mom had me is like my mom because she was a paramedic. She worked twelve hour shifts. So i was still with my grandmother Monday through finding a civil my mom on the weekends and so i would. Just kind of like a hybrid. So my grandmother's neighborhood was like a really tough neighborhood. washington dc. This was late eighties early nineties and my mom lived outside of dc maryland. And a pretty like you know. Middle class neighborhood was nice. It was mixed white people black people in everything was like really cool around a but My mom when i had time to spend. What does she instilled in me. A good work ethic entrepreneurship in and being nice and respectful. Mom for the most part at least initially when i was younger mike. Thanks changes certain point. So i wonder what that point changes because i remember you. There's something that you said in the book. And this is one of those things like i. I look at basically took everything that a highlight and underline and put it into a document. But you said you know when you start from a place like division avenue. Life's fragile you don't get to make mistakes because you don't have a safety net but and you know when i when i read that and i was going through the book I remember going to school an probably. What was the worst neighborhood in a place called bryant texas and it was in seventh grade and it was by far the most dangerous area of town and i used to have to stay there late at night because i worked at the university. So it'd be terrified as this seventh grader after basketball practice but i also think that to some degree probably i have certain biases about that neighborhood. Ob just baked into how. I was raised by And so i wonder what about what about those kind of environments. Do you think that we have misperceptions about from you. Know media like my immediate thought was. Oh this is probably just like boys in the hood rob so like how accurate is stuff like that. Well i would look at it differently right a little bit. I would say. I mean you're right in the sense that folks have their biases about Neighborhoods like that. But i think what people don't think about is what would have conditions in policies that will put in place to make these neighborhoods. The waiting. Were you know so like police Name was policed in. You know people just being harassed by the police. That's what happened with. Like when i was growing up. Only come through his jump out. Pakistan folks didn't own a home folks Couldn't get jobs so there was a lot of stuff but these were like based off for policies put in place that kinda like creed atmosphere what he's neighborhoods dangerous so always important for people to remember that So that's something that you know. I don't think people think about no well. I mean you. And i were talking about this before we hit record here I remember dave chapelle talking about you know with your an african american men. Your relationship to law enforcement is fundamentally different than that of other people like you actually have a relationship of fear of the very people who are basically put in society to protect you absolutely absolutely Better than us especially at my neighborhood on weight it was just all black people and so only interaction while white people were police and when they would it would pat down. It wasn't like nice. It wasn't like it would ask. Holiday was so we grew up this way and then when stuck what happened in our neighborhood. I'd say shoot something like that and like folks like neighbors or call the police. It'd take a mike thirty five minutes. Get it twenty. Minutes or maybe. Sometimes they didn't even show up so this was a relationship with them growing up in. So is this like naturally like and then we see people on. Tv shot by police like all the time. So it's something like it's a survival mechanism to just be you know worried police.

DC Berkeley Chris Maryland Washington Dave Chapelle Mike Basketball Texas Pakistan
Why The 90's Was The Decade Of The SuperCar

Past Gas

05:37 min | 1 year ago

Why The 90's Was The Decade Of The SuperCar

"To pass gas. I'm your host known sites trying to always by james pump. Frey hello there. Everyone it is i james and not an pasta and joe weber. What's up wink wink nation. I'm here for you. And i am fired up and as as the boys have been Saying we are talking about ninety supercars today on this episode. We were talking before we started. Recording i think like we're a little bias as far as the nineties. Being the greatest time for supercars that's like saying like the nineties is the best time for cartoons. Yes because that's when joe and i grew up at least win win. Did you grow knowing how old a year you're six years six years old Yeah i mean born in ninety three so like my k- yeah you're the first time when you realize supercars where thing was in the nineties. I sure i heard third eye blind on the radio is what you're saying about three eleven. Her three eleven to okay got it. So like like the diablo's the labor gyn machines. Those are big big parts of your formative years for sure. Yeah now supercars are a lot more prevalent. Yeah i feel like within the last ten years like it's blew up again. But i feel like the nineties really set the president the president the president and showed what was possible and kind of like blew the whole supercar thing out of the water because we had just come out of the malays era and people were like. I want something fast and flashy and purple and green are really cool right now so. Let's just make cars like debt for sure. And i think you know from the sixties to the eighties like cars. That would be considered supercars today. I mean there are just called sports cars you know. Yeah 'cause they were. They were really fast. Yeah not the ninety s great supercars because it literally defined that genre. That's when he started seeing like dance materials carbon fiber the. That's it that's it really for me only carbon-fiber that's the only qualifier. I think we should just get right into it. Yeah let's go. let's go so so. How did we get to the nineties. Being the definitive era of supercars the term supercar itself isn't really official it. Roughly describes a high performance. Luxury or exotic. Sports car generally a two seater with at least an eight cylinder engine. Although that'll probably change here the trend towards these vehicles started as far back as the sixties when detroit started shoehorning big block. v8's into sedans and turning the results loose on the american public and of course we know those as muscle cars across the atlantic european manufacturers were also busy refining. their lightweight. sports cars what. These smaller cars lacked in displacement and seating they made up for easily in handling and driveability as a sixties turned into the seventies. Those massive motors became liabilities with the looming gas crisis and clean air act of nineteen seventy then the second oil crisis in nineteen seventy nine. The industry yet again. An american cars continued to get smaller and more efficient manufacturers in the. Us knew they had to do something. So they're carburetors. Were replaced by fuel injection and distributors being swapped for coil packs. But we weren't there yet after all the one thousand nine hundred. Five corvette made her on the same horse. Power as a well-equipped twenty twenty. Camry the so-called malays era when autos reached a low point of reliability and performance was in full swing. New emissions equipment was starving the motors of their power. And even in the instances where these new cars had style. The eighty-five corvette being a prime example was under. The hood didn't match up that being said the eighties were still an impressive decade for supercars. Just not in the united states. American consumers still reeling from the death of the muscle car scene started looking abroad for inspiring performance. Every decade is a reaction to the one that came before in the eighties shoved back. The seventies with an absolute explosion of high performance supercars a handful of imported performance. Cars like the lamborghini coon tash for testarossa and the lotus esprit were blowing enthusiasts minds and with the stock market. Looking like pikes peak. There were selling faster than cocaine in wall. Street bathrooms by the nineties. A lot of that pesky emissions tech that was thrust on manufacturers was starting to get smarter as we're onboard computers and fuel injectors the progressing technology let engines breathe better and pass their gases in ways. That didn't starve the performance. Nice if you if you like stories like this check out. Our podcast passed gas. Celebrities enrich folks. Were having a hard time justifying spending big bucks on stiff bucket seats and jarring track suspension setups and manufacturers took the hint burr example lamborghini spent the late eighties upgrading. The coon tauch into the diablo. The coon tosh is often derided for having a borderline unusable only tight interior that overheats quickly so they lengthened diablo to improve the comfort ability in the cabin. The word is this comfort. Yeah right after ability never heard of that. Is that a diablo right there. This is a blow right here and it's purple too. Yeah that's the blister. That i had

James Pump Joe Weber Frey James JOE Detroit Motors United States Esprit Lotus Lamborghini
Rush Limbaugh, conservative radio host, dies at 70

Wisconsin's Afternoon News with John Mercure

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Rush Limbaugh, conservative radio host, dies at 70

"Of Rush Limbaugh a day after cancer claimed the life of the country's preeminent conservative radio talk show host He came along at a time when am radio is in real trouble. Poynter Institute cell, Tompkins says Limbaugh saved the frequency FM radio became the choice for music. But am Radio ended up not really having the purpose. FCC rules Changes and Bill Clinton giving rise to limbo Conservative angled talk radio survived. But liberal talk radio died and and never came back again says they're just too all talk stations in America in 1960, the late eighties changes and Limbaugh payment. The way for the 1100 on the air. Come. 1995, G Miller. WTMJ news.

Poynter Institute Rush Limbaugh Limbaugh Tompkins Cancer FCC Bill Clinton America Miller Wtmj News
The Failed Shangri-La Plaza

Ghost Town

04:18 min | 1 year ago

The Failed Shangri-La Plaza

"The star studded high production surrealistic musical sitcom shangri la plaza was originally produced as a pilot for b. nineteen ninety ninety one season but for one night only the network decided to air it as a summer fill in on july thirtieth nineteen ninety and that half hour made history. Well kind of in a really weird bad way. So we're gonna talk about the sitcom shangri la plaza. All of the weirdness that occurs around it to talk about cop rock. That was abc. Same year that this came out. It has a very cop rock field. But what is what are your reactions to this the intro. I could not tell you what it was about. If you pay me any amount of money it so abstract i guess and never mind the cheesiness. that's i expect that it's one thousand nine hundred ninety experimental. Things are a little bit weird. I was just saying that. Like i guess seinfeld came and say yeah television at that point but i could not tell. It seemed like a place. Where maybe there's food and abc live. I don't know what is highly. It's hard to tell it's it all began really with nineties. L. a. mall culture shangrila was inspired by that and it was filmed on location in north hollywood strip mall at the corner of vineland and burbank boulevard. In north hollywood california just went for it. This set a strip mall was built on top of an original strip mall which is where the problems really begin. This mall on mall design was the topic of a washington post story in nineteen ninety emmy award winning art director. Jeremy ray elton best known for his work on playhouse was responsible for the set sign. And that's not the only high-calibre name attached this very confused project. Broadway legend terrence man. Who played leads in. Layman's and cat stars as ira bondo machine mechanic who works with his brother. George jeff jaeger lanes musician love interest. John remain in seinfeld. Speaking of seinfeld at the mall's bodyshop. When amy molloy hardin yes jan on the office takes over her shitty husbands donut shop. I think after he dies. Both brothers are instantly. Smitten future smallville. Star nexium sex cult leader. Alice mac a very young l. Plays amy's precocious eight year old daughter in her only on screen acting role jazz. Great carmen lundy plays the donut shops. Only employees savion glover plays a wrapping teen commenting on. What's happening kind of greek chorus style. An oscar nominee. Chris sarandon plays the plazas landlord. It's for something where it's just a pilot of a throwaway like experimental pilot like pretty heavy hitting actors. The show itself was helmed by horror sci fi writer director nick castle. You may know him as the co writer of john. Carpenter's state from new york. And he played michael myers in the original halloween. The composers were craig sapphire or sedan known from his work. On cheers and mark mueller. Who wrote the theme song to duck tales and jennifer pages. Nine hundred ninety eight hit crush it just like there's a lot of talent involved in this project and it just gets lost along the way while working together on projects like the last starfighter tapped the trio discovered. They had a common passion. The three of us loved old musicals. Knicks dad was a choreographer who had done royal wedding and many other movies sephardim says and the opportunity to make a musical finally happened. When cassel's pal jeff sagansky became the head of cbs. He was looking for something new. Some fresh ideas for cbs program lineup castle savannah mueller who themselves the schmaltz kings were creating in la based rock opera and unique written and composed by credit on the pilot the or inspired like i said by the strip malls around the mall culture in the late eighties early nineties. Kind of creating something colorful and also their love of musicals. It's like a hat and a hat on a hat. The pitch to cbs was also pretty weird. The schmaltz kings cleared off sagansky desk and with the keyboard and two speakers. They perform songs from the show in character.

Shangri La Plaza Seinfeld North Hollywood ABC Jeremy Ray Elton Ira Bondo George Jeff Jaeger Amy Molloy Hardin Alice Mac Carmen Lundy Vineland Chris Sarandon Strip Mall Emmy Award Nick Castle Craig Sapphire Terrence Savion Glover Mark Mueller Layman
"late eighties" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"late eighties" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Beautiful. They all five new X multipliers scratch offs from the Maryland lottery like nothing we've created before play safely and responsibly free I heart radio app is number one for music, radio and podcasts, All in one discover a new podcast from our library of over 350,000 titles. Here's an I Heart radio podcast preview known At the beginning of fish. What I know now, you know, the band is like an organic ever growing thing. That's a conversation I had with Trey Anastasio, lead singer and guitarist of Fish for a piece I wrote Back in 2002 1st saw fish at a tiny club in the late eighties. Now, decades later, the band is still touring, still making a cultural impact. And I'm still covering them. I'm Dean. But Nick and this is long May they run season one fish E saw the late eighties and the people are going crazy. I mean attention. Like a storm effort. A shark rushed backstage. I should look Quitting. My job is a broader. I'm you know, Manager. I've seen it, And that's the future. They change. The industry that changed the landscape of the entire festival circuit were to draw 75 80,000 people to Indian reservation in the middle of Florida on New Year's 1999. No, never heard of us. We're gonna do it anyway, and have it work. This'd like path. We're gonna follow it. We don't care where it leads the Baker's dozen a different show every night at the world's most famous arena, not a single song repeated. I beg everyone to find me a band who could do that. Welcome to long May they run, Listen and follow this podcast for free on the I Heart radio at number one for music, radio and podcasts, all in one The free I. Heart radio APP is number one for music, radio and podcasts, All in one discover a new podcast from our library of over 350,000 titles. Here's an I Heart Radio podcast preview in April..

Carries Satanic Book Report

Oh No Ross and Carrie

05:24 min | 1 year ago

Carries Satanic Book Report

"Hello and welcome to. Oh no ross. And carrie the show where. We don't just report on for in science spirituality and claims of the paranormal but take part ourselves yep and they make claims we ships. You don't have to i'm carrie. Poppy morales blocher. And were back today. To talk about a man named bob larson. I don't know if you've heard of him but i have. He has a ministry but really it's it's about him. I mean without bob. Larsen won't be much of a ministry. Yeah bob larson ministries is the name of the ministry. When we have no bob how many ministries do we know of that are actually named after the founder. There's tony llama. Oh yeah. I want to say. There's quite a few. But i can. I name them off the top of my head rail. Ism benny hen. Oh you're thinking like groups that we've investigated that have the the person's name in the title. The james randi educational foundation. There we go there. You go known cult or kidding that's always something interesting to look out for the presence or lack thereof of a succession plan granted. He's had his daughter's involved as teenage exorcist. So maybe they could step up and continue the fight. Yeah maybe yes. I'll you don't know about this whole thing. This all Systemic sexism sure. Yeah but i mean. At least he's had them perform. Exercises assumes yeah i just somehow i have the sense that they're not as passionate about it as he is though bryn. His daughter did publish book. Yeah i bought. I need to find that l. Yeah we'll have to compare her writing style to his. So maybe she's the heir-apparent maybe maybe she's the ivanka. Well i would love to tell you about a book. I recently read called satanism. The seduction america's youth. Yes okay. so he's got this book. It is black and threatening on the cover. It says bob larsen at the top and then it says satanism in red letters that are spiky instead of sarah. They have spikes that can hurt you. If you touch it. Who the teas got a fun. Little curly tail coming down from it. Yeah like the devil's pitchfork. No i assume. That's just bob larson saying i am the author and then the title of satanism rather than this being about bob larsen satanism. Now this is special brand of satan. Okay these seduction of america's youth. Okay thank her. Then what have we got on the back on the back. We have a pentagram. Oh anarchism symbol lasta. These are bad. These are these are bad. According to bob i guess equally bad none. None of these are standing out more than the other as far as designed goes. What's that top line in front of the the symbols it says. Do you recognize these symbols. Yes see page one hundred nine for more information. Oh okay that always amazes me. I just think of books. In progresses these very fluid things that it specifically mentions page one hundred nine but of course. They know that after they're done writing about that. Especially in a book when it says to page this and i think how do you know that okay. They must they write it and then they highlight it and then at the end they have to go through and make sure okay. Where does oh shoot. I added this note and change. The page layout the point is rosner secret edits. We realize these are easy problems to solve. But they fascinate us. Apparently okay how many pages carry. That's always important with bob larsen pages. How 'bout in two hundred and twenty three you know. I think if i had to say like what is the average length of a book would be somewhere in that ballpark. Two hundred twenty three. Yeah yeah seems about right. Yeah so this was published in nineteen eighty nine. The same year my fiance drew was published. Nineteen eighty nine it and oh it was princeton. The eunice did states of america. All right ice. So i was working backward with my book. The first book i talked about was jazz abell which was written in. I wanna say twenty fifteen. And then i read demon proving prayers which was twenty eleven and you started farther back in the bob cannon and now you're moving towards the future that's right time travelling here this was published by thomas nelson inc. Okay who's this thomas nelson guy and what happens when he dies who keeps publishing those books. This is suspicious. we are still very dumb. So what's bob's take his. Is he four satanism against it. Do you wanna guess cast lots. I'm going to say against just hunch year right right so if he were a person browsing the nonfiction center at your local christian bookstore in the late eighties and you pick this up and you look the back. You'd see what's a parent to do with the devil. Have you ever explained to the supernatural to your child and discussed the influence of satanism in our society. Do you dabble in parapsychology or new age philosophy which could indicate your acceptance of the colts

Bob Larson Bob Larsen Poppy Morales Blocher Tony Llama Carrie Benny Hen James Randi Educational Founda BOB Larsen America Ross Bryn Sarah Rosner Jazz Abell Bob Cannon Thomas Nelson Inc. Eunice Princeton Drew
Vlad tidings: demonstrations across Russia

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:07 min | 1 year ago

Vlad tidings: demonstrations across Russia

"On saturday tens of thousands of russians took to the streets in more than a hundred towns and cities across the country. In support of jailed kremlin critic. Alexey navalny protesters chanted. Putin is a thief as well as freedom to navalny chilling videos emerged police beating and kicking demonstrators. The response was not one about an out brutality. More than three thousand arrests were made at. Even mr navalny's wife was briefly. Detained the demonstrations were sparked mr navalny's arrest on spurious charges. Just as soon as he returned from germany last week but protesters were also fired up by to our video narrated by mr navalny and released a day later. Throw it saw my viceroy was thirty. Wrestling depicts a lavish palace. On the black sea. Allegedly built for president vladimir putin and funded with dodgy. Money allegations the kremlin dismissed as just rumor mr putin remains in a tough spot with disquiet spreading and his loudest critic making just as much trouble while in jail as he did out of it. This was not my first protest in moscow in quite a few the past few years are cody. Trotsky is russia editor in moscow. I would say that. Fear was one of caution pretty much on both sides the fact that people have braved the streets brave. The police cordons came out. Despite enormous intimidation campaign was waged. By the kremlin in the preceding days is in itself extraordinary russia's much more repressive state today than it was even a few years ago. The people who were out in the street was certainly not radicals as abba in moscow protests. That was scary. Moments police charging but on the whole the police behavior some restraint and its actions were nowhere on the level of violence and brutality which we saw a few months ago in neighboring belarus. There was no special measures with no tear. Gas rubber bullets so it was definitely tense. But i didn't see many of the accesses and when we spoke to protesters what were they saying. Why were they out. The protesters came from the social strata and had different possibly political beliefs. What brought them out onto the street. Were few things. There was a sense of injustice over the arrest of alexei novel name who was arrested at possible control on the rival at airport and is now facing three and a half years in jail for breaking parole rules on a previous suspended sentence and the reason he broke his parole rules. That didn't comfortable to the police was just happened to be recovering from novichok nerve agent poisoning in germany. So people obvious that as an injustice the other big catalyst for the protest was the release of alexander violence extraordinary two hour long documentary film about allegedly putin secret palace in the black sea coast which was bill deem volumes cronies at a cost of one point three billion dollars. It's your absolutely archetypal. James bond villains had with all the trimmings and the golden toilet brushes that made a big impact. It clocked over eighty million views on youtube. An underlying over that was just general sense of tidiness of putin's regime tiredness of course lack of economic growth it was a very broad protests. And that's what made say interesting. You know lots of people came out for the first time. And so do you think that. That broad dissent a across demographics. On a lot of first-time protesters will will make any difference to to. What the kremlin actually does. It's not going to make any difference. In the short term the kremlin has already said. It's not going to pay attention. Admittedly fiscal putin spokesman said well. We think it was a very small protests. Many more people vote for vladimir putin. That was ironic. Given that alexander was barred from the election in which people voted for vladimir putin the reason the numbers were kept down walls because of enormous intimidation campaigns parents schoolchildren were told to keep their kids at home. Students were threatened with expulsion employs. The employees they'd risk dismissal if they would join the protest et cetera et cetera. The kremlin is not going to release alexei navalny overnight but only himself and he's associates of said. This is not an immediate process. This is a long haul to re coined the famous phrase by me. He'll gorbachev in the late eighties. The process started so. Do you think that the detention of of mr navalny and the release of this video and all of those us have really changed things. Is this a turning point. They do and this change effects vladimir putin's legitimacy which is already being Waning and we. We've seen that in in the raising figures. But this film and alexander. Violence return to russia is a massive blow to putin's legitimacy and to the attitudes and perceptions of putin in the broad russian public as one commentator set to me you know two years ago people had to explain why they oppose putin today they have to justify why they support him. And how has the international community responded to to this protest mood and these protests i think so far west leaders have been watching very carefully. What's happening in russia. has been rhetorical outrage. At least both from angela merkel Sees this as a slap in her face because nobody was in germany under her protection also been marketed. Different reaction from washington. I think we will see a very different response. From biden's administration compared to trump's acquiescence to putin's action has been called for tax sanctions including from poland. A you member states the foreign ministers to discuss next steps. But i think there is also worry amongst western countries and particularly among russian neighbors and countries like the baltic states and poland that events in russia will have repercussions outside russian borders and this north unfounded fears because in two thousand fourteen two years after big protests swept russia features berg and other big cities the kremlin annexed crimea and stuff the war in ukraine in order to change the narrative and dominate political agenda so lot of russia neighbors worried that repression at home and protests against the kremlin will lead to aggression. Abreu arkady. thank you very much for joining us. Thank you jason

Mr Navalny Vladimir Putin Alexey Navalny Moscow Mr Putin Putin Russia Alexei Novel Germany Alexander Trotsky Cody Wrestling Belarus Alexei Navalny Black Sea Coast James Bond Youtube Gorbachev
"late eighties" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"late eighties" Discussed on KTRH

"APP is number one for music, radio and podcasts, All in one discover a new podcast from our library of over 350,000 titles. Here's an I. Heart Radio podcast preview known At the beginning of fish. What I know now, you know, the band is like an organic ever growing thing. That's a conversation I had with Trey Anastasio, lead singer and guitarist of Fish for a piece I wrote back in 2002. I first saw fish at a tiny club in the late eighties. Now, decades later, the band is still touring. Still making a cultural impact, and I'm still covering them. I'm Dean. But Nick and this is long May they run Season one. Fish e saw the late eighties. And the people of growing like crazy. I mean the dancing like a storm after the shark rushed backstage as you're looking, I'm quitting. My job is a broader. I'm you know, Manager. I seen it, and that's the future. They changed the industry. They changed. The landscape of the entire festival circuit were to draw 75 80,000 people to Indian reservation in the middle of Florida on New Year's 1999. No, never heard of us. We're gonna do it anyway. And have it work. This'd my path. We're gonna follow it. We don't care where it leads. Baker's dozen a different show every night at the world's most famous arena, not a single song repeated. I beg everyone to find me a band who could do that. Welcome to long made a run. Listen and follow this podcast for free on the I heart radio at number one for music, radio and podcasts, all in one Looking back at the world of sports. It's the I Heart radio weekend. Sports Time capsule. What's happening?.

Fish Trey Anastasio Nick Baker Florida
"late eighties" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"late eighties" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"APP is number one for music, radio and podcasts, all in one discover a new podcast from our library of over 350,000 titles. Here's an I. Heart Radio podcast preview known At the beginning of fish. What I know now, you know, the band is like an organic ever growing thing. That's a conversation I had with Trey Anastasio, lead singer and guitarist of Fish for a piece I wrote Back in 2002. I first saw fish at a tiny club in the late eighties. Now, decades later, the band is still touring, still making a cultural impact. And I'm still covering them. I'm Dean. But Nick and this is long May they run season one fish E saw the late eighties. And the people are growing like crazy. I mean attention like a storm after the shark rushed backstage. You should look it. I'm quitting. My job is a broader. I'm you know, Manager. I seen it, and that's the future. They changed the industry. They changed. The landscape of the entire festival circuit were to draw 75 80,000 people to Indiana resident It's 16 minutes time. Travel curious TERROR evidence these trey insurance time Taymor detailer. Good morning to you dealing with a couple closures one of Miami Dade Holman or North Bannon, Northwest 25th Street. Hear a crash just before that has the Express lane shut down. This reporter sponsored by Michelin and during silicone wiper blades, looking at its surface street in Pembroke Pines, that's Pines Boulevard eastbound at the intersection of Southwest 68th Avenue westbound traffic now getting by drivers detouring through the neighborhood to reenter pines. Take Johnson or Pembroke, though, as your alternates and 75 north bound before Griffin Road crashes, too. Right lanes blocked that crash involving a tractor trailer. Use caution on the approach. Weather can be unpredictable. Be prepared with windshield wipers that can handle anything. Michelin endurance XT Silicone wiper blades are real world Proven for extreme weather performance.

Fish Pembroke Pines Trey Anastasio Michelin Taymor Indiana Nick Miami Dade Holman reporter North Bannon Johnson
"late eighties" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"late eighties" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"That's a conversation I had with Trey Anastasio, lead singer and guitarist of Fish for a piece I wrote back in 2002. First saw fish at a tiny club in the late eighties. Now, decades later, the band is still touring. Still making a cultural impact, and I'm still covering them. I'm Dean. But Nick and this is long made a run season one Fish. I saw the late eighties. And the people are growing like crazy. I mean the dancing like a storm after the shark rushed backstage looking, I'm quitting. My job is a broader. I'm you know, Manager. I seen it, and that's the future. They changed the industry. They changed. The landscape of the entire festival circuit were to draw 75 80,000 people to Indian reservation in the middle of Florida on New Year's 1999. No, never heard of us. We're gonna do it anyway, and have it work. This is my path. We're gonna follow it. We don't care where it leads. Baker's dozen a different show every night at the World's T T song from the Trading Well, Studio your local fiduciary creating wealth dot com This is knsd Am 7 90 High ARD radio station. Tightening security for the inauguration. I'm Rich Dennis and Fox News Washington D C. Essentially, lockdown is 25,000 National Guard members deployed to the city to ensure a safe transition of power..

Fish Trey Anastasio Rich Dennis fiduciary Nick Fox Baker National Guard Florida Washington
A Conversation With James Fox

Walking the Shadowlands

04:45 min | 1 year ago

A Conversation With James Fox

"James thank you very much for joining us today. From you on the show we could stop with you telling us about how you got into documentary filmmaking and specifically how you got into the erie of few documentaries that would take us back to the early. Nineteen nineties where. I had a father who was paralyzed from the neck down with multiple sclerosis and he was a writer and in. So i've been traveling. He was a fantastic to larry's driven ambitious intelligent witty. Great fun guy. We traveled the world together. I was his legs. Is schommer is secretaries nurse. With a lot of fun. We interviewed. Stephen hawking we interviewed race cartilage legend. Dan gurney traveled to formula one races down in mexico city. I mean we did some really cool stuff and my my father was a brilliant writer. I was always amazed at how could put words together and So good at it. Got such a skill and i had picked up probably in the late eighties very early. Ninety certainly the late eighties early nineties. A video camera from a friend of mine. And i was so a amazed at the technology of steve instant. The did was take back then. But the instant playback it's like you know it was amazing. It was a real novelty back then and and what a great tool it was for documenting things and so i started doing video production. You know probably my very early twenties and Probably i dunno. I want to say when i was around. Twenty three twenty four a very good high school friend of mine. One of my best friends. One of my best mates we We bought a car length. We flew to europe from america. We bought a car in london. And we drove this old fiat. One thirty one doors read two hundred pounds for it. We drove it all the way to added justin not just had a hell of a of adventure together and car did make it out four gold back but he was a good friend of sky rene and he started to tell me back back in the us About ufo's in one of my best friends honestly and i had. He didn't talk to me about highschool but he talked about it later in early twenties tonight. I thought he'd lost mind. I really did talking about roswell. You take your you haven't heard about roswell and i just thought well it's been a good friend and i'm gonna have to write him off. He's lost his mind and I was telling the story to a a mentor apprentice. Video production house in san francisco Ellison horn productions have been like this in this guy. Richard van sickle was was one of the senior people at the production house. The brilliant guy. I really looked up to him. And i just one day told him all. You're not gonna believe really good friend of mine is tell me about your phone and then about how you crashed and aliens were recovered in roswell back in the forties. Got my poor friend. He's lost his mind and Richard turns me and he says no. You heard about that. I said haven't heard. But no i haven't heard fully happened. He said they actually admitted that it happened. And i thought well hang on a minute. richard. Somebody i look up to and i respect and very intelligent. He runs his video production company. And i thought well if richard thinks that happened. Maybe i should take a closer look. And so i did. And i went to a couple of conferences and i Befriended some military guys basically exchanged offered an exchange of of documenting them and making you know Making their interviews available to the public and documenting presentations and things of that nature in in exchange. They kind of brought me into their world. Bit and then I think when i was twenty four maybe twenty five. I said hey. I'm a documentary on your phones. And i was amazed at how not unsupportive. My father was because my father was

Schommer Steve Instant Dan Gurney Multiple Sclerosis Mexico City Ellison Horn Richard Van Sickle Roswell Larry James Stephen Rene America Justin Europe London San Francisco Richard
Is Student Loan Forgiveness A Good Idea?

Money For the Rest of Us

09:16 min | 1 year ago

Is Student Loan Forgiveness A Good Idea?

"Right now on the. Us government federal balance sheet there's loan receivables over a trillion dollars of student loan debt sitting there as a receivable for the fiscal year ending nineteen total assets of the federal government worth three point nine trillion of which one point one trillion was direct student loans. But here's the thing. Three point nine. Trillion in assets twenty six point nine trillion in liabilities. The difference the deficit is twenty two point nine trillion dollars. The us government is effectively insolvent. It does more than its assets. And if the us government road off four hundred and forty billion dollars of student loans it would just increase the level of insolvency. It would not sink. The government by any means the education department according to some private consulting work that they contract it out understand what the potential losses are on their student loans found. According to a report by the wall street journal that losses on the one point three seven dollars of student loans outstanding at the time this report was compiled would equal four hundred and thirty five billion dollars. Only nine hundred and thirty five billion would be paid back and that didn't include about one hundred fifty tonnes originated by private lenders that are guaranteed by the government each year. The government lends a hundred billion dollars to students to cover tuition to more than six thousand. Colleges and universities doesn't look at credit scores or the field of study or whether students will make enough after graduating to cover the debt. The wall street journal article reported that between two thousand five in two thousand sixteen four intent student loans. Most of them federal went went to borrowers with credit scores below the subprime threshold. That's assuming they actually had a credit score. Which at the time. That i took out my first student loan which i'll talk about a little later in this episode. I didn't have a credit score. Nor frankly i know what i was doing. But here's the thing. The consultants found out that a major driver of those losses were students. Who went on some type of income driven repayment plan. An income share to wear they only had to pay a percentage of their income and ultimately the loan could be forgiven after a number of years. If a loan isn't paid back in full because the payments are based on income in income isn't growing and ultimately the alone is written off after twenty years or so then that will lead to a loss in addition that study found that there are millions of other borrowers that would default on smaller amounts typically less than ten thousand dollars after the drop out of a community college or a for profit college one of the comments in this wall street journal article on the private consultants conclusion regarding the potential losses. For the us government. Student loan program is that taxpayers would be on the hook for this if the government off four hundred and forty billion dollars of student loans. Us government would receive less interest income and principal payments annually interest if we assume a five percent interest rate on one and a half trillion dollars of student. Loans is is only about eighty five billion dollars. now. I say only because total. Us government revenue is three point four trillion dollars. Interest income from student loans is only about two and a half percent expenditures in fiscal year. Twenty twenty six and a half trillion dollars. The deficit was three point. One trillion fourteen point seven percent of economic output or gdp nominal gdp and fiscal year. Two thousand twenty was twenty one point two trillion dollars. This deficit was fourteen point seven percent of that number the highest since the great financial crisis where the deficit was nine point. Eight percent the highest deficit ever was in nineteen forty three at twenty nine point six percent of gdp. The us ran three point. One trillion deficit in twenty twenty and the federal reserve increased the amount of treasuries on their balance sheet essentially funding that deficit. Two point two trillion dollars is the additional treasury bonds that the federal reserve bought so two point two trillion of the three point one trillion dollar deficit. These student loans are tiny percent of what the government is spending much of which the federal reserve financed indirectly. Veterans are didn't just give the money to the treasury. they went through the county mechanism of buying treasury bonds. But that's what happened. The federal reserve created the money out of thin air to purchase treasury bonds to plug the deficit now when i started hearing about forgiving student. Loans cancelling them. My impression was the student loan. Burden is as high as it's ever been. That students are struggling tremendously compared to when i took out student loans in the late eighties and early nineties. What i found was the average student loan and again this is based on data from marc canter wits. This is just the average student loan balance for graduates with bachelor's degree when they leave school in one thousand nine hundred nineteen ninety-three. It was ninety three hundred dollars. Forty six percent of students had student loan debt. That's about how much i had little over ten thousand dollars in student loans. When i left graduate school today. The average student loan balance is twenty nine thousand nine hundred dollars just for students. With bachelor's degrees sixty nine percent of graduating students have student loan balances. That amount going from ninety three hundred to twenty nine thousand. Nine hundred was a four point. Six percent annual increase. Now that's a burden no doubt and if it growing at four point six percent it's growing faster than inflation yet if i look at what students are making when they graduate in nineteen ninety-three or year after they graduated so in nineteen ninety-four an engineer. Starting salary was thirty thousand. Nine hundred dollars. A humanities graduate was making twenty one thousand three hundred dollars so if we compare that salary to the amount of their debt engineer made three point three times. The amount of student loan debt they had and the humanities major may two point three times the amount of student loan debt they have if we look at what engineers typically make coming out of university. Today it's close to seventy thousand dollars or about two point three times the amount of their student debt back in one thousand nine hundred. They made three point three times the amount that they owed now. It's two point three times so they own more relative to their salary but the interest rates are lower now. So they're able to handle that. But it's not this huge change that i had expected for the humanities graduate. They went from earning two point. Three times Student loan balance to one point eight times now. Part of that is pell. Grants which are grants given to low income students to essentially pay for school. I got a lot of pell grants when i went to school. That program has only grown about three point nine percent per year the maximum payout amount per student so it has not grown as fast as student debt levels. Now we can say well may be. College graduates are able to find jobs. The unemployment rate for recent graduates was five point one percent in nineteen ninety-two it was three point. Nine percent before the pandemic hit in february twenty twenty and so a greater percentage of recent graduates had jobs in early. Twenty twenty then back in nineteen ninety-two now. The unemployment rate at least in september was nine point one percent according to some data from the new york fed which suggests that yeah Graduates are struggling to get jobs. It is harder today than it was in nineteen ninety two but not that much difficult. And i don't recall calls to cancel student. Loan debt back in the early to the mid ninety s

Us Government Wall Street Journal Federal Reserve Treasury
"late eighties" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"late eighties" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Is number one for music, radio and podcasts. All in one discover a new podcast from our library of over 350,000 titles. Here's an I. Heart Radio podcast preview. What if I had known At the beginning of fish. What I know now, you know, the band is like an organic ever growing thing. That's a conversation I had with Trey Anastasio, lead singer and guitarist of Fish for a piece I wrote back in 2002. I first saw fish at a tiny club in the late eighties. Now, decades later, the band is still touring. Still making a cultural impact, and I'm still covering them. I'm Dean. But Nick and this is long May they run Season one fish e saw the late eighties and the people of Girl like crazy. I mean dancing like a storm. After the shot rushed backstage. You should look it. I'm quitting. My job is a broader. I'm you know, Manager. I've seen it, and that's the future. They changed the industry. They changed. The landscape of the entire festival circuit were to draw 75 80,000 people to Indian reservation in the middle of Florida on New Year's 1999. No, never heard of us. We're gonna do it anyway. And have it work. This'd my path. We're gonna follow it. We don't care where it leads. The Baker's dozen a different show every night at the world's most famous arena, Not a singles. More news with Chris.

Fish Trey Anastasio Nick Baker Chris Florida
Samuel Little, most prolific serial killer in US history, dies in Los Angeles

John Rothmann

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

Samuel Little, most prolific serial killer in US history, dies in Los Angeles

"FBI considers the most prolific serial killer in U. S history is dead. Corrections officials say Samuel Little died at an L. A hospital. He was 80 little had been serving three consecutive life without parole sentences for the deaths of three women that occurred in the late eighties. Little comm passed over 93 murders across the country and

Samuel Little FBI
"late eighties" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"late eighties" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Here's an I Heart radio podcast preview if I had known At the beginning of fish. What I know now, you know, the band is like an organic ever growing thing. That's a conversation I had with Trey Anastasio, lead singer and guitarist of Fish for a piece I wrote back in 2002. First saw fish at a tiny club in the late eighties. Now, decades later, the band is still touring. Still making a cultural impact, and I'm still covering them. I'm Dean. But Nick and this is long May they run Season one fish e saw the late eighties. And the people are growing like crazy. I mean dancing like a storm After the shark rushed backstage. You should look it. I'm quitting. My job is a broader. I'm you know, Manager. I seen it, and that's the future. They changed the industry. They changed. The landscape of the entire festival circuit were to draw 75 80,000 people to Indian reservation in the middle of Florida on New Year's 1999. No, never heard of us. We're gonna do it anyway. And have it work. This'd like path. We're gonna follow it. We don't care where it leads A Baker's dozen Different show every night at the world's most famous arena, Not a single song repeated. I beg everyone to find me a band who could do that. Welcome to long May they run, Listen and follow this podcast for free on the I Heart radio at number one for music, radio and podcasts, all in one radio 1055 w We are see. Mm hmm..

Fish Trey Anastasio Nick Baker Florida
Applications and Impact of CRISPR/CAS9 in Bioprocessing

Cell Culture Dish Podcast

05:48 min | 1 year ago

Applications and Impact of CRISPR/CAS9 in Bioprocessing

"Today. I'm joined by fanling. Wong director of cell line development and protein sciences and zane starkey wolf director of corporate development from wishy biologics. I'm excited to be speaking with both of you. Today about crisper cast nine technology and its possibilities in the discovery and development biopharmaceuticals. We will also conduct a deep dive on its potential impact on bioprocessing and bio manufacturing. Welcome fanling and zane to the podcast. Zinke randy glad to be here. Thank you brandy before we get too far and because of our audience is quite diverse with regards to their experiences in life sciences. Fenland could you please provide some background on. Crisper cast nine as molecular biology. Gene editing tool. Yeah sure so christmas. Nineteen action system is actually adapted from a natural procure arctic defense mechanism to bacteria to simplify. What could spec assistant can do is took leave the face she and i was. It has been incorporated into the bacteria routine on so that to keep the fate from reproducing. Crisper is actually akron stands for clusters servers regularly interspace. Shot had a dramatic repeats and kissed by the most well well-researched variant of the class outcasts nucleus. Which has been used within the gene editing function. So i think the research community have actually adapted this mechanism to revolutionize how we perform the genetic modifications Not only in pro arctic. But or so. You can arctic sales since the system was first published and zane i know from our previous conversations that you were saying that crisper casts has an intriguing origin. Would you be able to elaborate. Yes interesting research can be found on crisper that dates back to the late. Eighty s Other work has been conducted throughout the first decade of the two thousand however it wasn't until two thousand twelve that two pivotal research papers were published in the journal. Science one by jennifer down nov uc berkeley and manual shopping chair of the university of vienna and then another pianist by doctors cross unanimous and sickness at vilnius university. All demonstrating the use of bacterial. Crisper cast nine as simple programmable. Gene editing jewel. But i know that the story doesn't stop there does it no. It certainly does not in less than a year in two thousand thirteen. The labs of dr fung jong and will chong of the burden student. Mit dr george. Church's lab at harvard reported success in adapting. Crisper cast nine for genome editing in your area cells and both mouse and human cells. And i know that we could really spend an entire podcast. Just on the history of crisper so i wanted to stay focused on the technology here. There's been a lot of excitement since discovery about this molecular biology tool. Can you explain why. Sure the remarkable functionality of this tool is that it allows scientists to target specific locations within the genetic code of an organism to cut out or replace a segment of dna due to the high specificity and exactness of utility. The applications have far reaching potential. And it has already become a much to walks game changer. In many fields of life science because it enables efficient cost effective and precision gene. Editing that has a wide utility for development of biological therapeutics including so and gene therapy disease modeling diagnostics agriculture industrial biology and more. And this has me thinking just about alternatives to crisper casts altogether Are there other ways to edit genomes. And if so what makes a crisper cast so much better. Great question brandy many of the other gene editing systems utilize today such as zinc finger. Nicholas's talons the use of mega nick. Liaises or other by all vectors like a. Iv compared with christopher cast nine are in the end very complex and time intensive often requiring many more steps and thus are more costly as well also and this may be greatest benefit. Is that crisper chess. Nine as a low off target affects profile which again makes it an ideal gene. Editing tool justify along with that. I've read many Recent advances using crisper technologies. Could you elaborate a little bit on those. The advances are extensive and continuous. We speak one example includes crisper a crisper i which are techniques to up and down regulate gene expression using dead cast nine dead cast nine removed the nucleus capability of cast nine but still allows for the targeted binding to a double stranded. Dna sequence of interest using the highway. Specific guide are a that is one of the cornerstones of crisper genome editing. I'd like to add that another application. It's a using crisper for hamas directed repel or so called a the are so this technique in simple terms can repel a double stranded. Dna break which is very important for genus ability. But what does the crisper made. Sdr can do is that. It cannot only to repel a break. But or so crew. Eight the break and then replace it with a small mutation or as elijah sequences so this techniques have actually substantially opened ability or researchers to make gino added more quickly and more efficiently

Cell Line Development And Prot Zane Starkey Zinke Randy Arctic Dr Fung Jong Dr George Wong Vilnius University University Of Vienna Zane The Journal Berkeley Jennifer Harvard Nicholas Christopher Chess Hamas Elijah Gino
Interview With Signet EVP And Global CIO Howard Melnick

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

06:13 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Signet EVP And Global CIO Howard Melnick

"Howard melnik. Welcome to second ovation. Thank you peter adding me. That's a pleasure. I thought we begin a howard with your your role. You're the executive vice president global chief information officer of signet. And i wonder if you could take a moment for those who may be less familiar with the company. Can you provide a brief overview as to what you all do. Let me tell you a little bit about my role and a little about signet. So i i've been at signet for about two and a half years and drew me to signet was that the company was launching transformation with a digital focus and a real customer first mentality. My sweet spot has always been integrating business and technology to create value as you mentioned. I'm accountable for information technology as well as analytics programs really focusing on things like being customer centric digital first or accelerating our cloud adoption and using analytics with machine learning in ai the Overall focus is really on driving business value. I part very closely with both our chief innovation officer arner chief digital officer To really create a world class customer experience. And so peter as you mentioned many people may not know the name sick but you're probably really familiar with the brands that we represent so first. Six cygnets mission is to celebrate life and express love so kind of what a what a great place to work at a particularly in these times where the world's largest retailer diamond jewelry and the largest specialty retailer in the us the uk and canada the brands that we have our kay jewelers zales. Jared piercing pagoda people's jewelers in canada h samuel and ernest jones in the uk and james allen which is actually a digitally native company which was a out of tel. Aviv's will thank you for that overview howard. I appreciate it Would love to talk a little bit about your your current strategy. I know from our past conversations that you've talked about the aspects like the path brilliants Some of the omni channel type aspects that you're doing and so on maybe you can dive a little bit further into some of the details of those if you would okay. Great peter so. I let me give a little background which i think really helps frame up the business strategy so signet. The group was founded in nineteen forty nine and grew organically until the late eighties early nineties. Back in february of two thousand fourteen signet acquired zales corporation which was based in dallas. And then two thousand seventeen we purchased to net. Which are the owner of the company. James allen which really starts to be our innovation hub so these acquisitions were great because they gave us breath and scale but gave me the ability now to say i have multiple technologies. Or how do i leverage that scale but at the same time be able to create really unique experiences by brand for our customers so with that we born are packed. Brilliant strategy now if you go back and think five or ten years ago. Julia was not a big on line. Purchase category jewelries intricate people. It wasn't a book and so we started to develop a strategy back in two thousand eighteen. That had three strategic pillars the customer first on the channel with a digital focus and building a culture of agility inefficiency and so peter when we last spoke which was about eighteen months ago we were just in kind of wrapping up to your one and one for us was fixing operational issues building a foundation getting us ready ear to came and that's really what strengthening our foundation rebuilding on the channel capabilities. We're actually getting us more product diversity and starting to really focus on innovation and then in year three where we sit now when we really were gaining momentum cova hit and coded for us was actually an accelerate. I would say in two months of kobe. We probably did two years worth of work. And so many companies kind of shutdown. We really started to accelerate areas of digital growth. And i think what we've seen is customer treads also accelerated things like buying line up in store curbside pickup. These are things that were kind of emerging at at slow pace but have really accelerated. I think in a post covid world are going to last forever very interesting and talk. Talk a bit if you will about the the way in which that. It strategy that path the brilliance supports the broader enterprise strategy with paths brilliance laid out. We developed an it strategy that had four key areas. I was when i called fix improved so a certain areas that we inherited that we wanted to make better Around people process technology data than the next area was with multiple brands. What are the areas. I should harmonize and then modernize and then the last area was really around innovation when we think of innovation innovation for us isn't just catch up. Its halloway leapfrog the competition. What can i do to really position as well so let me walk you through each one of those areas in some of the give some examples of things we did so if we look at one of the first area which was fixing improve. I'm a big fan of jim collins. The author good to great and one of the things he says. Is you get the right people on the bus. So the first thing we did is get the right people on the bus and then we started to look at our operating model and so since we had grown up with multiple banners multiple campuses traditionally were organized by technology by geography with some people sitting in akron in some people sitting in dallas. What we wanted to do is organize by foce. And so we started to make that shift where e-commerce team moved from traditional project teams to product teams but in other areas we started to leverage the concept centers of excellence particularly around areas like integration. Devops testing analytics.

Signet Howard Melnik Arner James Allen Great Peter Howard Zales Corporation Peter Ernest Jones Canada UK Aviv Jared Samuel TEL Dallas Cova Julia United States Jim Collins
"late eighties" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"late eighties" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Heart Radio podcast preview. What if I had known At the beginning of fish. What I know now you know, the band is like an organic. Ever growing thing. That's a conversation I had with Trey Anastasio, lead singer and guitarist of Fish for a piece I wrote back in 2002. I first saw fish at a tiny club in the late eighties. Now, decades later, the band is still touring, still making a cultural impact, and I'm still covering them. I'm Dean. But Nick and this is long May they run season one fish. I saw the late eighties and the people are going crazy. I mean dancing like a storm after the shark rushed backstage and said, Look, I'm quitting. My job is a broader. I'm you know, Manager I seen it, and that's the future. They changed the industry. They changed. The landscape of the entire festival circuit were to draw 75 80,000 people to Indian reservation in the middle of Florida on New Year's 1999. No, never heard of us. We're gonna do it anyway. And have it work. This'd like path. We're gonna follow it. We don't care where it leads. Baker's dozen a different show every night at the world's most famous arena, not a single song repeated. I beg everyone to find me a band who could do that. Welcome to long May they run, Listen and fucking rock. It appears to be official mouth. Yes, And this is according to Paul. Danger Junior on Twitter can confirm.

Fish Trey Anastasio Twitter Nick official Paul Baker Florida
"late eighties" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"late eighties" Discussed on KTOK

"What if I had known At the beginning of fish. What I know now, you know, the band is like an organic ever growing thing. That's a conversation I had with Trey Anastasio, lead singer and guitarist of Fish for a piece I wrote back in 2002. First saw fish at a tiny club in the late eighties. Now, decades later, the band is still touring. Still making a cultural impact, and I'm still covering them. I'm Dean. But Nick and this is long May they run Season one fish e saw the late eighties and the people of Girl like crazy. I mean dancing like a storm After the shark rushed backstage, I should look at I'm quitting. My job is a broader. I'm you know, Manager. I seen it, and that's the future. They changed the industry. They changed. The landscape of the entire festival circuit were to draw 75 80,000 people to Indian reservation in the middle of Florida on New Year's 1999. No, never heard of us. We're gonna do it anyway, and have it work. This'd my path. We're gonna follow it. We don't care where it leaves a baker's dozen a different show every night at the world's most famous arena, not a single song repeated. I beg everyone to find me a band who could do that. Welcome to long May they run, Listen and follow this podcast for free on the I Heart radio at number one for music, radio and podcasts, all in one The free I. Heart radio APP is number one for music, radio and podcasts, All in one discover a new podcast from our library of over 350,000 titles. Here's an I. Heart Radio Podcast preview 500..

"late eighties" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"late eighties" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Heart Radio podcast preview known At the beginning of fish. What I know now, you know, the band is like an organic ever growing thing. That's a conversation I had with Trey Anastasio, lead singer and guitarist of Fish for a piece I wrote back in 2002. I first saw fish at a tiny club in the late eighties. Now, decades later, the band is still touring. Still making a cultural impact, and I'm still covering them. I'm Dean. But Nick and this is long May they run Season one fish e saw the late eighties. And the people are growing like crazy. I mean attention like a storm after the shark rushed backstage. You should look it. I'm quitting. My job is a broader. I'm you know, Manager. I've seen it, and that's the future. They changed the industry. They changed. The landscape of the entire festival circuit were to draw 75 80,000 people to Indian reservation in the middle of Florida on New Year's 1999. No, never heard of us. We're gonna do it anyway. And have it work. This'd like path. We're gonna follow it. We don't care where it leads. Baker's dozen helped build the Biden administration. I'm Dave Anthony Fox News, the president elect picks his chief of staff. Who is it? Fox is Rachel Sutherland.

Fish Trey Anastasio Dave Anthony Fox Biden administration Rachel Sutherland Nick Baker Florida chief of staff president
"late eighties" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"late eighties" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Tiny club in the late eighties. Now, decades later, the band is still touring. Still making a cultural impact, and I'm still covering them. I'm Dean. But Nick and this is long May they run season one fish I saw in the late eighties. And the people are going like crazy. I mean, the dancer like a storm after the rush back, Say I should look it. I'm quitting my job, Rhoda. You know, Manager I seen it, and that's the future. They changed the industry changed the landscape of the entire festival circuit were to draw 75 80,000 people to Indian reservations. This is news radio 1055 w. E. R C Birmingham coming over and I Heart radio station. It's midnight. Borland's battered Monjack, Ella and Fox News by Category two. Hurricane Zeta, which blew ashore Wednesday afternoon after six near misses, the city of New Orleans was impacted as we know right now. Classified as a category two hurricane. Thankfully, it came through very fast as predicted. We are now beginning to assess the damage you orleansmayor LeToya Cantrell. Damage is mainly Downed power poles and lines trees on a lot of vegetation blocking the room, which would certainly make sense. With those high wind. It just sent treat limbs all over the place. And Kimberly Curth of Fox ate in New Orleans. Reports downed power lines are blamed for the electrocution death of a 55 year old man in New Orleans, the first known fatality from the Storm Zeta now moving rapidly northeast across lower Mississippi in central Alabama. President Trump has declared a federal emergency and ordered federal assistance expedited to aid in the recovery efforts. A typhoon has triggered mudslides in Vietnam, killing at least eight people, saying there just isn't time The U. S. Supreme Court will not weigh in on a Pennsylvania absentee ballot rule before Election Day. The Supreme Court is not granting a pre election review to a three day extension for mail in ballots to be received in Pennsylvania. State Republicans are asking for that appeal after the Pennsylvania Supreme Court ordered the extension. But the state has agreed to segregate ballots that air received in.

New Orleans U. S. Supreme Court Pennsylvania Supreme Court Pennsylvania Hurricane Zeta LeToya Cantrell Storm Zeta Borland Rhoda Nick Fox News President Trump Birmingham Vietnam Kimberly Curth Ella Mississippi Fox Alabama
"late eighties" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"late eighties" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Here's an I Heart radio podcast preview known The beginning of fish. What I know now, you know, the band is like an organic ever growing thing. That's a conversation I had with Trey Anastasio, lead singer and guitarist of Fish for a piece I wrote back in 2002. I first saw fish at a tiny club in the late eighties. Now, decades later, the band is still touring. Still making a cultural impact, and I'm still covering them. I'm Dean. But Nick and this is long May they run season one. Fish. I saw the late eighties and the people are going crazy. I mean, dancing like a storm after the rush back, Say I should look it. I'm quitting my job, Rhoda, you know, Manager I seen it, and that's the future. They changed the industry changed the landscape of the entire festival circuit were drawn 75 80,000 people to Indian reservation in the middle of Florida on New years. 1999. No, never heard of us. We're gonna do it anyway, and have it work. This is my path. We're gonna follow it. We don't care where it leads. Baker's dozen a different show every night at the world's most famous arena, not a single song repeated. I beg everyone to find me a band who could do that. Welcome long made a run. Listen and follow this podcast for free on the I heart radio at number one for music, radio and podcasts, all in one hot flashes, irritability, intimate dryness, even unsatisfying sex. Hi, I'm Dr Elissa Drag a board certified.

Fish Trey Anastasio Dr Elissa Drag Rhoda Nick Florida Baker
"late eighties" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"late eighties" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Radio APP is number one for music, radio and podcasts. All in one discover a new podcast from our library of over 350,000 titles. Here's an I Heart radio podcast preview if I had known At the beginning of fish. What I know now, you know, the band is like an organic ever growing thing. That's a conversation I had with Trey Anastasio, lead singer and guitarist of Fish for a piece I wrote back in 2002. I first saw fish at a tiny club in the late eighties. Now, decades later, the bandits still touring still making a cultural impact, and I'm still covering them. I'm Dean. But Nick and this is long May they run season one fish I saw in the late eighties. And the people are going like crazy. I mean, the dancer like a storm after the rush back, Say you should look it. I'm quitting my job, Rhoda. You know, Manager I seen it, and that's the future. Change. The industry changed the landscape of the entire festival circuit were to draw 75 80,000 people to Indian reservation in the middle of Florida on New years. 1999 No, never heard of us. We're gonna do it anyway. And have it work. This's my path. We're gonna follow it. We don't care where it leaves a baker's dozen A different show every night at the world's most famous arena, Not a single song repeated. I beg everyone to find me a band who could do that. Welcome, tto long made a run, Listen and follow this.

Fish Trey Anastasio Rhoda Nick Florida
"late eighties" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:42 min | 2 years ago

"late eighties" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"They're in their eighties late eighties, and we just Like being around him. That's a smart move. You know, I have been bemoaning the fact that the one stat I would like to see most. And as a as a commander, I'm sure you know that. But information you get has got to be relevant to the task in front of you. The most relevant information me right now, Number of people dying on their co morbidity is an age and I honestly cannot find it anywhere. Admiral. I do not understand how this most significant of data set is not easily accessible. I'm surprised you aren't able to find it. But, you know, now that you mention it, I'm not sure I've seen that laid out holistically myself. I think we all have An intuitive sense that the extreme elderly say in their eighties, particularly in nursing homes constitute I want to say 40% of the deaths, which is quite remarkable, but I don't have I don't. I haven't seen that in writing and I think that's worth Really looking at a CZ. We all know, the CDC guidelines says. If you're 65 or older, you're particularly at risk to take special precautions right. 244 people died in United States yesterday, but it's a steady decline in total death per day that I confined every day. I get a statistic per day, but that's not sliced and diced by age. Which I find amazing giving the surgeon infections that we've had. And I think what has happened is that we figured out how to take care of people when they arrive at the emergency room. I don't think they end up in the I C U and I don't think they end up dying. And I think we get to them much earlier with oxygen. Testing the blood. I'm pretty optimistic. Actually about the treatment of this disease, are you? I am. I think you've laid it out. Well there, of course what is also happening? It appears that you know, 30 35% of people are asymptomatic. But now more people are going in and taking those tests and as a result You are as a percentage number. You're seeing a decline. In death back to your point on morbidity. If you look at the raw numbers, it would suggest that it's about a 5% morbidity rate. I think we're gonna find that's going to be lower than that, probably in the 1 to 2% but again back to where we started this conversation, there will be Quite aged dependent. The key thing, However, in all of this, I think is that we all need to get out there, in the words of my state Senator Marco Rubio. And where the damn mask and that doesn't matter how old you are where you are, What your philosophy is on this thing If we would all wear the mask would get around this thing. And the point here is not necessarily just theory. Look at other countries that have had aggressive mask wearing they're in much better shape than we are. Conversely, look at Brazil, which is in even worse shape than we are. Very little culture there a mask, So I think that's the key. All right, you two and and and people using common sense If they're older and have a co morbidity, stay home on, Dad. Someone to take care of. You know, Admiral, I want to turn to the lighter subject. The Redskins were going the way of all human things, as are the Indians, my Indians, Terry Francona, and I agreed on the same day they change it. If sports is supposed to unify, not divide, it divides. It all change it. It's not a hard test, and so the Redskins are going to change. You and your pals have a suggestion. We dio we think Wait for it. The Washington Redskins ought to become the Washington fighting admirals, and that may not leap off the tongue The way the Washington Braves or Washington warriors are watching to Whatever's But think about it. Washington is in fact, a naval town you can turn right coming out of old town, Alexandria on the river being the Atlantic Ocean in an hour or so, depending on the speed of your boat. Did you know this you General George Washington. Originally wanted to be a British naval officer and actually applied for a commission in the British Navy. Think about how different our history would be if he had become a fighting admiral for the British. Not a good thing. I'm not a good dad, and that Third and finally, it's just it's rich with tradition. And if you goto our website, which were slapping together fighting admirals dot com I purchase the domain name. You can see some cool pictures of a bunch of different fighting. Admiral's going from some of the really early ones to people like Admiral Bill McRaven, so It's a cool idea. I'm sure there'll be tons of great ideas for a new name for the Redskins. But, boy, Am I with you? We should think about sports is something that brings us together, and I've been a Redskins fan since I was in junior high school attending Quantico High School, just south of Washington, D C. Oh, and, you know, I think people are the hard core sports fan, and you can't get a hard core Brown's Iranians fan than me. The name doesn't matter The rings do. I would love to win a World Series have the Indians win or the blues of the Lakers or whatever they come to call in my lifetime? That's all I would like now, Admiral in terms of the push back from the Army. We can't call him the Washington generals because that's the team that played the Harlem Globetrotters forever. Right? We can't call him the Washington generals. There is no hope of the Washington generals and ah, I would say again, Go to our website fighting.

Washington Redskins Washington Redskins Admiral Bill McRaven George Washington Senator Marco Rubio commander Washington Braves United States asymptomatic Brazil CDC Lakers Harlem Terry Francona British Navy Atlantic Ocean
"late eighties" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

07:38 min | 2 years ago

"late eighties" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"On Facebook, YouTube or the first Channel 2 48 on TV about seriously that any vaccine will ever be 100% protected the best we've ever done. His measles, which is 97 to 98% effective. Um oh, that would be wonderful if we get there. I don't think we will. I would settle for 70 75% effective vaccine because that would bring you to that level of would be herd immunity level. That stock for vouching welcome back to the show, and I'm doing less. I'm not a doctor, but I like to question them, which I think you should question. Everything always always question everything that you're right and it's your responsibility. So I just shared with you in the headlines how they think there's another flu strain. That's in pigs. Now in China. It could. I can't. I can't. I know I hear you. I am right there with you. I just gripped the handlebars too. I totally him right there. No cyber, You know how I feel and hear headlines like this. Okay, I'm gonna bring the tugboat. Roll with me. My mom one time thought it would be a great idea to take me roller skating. Now I am a woman of many talents. I can bake. I can it I can shoot. I can kill stuff, you know, raise kids, Uh, You do a lot I could diagram sentences were settled The beaver Bs you get the idea. There's one thing That I was purposely made by God not ever. D'oh. Ever. When I was in Thie God factory. And he was like, Let's give this one. The inability To deal with anything that rolls on her feet. And baby Baby Boo was done. So fast forward Festus, Missouri sometime in the late eighties. My mom decides to take elementary school, Dana To the roller rink. It was the one that was in a cave here. That one Do you know the one of us is? Yeah. Yeah, it was in a cave is pretty cool. I don't know why I remember that. And It was at first It was just pure excitement. You walk in, and sometimes they dimly light it and then they have, like the disco thing. Go on. Even though it was like late eighties. It was really like new wave. But whatever cave Lana Yeah, Gosh, that sounds like a magical place. Doesn't it? Or a horror film? I mean, or both. So we're going into the roller rink their cave lamb. And I was so excited. I have never seen anything like this before. I mean, everybody was happy. And then I saw the rink and that you know that has the big Ojai wall and I could just see that people's heads spinning around like they were stuck in some kind of world pool. And I was ready to rock and we got fitted with skates and on the carpet. You think you're great, like on the carpet? I was like I in my little elementary school mind. I'm like, I can't believe that I've taken to it like this. I may be a prodigy. And I'm getting ready to go over and I get on the wood part of the rink and everyone's going crazy around me and I Sort of accidentally pushed myself off of the wall in little bitty Dana, who had to wear toddler sized clothes in kindergarten because she was so we ended up rolling right into very slowly and awkwardly right into the middle of the rink. A ring or whatever you hell you call it? It's a rink when it's the wood to visit. I don't know. And that's when I realized the life of roller derby was not going to be for me. I could not do anything. The skates were so heavy. I realized how actually hard it was to move them on the wood. And every time I tried to move them on the wood, I ate it. And I think I busted my lip, and it was a mess. And it was just like everything that you could imagine indie horror of an elementary child's mind happening at a roller rink. And then the worst thing ever. I look back thinking my mom is going to come and save me. But my mother apparently thought it was great. She herself couldn't skate, so why not take her child to go skate? My mom was gripping the wall like an octopus. And I realized that was on my own so thin the worst thing in the world happened. The lights came up. Everybody had to be cleared off the rink and these poor high school kids had to come out and get me because I could not physically move. That was the last time I ever went roller skating, I will never go again. And then a little addendum to it. My high school friends convinced me to go ice skating another time, and I thought this is different from roller skating because its blades right and not wheels, so it's better. And I do ballet. I can surely do this. No, No, you can't can't can't do it. And I was going really, really fast, like on the side and I forgot that you it doesn't go on infinity and you have to turn And I ran right into the half wall, half Plexi glass and again busted my lip. So once again, everyone get off the rink. 16 year old Anna has to be gotten by high school kids who were probably 15 and it was just a nightmare. It was an absolute nightmare so never again, and I also realized it's similar to scheme. Although I was a little bit better with skiing, And when we had our ski instructor when we went for the first time ever, and he was like you have great balance. You know, he and he was not hitting on me. Stop. Is that you have really great balance. I like what I played all kinds of sports in school and United Ballet for 17 years, And he's like, Oh, you're going to be great at this. And then when he realized I wasn't it was like a dad the expression washing over his face when he realizes his oldest and favorite son can't throw or catch a football. It was just awful. I feel like that every single time Long story shorter every single time I see a headline about some weird ass disease coming from pigs in China. I get that same feeling again. Like okay, I'm back out in the world. We're all going back. Yeah, we're back living. Oh, what What? There's a pig virus. Now That's it could be another pandemic. And then everybody get out of the rink. Get out of the ring overhears data in the little. Oh my gosh, It's crazy. It's insane. I will never go again. Don't send me emails. It's not gonna happen. Don't offer. It's not gonna happen. So this is What doctor found she's discussing here. And I don't know if everything is going to shut down again. I really hope it doesn't you have James Clyburn. The top House Democrat. After we didn't do anything to save old people in nursing homes were now going to make sure that everyone on the Koven subcommittee wears a mask. It's going to bring back all the people into a Cuomo killed. Did you see his close encounters Mashed potato Covad Mountain that he held hit a press conference yesterday I was It was too funny for me to even talk about it to get through it. Thie names of it. Is why the Internet was created. It was created for us as a gift. Because people the 100 if they were reddit, er's or who it was, but they were. They made the mound The cove it mounted job of the hut and they turned Andrew Cuomo, the real Fredo. They turn him into. Ah! Carrie Fisher. This Princess Leia. It was hysterical..

China Andrew Cuomo flu Facebook Carrie Fisher YouTube Missouri Covad Mountain James Clyburn Festus Dana House Ojai United Ballet instructor football Anna
"late eighties" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"late eighties" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Powerful by allying itself with a huge company like AT and T, you know, and so he wanted to see it blocked as well. I would assume, but I'm I've got to say Murdoch's people declined to speak on the record to us about it. Rupert Murdoch is not a young man he's in his late eighties. It's known that his children are not wild about certain aspects. Certainly a Fox News except for the aspect that it makes billions of dollars in profit. What do you expect will happen to Fox News when Rupert Murdoch has gone? Well, it's a great question. I don't have the answer. I think it's it's going to hang on Lachlan Murdoch. Probably he's the son the oldest son of of Rupert who is going to be the top person overseeing Fox News with his father. And he shares his dad's politics, I think he's quite conservative. But I have heard that people at FOX seemed to think that maybe he'll make it slightly more center, right James Murdoch, who's much more of a political independent is not going to be involved. He sort of opted out of all of this. And the thing is it makes so much money. Like this for them. I'm just not sure they're going to want to do anything that hurts the golden goose Howard, the Trump presidency and the future. Fox News linked to each other. How how do you expect to see the campaign covered? Well, I mean one thing that is a danger for Trump is that the FOX base viewership needs to be in. Enraged in order to keep the business model working, but it's not necessarily great for Trump to only reach those people e can get cornered by his own allies. And it's happened before it happened on the budget deals where he wound up in an effort to please FOX he wound up doing things that really hurt his own popularity and that could happen again in the campaign. He may find it hard to broaden the base the way he needs to to get reelected, if he's only narrowcasting his message.

Rupert Murdoch Fox News Lachlan Murdoch Trump FOX James Murdoch AT Howard
"late eighties" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

03:09 min | 3 years ago

"late eighties" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Sister had dementia. And became a completely different person toward the end of her life. And so seeks family wants to preserve that dignity. Keep is condition. Private. At the same time. He is renown for his accomplishments in baseball. Not only is he a hall of Famer. Going back to the class of nineteen Ninety-two. He won three hundred eleven baseball games. The Mets retired is number in the late eighties. And in fact, are celebrating that World Series team the miracle method nineteen sixty-nine of which Seaver was apart. They're celebrating that team in June. And so they plan to honor him even though he won't be able to attend. This was the statement from the Mets we've been in contact with the fever family were aware of his health situation. Although he's unable to attend the sixty nine anniversary. We are planning to honor him in special ways and have included his family in our plans. Our thoughts are with Tom Nancy and the entire Seaver family. Tom's been in the public eye less and less over the last couple years. Even when the sixty nine Mets were being honored, even when he was invited to various events. Saver if you have memories of him saver, those are certainly are plenty of. Iconic moments as well as decorations on his baseball resume. He was the sixty seven rookie of the year. He went to the all star game twelve times. He led the league in strikeouts. Five times he has three Cy Young awards. And as I mentioned finished his career with three hundred eleven wins and thirty six hundred forty strikeouts. And while he wasn't a unanimous selection for the hall of fame. He was pretty darn close. Ninety eight point eight percent of the vote going back to nine hundred ninety two. So he's a first ballot. And he didn't just pitch for the Mets. He wrapped up his career in eighty six with the Red Sox and between Red Sox and Mets. He had the reds and the White Sox in there as well. And this is kind of cool. You can imagine this'll be therapeutic for him. And I think he will continue to work. At Seaver vineyards. That he founded along with his wife in two thousand two they have more than one hundred acres. At diamond mountain in the wine region of California. At least he gets to finish out his days overlong has and I hope it's years and years. Doing what he loves. It's after hours with Amy Lawrence on CBS sports radio. Mickey Callaway the manager of the Mets gave some brief comments at spring training on Thursday to have such a special baseball player. Such a special pitcher a legend of the game of baseball. The man.

Mets baseball Seaver White Sox Seaver family Seaver vineyards Red Sox Tom Nancy Mickey Callaway Amy Lawrence CBS California one hundred acres eight percent