3 Burst results for "Lasker Award"

Scientists honored for COVID-19 tracker, prenatal test

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 4 months ago

Scientists honored for COVID-19 tracker, prenatal test

"A scientist who created a global COVID-19 tracker was among those honored for achievement in medical research Lauren Gardner a Johns Hopkins University engineer who studies the spread of diseases is the recipient of this year's lasker award for public service by the Albert and Mary lasker foundation which recognizes achievements in medical research Gardner worked with her lab team to develop a website that tracks COVID-19 as the virus began spreading worldwide in January of 2020 The dashboard became the key resource for the public and policymakers seeking information on global cases deaths and vaccines Other award winners include a biologist in Hong Kong who designed a prenatal blood test for pregnant mothers that can screen their unborn children for down syndrome and three scientists whose work on key immune proteins helped launch the field of integrin research I'm Jennifer King

Lauren Gardner Lasker Award Albert And Mary Lasker Foundat Johns Hopkins University Gardner Hong Kong Down Syndrome Jennifer King
"lasker award" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"lasker award" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Hello, from wonder media network, I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is a manica. Today we're talking about one of the most renowned and distinguished doctors of the 20th century. Though she faced numerous challenges she persevered to produce a legacy of work that saved countless lives. Let's talk about Helen B taussig. Helen Brooke taussig was born on May 24th, 1898 in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Her father, Frank W taussig, was an established economist and professor at Harvard University. Helen's mother, Edith guild, was among the first to study at the new Radcliffe college at institution for women. Growing up with well educated parents likely set the stage for her future academic career. But Helen's educational journey wasn't always easy. She struggled with dyslexia as a child, which greatly impacted her performance in school. And when she was just 11 years old, her mother passed away from tuberculosis. Helen's father extensively tutored her in reading, writing spelling and math. Helen graduated from the Cambridge school for girls in 1917, and went on to graduate from the University of California at Berkeley in 1921. Though reading remained a challenge, she excelled academically. Helen wanted to attend medical school in Boston, but in the 1920s, both Harvard and Boston University refused to admit women into their medical programs. So Helen adjusted her plans and found that Johns Hopkins school of medicine. When reflecting on this moment, Helen said, it was one of those times in life when what seemed to be disappointment. Later proved to be a great opportunity. Johns Hopkins would become Helen's academic home for the rest of her career. After earning her MD in 1927, she was appointed a fellow at the heart station before interning in pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins hospital. In 1930, doctor Edwards park, the chair of pediatrics at Hopkins, and one of Helen's closest advisers and mentors, appointed her as physician in charge of one of the first pediatric cardiac clinics. At that point, Helen was only 31 years old, but she was already facing her next challenge. She was losing her hearing, a crucial requirement to assess patients heartbeats. Helen came to rely on hearing aids and lip reading. She also developed a completely unique skill, feeling a baby's heartbeat with her fingers. Her ability to detect the rhythms of the heart by touch gave rise to some of her later innovations in pediatric cardiology. Helen is perhaps best known for her work on blue baby syndrome, and often fatal condition that causes a newborn skin to look blue due to lack of oxygen to the heart. Using a new x-ray technique, Helen discovered that baby suffering from the syndrome had an underdeveloped artery connecting the heart to the lungs and a leaking heart wall. In 1941, while discussing this condition with her colleagues, Alfred blalock and Vivian Thomas, Helen suggested an operation that might fix the problem. Though it was a challenging and delicate concept, Alfred and Vivian knew it was worth a shot. After extensive practice on dog hearts, Alfred performed the operation on an infant for the first time in 1944, with close support from Helen. The procedure initially worked, but the child passed away in a follow-up surgery two months later. Helen and her colleague soldiered on, and soon after performed two successful procedures. They published their findings in the journal of the American medical association in 1945. The technique now called the blalock Thomas taussig shunt. Was adopted worldwide within a year it was used to save more than 200 children's lives at Johns Hopkins. Helen's vital contributions to medical research didn't end there. She also played a key role in understanding how the drug thalidomide causes severe and often deadly birth defects. In the 1960s, Helen learned about an epidemic of severe defects in limb development across Europe. She traveled to Germany to help research the situation. Helen found a link between the defects and thalidomide, which pregnant women were taking to combat morning sickness. She returned home published her findings and testified about the dangers of the drug in front of Congress. Thanks to Helen's testimony and research, the FDA disallowed the sale of thalidomide. Congress passed an amendment to the federal food drug and cosmetic act that required stricter oversight for clinical studies. In 1963, Helen officially retired from her position at Johns Hopkins. Still, she continued her research and advocacy for pediatric cardiology. She published 40 additional articles after her retirement. Over the course of her life, Helen received numerous honors and awards. She was one of the first women to receive full professorship at Johns Hopkins. Earned the prestigious lasker award and was elected the first woman president of the American Heart Association. She even received the Medal of Freedom from president Lyndon Johnson in 1964. On May 21st, 1986, Helen brook tausig was killed in a car accident. Three days before she would have turned 88. All month, we're honoring women who changed the landscape of health and wellness..

Helen Jenny Kaplan Helen B taussig Helen Brooke taussig Frank W taussig Edith guild institution for women Cambridge school for girls Harvard and Boston University Johns Hopkins school of medici Edwards park Radcliffe college Alfred blalock Vivian Thomas Harvard University dyslexia Johns Hopkins hospital tuberculosis Cambridge Alfred
"lasker award" Discussed on The Long Run

The Long Run

07:02 min | 1 year ago

"lasker award" Discussed on The Long Run

"David Baltimore, welcome to the long run podcast. Thank you. So I want to start off by giving you a congratulations for this lasker award which she picked up recently, special achievement, lifetime achievement that really recognizes not just your contributions to biology, but also your work as an administrator and as a mentor to so many scientists through your career. And a contributor to public policy debates. There's a lot of breadth in here. And so I wonder, when you got that just curious, did you just stand out for you among all the various awards that you've gotten through your career as special in some way? Well, yes, it did. And for a number of reasons, one of them is the breadth of recognition because I have in my life try to participate in all the various aspects of being a scientist. And that includes administrative work, it includes mentoring, it includes doing of science, the publishing of science, and there are really are very few awards that take into account all those aspects of scientific life. And so I was very honored by the last reward. Also, I knew Mary lasker, and admired her devotion to science, although she herself had no scientific training. And so I really appreciated the connection. Yeah. Yeah. Well, there was a great scientifically minded citizen. I guess you could say someone that champion research. And was a very effective advocate on Capitol Hill. Yes. Okay, so I think one of the through lines, listeners of this show recognizes that we like to talk about where scientists and scientific entrepreneurs come from. And they come from many different walks of life. Many different backgrounds. So where does your story begin David? Where'd you grow up? I grew up in a suburb of New York City. On Long Island, great neck Long Island. And I went to public school there. Through high school and had the remarkable good fortune that my mother was interested in experimental psychology and was studying at the new school for social research in New York. And she saw there an ad for a summer program by high school students. At the Jackson laboratory in bar harbor Maine. And she brought it home and said, would I be interested? And I said I would and I applied and was accepted and spent. 6 or 8 weeks that summer between my junior and senior years of high school now, why do you think she brought this ad? Well, I think she had seen that I did well in science related activities, mainly mathematics that at that stage. And that I got a real sense of excitement about learning the underpinnings of the world. As a scientist does and so where do you think that came from? That desire to learn that curiosity as a kid. I have no idea. Clearly, not many kids have it. But when you do have it, it's pretty obvious to people around and I've always credited my mother with having recognized this in me. And it really was a record issue of my inheritance from her because she was a scientist. Now, were you bored in school were you not really challenged was she seeking to give you a little more challenge? And yes, absolutely. I was bored completely and in the science part of school. Because I wasn't challenged. And. Doing the kind of math that we did in high school was a trivial exercise for me. So you went to Jackson lab for part of a summer when you were in high school. What was important about that experience? What was important was that I first of all admit real scientists, many scientists came and spent the summers at Jackson lab, the program that I was in was for 27 or something high school students and each of us had three mentors. Who asked us to do simple experiments? In their own interests. And so I was doing experiments working at the forefront of science. Because I was asking questions that had that didn't have a known answer. And that was just incredibly exciting. To discover that the frontiers of knowledge were accessible to me as a high school student without a whole lot of background. And.

David Baltimore Mary lasker school for social research Long Island Jackson laboratory Capitol Hill bar harbor New York City Maine David New York Jackson lab Jackson