35 Burst results for "Larsen"

"larsen" Discussed on Thinking Crypto News & Interviews

Thinking Crypto News & Interviews

03:20 min | 2 weeks ago

"larsen" Discussed on Thinking Crypto News & Interviews

"You can trade from anything to anything. For example, you could trade between cryptocurrencies and precious metals. It's an amazing platform that I've been using for years. And in fact, I still use to this day because there won a great exchange. There are reputable and they're one of the only exchanges that still list XRP. Many of the other exchanges have delisted XRP due to the SEC lawsuit, but you can still get XRP on uphold. So I've interviewed the CEO, the founder and many other representatives, some uphold over the years. And I'm a fan of this platform. And once again, there's some great features like trading between different assets very easily. You don't have to convert to a currency and so forth. They're used by ten plus million users. They have over 200 cryptocurrencies. And they have a very easy to use app. The interface is really nice. So I can certainly vouch for this platform. Once again, I've been a user for years. So if you'd like to learn more about uphold, please visit the link in the description. Welcome back to the thinking crypto podcast, your home for cryptocurrency news and interviews. With me today is kaj Larsen, who is a former navy seal and cofounder of guild financial, as well as Russ Davis, who is a celebrity crypto consultant. Gentlemen, it's great to have you both on the show. Thank you for having us. Thanks for having us. Well, I'm very excited to speak with you both about challenge coin and the great work you're doing there. Before we get into the details around challenge coin, let's start with your backgrounds. Maybe cause you can kick us off and tell us a bit about yourself. How did you become a navy seal and where you're from? Yeah, well, it's easier to start with me. I'm the knuckle dragger in the relationship Russ is the 10,000 pound brain. I just carry heavy shit, you know, break things occasionally. But no, so my background is that I'm originally from California from Northern California. Sleepy little surfer town called Santa Cruz. Known for big waves and even bigger sharks sometimes. And I started off as a young kid. I was always, I grew up surfing and scuba diving and just being a consummate waterman. I played water polo in college. At the division one level. And then that led me to a natural transition to apply to the seal teams. My father was a marine, my grandfather served in the navy in World War II. So we have kind of a legacy of service in our family, and it was always important for me to serve as well. So after college, I applied, tried out for a billet for an officer candidate school billet for the basic underwater demolition seal training program, which is called budge. I was in budge first phase of butts on September 11th. So it went from being very much a peacetime military to a wartime seal. I spent the next decade or so deployed in service of my country, but a bunch of special operations around the world in the global war on terror got off an active duty, went to graduate school at Harvard University, got my master's there, and then actually came back into the seal teams after a small break in service through the newly formed seal reserve community.

kaj Larsen Russ Davis navy SEC Russ Northern California Santa Cruz California Harvard University
"larsen" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

The Pomp Podcast

05:31 min | 2 months ago

"larsen" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

"Two months into my startup when I had the really wonderful conversation with my cofounder like, hey, I know we just launched this great new startup guild like things are humming along. Things are awesome. But we're so early stage that we've never even talked about vacation policy. But everybody gets vacation, right? So I'm going to take my vacation and take a little sabbatical and go to Ukraine because I feel morally compelled to do so. But what it does, the Ukraine mission does fit into this kind of my portfolio is really divided in half it's my and the Venn diagram overlaps a lot. There's the humanitarian service oriented work that I do. My philanthropic work. And I did that for a decade. It helped start an organization using my combat pay called the mission continues. That led to and served on the board there. That was about giving veterans a sense of purpose and giving them an opportunity to do public service. And then that led to us giving a grant to team Rubicon to start team Rubicon I also sat on the board at team Rubicon. Again, humanitarian work in disaster zone. So I spent and now I'm part of a team called force blue, which takes former combat divers, repurposes their skills for ocean conservation, it's awesome. It's actually based right here in Miami. We're all we all became scientific divers for the frost science center downtown. Here in Miami. So we go out, we do coral restoration. We do turtle rescue missions. It's pretty awesome. As a frog man, it gets me back in the water with a sense of mission and purpose. So I have this for the last decade concurrent with my media career in parallel. I've been really oriented in the veteran service space. And I've spent a decade trying to give veterans a sense of mission and purpose. But what I've come to realize in this next chapter in my life. And we started this company this past Veterans Day. We launched on November 11th. And so we're coming up on our that was our beta, but we're coming up on essentially our one year anniversary. What I started to realize is that sense of veterans purpose is really important. And it's what economists call necessary, but not sufficient. Oh, interesting. If we are not just giving veterans a sense of renewed sense of mission and purpose, but we're not also paying attention to their purse. And to their sense of financial security, their sense of financial stability, their long-term financial health and wellness. All of the mission stuff in the world isn't going to matter. And all the problems that we hear in the military community and the veterans community, a lot of those are magnified by this lack of financial stability and planning. And financial health and wellness and lack of financial literacy. So basically the way it started for me is like the analog here is people talk about meditation and there's a lot of talk in the wellness space like you and I are big fitness buffs. I do a lot in the fitness space. I owned a CrossFit gym for many years, right? That's how I keep my knife sharp. Is by pushing the envelope physically. And even a lot of the veterans events are like swims around the Hudson and all of that stuff. It's all part of keeping my mind body sharp. But when I think in the wellness space, there's all this talk about mindfulness and meditation. Really important stuff really valuable stuff. But you can go meditate for 30 minutes in the morning. And then if you come back to a trove of

Ukraine Miami Rubicon
"larsen" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

The Pomp Podcast

05:15 min | 2 months ago

"larsen" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

"Anderson Cooper, who I consider a friend, good journalist, came from the same kind of investigative DNA background that I did. Anderson called me up after the piece. And he's like, he's like, gosh, it's amazing that you pulled this off. He asked me the same thing you did. How did you do it? He's like, because I've been looking into it for a while. And all I could find was these weird S&M groups to do it to me. And I was like, it's the world you walk in Anderson. You should definitely have them come do it on national television. Exactly. But no, look, basically, the impetus was this. That debate was raging in the national security community. Guys like you and I and within the military it had sort of trickled out and was bubbling up and people are saying, should we be doing this? Is it torture? John McCain had actually kind of gone to war with The White House. I was a big John McCain fan. He came and spoke when I was plead at the naval academy. I had read the book about him nightingale's song. And I had tremendous amount of respect for what he had been through. And obviously they talk about McCain and those guys at Sears school, right? A lot of the stuff is modeled on what those guys went through at the Hanoi Hilton. So I thought he was a really credible voice in this debate. And so this debate was happening and I would see The White House like doing talking points. I'd see McCain kind of raging about them and then I'd see all the pundits sort of saying stuff. And I was like, this is the most surreal bizarre debate because we're talking about this thing that nobody's ever seen and doesn't really have any experience with except for guys like so I was like, look, let's just let's just open the kimono and show people what it is since we're having the debate. And I thought that's how I could best be of service. And for me, it was a moral position that if we're going to have informed debates, like we need to know what we're talking about. And that's where I saw my value of bridging these two worlds between the military and the media. When you're like, all right, cool. I think that we should do it on television. And you call the producer or whoever they like, hell yeah. Let's do it. Or are they, let's call the lawyers and make sure that something doesn't go wrong. Actually, everybody said no. The lawyers, everybody. This is sort of a story lost to history or whatever, but you know who said yes was Al, was Al Gore. Really, Al thought it was important. And he overrode all of the lawyers that I think the CEO or the COO of the company definitely overrode the general counsel, the GC of the company, said, no, this is too important, let kaj do it. And that was the genesis of it. I don't think I've ever even told that story. To anyone ever. The lawyers are there that are supposed to be the risk killers, right? Like, hey, this is pretty damn risky. And to some degree, do you feel like it changed the conversation? I do. I do. In journalism, your wins are few and far between. Especially these days, right? So I'm happy to hang my hat a little bit on that one and say, I think that was fundamentally different.

John McCain Sears school Anderson Cooper McCain Hanoi Hilton naval academy Anderson nightingale White House Al Al Gore
"larsen" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

The Pomp Podcast

05:28 min | 2 months ago

"larsen" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

"And I think that that gets lost a lot because it sounds great. Like, oh, navy seals are all using steroids, and of course they are. Totally, right? There aren't steroids, of course, there are, but when we're trying to paint an accurate picture of an overall community, the average age of a soft special operations force is operator is 34 years old with two children. It takes a decade to develop the skills of jumping, diving, shooting, in order to conduct missions like Neptune spear or red wings or any of these high profile missions that you read about or more importantly, the ones you don't read about. Yeah. When you think of all of the missions that folks are aware of, is there one that you look at and you're like, that was some crazy shit. Whenever you talk to somebody who's trained for something, who's kind of in a club, whether it's in business, whether it's in the military, sports, whatever. Most of the things I think outsiders are impressed by people are like, eh, it's cool, but the insiders aren't impressed, but was there one where you guys were all like, yo, that was fucking cool. I can't believe they pulled that off. Yeah, well, there's a hundred that I can talk about in a hundred that I can't. But I'll tell you something that stands out in my mind that's in the public domain is one that was sort of portrayed as a failure, but I think if we look at it from a different perspective or a different lens, imagine what happened. So there was an operation that went down to capture a high profile, a high value target in Somalia. So this was a terrorist leader. If my memory serves me correct associated with Al shabaab, which is one of the terrorist organizations that operates out of Somalia. It was on a beach north of Mogadishu. He was in a safe house. The seal operational unit inserted via water, which is our maritime domain specialty, inserted via water in the early hours of the morning, pre dawn. And got in a huge firefight with the guards there. Thousands and thousands of rounds of ammunition dumped in both directions, the GFC, the ground force commander, made the decision to tactically withdraw back to the water. Like any firefight, it's messy, right? Few magazines, few radios get dropped in the middle of this several. Navy seals litter. Oh my God, okay.

navy Al shabaab Somalia Mogadishu GFC
 Column: Elliott angry with teammate Larson as playoffs loom

AP News Radio

00:25 sec | 3 months ago

Column: Elliott angry with teammate Larson as playoffs loom

"Count Larson and teammate chase Elliott battled it out for most of the day at Watkins Glen international but when the checkered flag fell it would be Larsen crossing the line first after the two made contact on a final restart 6 laps before Larson said he wasn't proud of the breaking maneuver that forced Elliott up the track but they were battling for a win AJ only moved into second place followed by Joey Logano in third Elliott would finish fourth but locked up the regular season NASCAR championship I'm Jerry Jordan

Chase Elliott Larson Watkins Glen International Larsen Elliott Joey Logano Nascar Jerry Jordan
"larsen" Discussed on Veteran on the Move

Veteran on the Move

04:06 min | 5 months ago

"larsen" Discussed on Veteran on the Move

"If you choose, right? And it's kind of part of the community. So I'm guild one killed one actual, right? You go on and see whoever else is out there and look up and down and coming right out of that navy Intel training. And coming right out of being the admin department head. We take everybody and we stack and rank them. On a daily, weekly and monthly basis. So you can see everyone's performance in the community and how they've done over the last day, week or month. How's everybody doing in the last week? Yeah. It's amazing. Over the last couple of weeks, we still get one or two guys that are up for a week. It feels pretty good, but we can talk about that in a second because I think these are the times to try and solve. So these are the times that I think that really really shows how important it is to think about being a long-term investor, not just some day trader. Like, I'm going to go on and trade some crypto and Ethereum and Dogecoin and make a bunch of money. That's not how it works, right? Trust me, I spent 13 years in the navy. I spent a lot longer on Wall Street. Trust me, that's not how it works. It's very hard to get rich quick, but it's not that hard to get rich over a long time. And that's the thing people are going to have to get through their heads. So we provide access to that investing. And then we have the financial education piece built right into the app. So in the app itself, we open your account. You'll go on, you'll see your account page. You can see a leaderboard, you can see how everyone's still and you tap into their portfolio. You don't see dollar amounts people have, right? So you don't know whether it's a $1000 account or a $10,000 account, BC percentages. This guy's got 10% of apple and 5% of Tesla and 25% of Berkshire Hathaway. And you can see what their performances for that. And then action, we have a true collective intelligence portfolio. So just like they did for the search of.

admin department Intel navy Berkshire Hathaway Tesla apple
"larsen" Discussed on Veteran on the Move

Veteran on the Move

05:50 min | 5 months ago

"larsen" Discussed on Veteran on the Move

"If it was going there and playing golf and doing that kind of stuff, it just would have been the real experience. So did that and then got put into sort of the navy Intel training pipeline. In a couple of schools, the big school navy Marine Corps Intel command, which was down in Virginia in those days, they moved it out to the West Coast now. Which was actually pretty funny. It's the place where actually I came up with the idea for this business that we're running now. But that navy Intel training was good stuff. That basis pretty cool base to be at. There was only navy Intel school there. And naval special warfare development group there too. So lots of cool things going on. It wasn't hard to tell who was with whom. But did that, and then was regained by O and I worked in O and I for a while, we actually ran domestic collection mission here in states for a while. It was pretty cool to get with the coast guard in the navy. And then actually was getting ready to go in for the surge and I ended up rupturing a disc in my neck. Ended up with two cervical spine surgeries, kept me out of the surge and then steamed to chew for a little while. Which actually didn't turn out to be that bad because I was sort of like in this frozen status, right? But I could still pick up orders and do stuff. So as I was out of it, Intel community, which can be very very tough on a way what they want you to do, but I was like a free agent for a little while. So that was a time I actually enjoyed and then came back and was at DIA until 2016 and got out then. My last role there was the admin department head of DIA. So it got to be enough. It was great, you know, and of course I miss it every day, but my time and service was certainly a bit different than most and for someone that came in already with a family and kids. Big adjustment for people in my household. But obviously, I'm so glad I did it, right? And it just goes to show. It's never too late. If you're thinking about doing it or haven't done it, or you're thinking about starting your own business, right? It's never too late. Yeah. Wow. What do you need story? Thanks for sharing that, Sean. So what about you guys? Yeah, so my background is that I spent 13 years as a seal officer in naval special warfare. The best, most important and valuable experience of my life. And as president Kenny said the great honor of my wife to be able to serve as a naval officer, I was commissioned also. I also spent my time in Pensacola just like Sean. So I came through officer candidate school. Originally, actually, I wanted to fly. Because I have my private pilot's license and I've been finding since I was a kid. And my dad's marine also. Once marine always a marine. So a lot of respect for marine air for over on this side. Yes, I wanted to fly but I played water polo in college and I played with a group of guys who were all going into this community. But frankly, I'd never heard of. I'd never heard of the SEAL Team. Now, you know, seals are in the spotlight and there's books and movies and all of that stuff..

big school navy Marine Corps Intel navy admin department West Coast Virginia golf president Kenny DIA Sean Pensacola SEAL
"larsen" Discussed on Code Story

Code Story

08:03 min | 7 months ago

"larsen" Discussed on Code Story

"He was very young, Todd Larson was always interested in tech. However, he ended up studying audio engineering, so he found his way to tech through teaching himself how to code. Outside the tech, he's a father to a 5 year old daughter and a musician, which both things occupy his time outside of this business. Having gained fantastic experience in the advertising space at groupon and then it digit, he learned how to execute on longer term initiatives, but balanced with fast delivery on top of strong foundations. All of this experience was hard fought in as he started consulting, he thought, how can I scale myself? This is the creation story of tech leaders. You know, my background is, you know, I started in the advertising space, so building lots of products quickly and advertising. It's all about kind of short lived apps and stuff that are like campaign based. And so got a lot of experience of how to build quickly and build the right thing at the right time to move fast in the advertising space. And then I went into the product world at groupon. That's where I kind of learned how to do longer term operations and how to really maintain things over time at scale with lots of stakeholders and that sort of complexity. How to effectively manage what are some of the traits of particular leaders in the organization that got the most done. I took that forward when I joined digit, which is one of the FinTech financial health companies that was kind of earlier in the space. They just recently got acquired by opportune. I was there for almost 8 years and helped to go from nothing, no monetization model at all to about a hundred people when I left and over that time I had to learn a ton more about how to get first versions of product ship to production, how to integrate those in, you know, all the typical things you'd expect with a fast growing startup. And I had to learn the hard way. And it took a long time to really just build all that from scratch. Since I left digit, I've been doing a lot of consulting for various early stage startups. And across the board, they're always looking for this sort of early stage founding engineer, CTO, whatever you want to call it, that first technical perspective, it's going to be able to make the right decisions early on to set a strong foundation for the startup. And so what we've done with tech leaders is actually clone myself, essentially. So my answer, these people is like, I can only do so much at one time. So how can I scale what I've learned is that early stage startup, founding engineer, to be able to help other companies do it a lot faster and do the same thing. One way to think of it is AWS and Heroku. Made it so startups didn't need to spend a lot of time standing up new servers and managing all that. It became kind of click of a button, infrastructure out of the box. We want to think of it the same way as that for the engineering orb. So helping staff the team immediately with a kind of consistent, healthy engineering, culture that we know works, you know, specific ways of working, kind of a modified agile, methodology. All these things that you kind of take for granted at a bigger company that is honed over a long period of time, we can stand that up for companies right away to make sure they can ship really good products a lot faster. You know what would be interesting to ask this question because typically I'm interviewing sass founders or software creators that which you are, but it's not exactly what you're doing here, but I'm gonna ask, tell me about the MVP for tech leaders. You know, that first version of what you have created. It'll be interesting to ask this too. How long did it take you to build and you know what sort of tools did you use to bring what you have today to life? The MVP really started with me needing to scratch and itch after leaving digit. I wanted to just build something from scratch all over again. And so I kind of went back to basics of like, what is the best technical stack? Best in class right now. And that's something that over the course of my career, consistently stayed on the edge of what are the best technologies to continue building into bet on for these companies that are going forward. I started with just like building a new micro sass out of this stack. And so that was a lot of fun because the goal was to just launch that and get it to generate revenue as quickly as possible. So I hit a $1000 MRR and 30 days of launching it. That was kind of the spark of like, oh, I could lead this one product, but what if I could do many, many more. So I started to take on clients to help them bring their MVPs to life as quickly as possible with a really good tech stack. This kind of all the best practices that have been learned over time. At that point, I reach kind of a max saying like, okay, I can only do so many of these at a given time. Now, how do I clone myself, so to speak? And do that through training and recruiting, starting with just people in my network who are other really great technical leaders that I know that were CTOs and other early stage startups. That could help come in and kind of continue to build out. It's like productized engineering is the best way to think of it. When you're building any sort of MVP, right? Or any sort of first version of product process or team, you got to make certain decisions and tradeoffs about what you're going to start with, right? Tell me about some of those you had to work through and how you coped with those decisions. Decision making is one of the key things that we pride ourselves on, and I think a lot of people talk about making good decisions, but not a lot of clarity about what that actually means or what that looks like and how to do it on a repeatable way. And so I think for us, it's about looking at all the various inputs to a decision and then also understand what are the consequences and outputs of the options. What that looks like is to give you an example is a lot of people skip straight to the how. And they just dig right into how they're going to solve a problem and make decisions about what's the best hat. But they're skipping over thought and discussion around the why and the what. And so those are much more critical to consider as inputs to the decision because it will drastically change the how. This is like kind of our framework that we use and teach people that join us as tech leaders and something that goes into how we're able to make these good decisions by really anchoring everything into the business case. One of the biggest problems is when engineering veers away from product or business, if it's not tightly integrated always. And so this decision making framework really keeps that tight this episode is brought to you by stitch. As a developer, there are certain things you can expect to loathe when spinning up your solution. One of them is use authentication. You've got to build the same thing you've built ten times before. In a secure seamless fashion. You need a better way. You need stitch. 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Todd Larson groupon
"larsen" Discussed on Digital Conversations with Billy Bateman

Digital Conversations with Billy Bateman

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"larsen" Discussed on Digital Conversations with Billy Bateman

"Were them. Simplify is yeah and what you guys do in about. Your older developments simplified is a full development company. The thing they do most is custom development fast product apps processes back in so they do custom coding and they do a lot of websites as well. But not so much wordpress sites or wicks type sites. These are sites where people need something very specific or they want a very specific customer journey or something interactive that you have to have custom coding written for and so i actually approached. My brother is one of the owners. He's owners with two other people. And i approached him and said you know it just makes sense to me that you guys would offer marketing solutions. Because you're a developer. Usually if someone is getting a product developed they actually did take that product to the market and so that kind of how that whole journey started. And i was about four years ago and since then we've just become a real powerhouse team between marketing and development. We've realized i brought in marketing. Customers that needed development and development has brought in customers that needed marketing. And so we've actually created this really cool powerhouse team. Between the two companies we used to just be development simplified now. We have marketing simplified. They are two separate companies but working under the same. We work in the same office. We have two offices that we have two teams and yes so it was a four year journey. We just the benefit to that has just been massive in. It's just the development beads. The marketing the marketing deeds development end the customers just really benefit from that relationship.

Bulwer Salva billy bateman jeannie larson billy Bateman deb
After Fatal Floods, Germans Look at How Climate Change Contributed

Environment: NPR

02:05 min | 1 year ago

After Fatal Floods, Germans Look at How Climate Change Contributed

"To germany now where crews are cleaning up after the worst floods the region has seen nearly six decades more than one hundred sixty people have died. The damage amounts to billions of dollars. Now germans are asking what role climate change may be playing and how to keep this from happening again. Npr's rob schmitz has been out surveying the destruction. He joins us from the flood. Region near bonn. Hey rob emyr lewis. So i know you have been out. In one of the worst hit towns. You spent yesterday talking to people there. What are they saying about how this happened. Yes spoke to several yesterday. In the town of knowing of isla people who had suffered incredible damage to their homes. Dozens of people in this town died in this disaster and the one thing everyone was talking about was how unnatural all of the seem. The rain was nothing like anyone had ever seen. Before the way the tiny creek that runs through this town the are filled up from below a foot deep to twenty five feet deep in a matter of a few hours as water rushed down into this valley as spoke to resident martin larsen about this and he thought climate change was definitely a part of this but he also listed other culprits behind the severity of the flooding. Here's what he said. This type of flooding is not normal. This type of rain is not normal. The consequences of not for the main thing is probably infrastructure. Now you've probably been building everywhere where we hear you asphalted. Everything's paved the river straight. Yeah it's not bending back and forth. It's been manipulated by man throughout the years. It's nice and and shallow and it's just cozy but when it comes high water it's a germany is europe's most populous country. It's about the size of new mexico but it has more than eighty million people in that area so its population is fairly dense and there are so many towns like the one i visited yesterday that are built along waterways that are highly engineered and urban management to prevent these extreme weather events from causing so much damage is something that german officials will likely start analyzing more closely in the aftermath of this tragedy.

Rob Schmitz Rob Emyr Lewis Martin Larsen Bonn Germany NPR Isla New Mexico Europe
"larsen" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"larsen" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"Never <SpeakerChange> ending story. <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> of course. I've got thoughts <Speech_Male> on this episode. But before <Speech_Male> i get into that. <Speech_Male> Here's a sample of <Speech_Male> my interview with guy <Speech_Male> roz. <Speech_Male> Npr's how <Speech_Male> i built this. <Speech_Male> He shares his number <Speech_Male> one secret to getting <Speech_Male> a great interview. <Speech_Male> How asking difficult <Speech_Male> questions during the <Speech_Male> interview serves both <Speech_Male> the overall story <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and the guests being <Speech_Male> grilled. And it's kind <Speech_Male> of nice riff with <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> somebody else in the business <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> i came <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to. Npr's a twenty <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> two year old intern. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I was very <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> lucky. You know. I really <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> wanted to be an overseas <Speech_Music_Male> reporter and <Speech_Music_Male> the stars were <Speech_Music_Male> sort of aligned <Speech_Music_Male> in the right way where <Speech_Music_Male> I got <Speech_Music_Male> the job. And <Speech_Music_Male> i was totally <Speech_Music_Male> terrified. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I was sent to berlin <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to be the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> correspondent for <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> npr. Don't <Speech_Music_Male> miss this up. Oh yeah <Speech_Music_Male> by the way. You're going to bosnian <Speech_Music_Male> alarm. 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This <Music> <Advertisement> is my secret <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> if you really <Music> <Advertisement> wanna get <Music> <Advertisement> good interview from <Music> <Advertisement> somebody <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you to honor. <Music> <Advertisement> Their story <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> need to honor <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> apt. Is they're coming <Music> <Advertisement> to talk to you. <Music> <Advertisement> And you <Music> <Advertisement> honor them as you learn a <Music> <Advertisement> lot about <Music> <Advertisement> you. Spend the time <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to do the work <Music> <Advertisement> and if <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you do that <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> there's a better <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> than fifty percent chance <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that they will <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> appreciate that respect. <Music> <Advertisement> I <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> mean those <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> events. They're real. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Because what i <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> do in an <Speech_Music_Female> interview is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> tie completely <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> leave <Speech_Music_Male> the world <Speech_Male> that i'm in. I <Speech_Male> completely leave <Speech_Music_Male> the surroundings. <Speech_Music_Male> Every chaos the <Speech_Male> noise. You know <Speech_Male> trump and politics. <Speech_Music_Male> I just leave <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> his out all <Music> <Advertisement> the noise. Cova <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> it's gone. <Music> <Advertisement> It's like <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> when you see a movie. <Speech_Music_Male> I <Speech_Music_Male> am just <SpeakerChange> in <Speech_Music_Male> that person's world <Speech_Male> for <Speech_Male> more including the one <Speech_Male> teachable quality. <Speech_Male> All entrepreneurs <Speech_Male> seemed to have in common <Speech_Male> checkout episode. <Speech_Male> Four four <Speech_Male> of the jordan harbinger. <Speech_Male> Show with <Speech_Music_Male> garros. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Thank you all rick larsen. <Speech_Male> This is the end of part <Speech_Male> one. Of course we're going to <Speech_Male> keep going with two <Speech_Male> here in just a few days. <Speech_Male> It's probably already out depending <Speech_Male> on when you're listening to this. <Speech_Male> Obviously <Speech_Male> all the links in the <Speech_Male> show notes transcripts <Speech_Male> on the show. It's worksheets <Speech_Male> are in the show notes. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> There's a video of this <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> interview. Going up on <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> our youtube channel at <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> jordan harbinger dot <Speech_Male> com slash <Speech_Male> youtube. We <Speech_Male> also have

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"larsen" Discussed on KFAB's Morning News with Gary Sadlemyer

KFAB's Morning News with Gary Sadlemyer

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"larsen" Discussed on KFAB's Morning News with Gary Sadlemyer

"I'm gary saddle mayor this morning. News seven thirty seven and appreciate lameta. Police chief bob lost and joining us for a few minutes as we approach for weeks. Now that Young ryan larson has been missing one of the mo. I hear so much Comment still around the community bob. About this case people. Are you know a combination of sad and scratching their heads. What can you tell us this morning. relative to what's happening right now well What we got. We are continuing to scour video. We had a delay on getting some what we call key video from an area of eight thirty four in harrison from a couple of businesses. Their local managers were very cooperative but they were stymied by their legal staffs of a couple of the large chain businesses. And now we've been able to get that video and going through it It kind of gives us a better picture during the time period To try to back up where ryan actually was when he was last. Seen that been helpful. Yes it has Again early on we had a video from lewis keno that showed ryan at roughly one forty in the afternoon That kinda hammered An eyewitness account at him near his apartment at two o'clock but since that time nobody has seen him with strikes me rather to be rather odd. Because somebody out. There's know something about where he's at There was A body found yesterday Bonney lake in lancaster county and i and they don't have those gonna be an autopsy today. They released no more information. I'm sure you're interested in that case right. But also those listening young female Donna lincoln yes and I'm just going to think that the proximity of that's probably gonna be possibly related to that case in not ours. You know one of the things that that we talked about a couple of weeks ago. Is that You guys and And other law enforcement agencies involved were concentrating on walnut creek lake for a reason. Is that still a possibility as as a as a potential search area. I'll say well let us. I would say that still in play We've been down there several times. We've had a a cadaver dog That's fema certified hit several times and They lowered the lake level for us. Which which helped us but We had a couple of detectives out there yesterday and three of them took a couple of steps out into the off the shore and one of them almost sank to his waist. So there's a lot of muck stuff that's in. La i to go back to those video cameras again in neighboring businesses are there. Are there like if you looked at all of the businesses that have video cameras. Could you do time line. Could you track everything and is just a matter of that being a laborious process or are there holes in the in the narrative video narrative. So it's it's It's a tough process to go through. We're really trying to get a picture of Where ryan was at prior to one thirty and after two o'clock and if he was near eighty fourth and harrison again. This is a young guy was scary going across the screen. He was he was scared of bugs. He scared of the dark. You know some of the early narrative that we've discovered now may not fit We're at today and another some things about the investigation. You can't tell us I think you're talking to a area perverts. right known sex offenders is that we working with the sheriff's department and surp- canyon nebraska state patrol on sex offenders that live within a certain proximity to that area And quite frankly when you look at some of the numbers quote didn't realize there were that many scott for his chief you had been looking for a person of interest A woman a couple of days ago quickly found her. Can you give us some indication with that was all about yes. She was in an area The second day after ryan went missing and somebody had taken a photo earned. They thought she was asking some strange questions. And once we found out who it was we found that She was an employee of the school district and she was actually going to be Like a paraprofessional mentor ryan. We goes to the junior high. So that Well somebody else thought was on. We checked out ended up. Not being anything. Let me ask you this. Jv bob lawson with us from la vista and obviously. I know you can't get specific but can you tell us. Do you have suspects. That's that's the frustrating part with us all right and final question before we run. Is there anything you need from the community to help in this investigation or this search we we pan out and community support. Not only from the people of this and everybody that works here but From everybody in the metro in really if you think back to that day and again we're twenty five days into that if you think you might have saw something with a young man near eighty fourth and harrison In just mean made a thought it was kind of innocent. Let us know because maybe it was something could help us very good chief. Thanks so much for the time. As always you bet chief bob lawson lameta police..

Donna lincoln ryan Jv bob lawson yesterday two o'clock bob lawson today ryan larson twenty five days after two o'clock three Bonney lake bob la vista one couple of days ago lancaster county gary saddle couple of weeks ago this morning
Deanne Shinzan Larsen on the Dharma Combat

Yokoji Zen Dharma Talks

01:48 min | 1 year ago

Deanne Shinzan Larsen on the Dharma Combat

"Good morning. I'm deanne john on larson the head trainee for this spring training period. Thank you so much for joining us this morning. Attention toes on was ill among asked osho. You are sick is there. Someone not sick chosen answered. Yes there is the monk asked osho does the one who is not set. Look after you toes on replied. This'll monk is able to look after others. The monk asked osho how about when you look after others toes on said than the having of sickness is not seen this is case ninety four toes zones illness from the book of equanimity. In this main case we learned that the venerated toes on is ill very ill among cubs to visit him in his somewhat impertinent as he notes this monk sickness he does not ask if he can help but decides instead to test toes on with questions about sickness and not sickness in caretaking the toes on his. Ill is willing to engage with this monks questioning toes on states quite strongly that there is someone who is not sick and that he is very able to look after others and that when he does. The having of sickness is not seeing

Osho Deanne John Larson Cubs
Exploring Parkour, Resonance, and the Good Life With Dr. Signe Højbjerre Larsen

Physical Activity Researcher

02:56 min | 1 year ago

Exploring Parkour, Resonance, and the Good Life With Dr. Signe Højbjerre Larsen

"And so we'll be exploring seen as most article with the title. Parker playing in the modern accelerated sitting and the paper was published in the journal of philosophy sport. And in this work. She's exploring the ideas of alien nation and non alienated human experience which is something that she argues could take place at least momentarily in in the practice of park gore. So let's just start with what were some of the ideas and questions that you wanted to explore in in this work so in the this id paper abbas interesting in the in describing of the profound at the end meaningful experiences that they the petitioners have monday at practicing the cooler. So they are. So of course is characterized by this change in position. So you see and you experience the the urban spaces a different way and the ad also fill heavily connected to to the environment that you Do moving in. And the because of that. I found russillo concept of resonances very bill fitted to to describe and to analyze some of these experiences that the that the petitioners have when they practicing Also because founded quite interesting that we We spending a lot of money and time and resources to make very nice urban spaces in public so we put up a lot of green stuff. We benches the covers to make it attractive to people to dwell in open space. But when i looked at the partition acid in peculiar then not attracted to that kind of stuff. A they are attracted to places that we could the crash by characterizing the mess none places you know disgusting places Unimportant places the places that you don't even recognize because it's just the on the backside of a supermarket where have some railings. Awesome wool saw all the concrete walls a and fauna quite interesting. That the that decision of fine these non places so attractive is an ex leaf feels connected to these places when the when they are moving in them. So i find that quite interesting. And i figure i actually find out that the theory residents and especially also bought a siphon could could explain why the petitioners were so connected to the yeah non places in in urban

Journal Of Philosophy Sport Parker Abbas Gore
Will Steger's 1989 Route Across Antarctica in Gone

Climate Cast

01:36 min | 1 year ago

Will Steger's 1989 Route Across Antarctica in Gone

"Tell us why now for this film well. The two young filmmakers i worked with it was their idea actually when i met him about seven years ago. They wanted to do a film. I give them for all my archives and they join me two of my expeditions. We went to antarctica either. All i knew about the film was called after. Antarctica is for the first time last month. Will your team made this four thousand mile antarctic crossing nineteen eighty nine at the time. Did you have any idea that climate change would be evolving as the crisis of our time now back in nineteen ninety. I was very much aware of of climate change. I actually taught it my classes in the late sixties. But i never thought it would happen so quickly. It was twelve years after that in ninety nine nine hundred ninety when we finished it when the larsen ice shelf broke up in two thousand and two dow was my called action. And that's it was two thousand two that a realize this is very serious and nobody is really aware of. What's what's happening. And that's critical right because those larsen ice shelf. You actually cross those during your journey right. And then now they're gone. They're gone and it took us thirty days across Both larsen abmc and now they're mostly gone in a shelf that have crossed both in the polar areas in the arctic car. I have the cynic integrated and we've lost about sixty percent of the ice on the arctic ocean in the summer. So you know it's happening so quickly. Accelerating very fast right now.

Antarctica Arctic Arctic Ocean
State Sen. Chris Larson, son and daughter test positive for COVID-19

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:12 sec | 1 year ago

State Sen. Chris Larson, son and daughter test positive for COVID-19

"Wisconsin State Senator Chris Larson says he, his son and daughter have all tested positive for covert 19 Larsen again urging residents to take the pandemic seriously and follow guidelines, he adds. He is only showing minor

Chris Larson Wisconsin Larsen
"larsen" Discussed on We Are The Runners Show

We Are The Runners Show

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"larsen" Discussed on We Are The Runners Show

"Hand cycle. We get there. If i need to arup tires. He helps me with that. He helps me find bathrooms. Because something a lot of people think about is there's all of these porta-pottys but there may be one that's wheelchair accessible and so we've not find that one wheelchair accessible porta potty. Or we've got to find bathrooms. That i can get into you so you know he's always there to help with that sort of thing. It's a light on him a lot on him so a lot of races if he will just be there are just as my support but some races he will be running to so we get there early. He helps me all situated after he gets me situated in i start then he goes back and gets in his corral. So yeah it's a light a he's constantly having For me all that now. I have friends that are not married. That don't have a significant other to help them and they manage there are ways to manage without it but it helps so much to have him be there to help with all of that and then i also have a volunteer Does all my local races with me in. He has been incredibly helpful over the years. He's got to really know me. Know my writing style. My racing style. He is on the course with me helps. Avoid potholes helps. Make sure i have clearance to return it. He makes sure. I'm the first person out that he is writing ahead to those intersections to make sure the police are paying attention and that intersection shutdown. Before i come through eight all of these little bays there have been times on the course where i have to make pit stop. It happens and he is able to help me get out of my hands cycle and it me to a wheelchair accessible porta potty. Or whatever so that. I can go to the bathroom if i need to go. I do have nobility. I can stand. I can walk. I just stand very long..

first person eight one wheelchair one
"larsen" Discussed on We Are The Runners Show

We Are The Runners Show

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"larsen" Discussed on We Are The Runners Show

"You know we kind of start to get to know each other over time joscelyn's great. She's in a couple of disney group. Simon and she's when she's always been so supportive supportive. She comes over. Be before Races there's an athletes with disabilities tent. Where we go and we put all of our equipment. We leave our day chairs. We've got volunteers in that. Ten are volunteers. The volunteers for every single rice may have been for years so they know each one of us individually really. Well they know our knees they know our personalities all of that so we all meet up the athletes with disabilities tent and then inevitably. There are other people that we've come to know that come over on race warnings but joscelyn's one of those. She always makes a point to come over to. The athletes disabilities ten hangs out with this. Says hi you know it. It's just and that's what. I love about run disney. It's just the bible. It's the people that really make. It's the people now. You had mentioned that your husband's of runner he is all an ultra marathoner. I think he yup yup Minds though he participates i would guess and the run disney is so how does that work kind of you're doing yours race. And he's doing his race or how does that work. Yeah so he does his thing. I do my thing pretty much. He comes to the athletes with disabilities tent with me in the morning in usually we make sure we say hi to all of our friends and all before the races. That's another reason to get there so early. Because there's a lot of people that we wanna see before the race in talk to and say hi and photos with an all of that. But i start early in he goes in gets in his corral and then i never see him on the course. Because i'm so far ahead of runners. And i am the more competitive person. When he does run disney basically..

joscelyn Simon disney bible Ten each one one single rice run disney
"larsen" Discussed on We Are The Runners Show

We Are The Runners Show

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"larsen" Discussed on We Are The Runners Show

"So you have congratulations to you and yes you will have to. Of course you'll update that on your social media. Because i will be or sure for sure so right now all the training everything is going in for the chicago marathon of xp race. That's my my big race of twenty twenty one so when the day is no. It's october ten so october. Eleventh is the boston marathon. And it's just going to say all these all these october. Never though it's crazy everything got me october so i'm going to fly to boston if i get in. My game plan is to race chicago. And then i'm gonna hop on a plane. Boston in boston will be my fun race. That's what i'll do the next day. I'm not going to try to compete. I'm going to take it slow. That's just going to of be my my victory lap. Hopefully we'll see quite But that'll be fun race. That i just go for the experience in then you know next year. Maybe try to race chicago or boston. Now are you though one of those people that say i'm going to you know put everything into chicago and boston will be that fun race but once you get in there. Is it really going to be just the fundraise or are you going to go full explode so i am totally. That person pushes myself beyond my limits. I have done that before. And i have ended up with though so i'm gonna turn really really hard because my doctors will shoot me if i do that again. And get wrapped again. And i i. Yeah i see do absolutely that. I'm gonna have fun. And then i'm going to push myself when i get there and get caught up in the excitement and you just want to go absolute i but i've got to take it slow because marathons on back to back days trying to push both of them bad bad bad idea so i yeah yeah i i am very very guilty that it is just now some races..

next year Boston october next day both october ten chicago marathon Eleventh boston twenty xp race one chicago
"larsen" Discussed on We Are The Runners Show

We Are The Runners Show

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"larsen" Discussed on We Are The Runners Show

"It is in most in cycles. Come with a drafting number okay. So the it's it's just a little extra piece of metal tubing that attached to the hand cycle and extends back in just behind your to rear wheels in that protects the wheels. So that when you're drafting or you former drafting line. If people bump into you by mistake they're gonna hit your drafting bumper instead of accidentally hitting the main part of your hands cycle or your rear tires okay. I talked to my husband about that a little bit and he is a cyclist and he was like. I'm so curious if drafting is allowed. And i might. I don't know i it is it is. It's you know it's one of those things depending on the race in his racing and a draft not her draft. Do you wanna take turns. And it's kind of one of the interesting things about racing. Is you know how the drafting lines will play out in. Who's going to be in the drafting line and that sort of thing so in sometimes in some races nobody asks everybody just goes off by themselves. Also right you had said that it can get quite competitive which i mean. Why wouldn't it right right right. Can you walk us through. That is far as you know. I know an upright running. You know there's all the protocols you know on you know coming through on your left you know. Just the different i must. Is it the same situation aweso. Typically you always try to stick to the right pass on the left as you would if you were running or cycling whatever you always wanna call out if you're gonna pass someone that you're coming up a pass on the left one thing that is different about hint cycling is we have a horrible turning radius horrible in fact i always tell people to car. White literally has a better turning radius than my hand..

one one thing one of those things
"larsen" Discussed on We Are The Runners Show

We Are The Runners Show

04:46 min | 1 year ago

"larsen" Discussed on We Are The Runners Show

"I'm happy to be in the hand cycle because it does give the back support. I'm able to lay back and take some of that pressure off of my core in my lower back in us more just my shoulders and arms to propel myself and i don't know if you just said that spot aren't there their knees or their legs. Excuse me are tucked. Beginning of most of the time for the racers their knees tucked their are kind of tucked up under. There are some that their legs are down a little bit more most of the time there tucked up under them and that is another thing that presents a problem for me because my knees are very very unstable in dislocate so putting my knees up in that position would also be very problematic. Okay so your son again. Our straight there straight out in front of me. I've got like support. So i actually actually have extra leg supports under my legs to because if i don't then my knees will actually hyper extend even in that position in pop out of place so got extra leg supports to put underneath my legs to keep them straight. So they don't. I br extend and dislocates but yes straight out in front of me. Okay and can you touch briefly. I know this is been a big part of your racing journey. Achilles international and what exactly they do for you and and how they help racers marathoners though i do. Yeah so achilles. Internationals fantastic organization. It is world wide in. They have chapters in different cities around the world. The headquarters in new york city in what they do is. They advocate for people with disabilities to participate in mainstream sports primarily. That's in road. Races marathons half marathons by peyton pay. They also do have a branch called try achilles where they do triathlons but they have this amazing organization that pairs disabled athletes with local guides. All in tears local training programs to give us the support that we need to get started in the sport in the to actually participate in.

new york try achilles Achilles international achilles peyton pay
"larsen" Discussed on We Are The Runners Show

We Are The Runners Show

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"larsen" Discussed on We Are The Runners Show

"Once i had gone through a year of physical therapy and everything else i decided just to start running and it took me a long time to work up to a half. Marathon is started with the five k. K. and i finally did finish my first half marathon in two thousand and yet and that was on my legs at the time. I was ridiculously slow because my knees in my legs were in such such bad shape and there is stuff that i just with my legs that i was never gonna be able to. I just wet. So i was one of those. Back of the pap runners super super slow barely barely staying ahead of the minimum pace requirements races. But i got out there. And i did it and i crossed the finish line and i ran for a number of years but i the connective tissue disorder that i have it's or stainless syndrome. I do have a severe case of a end. It is degenerative and so it continued to worsen and worsen to the point where my knees were dislocating. I couldn't couldn't maintain my balance. I was falling like so it just became really really dangerous for me to even continue to attempt that so in working with my physical therapist because all of this time in probably for the rest of my life i'm still going to be an audit physical therapy constantly working with mike physical therapist in physical medicine and rehabilitation doctor in two thousand sixteen. We made the decision that i should try him cycling. They thought that that might be a really good fit for me because my upper body does a lot better than my lower body so i switched over to hand cycling and it was just amazing. The first time. I ever got on hand cycle. I just immediately knew that is was what i was meant to be doing and fell in love with it. I did my first full marathon on the cycle in. I think it was january..

first two thousand january mike first time one first half marathon two thousand sixteen year a half a number of years five k. K.
Interview With Quincy Larson, Founder Of freeCodeCamp

Developer Tea

04:10 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Quincy Larson, Founder Of freeCodeCamp

"Do you feel like you're not learning enough quickly enough as a software engineer. That is the feeling that i talk about amongst other things with today's guest quincy larsen and if you missed out on the first part of my interview with quincy i suggest you go back and listen to that part first quincy is of course the founder and creator of rico camp Which is something that many of you probably either came to this show as a result of you actually heard about developer because of free co camp or you are going through it right now. Three co dot org in of course free co camp dot org slash donate if you want to support other engineers who are going through the beginning of their career by the way Quincy just to be clear. Did not pay us in any way to plug that Here on the show. Thank you so much to quincy for joining me. Let's get straight into the interview with quincy larsen and that feeling something. I'd love to hear your thoughts on the feeling of inadequacy because you're dealing with a lot of people who are probably invulnerable points in their lives especially people who are changing careers or there at the beginning of their career. They have a lot of uncertainty. And there's a mountain of learning in front of them curious you know. Do you see a lot of people who are in that vulnerable place. In what advice do you have for them when you encounter them while empathy is very important. And it's one of the things that i perceived lack of i was learning to code and keep in mind. I'm you know a middle class white male who has a graduate degree right like. Imagine if you're somebody who's been working as a cashier whose job just evaporated or or a restaurant and you don't have all those benefits of The those layers of privilege right in those layers of just general like oh. Yeah i see how this works. I understand the system so not afraid of it right. I understand how higher education works for example. A lot of people don't have that benefit so for them. It could be even more daunting and one of the things that we do. Is we just try to frame is realistically possible. We start from the premise. Coating is hard in fact when you create a new free co game account I added this blurb at the top when you first get into free co cabinet it basically tells you like this is going to be hard anybody who tells you that learning code is easy is trying to sell you something right. Because it's going to take years and you're going to be daunted in. You're going to be baffled. You're going to have tests telling you failed failed failed you're going to have you know your interpreter telling you air and you need to be able to power through that and the most important thing is to know that everybody goes through this process. A lot of people don't remember it. They don't remember what it was like learning to code because it's so long ago maybe they were one of the lucky people who got a computer when their kid in there. The parents Encourage them to learn programming. Or maybe they just had a natural inclination toward early on if they have years and years of extra experience that accounts i mean that definitely speeds up the rate at which they can learn new things so i would tell people you know. I learned when i was thirty. I didn't have a lot of experience with programming. Was undaunted essentially. And i think that more people if they can remain undaunted and if they can just power through the doubt than they can learn to so the community aspect is really important. Just having a support network in a lot of people can find that on twitter. They can find that through like separatists. They can find that through. Different forums and dischord groups. They can find it on the free cocaine form. There are lots of ways that you can find kind of your tribe and have them have your back in help push you forward and i think that that is absolutely key but but the most important thing again just know. This is hard now that anybody who says program is easy has just forgotten how hard it was when they were first. Starting

Quincy Larsen Quincy Rico Camp Twitter
"larsen" Discussed on My Worst Investment Ever Podcast

My Worst Investment Ever Podcast

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"larsen" Discussed on My Worst Investment Ever Podcast

"Been so close it wasn't one of my crazy speculations that i've done in the you know as a young kid i you know i was lucky enough to make enough money to retire early twenties and proceed to lose it all and pull myself up by the bootstraps and built this thing again. And it wasn't any wasn't it was so close that it was so close it. It's so painful interesting. So how would you describe the lessons that you learned from that as you invest in businesses nowadays. What have you learned from them. I think i've i mean that plus a couple of other bad investments is really what put me over the top of completely losing my interest and speculation. I mean i was buying into a revenue lewis company right like warren buffett. Says you can't value a company like he's always talking about is it. Ted robinson that great batter that he loved williams and williams. I'm sorry and you know. You only take pitches that are right in that box. Rate and warren buffett says like buying new companies like swinging the ball in the pitch and this one had the potential to not be that bad because there was contracts in place. This kind of stuff right. But you know you're so. There's all of the warren buffett lessons but there's the other one of just this idea of this is a new guy..

Ted robinson warren buffett lewis one warren williams Rate twenties speculations revenue buffett early
Carries Satanic Book Report

Oh No Ross and Carrie

05:24 min | 1 year ago

Carries Satanic Book Report

"Hello and welcome to. Oh no ross. And carrie the show where. We don't just report on for in science spirituality and claims of the paranormal but take part ourselves yep and they make claims we ships. You don't have to i'm carrie. Poppy morales blocher. And were back today. To talk about a man named bob larson. I don't know if you've heard of him but i have. He has a ministry but really it's it's about him. I mean without bob. Larsen won't be much of a ministry. Yeah bob larson ministries is the name of the ministry. When we have no bob how many ministries do we know of that are actually named after the founder. There's tony llama. Oh yeah. I want to say. There's quite a few. But i can. I name them off the top of my head rail. Ism benny hen. Oh you're thinking like groups that we've investigated that have the the person's name in the title. The james randi educational foundation. There we go there. You go known cult or kidding that's always something interesting to look out for the presence or lack thereof of a succession plan granted. He's had his daughter's involved as teenage exorcist. So maybe they could step up and continue the fight. Yeah maybe yes. I'll you don't know about this whole thing. This all Systemic sexism sure. Yeah but i mean. At least he's had them perform. Exercises assumes yeah i just somehow i have the sense that they're not as passionate about it as he is though bryn. His daughter did publish book. Yeah i bought. I need to find that l. Yeah we'll have to compare her writing style to his. So maybe she's the heir-apparent maybe maybe she's the ivanka. Well i would love to tell you about a book. I recently read called satanism. The seduction america's youth. Yes okay. so he's got this book. It is black and threatening on the cover. It says bob larsen at the top and then it says satanism in red letters that are spiky instead of sarah. They have spikes that can hurt you. If you touch it. Who the teas got a fun. Little curly tail coming down from it. Yeah like the devil's pitchfork. No i assume. That's just bob larson saying i am the author and then the title of satanism rather than this being about bob larsen satanism. Now this is special brand of satan. Okay these seduction of america's youth. Okay thank her. Then what have we got on the back on the back. We have a pentagram. Oh anarchism symbol lasta. These are bad. These are these are bad. According to bob i guess equally bad none. None of these are standing out more than the other as far as designed goes. What's that top line in front of the the symbols it says. Do you recognize these symbols. Yes see page one hundred nine for more information. Oh okay that always amazes me. I just think of books. In progresses these very fluid things that it specifically mentions page one hundred nine but of course. They know that after they're done writing about that. Especially in a book when it says to page this and i think how do you know that okay. They must they write it and then they highlight it and then at the end they have to go through and make sure okay. Where does oh shoot. I added this note and change. The page layout the point is rosner secret edits. We realize these are easy problems to solve. But they fascinate us. Apparently okay how many pages carry. That's always important with bob larsen pages. How 'bout in two hundred and twenty three you know. I think if i had to say like what is the average length of a book would be somewhere in that ballpark. Two hundred twenty three. Yeah yeah seems about right. Yeah so this was published in nineteen eighty nine. The same year my fiance drew was published. Nineteen eighty nine it and oh it was princeton. The eunice did states of america. All right ice. So i was working backward with my book. The first book i talked about was jazz abell which was written in. I wanna say twenty fifteen. And then i read demon proving prayers which was twenty eleven and you started farther back in the bob cannon and now you're moving towards the future that's right time travelling here this was published by thomas nelson inc. Okay who's this thomas nelson guy and what happens when he dies who keeps publishing those books. This is suspicious. we are still very dumb. So what's bob's take his. Is he four satanism against it. Do you wanna guess cast lots. I'm going to say against just hunch year right right so if he were a person browsing the nonfiction center at your local christian bookstore in the late eighties and you pick this up and you look the back. You'd see what's a parent to do with the devil. Have you ever explained to the supernatural to your child and discussed the influence of satanism in our society. Do you dabble in parapsychology or new age philosophy which could indicate your acceptance of the colts

Bob Larson Bob Larsen Poppy Morales Blocher Tony Llama Carrie Benny Hen James Randi Educational Founda BOB Larsen America Ross Bryn Sarah Rosner Jazz Abell Bob Cannon Thomas Nelson Inc. Eunice Princeton Drew
News of the World And Wonder Woman 1984

Filmspotting

02:56 min | 2 years ago

News of the World And Wonder Woman 1984

"Welcome to film spotting with the chicago. Tribune's michael phillips. I'm josh larsen a happy new year to you michael to to josh. And how was downtown chicago treating you. This is your first new year in a new place to live this. Yeah it's been about six months since we've been down here but yeah the first official winter. The weather is pretty much the same as as in the chicago suburbs. I'd say in the winter Maybe a little milder down there. A little less wind than there is here. But yeah we're doing we're doing well. Thank you very much for filling in this week. I i'm guessing that adam is off really studying his movie trivia You were with us. Michael last weekend's trivia spotting contests his team. I'm afraid didn't fair too. Well and so i imagine he's. He's out there studying getting ready for our next show. How did your team fair reminding. I've been such as one once. You know what head on so many weeks ago now. And i've never come close since and i have to blame. You know all my teammates. Honestly i you know i. I wanted to stack the deck. So that all my incredible lack of knowledge on the marvel cinematic universe in the basically most of the star wars stuff would be plugged in by some of my cohorts now. Well i've only won once as well and i'm going to credit might teammates for that as as you saw this last week and i can tease adam but i failed spectacularly in the lightning round. I couldn't even pull the title of. It's a wonderful life out of my hat given the clue bedford falls and and of course it's a lightning around so everybody's watching it's live and it was a face plant. I'll i'll just say. I don't know if you've experienced this during trivia spotting but for those answers that are obvious i find. There's like a millisecond window where your brain knows it and if you don't blurt it out that window shots and that's right it's it's honestly no different. I just enough bad college theater to know just like forgetting your line. There is nothing in the world. You can't muscle it into existence of. It's not fair so yeah. If anyone wants to see me regularly embarrassed myself please do join us for our next trivia spotting event. That's available to our films biting family members on patriot so it is a new year michael even more than most though i think these first couple of weeks of twenty twenty one are still very much stock in the year. Twenty twenty the oscars. They've been pushed back from february to april this year and so several high profile titles are still coming to theaters The eligibility window has been opened so we have movies opening. Now that'll be considered for oscars. They're also coming on demand. Regina kings one night in miami. That's one that's coming to prime video this weekend made adams top ten list of really good really good. Yeah

Josh Larsen Chicago Michael Phillips Adam Tribune Josh Michael Oscars Regina Kings Miami Adams
Interview With Micah Larsen, Hilarious University Marketing Professor and Mom

Fancy Free Podcast

05:21 min | 2 years ago

Interview With Micah Larsen, Hilarious University Marketing Professor and Mom

"Thank you so much for being with me today. Thank you for having me joanne. Absolutely fill in the blanks. What did i miss about who you are and what you do. Oh boy. I am a montana toddler. Mama which means that. I spent my time outside. Four seasons of the year chasing my one year old around right now league us. My background is in social science. So i'm actually a trained social scientists in published research on persuasion so that was kind of made. I love if you will. I married my husband. Eric works medicine. And so this has been a very interesting time Yes australian co bed. I'm sure you can imagine for all of time spent apart. We have a one year old wilder. Tell me about how you came to be part time professor. Yes i went into academia. Because i love people in their brains since i came out of the womb. My parents would say that. I asked why about everything. Why why would you now. I understand as a mom myself. So i found that social science was the key to why people do what they do and i fell in love with the idea of studying people's brains and how we form relationships in dot world of communication research. There's as little tiny nisha research called social influence or persuasion. And so it's basically the science of how we get people to say yes to things and within that i researched health communication so basically how we get people to say yes to wear seatbelts or donate their organs or in my case have safe sex so like use a condom and that was a really interesting topic to study. Oh my gosh. that's so fascinating. Yeah i think. I missed my calling. I listened to several podcasts. That are along this line hidden. Brain and invisibly leah and i like revisionist history with malcolm. Glad well even. Though i know that he's more of an observer at he's not as much of a scientist but i just find anybody who thinks about humans and what they do and how their brains work in a different way or a unique and new way. I'm so fascinated with i. I just can't even get enough of it. So i love eating this. Yeah you hit. The nail on the had hidden brain is exactly my realm of study. I love it. And i actually wrote a blog post about one of his episodes about tunnel vision. I almost felt like it unlocked. A part of my understanding about other people that was missing about how people can make such terrible decisions because they're under duress and there's a whole episode. I think actually unsafe sex. And you're rational decision making in your thought process when you're sitting in your office chair. Drinking a cup of coffee talking to a girl felt like well. Of course. I would never put myself in harm's way but then when you're under the influence of infatuation and the moment somehow suddenly our brains make different types of decisions but that that episode about tunnel vision. There's so much more there. I think he just kind of grays. The tip of the iceberg on why people make unexpected unpredicted decisions and why people kinda dig themselves into a deeper when all of the outside observers are going wait. Why don't you just stop doing this and start doing this. But because they're already in that whole they just can't you know yacht. We get super married to our convictions. In so our brains are really uncomfortable with information that goes against our beliefs so we end up seeking out and believing information that even if it's not really good information as long as support previously held beliefs. We just roll with it. I haven't heard the tunnel vision episode but that sounds exactly like the type of research that was doing which kind of explains like people who believe that cohen is a really scary disease will contain to believe that more and more staunchly. Yeah they will reject data to the contrary they will collect data to the consistent. Exactly that is exactly the same thing we do with politics and so many things all right. Well let's do rapid fire questions. If you had to describe yourself in one word. What would it be bold awesome. What is your number. I'm in achiever. Which i think is a three with an individualist swing so achiever in midwest yes okay. So three wing four. Fold your baby. I love it. What is something unexpected. That has changed about you in the past few years so i became a mother which wasn't unexpected. Because i didn't know if. I wanted to have children but i became a mother in a very unexpected way which i'm sure we'll talk about. Yeah gosh. I can't wait to hear more about that. Wow becoming a mother is like the earth shattering and paradigm shifting. I opening and exhausting. What's the scariest thing you've ever done for fun moved to africa. Wow you did it for fun. And when was that twelve years ago. I was in college. Amazing and africa is a continent. Where were you in africa. Yes i was in ghana which is like no armpit carnival area of the west coast. So we're kind of curves.

Nisha Joanne Wilder Montana Eric Malcolm Cohen Midwest Africa Ghana West Coast
The Counter-Strike Professional Players' Association (CSPPA) Civil War

The Center Ring esports podcast

04:09 min | 2 years ago

The Counter-Strike Professional Players' Association (CSPPA) Civil War

"For those who might not have looked at twitter in the last forty eight hours. This all started when mouse sports and astrology decided to boycott their match for a handful of hours over the weekend or not even over the weekend. Was it tuesday. Tuesday tuesday yesterday. Was that just yesterday was yesterday. Oh my oh my the the. I've never seen drama escalate this much. So then they decided to boycott and somehow within twenty four hours every dirt that everyone's been holding on to the players association is all of a sudden coming to light like so to set the stage. The players association boycotted sir. Scoots is an adviser for the players association and more or less. I don't know if he calls himself this but the public voice of is that fair. He's the only one that vocal out of their group at least right so i don't know if he's like official but i'm just telling you from public perception. He is right thornton per flashpoint. Yeah that's exactly right thorn. We'll tell you up and down that he's not the official spokesman for flash points butts bro. Read the room right like yes you are and speaking of now thorne and all this has come to light. I don't even know where to begin with our opinions. I mean maybe we should just kinda give the backdrop as to what's going on a little bit. Okay i'll let you do that so all of this revolving around voice communications If you don't know what we're talking about here it's players voice comms getting recorded and then being used out for content purposes. Which as you'll hear us talk about in the interview is probably wanted to best truest forms of content right anytime. There's a live listening with cd l. Or you're watching you know. Nfl films or behind the winter classic or hard overwatch league does the same thing. A lot of funny moments have come from. Listening to player comes in the middle of a match. You know a lot of funny moments of people just gravitate towards that stuff so and so do we like larsen and who is a fan of something and says you know what. I don't eat behind the scene stuff. I'm okay yeah. i don't wanna know what it's like for them. I don't wanna know what's really going on over there. you know. it's it's like it's something. that just intrigues. Everybody fund follow obviously in an and. We're no different in so a issues of competitive integrity started coming up in You know players rights. I guess you could say in determining can they have this footage and use our likeness in whatever ways that that they choose to enter the ppa. All along with a couple of the heads of state. I guess you could say like the main people that are involved with the pa from a player's side. Looks like they got together and made some decisions really without everybody being in the know what was going on and so they came out and publicly blasted blast for The voice calm situation in having the ability to do so and you know blasts been coming out defending themselves saying like this is conversation with us in the org and you know this is like part of player contracts and ruling. It's just a lot of back and forth. I wouldn't say there's been a lot of confirmation on anything honestly like we're hearing two sides arguing with one another. What essentially happened. Is the players boycotted and delayed matches for blast pro remind you this was like a four hundred k event like this is a very large event that they're doing the senate Potentially causing some long term damage with blast and some of their partners right. There's like a rumor that there is a bbc deal on the table and the voice comes. Were a big selling point. You know that could be jeopardizing that deal. Potentially a but a lot of just a lot going on from both sides like with wait. Twenty four hours. It's been a twenty four hour

Players Association Scoots Thorne Twitter Larsen NFL PA Senate BBC
Trump campaign loses appeal in Pennsylvania

KOGO Weekend News Edition

03:49 min | 2 years ago

Trump campaign loses appeal in Pennsylvania

"Appeals court on Friday denied the Trump campaign's effort to revive the federal lawsuit challenging the election results in Pennsylvania ruling the claims have no merit. The judges also rejecting the president's motion to one do Pennsylvania's certification of oats. The state on Tuesday certified its general election results in Pennsylvania, formally awarding President elect Joe Biden 20 electoral votes. There are those now who think that this rejection, But the federal appeals court will help the Trump campaign effort to get a case before the U. S. Supreme Court for it to decide the Supreme Court the night before Thanksgiving handed down a favorable ruling for many of the supporters of the president when they said the governor of New York's covert restrictions on some Catholic churches and synagogues Should be tossed out. So what does it mean for the future of the fight by the President's campaign, Mark Larsen from AM 7 60 talked to CBS News correspondent in Washington. Major Garrett about these cases, the third circuit in the most recent decision that came down today out of Pennsylvania case set. You need facts and law to be in dispute and we have neither. There's no evidence. There are no facts there. No presentations. There are just accusations and happily because court should not jump in when there are no facts and no relevant allegations and no dispute. About the underlying walk, no courts to jump in and do that They're not and they're not going to and nothing is going to get the Supreme Court that's reversible. And everyone says Oh, my gosh. Supreme Court said that Religious organizations are protected from certain covert restrictions. Of course they are in the First Amendment. There's a higher standard that's been part of U S law. The very beginning it's in the bill of rights. It's the First Amendment. Yes, there has to be a higher standard and a higher standard has been in law for a long time. It's not a departure. It's a verification, so they're separate things. Oh my gosh. The Supreme Court protected religious organizations and how they observed from covert restrictions. Yes, yes, There's a higher standard, right. Let's talk about that for a second. That was a big deal. Amy Cockney Barrett's first big swing vote opportunity there, and this puts limits on New York on Cuomo. When it came to, he was imposing attendance limits, like kind of like we have here in many cases with his own version of the color codes. 10 people in red Zones 25. People in orange zones seem to be disproportionately getting to the Catholics and the Orthodox Jewish congregations and so forth. So so this is a is a big deal. That sort of happened just over the holiday here in the court. Said. What the court has always said, which is Because it's in the First Amendment because it's in the bill of rights because it's in the Constitution. There's a higher standard that must be met. If you're going to restrict this activity. You better have a compelling state reason to do that. Mm. And if people have the volition to decide which they do, And you have to let them operate within the freedoms outlined in the Constitution that to meet is that doesn't strike me is radical and it doesn't strike me as something is his dangerous now did the chief justice when it was an eight member Supreme Court before him. He called me Barrett was nominated confirmed. Keep it for four. Yes, he did. So the chief justice comes down differently. But this didn't seem to me to be a radical departure that would should make us all breathless are nervous about what the court's going to do. And for the same reason, if any of these cases which I don't ever imagine they will get Supreme Court get there. The Supreme Court's not going to say you know what What doesn't matter, and we're going to keep President Trump in office, and it's not going to do that's not gonna happen. There's nothing that is meticulously legitimate about the assertions made so far and they've had plenty of time to find something and they found nothing. And that's the way it is. Major

Pennsylvania Supreme Court Mark Larsen Major Garrett Appeals Court Joe Biden Amy Cockney Barrett Cbs News New York Washington Cuomo Barrett President Trump
The History Of Exorcism

Oh No Ross and Carrie

05:58 min | 2 years ago

The History Of Exorcism

"Tony us and carry the show where we don't just report on fringe science spirituality and claims of the paranormal. We take part ourselves. Yup when they make the claims we show up so you don't have to carry poppy and i'm becoming an exorcist me to a and so can you at the international school system bernadette dad too. That's my for everything now. Oh are you willing to give it to bob larsen. I'm willing to rent it to bob larson. Yeah you're welcome bob. Yeah bobo what is it that. Let's see your outing a little bit of a syncopation bad about up. But i'm different. Now you repeat all right. We'll know is asking myself if that was different from what you did. I don't know i anyway. it's beautiful. Thank you and we have taken. The course work to become exercises. We've told you a little bit about it in our previous episodes but now we're in deep dive mode. Yeah man. let's get into the history of exercises so put on your exorcism hat. Your student hat last time we left off at the end of level. One course one. I know big cliffhanger yes so. Let's talk about tanger absolutely. Let's talk about christian and pre christian exorcism. Okay well this is module two of level one apprentice level. Oh okay you're making the sound like a very long journey of the exorcist. They have all these like sort of sub descriptions. When you get in there it's not very easily delineated. Your but yes so. You're talking about macho to within level one to be fair level. One is synonymous with the apprentice level. Correct so there's going to be ten modules. And as i was telling you earlier today all ten modules basically amount to exercise been around a long time. It's not a new thing. I'm bob larsen. Just summed it all up for our show for show. Thank you so much. So they're christian and pre christian extra schism part is about how there were indeed exorcisms before jesus even right before. There were such things as christians. So don't be thinking that exorcism is just this new up start phenomenon or that. Bob invented So he let us know that egypt. Persians canaanites all had x.'s rituals. Yes mostly they were incantations or enchantment. There's always going to be kind of a rough line around exorcism as posession versus exorcism as occurs. That's influencing you or maybe laid upon an object so there's kind of squishy lines around all of this. I wonder if he would acknowledge that. Sometimes people did them for health ailments that we would now just acknowledge our health elements. Yes yes. yeah. I think bob's pretty weird that little bit of god of the gaps where god when used to explain things that we just don't understand yet like lightning for example like when a lot of churches and the late seventeen hundred started installing lightning rods. A lot of people were upset. Like oh well this is going to subvert. The will of god share so then when science steps in and explains that oh actually charged particles in quick energy transfer. And hey look you know you can actually take control of that aspect of weather. Then god stops being used as an explanation right. That's what i mean. When i say god of the gaps oh god gets increasingly small and one's world view if one defines god based on what we don't know the more we know the less god is invoked to explain. They should make that at the. Bottom of the nbc. The more you know you need to invokes to explain what are bypass about about so. While bob didn't used that terminology. I think he realizes yeah. Ok some things now. We do explain with medical science or just an understanding of the natural world and very late in this game hill. Really get into mental health issues. That definitely although i think he'd draw a hardline around anything that happened. During the jesus years everything jesus healed. It was whatever she said it was the bible. Says you're walking on water. You turned water into wine or something else involving water then. Yeah that was legit because the bible is absolutely correct about everything i was gonna say. Is there any area where. Bob is not a scriptural literalist. Oh good question you know. I feel like that is always hard to define. Because some people say they are and then as he listened to them describe their beliefs. But if you look through a certain lens you'll see that at the time they were encoding. They're under yeah virgin actually There's gonna be all kinds of ringing. But i feel for the most part bob pretty literal. Yeah he doesn't have to do a lot of back flipping to defend his literal biblical azam. So one thing. He said that i thought was interesting. Is basically everybody alive. During that time was an exorcist like it was kind of taken for granted. Something anybody could do if there are spirits in this world you talk to the spirits right being and when you live in that world where everything around you is kind of controlled by the whims of the gods and the demons. You have to deal with them and placate them. So you mentioned in ancient babylon you had priests like creating a clay figure of a demon and then smashing it. In hinduism you had demons and demigods. Who were understood to attack living beings in greece. You had the oracle of delphi and they were supposedly possessed to tell the future Andy pointed to other which and shamans and various cultures that have had the equivalent of these beliefs

Bob Larsen Bob Larson BOB Bobo Bernadette Tony Egypt NBC Azam Bible Delphi Greece Andy
How to watch the first presidential debate between Trump and Biden

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:45 sec | 2 years ago

How to watch the first presidential debate between Trump and Biden

"The first presidential debate happens tomorrow night, President Trump and Democratic nominee Joe Biden will lock horns in Cleveland. It's a 90 minute debate moderated by Chris Wallace, who was the host of Fox News Sunday. Wallace shows six topics for the debate. The Trump and Biden Records the Supreme Court Corona virus, the economy. Race and violence in US cities and the integrity of the upcoming election, their tomb or debates on the 15th and 22nd of October. The vice presidential debate is set for October 7th. And when that debate happens, you can hear it live right here on Kogo. That is tomorrow you'll have a chance to weigh in as well. With Lou Penrose and Mark Larsen live and taking your calls. That's starting at six

Joe Biden President Trump Chris Wallace Lou Penrose Supreme Court Cleveland Mark Larsen United States Kogo
Congressional Inquiry Faults Boeing And FAA Failures For Deadly 737 Max Plane Crashes

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:57 min | 2 years ago

Congressional Inquiry Faults Boeing And FAA Failures For Deadly 737 Max Plane Crashes

"A sweeping congressional inquiry has found damning evidence of failures at both Boeing and at the Federal Aviation. Administration in the development and certification of the seven thirty seven Max, the report says these failures contributed to to Max plane crashes killing three hundred and forty six people. Here's NPR's David Schaper. The House Transportation Committee investigation finds that there was no singular technical flaw pilot failure that led to the deadly 737 Max plane crashes. In Indonesia, in October of two, thousand, eighteen Ethiopia, the following March instead it describes the circumstances that led up to them almost like. A perfect storm calling it the horrific culmination of a series of faulty technical assumptions by Boeing's engineers lack of transparency in the part of Boeing's management and grossly insufficient oversight by the FAA. The report details Boeing's flawed design of a new automated flight control system on the plane and mistakes and using outdated and faulty assumptions of pilot response, as well as a culture of concealment keeping information from the F., a. its customers, and the pilots would fly the plane. There's something big came out of this. That's just is mind Boggling House Transportation Committee Chairman Peter Fazil Inquiry and says, what's mind boggling is at both Boeing and the FAA contend they followed proper procedures at vowed the seven thirty seven Max to be compliant that the bureaucratic were it was compliant but the problem is it was compliant and not say and people died the report also details how Boeing employees were under enormous pressure to keep costs down in the plane on. Schedule Aviation Subcommittee chairman. Rick. Larsen says misguided priorities of senior management drove. A number of troubling decisions in one case, senior management when as far as installing countdown clocks in conference rooms making clear to Max employees meeting production timelines rather than safety was a top priority. The congressional investigation is one of many into what caused the lion air and Ethiopian Airlines. Seven thirty-seven Max Plane Crashes Christine Negroni is an aviation journalist and author of the book, The crash detectives and she says, while much of this information isn't new. Poll, what is to me astonishing about the report is the depth, the thickness and the jury of both FAA and bowling knowing that there were problems with the redesign of this airliner and the oblivious -ness of both parties in recognizing that this was a problem that needed to be addressed and thing to grow any fines. Remarkable is that a number of people did raise. Safety concerns about the seven, thirty, seven Max. But those were either inadequately addressed or just dismissed by Boeing many of them never seeing the light of day at the FAA and that's an especially painful realization for the families of those who died in the Max crashes. It angers us to see how how much. Boeing did to cover this up and how much FAA is done. To help them cover it up Michael Stu Mos daughter twenty, four year old Samya arose to mow was on the plane that crash last year Ethiopia, he believes evidence in this report now shows that the first plane crash in Indonesia was preventable within covering up to keep the Max in the air after the lion aircrash so that it crashed again in Ethiopia and killed my daughter. was unforgivable in a statement a Boeing spokesman says, the company has learned many hard lessons from the plane crashes and its mistakes and has made fundamental changes to the company's safety culture and protocols. As a result. The House Transportation Committee is now drafting legislation to improve at a oversight and certifying planes. A Senate committee is expected to take its own at a reform bill later today. David. SCHAPER NPR news.

Boeing FAA House Transportation Committee David Schaper MAX Ethiopia Indonesia Federal Aviation NPR Chairman Ethiopian Airlines Schedule Aviation Subcommittee Bowling Larsen Senate Christine Negroni Rick Peter Fazil Michael Stu Mos
Google and Twitter vow to block voting misinformation

Jeff Wagner

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Google and Twitter vow to block voting misinformation

"Changes as we head into the final stretches of the presidential elections in Legans, Andy Larson tells Wisconsin's morning news Twitter says it will remove false and misleading information about voting claims that might be misleading. About results off the outcome of voting, for instance, which could influence people haven't voted yet, Larsen says. Google says it will remove Ants from sites featuring deep fake videos Jane Matt there W T

Andy Larson Jane Matt Twitter Larsen Google Wisconsin Legans
Bipartisan bill introduced to require TSA to take temperature checks

Tom Sullivan

00:19 sec | 2 years ago

Bipartisan bill introduced to require TSA to take temperature checks

"A congressional bill would require the state to take the temperatures of all passengers during security checks. That bipartisan Healthy Skies Act was introduced by Republicans Ted but of North Carolina and Ralph Normal of South Carolina. And Democrat John Larsen of Connecticut, but said the statement that doing the Czechs will help Americans feel safe when they traveled

North Carolina South Carolina John Larsen Ralph Normal TED Connecticut
San Diego sheriff defends officers' use of deadly force

Sean Hannity

00:49 sec | 2 years ago

San Diego sheriff defends officers' use of deadly force

"Here in San Diego County Sheriff Bill Gore is defending his brothers and sisters at the San Diego Police Department. Speaking with AM seven sixties Mark Larsen, San Diego County Sheriff Bill Gore talked about how three shootings in the past 12 days involving officers at the San Diego Police Department translates to his deputies. And sheriff's no matter how good your deescalation training and policies are. It takes two to deescalate. Gore also mentioned what happens when de escalation doesn't work with officers. You're gonna have a weapon a gun and pointed A deputy sheriff for a long enforcement officer. De escalation is it's out of the question at that point time, these officers have a right to protect themselves in the community, and they had to use deadly force. Sadly, Gore was referencing an incident earlier this week when San Diego police fatally shot a man during a confrontation in city

San Diego Police Department Bill Gore San Diego County San Diego Mark Larsen Officer