35 Burst results for "Larsen"

Interview With Micah Larsen, Hilarious University Marketing Professor and Mom

Fancy Free Podcast

05:21 min | Last month

Interview With Micah Larsen, Hilarious University Marketing Professor and Mom

"Thank you so much for being with me today. Thank you for having me joanne. Absolutely fill in the blanks. What did i miss about who you are and what you do. Oh boy. I am a montana toddler. Mama which means that. I spent my time outside. Four seasons of the year chasing my one year old around right now league us. My background is in social science. So i'm actually a trained social scientists in published research on persuasion so that was kind of made. I love if you will. I married my husband. Eric works medicine. And so this has been a very interesting time Yes australian co bed. I'm sure you can imagine for all of time spent apart. We have a one year old wilder. Tell me about how you came to be part time professor. Yes i went into academia. Because i love people in their brains since i came out of the womb. My parents would say that. I asked why about everything. Why why would you now. I understand as a mom myself. So i found that social science was the key to why people do what they do and i fell in love with the idea of studying people's brains and how we form relationships in dot world of communication research. There's as little tiny nisha research called social influence or persuasion. And so it's basically the science of how we get people to say yes to things and within that i researched health communication so basically how we get people to say yes to wear seatbelts or donate their organs or in my case have safe sex so like use a condom and that was a really interesting topic to study. Oh my gosh. that's so fascinating. Yeah i think. I missed my calling. I listened to several podcasts. That are along this line hidden. Brain and invisibly leah and i like revisionist history with malcolm. Glad well even. Though i know that he's more of an observer at he's not as much of a scientist but i just find anybody who thinks about humans and what they do and how their brains work in a different way or a unique and new way. I'm so fascinated with i. I just can't even get enough of it. So i love eating this. Yeah you hit. The nail on the had hidden brain is exactly my realm of study. I love it. And i actually wrote a blog post about one of his episodes about tunnel vision. I almost felt like it unlocked. A part of my understanding about other people that was missing about how people can make such terrible decisions because they're under duress and there's a whole episode. I think actually unsafe sex. And you're rational decision making in your thought process when you're sitting in your office chair. Drinking a cup of coffee talking to a girl felt like well. Of course. I would never put myself in harm's way but then when you're under the influence of infatuation and the moment somehow suddenly our brains make different types of decisions but that that episode about tunnel vision. There's so much more there. I think he just kind of grays. The tip of the iceberg on why people make unexpected unpredicted decisions and why people kinda dig themselves into a deeper when all of the outside observers are going wait. Why don't you just stop doing this and start doing this. But because they're already in that whole they just can't you know yacht. We get super married to our convictions. In so our brains are really uncomfortable with information that goes against our beliefs so we end up seeking out and believing information that even if it's not really good information as long as support previously held beliefs. We just roll with it. I haven't heard the tunnel vision episode but that sounds exactly like the type of research that was doing which kind of explains like people who believe that cohen is a really scary disease will contain to believe that more and more staunchly. Yeah they will reject data to the contrary they will collect data to the consistent. Exactly that is exactly the same thing we do with politics and so many things all right. Well let's do rapid fire questions. If you had to describe yourself in one word. What would it be bold awesome. What is your number. I'm in achiever. Which i think is a three with an individualist swing so achiever in midwest yes okay. So three wing four. Fold your baby. I love it. What is something unexpected. That has changed about you in the past few years so i became a mother which wasn't unexpected. Because i didn't know if. I wanted to have children but i became a mother in a very unexpected way which i'm sure we'll talk about. Yeah gosh. I can't wait to hear more about that. Wow becoming a mother is like the earth shattering and paradigm shifting. I opening and exhausting. What's the scariest thing you've ever done for fun moved to africa. Wow you did it for fun. And when was that twelve years ago. I was in college. Amazing and africa is a continent. Where were you in africa. Yes i was in ghana which is like no armpit carnival area of the west coast. So we're kind of curves.

Nisha Joanne Wilder Montana Eric Malcolm Cohen Midwest Africa Ghana West Coast
The Counter-Strike Professional Players' Association (CSPPA) Civil War

The Center Ring esports podcast

04:09 min | Last month

The Counter-Strike Professional Players' Association (CSPPA) Civil War

"For those who might not have looked at twitter in the last forty eight hours. This all started when mouse sports and astrology decided to boycott their match for a handful of hours over the weekend or not even over the weekend. Was it tuesday. Tuesday tuesday yesterday. Was that just yesterday was yesterday. Oh my oh my the the. I've never seen drama escalate this much. So then they decided to boycott and somehow within twenty four hours every dirt that everyone's been holding on to the players association is all of a sudden coming to light like so to set the stage. The players association boycotted sir. Scoots is an adviser for the players association and more or less. I don't know if he calls himself this but the public voice of is that fair. He's the only one that vocal out of their group at least right so i don't know if he's like official but i'm just telling you from public perception. He is right thornton per flashpoint. Yeah that's exactly right thorn. We'll tell you up and down that he's not the official spokesman for flash points butts bro. Read the room right like yes you are and speaking of now thorne and all this has come to light. I don't even know where to begin with our opinions. I mean maybe we should just kinda give the backdrop as to what's going on a little bit. Okay i'll let you do that so all of this revolving around voice communications If you don't know what we're talking about here it's players voice comms getting recorded and then being used out for content purposes. Which as you'll hear us talk about in the interview is probably wanted to best truest forms of content right anytime. There's a live listening with cd l. Or you're watching you know. Nfl films or behind the winter classic or hard overwatch league does the same thing. A lot of funny moments have come from. Listening to player comes in the middle of a match. You know a lot of funny moments of people just gravitate towards that stuff so and so do we like larsen and who is a fan of something and says you know what. I don't eat behind the scene stuff. I'm okay yeah. i don't wanna know what it's like for them. I don't wanna know what's really going on over there. you know. it's it's like it's something. that just intrigues. Everybody fund follow obviously in an and. We're no different in so a issues of competitive integrity started coming up in You know players rights. I guess you could say in determining can they have this footage and use our likeness in whatever ways that that they choose to enter the ppa. All along with a couple of the heads of state. I guess you could say like the main people that are involved with the pa from a player's side. Looks like they got together and made some decisions really without everybody being in the know what was going on and so they came out and publicly blasted blast for The voice calm situation in having the ability to do so and you know blasts been coming out defending themselves saying like this is conversation with us in the org and you know this is like part of player contracts and ruling. It's just a lot of back and forth. I wouldn't say there's been a lot of confirmation on anything honestly like we're hearing two sides arguing with one another. What essentially happened. Is the players boycotted and delayed matches for blast pro remind you this was like a four hundred k event like this is a very large event that they're doing the senate Potentially causing some long term damage with blast and some of their partners right. There's like a rumor that there is a bbc deal on the table and the voice comes. Were a big selling point. You know that could be jeopardizing that deal. Potentially a but a lot of just a lot going on from both sides like with wait. Twenty four hours. It's been a twenty four hour

Players Association Scoots Thorne Twitter Larsen NFL PA Senate BBC
Trump campaign loses appeal in Pennsylvania

KOGO Weekend News Edition

03:49 min | Last month

Trump campaign loses appeal in Pennsylvania

"Appeals court on Friday denied the Trump campaign's effort to revive the federal lawsuit challenging the election results in Pennsylvania ruling the claims have no merit. The judges also rejecting the president's motion to one do Pennsylvania's certification of oats. The state on Tuesday certified its general election results in Pennsylvania, formally awarding President elect Joe Biden 20 electoral votes. There are those now who think that this rejection, But the federal appeals court will help the Trump campaign effort to get a case before the U. S. Supreme Court for it to decide the Supreme Court the night before Thanksgiving handed down a favorable ruling for many of the supporters of the president when they said the governor of New York's covert restrictions on some Catholic churches and synagogues Should be tossed out. So what does it mean for the future of the fight by the President's campaign, Mark Larsen from AM 7 60 talked to CBS News correspondent in Washington. Major Garrett about these cases, the third circuit in the most recent decision that came down today out of Pennsylvania case set. You need facts and law to be in dispute and we have neither. There's no evidence. There are no facts there. No presentations. There are just accusations and happily because court should not jump in when there are no facts and no relevant allegations and no dispute. About the underlying walk, no courts to jump in and do that They're not and they're not going to and nothing is going to get the Supreme Court that's reversible. And everyone says Oh, my gosh. Supreme Court said that Religious organizations are protected from certain covert restrictions. Of course they are in the First Amendment. There's a higher standard that's been part of U S law. The very beginning it's in the bill of rights. It's the First Amendment. Yes, there has to be a higher standard and a higher standard has been in law for a long time. It's not a departure. It's a verification, so they're separate things. Oh my gosh. The Supreme Court protected religious organizations and how they observed from covert restrictions. Yes, yes, There's a higher standard, right. Let's talk about that for a second. That was a big deal. Amy Cockney Barrett's first big swing vote opportunity there, and this puts limits on New York on Cuomo. When it came to, he was imposing attendance limits, like kind of like we have here in many cases with his own version of the color codes. 10 people in red Zones 25. People in orange zones seem to be disproportionately getting to the Catholics and the Orthodox Jewish congregations and so forth. So so this is a is a big deal. That sort of happened just over the holiday here in the court. Said. What the court has always said, which is Because it's in the First Amendment because it's in the bill of rights because it's in the Constitution. There's a higher standard that must be met. If you're going to restrict this activity. You better have a compelling state reason to do that. Mm. And if people have the volition to decide which they do, And you have to let them operate within the freedoms outlined in the Constitution that to meet is that doesn't strike me is radical and it doesn't strike me as something is his dangerous now did the chief justice when it was an eight member Supreme Court before him. He called me Barrett was nominated confirmed. Keep it for four. Yes, he did. So the chief justice comes down differently. But this didn't seem to me to be a radical departure that would should make us all breathless are nervous about what the court's going to do. And for the same reason, if any of these cases which I don't ever imagine they will get Supreme Court get there. The Supreme Court's not going to say you know what What doesn't matter, and we're going to keep President Trump in office, and it's not going to do that's not gonna happen. There's nothing that is meticulously legitimate about the assertions made so far and they've had plenty of time to find something and they found nothing. And that's the way it is. Major

Pennsylvania Supreme Court Mark Larsen Major Garrett Appeals Court Joe Biden Amy Cockney Barrett Cbs News New York Washington Cuomo Barrett President Trump
The History Of Exorcism

Oh No Ross and Carrie

05:58 min | 2 months ago

The History Of Exorcism

"Tony us and carry the show where we don't just report on fringe science spirituality and claims of the paranormal. We take part ourselves. Yup when they make the claims we show up so you don't have to carry poppy and i'm becoming an exorcist me to a and so can you at the international school system bernadette dad too. That's my for everything now. Oh are you willing to give it to bob larsen. I'm willing to rent it to bob larson. Yeah you're welcome bob. Yeah bobo what is it that. Let's see your outing a little bit of a syncopation bad about up. But i'm different. Now you repeat all right. We'll know is asking myself if that was different from what you did. I don't know i anyway. it's beautiful. Thank you and we have taken. The course work to become exercises. We've told you a little bit about it in our previous episodes but now we're in deep dive mode. Yeah man. let's get into the history of exercises so put on your exorcism hat. Your student hat last time we left off at the end of level. One course one. I know big cliffhanger yes so. Let's talk about tanger absolutely. Let's talk about christian and pre christian exorcism. Okay well this is module two of level one apprentice level. Oh okay you're making the sound like a very long journey of the exorcist. They have all these like sort of sub descriptions. When you get in there it's not very easily delineated. Your but yes so. You're talking about macho to within level one to be fair level. One is synonymous with the apprentice level. Correct so there's going to be ten modules. And as i was telling you earlier today all ten modules basically amount to exercise been around a long time. It's not a new thing. I'm bob larsen. Just summed it all up for our show for show. Thank you so much. So they're christian and pre christian extra schism part is about how there were indeed exorcisms before jesus even right before. There were such things as christians. So don't be thinking that exorcism is just this new up start phenomenon or that. Bob invented So he let us know that egypt. Persians canaanites all had x.'s rituals. Yes mostly they were incantations or enchantment. There's always going to be kind of a rough line around exorcism as posession versus exorcism as occurs. That's influencing you or maybe laid upon an object so there's kind of squishy lines around all of this. I wonder if he would acknowledge that. Sometimes people did them for health ailments that we would now just acknowledge our health elements. Yes yes. yeah. I think bob's pretty weird that little bit of god of the gaps where god when used to explain things that we just don't understand yet like lightning for example like when a lot of churches and the late seventeen hundred started installing lightning rods. A lot of people were upset. Like oh well this is going to subvert. The will of god share so then when science steps in and explains that oh actually charged particles in quick energy transfer. And hey look you know you can actually take control of that aspect of weather. Then god stops being used as an explanation right. That's what i mean. When i say god of the gaps oh god gets increasingly small and one's world view if one defines god based on what we don't know the more we know the less god is invoked to explain. They should make that at the. Bottom of the nbc. The more you know you need to invokes to explain what are bypass about about so. While bob didn't used that terminology. I think he realizes yeah. Ok some things now. We do explain with medical science or just an understanding of the natural world and very late in this game hill. Really get into mental health issues. That definitely although i think he'd draw a hardline around anything that happened. During the jesus years everything jesus healed. It was whatever she said it was the bible. Says you're walking on water. You turned water into wine or something else involving water then. Yeah that was legit because the bible is absolutely correct about everything i was gonna say. Is there any area where. Bob is not a scriptural literalist. Oh good question you know. I feel like that is always hard to define. Because some people say they are and then as he listened to them describe their beliefs. But if you look through a certain lens you'll see that at the time they were encoding. They're under yeah virgin actually There's gonna be all kinds of ringing. But i feel for the most part bob pretty literal. Yeah he doesn't have to do a lot of back flipping to defend his literal biblical azam. So one thing. He said that i thought was interesting. Is basically everybody alive. During that time was an exorcist like it was kind of taken for granted. Something anybody could do if there are spirits in this world you talk to the spirits right being and when you live in that world where everything around you is kind of controlled by the whims of the gods and the demons. You have to deal with them and placate them. So you mentioned in ancient babylon you had priests like creating a clay figure of a demon and then smashing it. In hinduism you had demons and demigods. Who were understood to attack living beings in greece. You had the oracle of delphi and they were supposedly possessed to tell the future Andy pointed to other which and shamans and various cultures that have had the equivalent of these beliefs

Bob Larsen Bob Larson BOB Bobo Bernadette Tony Egypt NBC Azam Bible Delphi Greece Andy
How To Make A YouTube Ad Campaign To Promote A Webinar

HEY.com - Video Content Marketing Tips

06:00 min | 2 months ago

How To Make A YouTube Ad Campaign To Promote A Webinar

"Install. podcast this podcast, we help marketers and business owners just like you get more value out of the fit your marketing efforts. My is Dan golden from video dot TV, where we help you utter game on Youtube for business and transform your viewers into loyal customers and our new business also is vid target dot io where we help you get a higher return on your too bad spend with targeted Youtube video placement lists along with my co-host she's the powerhouse video marketer from San Francisco. It's R. E. N. W. T. w. e. l. e., y. reneged from video explained. Hello. Renee Hello Dane today I'm happy as chocolate bunny on the day. Easter. Coaching this podcast but are you thrilled earl undelighted all of the things. And Rene, what do you do at video explained? That he explained I, offer video production and consulting services to help companies use video to build credibility, generate leads and convert those leads into paying customers. Okay and you the listener you should know that as always you can follow along in the PODCAST APP you're listening to right now with the transcript and the links and hey, let us know what you think and tweet us here on the show. I'm dain golden she's RT, Lee on twitter. And today we have a special guest. It's Jake Larson of video power marketing welcome Jake. Hey guys. It's good to be or I'm happy as a chocolate bunny as well. On a day after eastern, you made it. We made it through. Fantastic Jake Larson. We asked you on the video marketing value podcast today because longtime, you've been running the video power marketing company and you now have the Youtube ads playbook course, which I am a very energetic participants in which is great. You guys create ads, you manage campaigns for businesses of all kinds and I wanted to ask you because you guys wrote a blog post recently about how to drive Webinar registrations with YouTube bads, and this is very big for anyone's who's doing a B. Two B.. Type of business which we love helping people on with this podcast. Is this a good topic for today? I'm is really relevant I. Think. webinars have been around for a long time and they're still working and so in a lot of the clients that we're working with the have the have webinars, which is a great way to build trust in the marketplace. And Use it as an educational piece to train your audience at the teach them a valuable skill sets and then. Towards the end of. The. Webinar. You can invite them to take further action to help grow your business whether it be an application to work with you can purchase your program. So it's a great way to deliver value in the marketplace and also help grow your business to. Yeah. So I, completely agree with you I think webinars can be really effective for businesses but I also think Sometimes people don't really have a good understanding of the strategy behind their webinars and how to drive people to those webinars and how to get as much value out of them as possible and so I'm really excited about this topic as we've mentioned Webinar registrations or Keith for many types of businesses, particularly high ticket items such as you know what most companies will sell. So they're not selling a ten dollar subscription they're selling. Their products worth thirty, thousand dollars or ten thousand dollars or whatever. It might be kind of high ticket items. is also good for coaches, promoting courses and other types of things. So how should we think about the structure of a Webinar video ad on Youtube in a way that might be different than other types of? Yeah, so I always say whenever you your advertising especially as if it's for your weapon on your company's Webinar. To come from a place of giving like you WanNa give service, you WANNA be able to provide value for people. So making sure that you come, you're starting in the right place of delivering value and come from a place of giving I think is a great place to start. And after that, the the the goal of any AD. is to is want to grab people's attention Bill Trust at value and invite him to take further action and so for the actual ad piece. Wearing, biting them to register for your webinar where they can get additional training and potentially work work with you. So when it comes to really any ad not just weapon are we following a seven step framework where? The framework is basically What's the hook? I mean the hook is like how can like? WHO. Are you? Why should people watch the people continue watching this ad? How can you hook people watching the rest of the video to like anyone who was on youtube is is there to either solve a problem or to be entertained. So stepping. In our step number two is present the problem or challenge or opportunity that the audience is currently facing. Three, provide the solution for. For like what's the credibility like? What gives you the right to be making this video? What's proof that your solution works? And then five is the product overview and that's where we kind of diving the more. But what will people be learning on this on this Webinar? What are the three to five benefits that people will learn on the Webinar six the call to action inviting people to take action so

Youtube Jake Larson Renee Hello Dane Dan Golden San Francisco R. E. N. W. T. W. E. L. E. Twitter Rene LEE Bill Trust Keith
How to watch the first presidential debate between Trump and Biden

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:45 sec | 3 months ago

How to watch the first presidential debate between Trump and Biden

"The first presidential debate happens tomorrow night, President Trump and Democratic nominee Joe Biden will lock horns in Cleveland. It's a 90 minute debate moderated by Chris Wallace, who was the host of Fox News Sunday. Wallace shows six topics for the debate. The Trump and Biden Records the Supreme Court Corona virus, the economy. Race and violence in US cities and the integrity of the upcoming election, their tomb or debates on the 15th and 22nd of October. The vice presidential debate is set for October 7th. And when that debate happens, you can hear it live right here on Kogo. That is tomorrow you'll have a chance to weigh in as well. With Lou Penrose and Mark Larsen live and taking your calls. That's starting at six

Joe Biden President Trump Chris Wallace Lou Penrose Supreme Court Cleveland Mark Larsen United States Kogo
"larsen" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

Blank Check with Griffin & David

06:48 min | 4 months ago

"larsen" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

"Kinda scummy. That's about this is like this was sort of his breakthrough as a movie star. He's playing like a charming cad and then after this, he just becomes like the the American id of the eighties and nineties he just becomes like everyone's like coked up nightmare of like what if I just gave in all of my worst desires I forgot the American president where he's playing like a very idealized lovely I forgot. The other big. Yes right. He does eventually start to do sweeter. But like yeah postseason said the seeds here though is any I mean told us I into Kathleen Turner's Crotch is kind of. Planting a flag this feels like him figuring it out. He's like go further more of this. Ray To Tame Wall Street. Black Rain War of the roses basic instinct falling down disclosure. That's like his run after this right like American president is him being like? I gotTa Take My foot off the gas come. Because after this, he just is like I know exactly who I am as a movie star and I'm going to ride this all the way to the bank and America was like we love it despite the fact that. Always plays someone unlikable. It's he has wild career. We talked about this when we did basic instinct, but he's he's kind of anomalous in a bunch of ways, but we'll. We'll dig into this more. I feel like there's a lot of interest in career context in this movie, which is one of the things we like to talk about because we are has take the two friends. We are connoisseurs of context, and this is a podcast called blank check with Griffin and David I'm Griffin. I'm David. And I love it I. Love IT David I frankly love it. You Love Romancing the stone or you love the podcast David I'm being. Wave it. That's Great I. Love That you love that I'm David I love that you're Griffin. Well that means the world to me, and this is a miniseries. It's I'm sorry it's a podcast about photography's director to a massive success early on in their careers giving us, there's a blank checks, make whatever crazy passion products they want sometimes those checks clear and sometimes they balanced baby miniseries on the thumbs of Robert Damascus. It's called podcast away despite many people begging for it to be called podcasting, Putt Putt, managing the cast at. That's the thing that people want it. Okay I mean, no podcast away is what is called you here how well it rolled off my tongue pod Manson asked get outta here. People want to hear that for twenty two consecutive weeks. But this this is kind of what we call the guarantee her. Sometimes you get a movie in a career that gives them the turnkey that lets them do what they WanNa do, and this is like a guarantee her and then he follows this up with. A. Double Garin turn that essentially leave him open to make whatever he wants for the rest of time I mean, it's a Meka's in this rarified air. I feel like we've covered a couple other people like this cameron. Lucas Spielberg Nolan where it's like guess what you get to make whatever you want for the rest of time you did it enough times that you can have seven flops in a row and we'll still go like. But what if this one's another back to the future like every time Hollywood's like but it might be. It might be. Yeah maybe he should like. Adapt the documentary about the mentally ill guy you know with the soldier figurines and that that'll be a Christmas hit. What an incredible to look forward to? Joining us on the show. This is a very exciting. We have two friends who also hosts a movie podcast. What am I seeing double here? Six male friend Mindy podcast. It's only four. It's only four ladies and gentlemen joining us from the film spotting podcast the long running legendary film spotting podcast Adam Camping Josh Larsen live from Chicago are you guys doing doing great? Thanks for having us on. This will be fun I'm really looking forward to this I was saying to Adam, when we were recording earlier today, we made it through ten it. We made it through. I'm thinking of ending things and you got to sit down after both of those and just enjoy romancing the stone. So came at just the right time romancing the stone is a breezy or watch than either of those movies I like slightly. I'll say this we do and this is I'll say this I'll say this about me saying, I'll say this I say I'll say this too much but here's the thing I wanna say we do a march bad as competition every year that I will admit fully ripped off from you guys. The idea of just like, oh, you can do march madness with things that aren't sports and. And the way that you guys did it and involved your fan base now excite people got over it. Inspired me. I went to David I said, here's my idea we do that but we add the stakes of whoever wins are march madness competition we cover. So it's like we're handing too much control over to our listeners. And saying like here's thirty two directors in Nebraska. Pick who were going to cover a couple of months from now, and Zemeckis is the guy who was picked. In March when the world was going upside down when no one knew how long this was going to last if it was just going to be two weeks staying at home, I'm pretty grateful. That's AMAC is one like looking back at some of the other people who are on the bracket I some of them might be a slog to talk about now. In an alternate reality, you know you. Guys talking about like watching Hermansson the stone being a nice light thing I did feel that appreciation when I was watching the other night if like I'm glad this is what I have to watch. Yeah it was fun I wish I was doing this deep dive that you guys are doing because he someone I instinctually defend but I haven't gone back and re watched a lot of stuff beyond the things I watched a million times as a kid so a lot of my affection for him. Is born out of my childhood experience with him. That carried over even to things like what lies beneath which I think I love more than almost anyone but I don't know if a lot of that stuff would hold up on a revisit. So yeah, listening along we'll be fun and there'll be a little bit jealous that you guys get to do this. Yeah. I mean we'll three movies in. I'll say so far so good for for Bobby Z obviously, he comes out of the gate. Strong. Right, we haven't gotten to the difficult movies. Yeah but like. You know. I want to hold your hand used cars like these are now movies people watch a of these are not movies that are in the public lexicon and integrate time of both of them. Have have either of you guys rewatching those films at any point in the last ten years or so very sadly, both are blind spots for me..

David I Griffin president Kathleen Turner Putt Putt Josh Larsen Meka America Lucas Spielberg Nolan Ray Manson Bobby Z Adam director Mindy Hollywood Chicago Nebraska Robert Damascus
Congressional Inquiry Faults Boeing And FAA Failures For Deadly 737 Max Plane Crashes

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:57 min | 4 months ago

Congressional Inquiry Faults Boeing And FAA Failures For Deadly 737 Max Plane Crashes

"A sweeping congressional inquiry has found damning evidence of failures at both Boeing and at the Federal Aviation. Administration in the development and certification of the seven thirty seven Max, the report says these failures contributed to to Max plane crashes killing three hundred and forty six people. Here's NPR's David Schaper. The House Transportation Committee investigation finds that there was no singular technical flaw pilot failure that led to the deadly 737 Max plane crashes. In Indonesia, in October of two, thousand, eighteen Ethiopia, the following March instead it describes the circumstances that led up to them almost like. A perfect storm calling it the horrific culmination of a series of faulty technical assumptions by Boeing's engineers lack of transparency in the part of Boeing's management and grossly insufficient oversight by the FAA. The report details Boeing's flawed design of a new automated flight control system on the plane and mistakes and using outdated and faulty assumptions of pilot response, as well as a culture of concealment keeping information from the F., a. its customers, and the pilots would fly the plane. There's something big came out of this. That's just is mind Boggling House Transportation Committee Chairman Peter Fazil Inquiry and says, what's mind boggling is at both Boeing and the FAA contend they followed proper procedures at vowed the seven thirty seven Max to be compliant that the bureaucratic were it was compliant but the problem is it was compliant and not say and people died the report also details how Boeing employees were under enormous pressure to keep costs down in the plane on. Schedule Aviation Subcommittee chairman. Rick. Larsen says misguided priorities of senior management drove. A number of troubling decisions in one case, senior management when as far as installing countdown clocks in conference rooms making clear to Max employees meeting production timelines rather than safety was a top priority. The congressional investigation is one of many into what caused the lion air and Ethiopian Airlines. Seven thirty-seven Max Plane Crashes Christine Negroni is an aviation journalist and author of the book, The crash detectives and she says, while much of this information isn't new. Poll, what is to me astonishing about the report is the depth, the thickness and the jury of both FAA and bowling knowing that there were problems with the redesign of this airliner and the oblivious -ness of both parties in recognizing that this was a problem that needed to be addressed and thing to grow any fines. Remarkable is that a number of people did raise. Safety concerns about the seven, thirty, seven Max. But those were either inadequately addressed or just dismissed by Boeing many of them never seeing the light of day at the FAA and that's an especially painful realization for the families of those who died in the Max crashes. It angers us to see how how much. Boeing did to cover this up and how much FAA is done. To help them cover it up Michael Stu Mos daughter twenty, four year old Samya arose to mow was on the plane that crash last year Ethiopia, he believes evidence in this report now shows that the first plane crash in Indonesia was preventable within covering up to keep the Max in the air after the lion aircrash so that it crashed again in Ethiopia and killed my daughter. was unforgivable in a statement a Boeing spokesman says, the company has learned many hard lessons from the plane crashes and its mistakes and has made fundamental changes to the company's safety culture and protocols. As a result. The House Transportation Committee is now drafting legislation to improve at a oversight and certifying planes. A Senate committee is expected to take its own at a reform bill later today. David. SCHAPER NPR news.

Boeing FAA House Transportation Committee David Schaper MAX Ethiopia Indonesia Federal Aviation NPR Chairman Ethiopian Airlines Schedule Aviation Subcommittee Bowling Larsen Senate Christine Negroni Rick Peter Fazil Michael Stu Mos
Google and Twitter vow to block voting misinformation

Jeff Wagner

00:26 sec | 4 months ago

Google and Twitter vow to block voting misinformation

"Changes as we head into the final stretches of the presidential elections in Legans, Andy Larson tells Wisconsin's morning news Twitter says it will remove false and misleading information about voting claims that might be misleading. About results off the outcome of voting, for instance, which could influence people haven't voted yet, Larsen says. Google says it will remove Ants from sites featuring deep fake videos Jane Matt there W T

Andy Larson Jane Matt Twitter Larsen Google Wisconsin Legans
Bipartisan bill introduced to require TSA to take temperature checks

Tom Sullivan

00:19 sec | 6 months ago

Bipartisan bill introduced to require TSA to take temperature checks

"A congressional bill would require the state to take the temperatures of all passengers during security checks. That bipartisan Healthy Skies Act was introduced by Republicans Ted but of North Carolina and Ralph Normal of South Carolina. And Democrat John Larsen of Connecticut, but said the statement that doing the Czechs will help Americans feel safe when they traveled

North Carolina South Carolina John Larsen Ralph Normal TED Connecticut
San Diego sheriff defends officers' use of deadly force

Sean Hannity

00:49 sec | 6 months ago

San Diego sheriff defends officers' use of deadly force

"Here in San Diego County Sheriff Bill Gore is defending his brothers and sisters at the San Diego Police Department. Speaking with AM seven sixties Mark Larsen, San Diego County Sheriff Bill Gore talked about how three shootings in the past 12 days involving officers at the San Diego Police Department translates to his deputies. And sheriff's no matter how good your deescalation training and policies are. It takes two to deescalate. Gore also mentioned what happens when de escalation doesn't work with officers. You're gonna have a weapon a gun and pointed A deputy sheriff for a long enforcement officer. De escalation is it's out of the question at that point time, these officers have a right to protect themselves in the community, and they had to use deadly force. Sadly, Gore was referencing an incident earlier this week when San Diego police fatally shot a man during a confrontation in city

San Diego Police Department Bill Gore San Diego County San Diego Mark Larsen Officer
"larsen" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

06:11 min | 7 months ago

"larsen" Discussed on WDRC

"Larsen I wanted to share some words from president trump Juneteenth reminds us of both the unimaginable injustice of slavery and the incomparable incomparable joy that must have attended emancipation it is both the remembrance of a blight on our history and a celebration of our nation's unsurpassed ability to triumph over darkness that ability is rooted in the fundamental goodness of America and the truths upon which we as a nation declared an end to our status as the subject of a monarch emerged as a free and independent people those truths that all men are created equal by the hand of god endowed by our creator with the right to life liberty and the pursuit of happiness that is Kaylee McEntee of the white house less than two hours ago and this is first amendment Friday welcome to the Lars Larson show and I want to start off with Juneteenth in fact I've made at today's Twitter poll whether or not we should states and the federal government should mark Juneteenth as a holiday now I've heard some of my conservative friends say no no no no we don't want to do that we're not adding another holiday I think there's a good argument in favor of it and I don't do this cynically and I don't do it as a contrarian just to be different I'm suggesting to you that this is one of the things conservatives should think about very very carefully and say yes to that idea now here's my take and I'll give it to you and then of course on the show you're welcome to call in is a naysayer and tell me why it's a bad idea doesn't mean I'll change my point of view but at least I'll listen to yours and if you want to jump in it's eight six six A. Lars that's eight six six four three nine five two seven seven emails go to talk at Lars Larsen dot com on this first amendment Friday June eighteenth twenty twenty so here's my take let's do it let's celebrate it at the state level let's celebrate it at the federal level conservatives should welcome this chance to tell all Americans black and white about the real history of Juneteenth and how it all came about how the demo its launch to the civil war how those evil Confederate generals I know you're wanting to tear their statues down I suggest you do not remove that history it's important to remember it and those generals why do you think the left wants to tear them down Democrats all of them and the first Democrat president preceding the civil war that would be Democrats slave owner and very ill and hateful anti black person J. Andrew Jackson if you don't recognize him just pull out a twenty dollar bill his face is on the front of it remember Republican president Abraham Lincoln who won the civil war and then signed the Emancipation Proclamation celebrated on June thirteenth and yes the celebration began in Texas I'll get to Texas here in just a moment and if you're wondering why only now it's being proposed as a holiday well ask some of the governors out there many of the state's not taxes taxes have been celebrating it for a forty years now but a lot of state governors have not done it so let's remind folks of how we got from there to here June chained twenty twenty a hundred fifty five years ago the Emancipation Proclamation from a Republican president the end of the civil war and less than a decade later the right to vote for women including black women who wrote that amendment that would be Republican Susan B. Anthony I know a lot of news anchors leave off the are part of Susan B. Anthony but you should remember it if you don't believe me check it the amendment was written in the Congress by Republican U. S. senator Erin Augusta sergeant back when a Republican could still win in the U. S. Senate running from San Francisco California it took fifty years to ratify that amendment but Republicans have always been a little bit ahead of their time a Republican president who started the Panama Canal Republicans will like to the first woman to the house of representatives in nineteen thirty six it was a Republican American if you don't believe me check I could Jesse Owens who humiliated Hitler and winning win four gold medals at the Olympics it was the president from that other party who snubbed at Jesse Owens by refusing to invite him to the White House or even sent him a telegram now some of you weren't aware of that little of fact about FDR it's because they left it out of the Jesse Owens movie but do you think we'd fix anything by taking racist FDR's name off all the things that American name for him I mean there must be hundreds maybe even thousands of things named after FDR despite his history it was Republican Jackie Robinson who opened up baseball and then there was Martin Luther king sure you can probably quote the dream speech at least one line of it but the debate continues to this day whether MLK considered himself a Republican or Democrat I'll leave that debate for another day but you tell me with today's Democrats or the radicals who been riding in the streets under the banners of antifa or black lives matter would they welcome a conservative pro life gun toting civil rights leader like MLK to their ranks Republicans certainly would the Democrats probably not so much and then there's the question of civil rights there were four major civil rights acts passed by the U. S. Congress from the week late nineteen fifties to the early nineteen sixties and who gave the greatest proportion of the yes votes in the U. S. Congress for civil rights when the vote was called why that would be Republicans the Democrats actually gave a smaller number and that's when Democrats had big majorities in the house and the Senate those civil rights acts never would have passed without Republicans getting behind them as I mentioned it has been forty years since Texas became the first state to declare Juneteenth a holiday a conservative state in the south but at one time had two hundred and fifty thousand Americans who were held as slaves this past week we've seen the ugly treatment of statues of Thomas Jefferson and George Washington torn down in the name of protest for equal treatment tearing down George Washington wrapping of flag around the head of.

Larsen president
Companies Push for Virus Legal Protection, Prompting Worker Concern

Bloomberg Markets

05:05 min | 7 months ago

Companies Push for Virus Legal Protection, Prompting Worker Concern

"Yeah one of the key issues here is that you know as states re open cities reopen is the legal risk for companies as they bring you know their employees back into the office from remote working to get a sense of kind of what the layout looks there on that landscape Eric Larsen from Bloomberg news he's our legal team leader for Bloomberg news Eric thanks so much for joining us here what are some of the issues that companies are kind of you know juggling right now they think about reopening a bring employees back into the office just wanna point out I'm a reporter not that not the team leader but thank you for the quick promotion one of the main issues that of course employers are worried about right now across all industries in whether or not employees are going to get sick on the job a lot of people are you know million they're gonna be required essentially to come back to work in order to keep their job they're gonna be interacting with colleagues that are to be interacting with customers and it's an inevitable that a lot of them are going to get sick the question is what you know happened then are there going to be we're gonna be a flood of workers comp claims could there be lawsuits filed or anything some lawsuits filed so there really could be a waiver of this type of litigation or legal claims and it's that a lot of states run for exactly where it's gonna go yeah and I'm certain that there are many you know lawyers and all shops out there already sort of concocting defenses and and and cases based on this because you know that some of these are going to probably end up at the Supreme Court we don't have much president when it comes to pandemic loaded we are no ineffective the workers comp a system was really what was set up to deal with all all of these types of workers getting sick you know they it was set up about a hundred years ago it's run by state by state basis to really prevent companies from being bankrupted by in a liability claims especially with the the high damages that that one can get in court so really the the system requires most people essentially requires all workers that we first go through workers comp if they are you know if they get sick at work and a lot of those claims may it may end up being denied and if they are denied that's when they'll go to court and it could be pretty hard to prove a negligent in these cases because if you have to convince the judge or jury exactly where you got sick it's going to be pretty hard to do in a lot of cases because you can really catch the virus anywhere on your way to work the kids I mean who can really say that's why the workers comp system which doesn't require you to prove negligence if it is a lot cheaper for employers at the end of the day that just covers lost wages and medical bills so Eric is it safe I guess what kind of it is incumbent upon companies to provide a safe work environment in this New World I eat with shields and you know spacing and all those types of things is that an area where they just they can't they can't cut back they really have to do the right thing as it relates to worker safety I would say that's probably at the point of the employer's mind all across the country right now I'm Dave wants to keep their employees from getting that there's going to be social distancing there's going to be requirements were handled hand washing a lot of employees of course are going to continue to go to work at home I thought possible Hey you know it's the problem is that even if you take all those measures you're going to see that some people are going to get sick but if an employer can show workers comp board of war the judge or jury because the court that they did take reasonable precautions especially those recommended by federal state or local officials that they did the best they could and therefore that negligence issue wouldn't be there and a judge or jury might just say well you know this and you did your best and I could have done it what can you do Eric how much will unions takeover the workers side of things in this you know it it it's hard to say we have seen some union still over a failure and alleged failure to to get clear guidance but still there the union so far going after the the government authorities for not doing enough to tell employers what to do in terms of safety we haven't seen unions filing lawsuits against employers at least not that I've seen yet does seem to be coming from a private plaintiffs law firms and things like that saying that alleging that working conditions are dangerous and can lead to people getting sick the thing is seeing so far Hey Eric thanks so much for joining us we appreciate this is a fascinating issue that I think employers and employees are gonna be dealing with really for the next coming months maybe even years Eric Larson legal reporter for Bloomberg news talking to us about again some of that legal risk for bringing people back to work at that employees and employers in

The Prestige Nolan

Filmspotting

06:32 min | 8 months ago

The Prestige Nolan

"From Chicago. This is film spotting. I'm Adam are and I'm Josh Larsen. Every magic trick consists of three parts first. Paul is cool. The pledge magician shows you sound olery columns bird or May that was Michael Cain right. We're done with the trip. That was Michael. Cain with some of the opening narration from Christopher Nolan's The prestige we revisit the directors fifth feature as part of our Nolan who've review this week in addition to that we're going to recommend to new films that recently came to the od the vast of night and the painter and the thief that more. Are you watching closely ahead on film spotting? Welcome to film spotting. Josh in an alternate timeline. We'd be spending this post Memorial Day weekend show singing the praises most likely of fast and furious nine. Oh Yeah I'm sure I'm sure we'd both be huge fans I haven't been keeping up with. What would have been released because it mostly depresses me. So this is to me after nine atom as the as the real fans would call it. Don't let Debbie here that that was supposed to come out because she'd probably forced me into a fast and furious marathon at home in memory of it instead. Of course we are talking about films new. Vod We're going to do a little golden brick spotting in this episode. Indeed there are two new films that meet the criteria for our golden brick or D- that's are overlooked or under unforeseen film of the year. Honor that we give to a mostly newer at least new to US filmmaker. We've both seen the new documentary the painter and the thief and I'm also going to recommend the vast of night that's a low budget sci-fi thriller that comes to Amazon Prime this weekend. Of course we're also pinning all our hopes of summer movie season on the theoretically opening tenant the latest from Christopher Nolan. Somehow the word theoretically there just seems so appropriate when talking about Christopher Nolan Anyway. That is still scheduled as of this recording anyway to come to theaters on July seventeenth seven. Seventeen chosen for being a gallon. Drome like the title of the film. Josh I'm sure that you knew that and we can trust. Christopher Nolan is GonNa try to be Oh so clever. Right yes now. A surprise. Our Own Nolan who've review which has revisiting all of Nolan's films is currently scheduled to wrap up in time for that July seventeen release otherwise all of this preparations going to be for naught. Joshua we need ten to get to the big screen in the meantime. We're going to get to his two thousand six film. The Prestige perform this feat in a manner and never before seen by yourselves or any other audience anywhere in the world. Odeon SELECTA is trees topnotch. You'd celebrate a real magician. Tries to weaver something you got something other. Magicians will scratch their heads over spoke. You have such a tweet as you're gonNA remember me for what happened. Just mentioned triggered overseen. I need to know how he does it. He has no. It's real every great. Magic trick consists of three acts. The first act is called the pledge every Great Christopher Nolan movie consists of three parts or acts. The first part is called the pledge. The filmmaker shows you something ordinary with his fifth feature set in late nineteenth century London. It's two rival. Magicians Hugh Jackman sophisticated. Showman. Robert in Jira and Christian Bale's committed professional Alfred. Borden the filmmaker shows you these characters. Perhaps he asks you to watch them to see if they are indeed real on altered normal but of course they probably aren't. The second is called the turn. The filmmaker takes these characters and makes them part of something. Extraordinary are period piece becomes gothic science fiction a meditation on the moral limits of science in pursuit of knowledge the consequences of obsession. Now you're looking for the secret but you won't find it because of course you're not really looking. You don't really want to know. You WANNA BE FOOLED. But you wouldn't clap yet because one of our magicians finally winning isn't enough. Our minds have to be blown. That's why every magic trick has a third act. The hardest part the part we call the prestige fairly early. In the film. Bordon's life Sarah played by Rebecca Hall reveals. He's going to be a father. He shows her the trick. That's going to put food on their table. A bullet catch which he performs for her to prove. It's safe like any of us. Observing great trick. She wants to know the secret and insist. She can't comfortably allow him to do it unless she understands the mechanics of it he relents she replies disappointedly once. You know it's so obvious Josh. Any rewatch of the prestige requires that you know the twist and equipped with that knowledge. It does all seem well pretty obvious like Sarah did that Lee disappointed or even more impressed with Nolan sleight of hand. I am really glad you asked this question because it helped me clarify a little bit. It helped me locate one of the reasons. Why and I'll stay at say at the front here. This is still topped here. Nolan for me really love this film. I think it's incredibly strong. But your question. Help me locate one of the reasons why. I might have liked it a little bit less this time around. And it's not so simple as knowing the twists or knowing the surprises because confession. I don't think I watched the prestigious since two thousand six and I had mostly forgotten how everything unfolded now. Yeah the hints and clues pieced together in advance in a way that I did not in. Oh six but it's different from not knowing anything so I was still pretty much in the dark as this movie began. So it's not just that I knew the answers. It's and I'm not sure it disappoints even in terms of its reveals but in comparison is something like as before we started recording. You had mentioned the six cents so comparison to something like that which we did revisit just last year And is another case where it it hugely depends on its reveals. Its twists turns. It surprises

Christopher Nolan Josh Larsen Michael Cain Nolan Sleight Adam United States Sarah Chicago Paul Amazon Hugh Jackman Odeon Selecta Debbie Joshua Weaver Borden London Christian Bale Robert
"larsen" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

03:05 min | 8 months ago

"larsen" Discussed on WDRC

"Lars Larsen these are places that hold our society together and keep our people United the people are demanding to go to church and synagogue go to the mosque many millions of Americans embrace worship as an essential part of life the ministers pastors rabbis imams that other faith leaders will make sure that their congregations are safe as they gather and pray I know them well they love their congregations they let their people they don't want anything bad to happen to them or to anybody else that is president Donald Trump just a few hours ago talking about making sure that America's houses of worship are re open welcome to first amendment Friday on the Lars Larson show it's a pleasure to be with you and I'm always glad to get your calls especially on first amendment Friday nights and as always naysayers code to the head of the line at eight six six Hey Lars that's eight six six four three nine five two seven seven emails go to talk at Lars Larsen dot com Joe Biden when he's not insulting black Americans for not supporting him as he did today it may be the Joe Biden's campaign is gonna see some really tough times ahead because of that ridiculous if you're not for Biden then you ain't black but he promises he will not raise middle class taxes if he's elected president but what happened last time he made a promise like that we're gonna talk about that as the government has the rule of law with corona virus restrictions do citizens have the right to push back we've already heard enough fake news from the mainstream media but we now getting incorrect information from the late night host joking about re opening the country and take a moment to cast a vote in my Twitter poll you'll find it to places Lars Larsen dot com are great website work everything but the challenge coins is free to at Twitter at Lars Larson show president trump says of liquor stores are essential then churches are essentials to is he right I'd say yes he is right and I have a feeling this is gonna be a very lopsided vote but we decided to ask it anyway in yesterday's Twitter poll I ask you this if a coronavirus vaccine is developed should be mandatory I said no and so did ninety one percent of you it's one of the most common questions I've been receiving in the last few weeks over Twitter on Facebook and by email especially from people to say are they going to make it mandatory and my answer is no I have nothing there is nothing up there to suggest that the government either has the authority or the desire to make any kind of vaccine mandatory do I think that an awful lot of people will line up to get a vaccine once one becomes available and we're gonna talk about Georgia and some of the states that are re opening will do that with Christian toto just a little bit later on this hour but I want to welcome you to the program.

Lars Larsen
Top 5 Moviegoing Experiences

Filmspotting

09:01 min | 9 months ago

Top 5 Moviegoing Experiences

"From Chicago. This is film Spotting Josh. Larsen and I met HIM DR. Get stuck on a movie line with a guy like this behind you a free country. You have to give it so loud to shame to pontificate like that. And and the funny part of it is. You don't know anything about McLuhan. We miss the movies so much. We even miss the Marshall McLuhan pontificators this week on the show. We mourn the current closure of movie theaters with our top five movie going experiences listeners. China into that more. That's funny because I happen to have Mr McLuhan right here ahead on film spot. Welcome to film spotting with Josh. I'm Adam and as we record this. Josh movie theaters are closed. They've been closed for a month or more and they'll continue to be closed for the foreseeable future which means this week's top five movie going. Experiences is either perfectly timed or it's the last thing people want to hear right now. Yeah could be either an act of morning or celebration curious Adam. Is this the longest you've gone sense? You started going to the movies when you were young Without being out of theater because I think it might be for me. Actually it has to be right. When would you ever be away from movies? Maybe when my first child was born but even then we'll get into this a little bit with our lists. I remember going to a Lotta movies when Holden was very young. That's what that was my thought too is. It must have been when we had a new baby but no because in both cases I was working as a fulltime film critic so I would have gotten back to work within a month for sure and Bannon a theater so yeah. This has been a long stretch. If you were anticipating are ghostbusters versus Gremlins throwdown. We have decided just to move that to next week. So if you didn't get those viewings in you have a little bit more time. That part of our eight from eighty four series. This was a top five that our producer Sam suggested in fact he's been suggesting it for many months. Maybe a couple years ago Josh annually. Yeah for some reason. We have always resisted it. We talk about our apprehensions a little bit. And now it's gone from the top five. We both vowed maybe never to do to a segment that I vowed to Sam would never be more than about twelve to fifteen minutes to an entire show. While let's just for the record that happens almost every time we do a top five where they'll say this is only going to be twelve minutes and it could be an entire show so that's nothing new But yeah resistance to this list. is is proven. There's historical basis for that but times have changed. It's a different time. Adam and get does call for this list before we get to that though we want to once again mention the Chicago Cinema Workers Fund and then also the art house America campaign. The arthouse America campaign is co sponsored by the criterion collection. And it's already raised over five hundred thousand dollars for independent cinemas across the country so again keeping this on the mind not being able to go to theaters like these independent cinemas and really worrying about their future. More information on both of these funds again. The Chicago Cinema Workers Fund and then the Art House America campaign will be in the notes for this show at film spotting dot net on twitter invited listeners to write or call in with the names of family and friends who are working on the front lines during this pandemic and we heard from a friend of the show. Kenny Meyer also longtime listener Tom Morris and they called in with some shoutouts. We WanNa make sure that Jamie and Jennifer gets them. Well deserved attention responding? Kannemeyer back and Pump does our California and Just wanted to call and response to the tweet about the front line workers. Doing Cook Nineteen You guys know my sister Jamie She works in respiratory therapist. Linda Hospital Big Hospital here in southern California and Is on the front lines as they say. But if you follow around letterbox. She's still finding lots time to keep up on movies. She's already seen blow the man down so she's one ahead of me right now so just shut my big sister Jamie Thanks for doing what you do. Keep up the hard work and thanks to everybody. Who's out there working on our behalf. I don't funny Adam. Josh Sam Levy Guys. Thanks for the show in a long time to get any feedback So all the ones happy holidays. Happy Fifteenth Anniversary. Thanks for the Bette Davis Marathon and I right talk to you soon. Hey signing this. Is Tom Morris of the good the bad and the nerdy movie podcast? I just wanted to call and give a shout out to a very special person. Says dear to me who is a front line worker. That would be my wife. Jennifer sheet is a unit secretary at a hospital in my area. Hers is actually a little more complicated jobs and she. You know if you hit if a patient hits the help button. She's the first person they speak to. She's the one that organized the handles all the assignments. She gets the nurses to to alert them. When something's going wrong. She is basically the person probably speaks the most of the patient with them ever realize it and I feel like that her and others in her position should get many shout outs is. They're the UNSUNG heroes. Just like you know editors are and so forth and film anyway Let's get all those healthcare workers fighting save everyone's suffering for a couple of nineteen. Thanks thank you Kenny. And Tom for your thoughtful voicemails and of course thank you. Jamie Jennifer for everything you're doing and our thanks as well to everyone out there working on the front lines. If you have a friend or family member you want to give a shout out to. You could drop us a line. Three one two two six four zero seven four four or send us an MP three file or an email feedback at film spotting dot net. We're going to get into our top five now. Josh movie going experiences with some poll results that you could argue completely contradict the spirit of the top five. We asked listeners to vote on their favorite type of movie going experiences. We came up with these four opening night full house for a comedy opening night full. House for an action movie or opening night full House for a horror movie. You could also go. I'm not into crowds weekday alone at my favorite art house. Finally if none of those fit the bill for you you could vote other and right in your choice. How did it come out Josh? This is incredibly revealing? I think Adam other is in last place with six percent and then packed pretty tightly together. Are the three communal options. So ten percent of the vote went to opening night horror movie eleven percent opening night comedy and eighteen percent opening night action movies so you see some differentiation. There among those options but easily winning this poll. We're Buncha loners in film. Spotty Nation Weekday alone at my favorite art house took it with fifty five percent of the vote. That's also how you and I voted. Yeah it is though in fairness we could say that instead of being a bunch of loners film spotting nation is actually just a bunch of snobs. And it's not so much the day of the week or going by yourself or with a group it's the type of movie and they just loved the art house fare donors. Snobs you say potato. Yeah exactly we heard from John Dempsey. Who said I voted alone slash art house though? It's really a tie of extremes for me the other being full house slash blockbuster the alone arthouse preferably daytime experience really put you in a trance. There's nothing quite like seeing for example. The APU trilogy at Film Forum than leaving the dark theater for the bright bustling streets of New York and wandering literally and in your mind with one foot still in the world of the film on the other hand. The communal anticipation in line. The urgency of getting a good seat and the roars of laughter and gasps during an opening weekend showing of say a fast and furious film. It's the type of shared energy. Most people search for music festivals or sports stadiums. I need both in this stem dearly. And I think that's the case I think even us and the people who voted the fifty five percent who said Weekday alone of the art house. We want both and we do crave both and we're going to reflect back on some of the best communal experiences that we've had going to the movies. Yeah that makes sense to me. My my vote in favour of being alone was not in opposition to those other options. Because I do love all of those other options as well. So that's fair. John Characterizes it. Well

Josh Sam Levy Adam Tom Morris Jamie She Chicago Cinema Workers Fund Mr Mcluhan Kenny Meyer Jennifer Sheet Chicago China Larsen California Jamie Linda Hospital Big Hospital Jamie Jennifer Bette Davis America Bannon Art House America
Nolan #3 - Insomnia / Blow the Man Down / True History of the Kelly Gang

Filmspotting

09:42 min | 9 months ago

Nolan #3 - Insomnia / Blow the Man Down / True History of the Kelly Gang

"From Chicago. This is film spotting. I'm Adam Kanner and I'm Josh. Larsen can't be easy to keep working after three days. No sleep to keep focus. You're seeing things yet. Cause little flashes tricks alight that's Robin Williams with Al Pacino in Christopher Nolan's insomnia from two thousand and two as the follow up to his mind. Bending breakout hit. Memento insomnia struck some at the time as a frustratingly straightforward thriller. This week we continue our Nolan who've review with a fresh look plus we'll have thoughts on three new releases all available online more. Can I get up Pacino ahead? Unfilled SPOTTING Welcome to film spotting Josh. The theaters are closed. But the movies keep coming at least if you know where to look this week. We've got reviews of three new releases. Include ONE. That's definitely a golden brick. Were the debut. That's the cozy noir thriller. Blow the man down a feature debut set in Downey's main and the down under set the true history of the Kelly gang from director. Justin Kurt Sel and the high school set Sela and the spades one. You caught up with Josh Ross. Going to continue our Christopher Nolan who've review with two thousand? Two's insomnia the black sheep. Maybe of the Nolan filmography. We'll see if it does deserve that reputation later in the show first though let's talk some new movies for a change including that Australian import true history of the Kelly gang mother soldier pan. You cost me you. Can that back a child? It is already traveling. Full tilt toward the men are would become. That's from the trailer for True History of the Kelly gang which is available to rent ondemand this weekend. The director is Justin Kerr. Zal who previously made twenty eleven the snow town murders than in two thousand fifteen. He did Macbeth. Which starred Michael Faster and Marion Cotillard? All three of them re teamed for two thousand sixteen assassin's creed now. Kelly gang is set in colonial Australia. Where Kelly and his group of anarchists violently rebel against their British rulers nineteen. Seventeen George MCI plays Ned Kelly. The film also stars Russell. Crowe Nicholas Holt Thomasson. Mackenzie and Charlie Hunnam so strong. Cast their Adam. You're able to get an early look at this one before. It's on demand release. Did the cast live up to. Its Promise House the film in general some of it definitely did in terms of the cast. This is actually my first. Kerr Zal film. Haven't seen any of the other three that you mentioned despite the fact that Michael Fast Bender has been in those two that you mentioned and I'm always down for Good Shakespeare Adaptation. I can't compare obviously this film the Kelly Gang to his adaptation of Macbeth specifically but there is a lot of the Scottish play in his telling of Ned Kelly. Se Davis from our beloved. The Baba Duke plays his mother in this film and she is not someone to cross. She's domineering she's vengeful. It's born from years of oppression as a woman and as an Irish woman living under English rule in Australia. You hear her in the trailer. Seda a young Ned. You're a man. Now you go out and show the world. This isn't a gentle mother's encouragement. It's an order and like Macbeth himself. As ned gets closer to his fate the matter he gets and that unhinged hallucinatory spirit is. What colonel taps into visually think about the late nineteenth century? We get in. John Hill coats the proposition as a counterpoint. This is not that at all. This is realism clashing with fantasy to the point where there are times in certain sequences and shots. Josh especially a recurring motif of a man riding a horse. That feels more like more door than the Bush way outside Melbourne. And so I've dropped Macbeth. I've dropped Lord of the rings throw in the assassination of Jesse James by the Coward. Robert Ford and the pop aesthetic of Sofia Coppola's Marie Antoinette. Except with punk instead and you get some sense of what watching the true history of the Kelly. Gang is really like which may sound really amazing to you and other people. Yeah I'm I'm hooked so far. Yeah it's definitely a lot and honestly it was a little bit too much for me. Wants so much to be this fiery sneer. That doesn't conform do conventional biography and it's full of these big ideas about colonialism and storytelling and masculinity and challenging gender and sexual norms. The gang the Kelly gang actually wears dresses for me. It's just all too much of a performance of assault to really embrace and actually MCI is part of it. He's a really intriguing presence and has an unsettling physicality that he definitely brings to this role. A presence was kind of all he was in nineteen seventeen. That's kind of by the design of that film and I haven't read anything about his performance but I wouldn't be shocked to learn that he went really method here that he he went so deep. And as I said there's there's an intensity to it there's a real physicality to it but he's burrowed so deep into it. So deep into Ned Kelly psyche that he never emerges for me and I can appreciate the audacity of what Kerr's doing here and his. I our first shot of young. Ned actually is him peering through a slit in his makeshift home while his mother is engaged in a sex act with a paying customer. That's a British officer played by Hunnam and then later at the end it is big showdown with authorities. He's wearing iron over his head for protection. With the sliver is is that matches that exact same point of view so crucial knows what he's doing absolutely and he does have a really game cast Russell. Crowe shows up for a little bit in this movie. And there's a lot of fun as outlaw. Who Basically pays for? He buys a young Ned as an indentured servant to teach him the trade. And I really like Nicholas Holt. In this movie. He shows up maybe about midway through as a really charming despicable and entitled English constable. Who BEFRIENDS NED in the family? Until the family decides that they're not going to subjugate themselves to him like he expects everyone to do so some juicy fund performances here and crystals definitely doing allot as I said in terms of the filmmaking sounds like there might even be a little bit of animal kingdom in there too with the mother son Dynamic and of course the Australians setting so I. I'm intrigued by those comparisons. We'll we'll have to see if the catch up with if it works a little bit better for me. The True History of the Kelly gang is available to rent on demand right. Now the new one you caught up with Josh is called Sela and the spades the directing debut of Theresa Poh. It had its debut back in January at Sundance and it came to Amazon prime. This past weekend in your letterbox review you wrote any movie that mixes the DNA of mean girls. Brick and schooldays has my attention. We're all over the place with our references in this show so far. Tell me more. Yeah this this could be a lazy short and in some ways doing this exercise. But I think it's it is really helpful in this case because those are great films with distinct styles each trying to do something that maybe you hadn't quite seen before done in that way and mixing it all together is really exciting. That also puts a ton of pressure on a relatively small film like Sela and the spades and so I don't know if it's the sort of pressure this movie can entirely bare but I like that. All of these elements are in here that the basic scenario is selling. The speights takes place at an elite boarding school and we follow the illicit dealings and also the the relationships among various student factions there called and each of these factions. They're essentially like criminal gangs. So Sela played by Lovey Simone. She runs the drug-dealing spades. And you know there are maybe some Macbeth Lady Macbeth specifically comparisons to make here in her ambition and the way she holds grip on power. She does take an underclassmen under her wing. But as we come to learn you know it may not be the most altruistic reasons that underclassmen played by Celeste O'Connor now both of those performances are really strong by Simone and O'Connor There are some good supporting turns to. I could see this being one of those smaller. First films where two or three of the actors in them and this happened with mean girls as well right pop up in later films and you really see what what great talents. They have their There's also the whole criminal element calls on brick of course that this is going on among high schoolers beneath the adults is. It's kind of amazing. How little the adults have to play in in this world And then there are some really striking flourishes by PLO as director. And here's where some of the the school days Spike Lee school days comparisons come in because Sela is also the head of the spirit squad for the school and they have a direct address to the camera routine just about what. It's like to be a seventeen year old

Kelly Gang NED Josh Ross Christopher Nolan Macbeth Sela Director Kerr Zal Adam Kanner Crowe Nicholas Holt Thomasson Australia Justin Kerr Insomnia Charlie Hunnam Al Pacino Larsen Robin Williams Chicago Justin Kurt Sel Jesse James
"larsen" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

03:09 min | 11 months ago

"larsen" Discussed on WDRC

"Lars Larsen sure to be with you on a conspiracy Thursday night and what better night to be talking to the acting deputy secretary of homeland security Ken Cuccinelli I hope we keep your cell phone connection but miss sector it let me ask you about one oddball case and this was the case of this comedian who I guess was on the western dam which finally found a port they could tie up in income to Cambodia and they had taken hundreds of people off the ship and put him in a in a hotel and they said we're gonna test you were gonna quarantine yet and that's that and the guy because literally he said he had a gig in the United States he sneaked away from the hotel bought himself an EMR its air ticket an upgraded one so that he would die guess Ralph suspicion because he said he'd heard about people getting turned away from the bargain basement air carriers from Asia and he flew back it was a three hop flight and there's no indication that he told the airline or anyone else by the way I've been exposed now he doesn't have it as far as we know he hasn't tested positive but he was exposing who's being quarantine for region a reason are we you know what are we going to do with people who decide to take that kind of action and sneak around the quarantines because their life is being interrupted by this and they say I'm not sick I'm just gonna hop on a plane with a bunch of unsuspecting fellow passengers and come back to the United States and when he got to Seattle he said he walked up to customs and customs looked at him and said Mister king and he said yep and they said were you on the western dam and he said yep and he told he told customs those and they said well were you ever in mainland China no do you did did you test positive for corona no and they said okay you're free to go and they let him into the country so I appreciate the quarantining appreciate the screening but it sounds like some of the rules and some of the procedures are allowing people like him who sneaked away from quarantine to just sneak back into the United States and I worry about the disease getting in that way coronavirus well there when we take our containment measures we know that we can't completely contain the virus and nor can we completely keep out what we're doing with our containment efforts is to try to buy time to shrink the number of cases in the country and to be better prepared as we go along when he showed up at Seattle he was probably not only got cornered by customs border protection but there was a secondary medical screening going on there as well and so if he was able to walk away was because he was not symptomatic he wasn't showing symptoms of the virus right it and but there is to your point nothing in his passport you don't get a passport stamp with a cruise ship name on it so if you didn't if you didn't go to China and by the way the state department issued a travel advisory today to people warning them about cruise ships in the Asia area end any cruise ships in the world because people can fly from China to fill in the blank.

Lars Larsen
"larsen" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"larsen" Discussed on WDRC

"Welcome back to Lars Larsen show it's a pleasure to be with you I kind of ask you the question a little bit earlier today about whether or not people who are incapacitated by mental illness should have treatment forced on them in some ways it's very similar to the question about drug abuse and drug addicts and whether or not there should be a way to press them into treatment when they don't go on their own well one of the other problems of people living on the streets is people who are simply incapaz by bank capacity by mental illness if you walk down the street to most of the bigger cities in America you will encounter people who are talking to the air they're talking to themselves at their behaving in an abhorrent way and they live on the streets and day in many cases they are addicted to drugs they're using drugs both booze and illegal drugs and so the question's been what we do about it well the country is kind of approach the problem the same way everywhere with the same results that is it doesn't work well there's a bill in the state of Washington that's before their legislature which is in session right now and it proposes something very simple it says if you are incapacitated by mental illness and you have had at least five D. tensions that is you been picked up by the cops and either taken to a hospital taken to a mental hospital for a temporary hold or you've been held in jail five detentions in twelve months that the option would be opened up by this new law to let a judge put you into what's called a conservatorship a guardianship so that they watch out for your rights now it's funny the people who are opposing this some of them the National Alliance on mental illness Naomi is testifying in opposition to the bill because of civil rights the fact is some of the people in favor of this bill our people have lost family members to suicide to drug addiction to living on the street and they've said these people are family members in some cases it's a son or a daughter will end up going through the system they'll be picked up by the police because their behavior gets to a certain obnoxious level they may actually try to hurt somebody or try to hurt themselves and then they will be into the system for a day or two or three in California I think they can actually hold you for up to ten days and then they'll simply be cut loose again to go right back to the streets knowing to a fairly certain extent that the person put back on the streets is just as mentally ill and they really aren't capable of caring for themselves and that seems crazy so if they allowed a judge to say we've investigated this person is mentally ill they're incapacitated by their mental illness they cannot care for themselves and they keep getting process through the system if you started with the cases where there are five detentions in a twelve month period you're getting picked up by the cops every couple of months and then temporarily held somewhere but no real fixed your problem they get appointed conservator and say you have to go into mental health care the idea seems attractive to me not because I want to take away people's civil rights but if you say if we leave them on the streets what's the most likely result one is they're gonna hurt somebody maybe kill somebody and then they'll go to prison and their mental illness will hobby address there very well or two they're gonna hurt or killed himself and that's a bad result as well would it be and and this is where you have to carefully thread that needle of saying how far would do are we willing to go to take somebody's civil rights if the consequence of not temporarily interrupting their civil rights saves their life or save somebody else's life is that a reasonable proposition I think it is it's been introduced by states senator I think is the kind of thing that could work almost anywhere in America I think it's S. as sensible idea unfortunately I have a feeling that they're gonna be forces out there they're going to fight the idea they'll say why you're interrupting somebody's civil right well as far as I'm concerned the most single is set to sing at the most important single civil right did you have is the right to be alive end of leaving you on the streets leaving you without any mental health treatment even if they have to be treated against their will is going to save your life I think it's worth interrupting somebody's civil rights temporarily to be able to get them back to a point where they're not going to end up dead and they're not going to.

Lars Larsen
Phillies To Retire Roy Halladay’s No. 34 On 10th Anniversary Of Perfect Game

AP 24 Hour News

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Phillies To Retire Roy Halladay’s No. 34 On 10th Anniversary Of Perfect Game

"Late baseball hall of fame pitcher Roy Halladay's number thirty four is being retired this season by the Philadelphia Phillies the team will pay tribute to holiday on may twenty ninth the tenth anniversary of his perfect game against the Marlins it was the twentieth perfect game in MLB history Halliday was forty years old when he was killed in a plane crash three years ago he and don Larsen of the New York Yankees are the only pictures to throw a no hitter in the postseason Halliday opens the twenty ten and al division series with one against the Cincinnati Reds in his first career playoff start he was inducted into the hall of fame last

Roy Halladay Philadelphia Phillies Marlins Halliday New York Yankees Cincinnati Reds Baseball MLB Don Larsen
3D Printing at CES 2020

3D Printing Today

04:26 min | 1 year ago

3D Printing at CES 2020

"I did not go to see this year and I'm Kinda glad I didn't go to see as this year because we look at what's been written about what showed up at the twenty twenty three D.. Printing doesn't seem to be much. They're pretty slim pickens pretty slim. The first thing that at least in the article from Three D. Printing Industry. They Kinda I talk. Talk about the Davinci color the five day then. She's continually to push this notion of a color. Three d printer using inkjet technology. In which color is is while it's laying down the layer and it does work fairly well. I mean it's not bad it works. It's not it's not the highest quality color you get. It's kind of everything I've seen seems kind of bleed e eighty Kinda Fady you you put the color of the base. PLA which you have to use. There's it's kind of off white gray and that kind of changes and washes the colors that are being placed upon it but still bill. It's better than what you're going to get with. A multicolor multi multi filament color such as the pal the MU or tool changer right. It's going to be much much much much more detail on an f. d. m. for an f. the machine however I finally finally got to hear some I feed back on actually using these machines are are acquaintance. Joe Larsen who posted on our forms if you want want to hear in detail exactly what he wrote. Go on our three D. Printing Tips Three D. printing tips and tricks for him and look for Five D. printer thread. It's still up there. And Joe on the a fourth post wrote about his experiences and actually using the Davinci color printer things and he never has told us this before. Oh interesting so he's he's not very happy. He's not very happy with his experiences and it seems that every time he tries tries to use it some chip on the thing blows out now the chip. I think he's talking about is a chip on the SPOOL. Okay because the spools are shipped that was always the DAVINCI model for All their printers were were very inexpensive but then using Using proprietary trying. Trying to lock you at reprioritize filament. He complains that he buys a set of inks that are all brand new showing ninety nine percent full and then suddenly they show zero zero. Yeah plane and the the biggest problem is is that what he tries to contact. DAVINCI takes months to get fixed. Lau Amihai now now. He believes in their their methodology for color printing. And I think I do too. I think it's a a good approach to adding color to edit my the for some applications yeah not not not I mean how many applications really need hi Rez color in annual. I know but it's it's like toys and Hobby But you know it. It looks like it may not be worth while no As far as storing during the ink cartridges. It's going to be the same complication that as two d printing go dry thousand. Wear out quickly. It gets expensive very very very fast. They were supposed to send me one when it first came out and A guy exchange half a dozen emails with somebody at the at the company APP. Nothing ever never happened. But so yeah so if you're like you know rubbing your hands and they want to get that it's going to be like everything else. Take it with a grain of salt. You might be very reduce appointed right quickly and look at the look at the quality of the color you get on the on the prince because I found the of the quality of color. Kinda Canada's appointing. Yeah well it's kind of like if you take a regular peel print and color with like a Sharpie You get this kind of bleed lead affect yes. And and that's just the nature of of Pierre. Lay the layers just kind of wick. The the color and it looks at least from the samples. Apple's I've seen like it. Does that on this printer as well. The only way around that I know is to is to shoot it with primer and then it then it you know you can beautifully l.. Color it But this sprinters not they're just going directly onto the Palais. So there's GonNa be some

Joe Larsen Lau Amihai Davinci Apple Canada Pierre
Don Larsen, former Yankees pitcher, dies at age 90

AP 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Don Larsen, former Yankees pitcher, dies at age 90

"A former Yankees pitcher who threw the only perfect game in World Series history has died the peas and Greg Jacqueline reports for don Larsen who passed away at age ninety his career highlight is a tough one to top over a fourteen year major league career don Larsen one only eighty one games in his career record was ten games under five hundred but he made baseball history with a perfect game in game five of the nineteen fifty six World Series the only time it's been accomplished in World Series history Larson won eleven games during the regular season and fifty six a career high two years earlier he was three and twenty one for the Baltimore Orioles before being traded to New York I'm

Greg Jacqueline Don Larsen Larson Baltimore Orioles New York Baseball
Yankees Legend Don Larsen, Only Pitcher To Throw A World Series Perfect Game, Dies At 90

The Nat Coombs Show

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

Yankees Legend Don Larsen, Only Pitcher To Throw A World Series Perfect Game, Dies At 90

"Just last night. Don Larsen die who Was A pitcher for the New York Yankees. Akis who through the only perfect game in world series history I'd say he was a Journeyman pitcher But he threw this one great game and and beat the Brooklyn Dodgers Yogi. Berra jumped into his arms out after the last pitch. It's a nice little story is that there's a good clip of it on. ESPN if you want to look at it

Don Larsen New York Yankees Berra Espn Brooklyn
"larsen" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"larsen" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Larsen was the first and only person to ever pitched a perfect game in a World Series game he died at the age of ninety Larson said he realized he was a great pitcher but boy he pitched a great game that one time in the World Series twenty twenty bringing us some very good news at the gas pump as well prices are expected to be flat to slightly down from last year is the U. S. energy renaissance continues the energy information administration says the average price will be two cents a gallon less than last year at two sixty a gallon down to two thirty in Texas the main reason is the glut of U. S. production the U. S. last November exported more oil than we imported for the first time since the forties analysts say they could place more stress on already fragile middle eastern economies the feral hogs are so destructive here in Texas are suddenly spreading to other states and they're doing so in large numbers they've reportedly increase their range from seventeen states to thirty eight over the past thirty years extending as far north as Canada what's worse wildlife scientists believe they're being deliberately taken the other parts of the country in order to be hunted for sport well who would have thought that the big change in video games would be the stuff you buy in order to play the games this is a Bloomberg market minute the hottest thing in video games may not actually be fortnight but the advances in technology used to power such games there's gonna be a revolutionary change in gaming as we move to cloud streaming Ted Pollock is a video game technology analyst and co founder of the gamer ETF he says expected to hit its stride in three to five years clouds streaming is where the game is being processed on a remote server and all you need is a very low power processor to play high quality graphics in other words a high speed internet connection is required a high powered and pricey gaming PC or console is not another big growth area for the video game industry is watching the pros at play and was news to data predicting ease sports revenues to come in this year just a little short of a billion dollars thirty eight percent increase from last year Pollack says it could pave the way for a future as popular as traditional sports I think gaming could definitely rival professional sports the number of followers I'm John Doniger Bloomberg radio okay season down the night this time for your spurs insider with the voice the spurs bill Schoening and it's brought to you by via transit this first go for their third straight win in ten straight home win over Oklahoma City tonight okay see as one three in a row and seven other past eight ball games the spurs beat OKC in early November one twenty one one twelve this first three point shooting is come alive the spurs won three of their last four ball games in those three wins this person at forty seven threes at a fifty two percent clip Garderen Forbes as the spurs but moving better without the ball setting up but looks game my seven zip seven thirty tonight.

Larsen
"larsen" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

08:05 min | 1 year ago

"larsen" Discussed on WDRC

"Larsen back to Lars Larsen show it is first amendment Friday you know the Democrat party has left the black voters behind it it's a mad dash for the laugh what can the GOP due to better appeal to those voters if gynecologists specialize in the female reproductive system why should those doctors being forced to serve biological males course merely posing as females Senate Democrats have released a federal privacy bill it's aimed at corporations who place their projects ahead of your privacy but does that bill help your rights what is actually harm them and I want you to cast a vote my Twitter pull a Lars Larsen dot com and out Lars Larsen show tonight the question is should America keep training foreign nationals in our military when some of them turn into terrorists as one did today the man who opened fire this morning killed three people injured eight others at Naval Air Station Pensacola he is a Saudi national name Mohammed Saeed al sham Shyam Ronnie and he killed at least three people there eight others who have suffered some pretty terrible wounds he was finally brought down by local authorities the the two deputies from the Escambia county sheriff's department exchanged gunfire with the man and the man was shot dead and the Saudi government has now apologized the king of Saudi Arabia called president trump personally this man was on our soil learning how to be a pilot because he's already in the Saudi airforce and so we extend to foreign countries both for their benefit and for our benefit as well the ability to come to the United States and be trained on U. S. military bases unfortunately incidents like this happened they don't happen all that often but it should be interesting to see how the U. S. government tightens things up the other question that is raised at least for a first amendment Friday night I don't know that anything will be done about it but if you remember back to the shooting the mass murder at Fort Hood Texas carried out by major Nidal Hasan a member of our military the question was raised at the time why is it that on our military bases many times the only folks who are armed or the military police that average service members no matter what branch of the service they come from are not allowed to carry a concealed weapon even if they have a permit to be able to carry a concealed weapon off the base on the base they're not allowed to possess a weapon now that makes most military bases in America gun free zones in the sense that the only people allowed to carry guns on those bases are police or the military equivalent it's never made sense to me at the time of the Fort Hood showed shooting I argued that if you allowed some of the thirty thousand people who serve on say Fort Hood or to allow some of the thousands of people who work either as civilians or workers members the military at NAS Pensacola that you might have had some better ability to stop somebody like this and you might even deterred the person from acting in that way at all because as you know many of the people who carry out mass shootings are simply cowards they either give up to police at the end of the shooting and I can cite a couple of dozen of those or they end up taking their own lives rather than being taken into custody they are cowards start to finish and I believe this man was no different let's go to Richard it is first amendment Friday and if you want to jump into the best conversation and taught journalism it's eight six six four three nine five two seven seven Richard welcome to first amendment Friday a large thanks for taking my call glad to do it what's on your mind Tonite everything is fair game yeah I want to talk about how municipalities and leave heroes in Portland are not held to the same standard as US private contractors are you know you you spit on it may be a ramp and you got to replace it now can be detrimental to a small contractor you know you can go under and I see the water bureau out there turn up the street and not holding themselves to the same specs about I'm sure it's probably not I'm sure it's probably not the only place in America that is happening since we're talking to the whole country tonight I'm I'm willing to bet that this is is not something that is that unusual I'm not saying it's right I'm just saying that the idea that the government lays down a set of rules and says these applied to citizens but they don't apply to us the Congress is famous for doing a state legislatures to it for example the rest of America in the private sector is required to hew to the rules of the equal employment opportunity commission in that you can't discriminate based on race religion national origin physical disability and all that Congress may did self exam from that OSHA applies to the rest of America doesn't apply to Congress you know so they create these little car ballots for themselves and as far as I'm concerned if the rule is appropriate to apply to private companies and private citizens it should apply to the government as well and if you tell me no the government agencies the federal government the state government local government should be exempt from them if they can be examined they are not super citizens we should be exempt as well either make the rule apply to everybody or make it apply to nobody what do you think of that absolutely I couldn't agree more okay Richard thanks very much I appreciate the call so to Charles in Arizona Hey Charles welcome to the Lars Larsen show what's on your mind tonight Lars I want to know if you're familiar with something called the D. I eat initiative it stands for don't inspire evil I'm I'm not well you it is a consistent are you in the city of it is number of journalists and also was started by an organization called CPFL which is Jews for the preservation of firearms ownership I like that and I've had a lot to do with that group I'm a big supporter of Israel well I'm there media spokesman and I can tell you that the Jane PFOA is it as asking people in media not to say the name of the perpetrator because it gives them in some cases in this case probably not of such terrorism but in some cases it gives them what Margaret Thatcher called the oxygen of publicity I've heard that argument before Charles and let me jump right to it because I I think it's an interesting thing to talk about here's the objection I have as a as a journalist and it and it kind of goes along with the same argument I made a few weeks ago when I named the whistle blower in the in on the improvement hearings charm Ellen and the reason is you can't find out much about a person unless you can say who they are and when you say what's the purpose of saying their name I don't try to overdo it by saying a person's name over and over again but there are too many instances when as a reporter we've reporter on a story an arsonist or murderer rapist and you put his name out there and all of a sudden you hear from people who knew the person now if you don't name the person I understand the argument that says well he was doing it for fame so that he'd be fame famous or infamous as a quake case may be but then that cuts you off from finding out much at all about it and when the new when both news agencies and government agencies begin to say we're not going to name the person then you don't get that information about the background of the person not to defend them but also to you know find out more about them how do you how do you ensure that concern I do better by this by this statement if you for seventy two hours ago had no part on it but respectfully I have heard you say the name of the perpetrator in Colorado I've heard you say the name of several other perpetrators on the radio and I wish after the first seventy two hours you would you would refrain consider refraining from doing that and publishing their paper there are pictures of its on Facebook or anywhere.

Lars Larsen Democrat party GOP seventy two hours
"larsen" Discussed on Things Above

Things Above

08:01 min | 1 year ago

"larsen" Discussed on Things Above

"Maybe we should talk about field live dreams. I think that's one that is gonna lead you all right good. It's not an explicitly religious film but it's almost even in <unk> mainstream reviews of it. Mainstream critics talk about it in spiritual terms. You know i think just it has that right there on the front and it's really this <hes> <hes> it's a spiritual journey. I think prayerful obedience on the part of kevin costner's character this farmer who you know here's this whisper if you build it he will come and builds this <hes> baseball diamond in his field and there's a couple of there's a misunderstanding almost of obedience on ray kansallis apart costner character <hes> cause for much of the movie he just he keeps doing these things in hopes of earning a payoff and i think what's instructive struck about field of dreams is that that's not really what christian obedience is. We don't offer our obedience to god <hes> in order to earn something <unk>. Rather obedience is more. It's our response to a gift. That's already been given. That's what grace is and then we respond by saying to god. This is what we can offer you in thanks and also because you know the laws we are given by. God are determined. They're meant for are flourishing. They're meant for our goods so that's another reason why it's good to obey but raise lesson in this film. Is you know that when he builds odes this field and then the baseball players from the past arrive eventually they go off into the field and he wants to follow them. He thinks this is what he has finally turned <hes> and he's not invited and i think that's just a really instructive moment of how we should think about obedience as being something that <hes> <hes> it's not like a rigged slot machine as i write about where you put in your ax of observance and then the reward comes spitting out <hes> it's more of just a a response <hes> <hes> to the gift we've already been given oh yeah and there's so much in that film i mean it is definitely mystical and transcendent. You got another dimension. You've got is the cornfield heaven is iowa. I love with the baseball players say to him but <hes> yeah there's there's so much going on and and the he could not get not one but three whispers obedient with all three of them and and the james earl jones character who can utter lines lines like nobody. I know he will come wrote. A presence definitely gone. <hes> i just love the way he utters lines like will come and <hes> and they do. It's just i. I watched that film probably once a year so you really okay. It's kind of a seasonal. I love baseball. I was gonna say is it. Is it part of your sort of seasonal. Get ready for the season liturgy. I watch field of dreams. I watched the natural there you go <hes> <hes> yeah and those are those are movies that just i i continue to watch year after year. Yeah they put you. They put you in that space right that that that you can always return to that space that they create yeah and the yeah they end for the love of the game. That's another option. It's costner ago. Yeah that's right. It's <hes> but there's something that that i'm drawn to all of those movies and something about baseball too and i remember years ago. I was talking with a christian artist list and he he had made the point that <hes> that's that he said baseball actually is it fits paul's admonition to set your mind end on that which is beautiful good through the whole litany of things and i went what how is baseball that way and he said think about it. I mean it's a clean game and their lines there or there's three outs. There's three strikes. There's everything it just happens within this and then the beauty of the ball and the bat and and the catch in the throw and so ever since then. I've thought maybe there's something yeah spiritual about baseball that maybe that's another reason i loved those films. I don't well you know we we've been talking about theology of film and a whole other area that is rich to explorers theology of sports and i know there's been some academic work on that <hes> and maybe even a booker booker to but but a practical way of thinking about sports in theological terms <hes> i think we're i'd love to see that happen. We tried to do some of that. I'm something christian <hes> we've written about the n._b._a. Playoffs recently and just dip our toe in that territory but that's a huge area of interest to me as well that that i think is <hes> really really rich with potential. Oh for sure for sure well. This has been fantastic and i do have a little <hes> potential bonus for for people that wanna hang on and listen a little longer longer but i want to be sure and mentioned as we've talked about. You're going to be leading an intensive workshop at the upcoming. Apprentice gathering can't way and <hes> it's it's yeah now. People will get a whole. You know what almost six hours with you to go deep into this stuff. <hes> say shop and what you're you're hoping people will get from that yeah. I think it'll be doing in community some of the things that i do in the book because as i've gone around speaking with the book and i found that it's more interesting to do workshops workshops than necessarily lectures <hes> where we can actually watch scenes from these films and that what that really allows us to do is move a little bit beyond the thematic connections and dig into the aesthetic details that also echo some of these ideas. I've been talking about also you can really spend time talking about the cinematography how the lighting works in a certain scene <hes> or the use of color versus black and white talk about the wizard of oz there air. What does that say in. How might it relate to the way the film is functioning as a form of prayer so there's that element that is good is the audio visual element and also so just the <hes> communal element of getting people to do getting to do in real time with people <hes> the interpretation of these scenes because a lot the times <hes> it just pops out at you right as you're watching it does for me it will for the people who come to attend and so. I really hope this'll be something unware people can jump in offer their own observations. Ask questions and <hes> make it <hes> a fruitful experience for everybody. I'm sure it will be and i'm gonna pop in myself as much as i possibly can too busy day for me with the copper starting but i'm i'm. I'm stoked. That's going to be september. Twenty sixth and conversely begins that night runs through saturday so great speakers will be there. <hes> william paul young who's been on this podcast are utter. The shack is going to be speaking and other people so it's really good and <hes> but just to again movies or prayers is the book <hes> josh larsen and you can follow josh on twitter. What's your twitter handle correct yeah on twitter you can find me at larson on film and i have a facebook page with the same name larsen on film so yeah find me there and <hes> <hes> send me. A message asked me a question be happy to interact awesome well before we get to the bonus round. I just want to say josh. Thanks for being on this podcast. This has been a blasphemy me. I'd love it was fun. Yeah thanks for your thoughtfulness. I appreciate it well. I hope you enjoyed this episode. I know i did josh is amazing and if you liked what josh is talking about one learn more. I would encourage you to consider coming to the apprentice gathering. <hes> that's her upcoming conference fringe university september twenty six th through the twenty eighth you can find out about the conference at apprentice institute dot org and you can sign up for the conference and joshua's intensive workshop. It's going to be fantastic. Stick until then you can find me on twitter and facebook. James brian smith and you can learn more about this podcast at apprentice institute dot org. If you enjoyed this episode please.

baseball josh larsen kevin costner twitter facebook william paul james earl jones joshua iowa James brian smith larson six hours
"larsen" Discussed on Things Above

Things Above

11:27 min | 1 year ago

"larsen" Discussed on Things Above

"I am sitting in the midst of kansas so i think it's only fair that talk a little bit about the wizard of oz and how that represents a prayer of yearning close to your heart there in kansas. I get it the yeah i mean. This is. It's a search for home. Right is what the wizard of oz is and that's what all of our union is. I mean we know goes back to this idea of beauty and broken this. We know that this world in many ways feels like home and feels feels like the right place but also there is enough awfulness here that can't be fully right and so even those who don't know the christian story don't know the promise of a restored creation that the bible offers <hes> they still yearn for that that yearning for things to be made right for the true home is built within all of us so how can a movie that's all about that like the wizard of oz is not speak to audiences and not resonate nate as this prayer for yearning this wanting to find our way home and that movie is really interesting because much of it is all about dorothy going about that search in the wrong ways as right think about how often she fails thinking about the false gods that she puts her hope in not only the three friends but ultimately the wizard himself who shown shown to be a sham <hes>. I think this resonates with the christian story in in a lotta ways we cannot find our way home on our own. We can accept god's gift and god's grace <hes> that he offers that restoration will bring it about <hes> but dorothy is is not gonna be able to earn it and it's not really until she lets go of that understanding and just something simple as obey promise clicker heels that she does finally lake at home so i think your name i think earning is is something i really enjoyed this chapter. I'll i'll tell you jim because it was the one where i thought <hes> someone who isn't a believer might be able to read and say okay. I've felt that i've experienced that not only in myself but i've also resonated and with in movies <hes> that have done something similar. I spent a lot of time on science fiction films in that chapter because i think a lot of those capture <hes> this <hes> this this year earning we all share and so that was a lot of fun one too. That was a fun one to dig into it. It's a great chapter. I also think to josh about the wizard of oz that the the the yearning of the three characters you know the the desire for a brain for a heart yeah yeah it all three of them. The representing that i breath which i think is a huge issue in human life is i'm deficient. No i mean i think art whether it's our culture or sometimes are religious narratives. Tell us that we're somehow how deficient that we lack something yeah and and of course the irony of the whole thing is that for all all not only the three dorothy too. I mean dorothy. She already was home right. He already had the brain he already had courage. Yeah you know and and i think there's something explicitly christian than idea that that's a as people made in god's image that we are we commonsense fully equipped <hes> even if we don't think it but yeah yeah pretending to be like you so no i i liked that. There's i mean you're right. There's two sides of it. <hes> sometimes we're too hard on ourselves and don't see the god-given worth that we have and that god loves us as we are <hes> but then there is the other side of that <hes> being truthful about the ways we are broken to <hes> and so the yearning is both on a cosmic level that i think i was talking about <hes> where we wanna find that true home but i think it could be on a very personal level too is to know <hes>. We're going back to paul here. Why do i do these things. I don't wanna do <hes> because as though i am created in the image of god and have worth <hes> i also <hes> there's something broken about me as well and so that personal yearning is captured captured the wizard of oz even as it also seems to capture that cosmic yearning. That's probably whites such a classic. I would say in indeed and and josh that was a brilliant segway bag way or c._u. If you're mispronouncing a brilliant segue to the next chapter which is on prayers of confession because yeah we are made in god's image we're all so broken people and <hes> and there is sin and that's a reality <hes> but you know you use you use a film to illustrate prayers of confession session that i did not see coming. I gotta be honest toy story. Oh that surprise you really okay. Which of course i once you wrote about it and explained why i went of course i see that yeah and i know that film backwards in for sure many times with my kids but but i mean so help our listeners understand and how hoist story is actually a pair of confession. Yeah i think it helps to think a mainly about buzz buzz light year in this scenario and maybe that's why it doesn't come immediately to mind because we think about this you know as as what he's story a lot of ways but in toy story the first film <hes> one of the major narrative threads is buzz <hes> coming to understand and admit who he really is which is that he's not the space ranger. He's not out this heroic figure but in fact he's he's a toy and when it comes to confession <hes> you know i think our immediate instinct is to think about confession russian in terms of naming the ax we have committed <hes> that go against god's will and certainly that's part of it but really those acts are just <hes> just <hes>. It's just the bad fruit of what really is the rot that is at the heart of our sin that that we do hold again you know recognize are worth has created beings but also the broken this we have under sin and it's a form of self deception. It's not admitting that we are broken broken in many ways that we that's what we need to confess in a lotta ways is basically start there and say that yes. I do need <hes> god's reduction. I do need that grace. That's provided by christ's work <hes> and that sort of the story. That's the the narrative that buzz this follows you think about that great scene where he watches the commercial for other buzz light year toy is and suddenly it dawns on him the reality that i'm just a toy i'm not this space ranger and that's a that's a drawn out long seen as it sinks in a very purposeful one <hes> and and he fights against it if you remember runs to the railing and tries to over one more time <hes> in the face of that commercial he sees on t._v. He still denies it and all it results is is on is in him falling down to the ground and getting literally broken and it's not till he's l- recognizes that he is literally broken toy that he can start over and buildup then with that reality <hes> and so in that way one of the main things to me toy story is this <hes> prayer of confession <hes> behalf of buzz light year well and woody too because remember woody his i mean his sin was was <hes> jealousy. I mean he was sure. Buzz came in threatened his his his territory and he wanted him to go out the window yeah and then he and everybody says you did it would he not didn't they didn't <hes> but yeah. I think that it's yet i think because because what confession confession is an act of humility saying i'm not god it's saying i'm and there's something just so beautiful about out that and so i got it. I got to bring this up because in that same chapter you talk about the movie trainwreck which i'm sure a lot of our listeners didn't i didn't watch and maybe shouldn't watch. I don't know you got to discern but it's i thought it was hilarious and and kind of moving his obviously full of vulgar humor and whatnot not but it's an amy schumer yeah but but i too was moved by the film particularly i think in the way you were in in how she did sort of come face as the face with her own broken this but talk talk to the listeners about about how that movie for those who've seen it <hes> also has illustrates that same point and this is one of those as as you mentioned you know if if someone says that's not for me because it's rated higher and very raunchy i totally get it totally understand but for me. It was distinct from a lot to these sort of comedies where <hes> schumer plays this <hes>. She's a promiscuous hard-drinking magazine writer. She's basically just living. Her best is life as she wants to or at. Least you know what society tells her should be her best life <hes>. I think her if i remember right her mantra is i am fine. I am in control which yes to keep telling herself after she's recovering from another variety praised night out and it follows her again the humility she experiences as in realizing that no that's not the case not necessarily because of these specific acts a again that that's the bad fruit but because you have this underlying line belief that you're in control you can determine everything about your life and that what you want in the immediate moment is all that should matter <hes> and you know a lot of raunchy comedy spend time watching their main character indulgent bad behavior and then in the last thirty seconds they'll they'll slap their hands ends on slap on the wrist and say punish them in some way and say now you're going to be punished for all the fun you had <hes> and then it adds and it's really this kind of fast sil- <hes> hollow low way to look at it but trainwreck which schumer notably wrote as well spends a lot of time on her character's awareness and this recognition that there's something deeper <hes> going on here that i need to admit about myself <hes> and then move on from that outpoint and so it really stood apart from for me <hes> from a lot of the other raunchy comedies you get that kind of play in the sandbox <hes> but really are just doing it in in an exploitative way. I agree and i. I actually think that's why that film was blockbuster. I think it was so big. I mean they're they're raunchy stupid movies that are blockbuster and a sense of sales but i think there was something really sweet about that movie that people were drawn to and i think it was exactly what you're talking about. It was it her character does evolve and you get to that end in the end is actually <hes> i it a lot of it comes together and you get the feeling like she's actually grown up in a sense <hes> in in a in a better way but but pretty funny along the verify schumer schumer is brilliant so i'm. I'm a fan of hers. I was already going into that one hopeful and it was it was fun to see that paid off. Yeah i agree. I agree one last one <hes> the prayers of obedience. We could do this all day. Josh russian would fall <hes> first of obedience and you mentioned let me just list four that show up in that chapter that i bet a lot of listeners know about that would that would be. It's a wonderful life references. My favorite movie rocky the rocky movies. I would say star wars or the star wars movies and you include field of dreams as well <hes> so i'm going to just toss that onto you pick one of those and how does it ilustrovana a prayer of obedience yeah..

dorothy Josh russian schumer schumer kansas amy schumer nate schumer jim paul segway writer l woody thirty seconds
"larsen" Discussed on Things Above

Things Above

10:40 min | 1 year ago

"larsen" Discussed on Things Above

"Full. I mean we don't throw it out because there's darkness case you could make the case it's n._c. Seventeen and so what do we do with the bible when we encounters those things well. I think christians thoughtful christians ask ourselves will why is that in there <hes> how does how does is this content fit not in this specific verse or even chapter but within the larger redemptive arc of god's story that the bible tells and i think think it's helpful to take when you're discerning about film watching a similar approach and ask ourselves if there is some very difficult content <hes> in this this film. Why is it there. Why do the filmmakers choose to put this on the screen. Now there will be some cases where the simple answer is. It's to be exploitative additive <hes> and those are probably the films and examples. We want to avoid but i would argue in most cases when you're watching good films a a lot of thinking and careful deliberation went into putting that content in the film and it's worth exploring wise it there. What is the movie sane <hes> <hes> by using this sort of contact just as we with those rough stories in the bible yeah. I like that josh because it's when when the violence or the sexualities gratuitous is when it's just for the sake of the of the effect that has that to me. That's off the i don't. That's i'm not interested in that at all but you know if if if you say as a christian probably going to offend a couple listeners right now but but i think if you say you as a christian you can't watch an rated movie that it's just that it's out of bounds for a christian while you're gonna leave a lot of great art <hes> out i mean some you are movies that for me have been deeply flee moving in and discern. It's hard though and i like that i mean that's the other way too and just to say as your as your i agree with you. It's it's not helpful to say. All christian should avoid a movie. That's rated. I agree with you but we also have to come at the other way and say that isn't to imply imply that all christians need to watch r. rated movies right so the grace flows the other way where if someone comes up to me and says you know for whatever reason i found this film caused me to personally stumble in my faith walk then they are not. They're not a worse moviegoer for wanting to avoid it. Does that make sense. Discernment is also weakened. Say there are these foundational postures that are good to take but discernment is also very very personal so something that you know continent of film that i might find troubling for myself. <hes> you know maybe someone else doesn't and it's okay for me then to not watch that film so so we need to <hes> as we're encouraging christians to be open minded about movies also be respectful of those personal choices. Where are they want to say. That may be all well and good but for me. <hes> i want this to be off limits <hes> yeah i think that's right and i i mean certainly in my own personal life there have been. I'm thinking television series that i you know i got four five episodes anyway you know i don't like how i feel <hes> this. I don't know i mean i think that the violence and even whatever level of nudity or something i just go you know. I don't like how this feels is doesn't and i don't need to put my mind nine and the this this podcast is called things above we talked about what are we gonna put into our minds and i think i want to put things into my mind actually inspire encourage and so and that's a good question to ask really how how does this make me feel. That's that's really sort of an unscientific <hes> but very truthful way to kind of <hes>. I think is just to be honest with yourself. That's the other element to write. We deceive ourselves and might say oh. I can handle this. This isn't a problem <hes> so another element element is determined as it's important to do that in community. I think so that we're being honest about how something does make us feel yeah yeah. That's a good point in fact just just the other day a my niece. <hes> tha was talking to my niece about <hes> she had started watching a television program that i quit and she just said i don't know if i'd want to keep going with this and i said actually i would encourage you not to and it wasn't terrible bad but it was just like they were so much violence so much is unnecessary and it was to me it was a bummer because i think the show had a lot of good in it and that's the thing right well done. That's the hard the thing is when as i said the the good and the artistic is often alongside the troubling and that doesn't make it such an easy black or white question question this this discerning endeavor yeah and i think i kind of i think it comes back to paul's thing romans about look if if it's if for and you yeah i think you said it josh i mean if if a person says to me look i just never going to watch a movie. I go okay for you. I mean that's your call and it's and i'm not going to call that person a weaker brother because talk about that. Some people can't eat meat. That's offered idol. Some people can some people know ver- drinking is off limits and i totally am sensitive to that reality that you don't don't wanna make someone stumble or you know what you want to be sensitive to individual cases. I appreciate what you're saying about that as well. What let's let's go ahead and jump in because it's <hes> less i said i really really loved the book thank you movies are prayers <hes> a question. I asked pretty much every author i have on the show is what were you hoping to do with this this book i think i was hoping to there's been a lot of talk in recent years about <hes> the right for christians and to take films seriously in the way that you and i have just been talking about <hes>. I think we've shifted. I grew up in the culture wars of the eighties and nineties where <hes> it was an open question. Should we even engage films at all and i think the groundwork has been laid. There's been a lot of good books written about <hes>. Yes we should it. Here is here is not only why we should engage with films <hes> but here's some good films to do that with often these would be movies that have have obvious religious narratives if not obviously <unk> religious themes in them and so i started thinking about we've kind of cleared the ground for the right to to do christian film criticism for lack of a better phrase but what would an entire project of christian film criticism look like i wanted to actually do it. You know <hes> i was part of the conversation making the argument that we could do it but then what does it actually look like so <hes>. This was an opportunity for me he to say well. Here's how you bring a christian lens to film. It's just one way it's not the way that christians think about films but what if we looked at movies as prayers i as these offerings being given to god that follow the somewhat similar models of the prayers the explicit prayers that a christian might offer to god and i wanted to also bring in movies that weren't religiously explicitly religious. I should say so that i'm starting to see this sense of how almost any film has this spiritual potential built within it and here's a framework for maybe <hes> figuring out what that potential might be so that that was sort of what i wanted to do with it is just an actual project of christian film criticism. I think that's why i was drawn to the book because i had not really seen anyone approach the idea of film in general like the larger picture not just specific movies but the idea of film in general and to approach it from a christian perspective so that's immediately why <hes> when i saw i actually saw it in the bookstore at our conference we have i._v. Okay at our annual conference and i always go a and and look around and i saw that and and actually one of the one of the people working there at least <hes> she works v._p. Yeah i know at least it's all at you know at least yes i picked up the book and i was looking at it and she walked her because i love this book. I think i'm gonna do so. That's good make the statement. I mean the title itself says movies. He's our prayers like you didn't say might be prayers have right right now. How are movies prayers so yeah. It's it's a little bowl but that's what a title has to be right. I mean not not every movie is a prayer not exactly making that claim but i wanted to open up that possibility and the case is that it really has to do with with this idea of common grace which can partly be traced back to the dutch theologian abraham kuyper that all of humanity has been blessed by god with certain gifts and so there are creative folks who may not believe in god. They may not be professing christians yet. He's blessed them with a abilities and in their working through those gifts and in creating art than god's truth can sometimes be reflected in sometimes be revealed he can speak through that work even if it wasn't necessarily meant to be <hes> a work of spirituality -ality and so then that sort of the you know the underlying foundational making the argument that movies could even be seen this way more specifically as prayers. I just think that <hes> you know prayer. We have a very narrow definition of prayer. It's something a christian offers to god but i think when when we look at what those prayers are there really the sort of things that any human being professes when they ask themselves <hes> but god hears them. What is this place. Why am i here <hes>. Why is this world full of beauty. Why is it also full of baroque inness. Whenever a human being is wondering wondering those sorts of things and asking those sorts of questions <hes> i believe they're offering up a prayer and again. If they're not a christian they would not describe it that way but but as a christian i also fully believe that god is listening to them and hearing those things and there are very different ways that we express that sometimes they are prayers of praise when and we see something beautiful sometimes their prayers of anger when we're frustrated <hes> often their prayers lament when we we just don't know what else to do <hes> in a terrible situation situation and we have to give it up <hes> non-christians expressed those things to <hes> and because of that they express them through the movies they make so it's really this broader view of <hes> you know how.

josh abraham kuyper paul
"larsen" Discussed on Things Above

Things Above

14:08 min | 1 year ago

"larsen" Discussed on Things Above

"As a way of acknowledging that god has infused his grace in in everything if we're willing to look for it and that doesn't mean that everything is good or everything is holy to go back to where we started. We still have to bring discernment into this because often the <hes> the beauty is mixed right in there with the broken nece <hes> but in the really transcendental works of art. I think we can find it. <music> that was josh larsen and this is the things about podcast well. My guest today is josh larsen. He has spent twenty five years as a film critic. He writes about movies at larson on film. He's the editor of faith and culture magazine and he's host the podcast called think christian and i was excited to have josh on this podcast outcast today this things above conversation because of his book that i came across a gosh a little over year ago called movies are prayers how films voice our our deepest longings wishes book by university press which is my publisher and so when i saw that book i picked it up and said oh i gotta read this because i love movies so josh welcome to the podcast. Thank you very much jim. I'm excited to be here and also to be part of the upcoming apprentice gathering get to know you and your a group a little bit more and should be a lot of fun so i'm having here today because we are fun and we believe christians should have fun. We should be what it saint. Augustine instances christians should be alleluia from head to toe which i let sounds good. I like it. I'm gonna make a poster of that or something so hey. You're form chicago. Are you still ago yeah just outside of the city and tried to spend as much time in it as i can so for sure. It's an amazing city. I don't like your weather. Can i say well. You can say that there's no denying it but when you get that three maybe four months span of nice weather. It's sir my favorite city in the world it is i i will give you but that's only that's only <hes> one fourth of the year i know i know i know i i. It is an amazing city. I love it. I love going to wrigley field and going well right here. Talk about chicago but so do i know this about you. You grew up up watching siskel and ebert yeah. That's right part. Two part of the chicago. Tradition is film criticism and in print and of course cisco neighbor on t._v. V that was a weekly a weekly ritual for my family growing up me too i i i. I the tape those things why. I don't even know if i could do that too. I don't even have the record out his more. That is commitment. It was because i just those guys were brilliant. I loved when they argued when they thought you you know of course of course with thumbs up one was thumbs down but <hes> you know just for our listeners. They may not know that i actually myself am may movie fanatic fanatic. I probably do mention some movies in my books now and then but really for my whole life i i love movies and i'm i'm odd like you you. That's a compliment. I'm like i pay attention. Pay attention directors and actors and yeah love to talk about scenes and meaning and in symbolism and stuff like that so. I hope our listeners are ready to go hang with us in that but your book is really unbelievable. I love i was drawn to it. This idea that movies are prayers is <hes>. I had never thought about that. I'm fully convinced you're absolutely right and let's go. We'll get that feel nice feel a little better now about where this conversation we'll go yeah yes yeah he's not going to grill me <hes> but <hes> so so i thought we'd do something kind of fun at the beginning and it'll be a little teaser because for listeners who hang with us through the duration of this particular episode we might pick up some some some more of these kinds of questions but here we go. What's your favorite movie. Oh yeah that's that's one. I have to have an answer for even though there isn't really an an answer because i get it a lot and what i say because it's fairly safe i think is alfred hitchcock's rear window <hes> i say it because it's widely considered considered a classic. It's pretty safe but also for me. It is one of those personal treasures in film because it at once has so much to say a about it really has a lot to say about why we watch movies if you think about it because it is all about this character who's watching his neighbors but it's also breathlessly entertaining and you have jimmy stewart and you have all of that all of the surf l._a. Ledgers grace kelly you know those surface pleasures the movie eh the movies can give us are all there while at the same time it is this <hes> incredibly thought provoking and you know pretty disturbing and in pretty disturbing film as well it is oh it's freaky yeah and and you know and i watch it again and again and i still get nervous i even even i know how it's gonna end. I'm like he's. He's in that room. Oh no it has that intensity in that claustrophobia to it. Yeah and i think it works for people about what my son. Who's you know he's in his early twenties or i think he wasn't we. I saw it and he was. He got totally riveted into it so i think it's just one of those timeless films that for sure you're even though it's black and white. It's just great. Okay <hes> for me. Josh it's <hes> it's a wonderful life. Okay there. You go yeah you know and i know that's one that you mentioned in the a book so <hes> it's my kind of like you. It's like an easy one to go to but i love the i love the kind of christian themes that are there which will will probably talk about a little bit later definitely first movie you saw. This is also difficult to answer because i'm sure there are i know i know there are movies. I saw before raiders of the lost ark in how 'bout in theaters that oh okay yeah i. I'm sure i saw something before that but i i definitely definitely remember seeing that and i remember we were on vacation in michigan with my family extended family vacation like eighty people would come for this but my dad and i stole away from the lake to go to another town and see and this is where things are fuzzy to. I'm ninety percent sure it was raiders <hes> but it could had been indiana jones and the temple of doom so i i was you know around that time i was six between six nine something like that when those films came out so memories meri's little fuzzy but i think it was partly <hes> going to see the film with my dad just the two of us as much as the film itself <hes> having that time but of of course raiders <hes> is another classic one of spielberg's best and as a kid also one. That's gonna completely enthrall all you so that yeah that experience. I guess it was so formative. I think of it as my first movie experience yeah oh it's so good and it just it grabs you from the opening scene in the jungle zion ball rolling and you think it's coming to hit you and it's a it's a ride to the end. It's oh so good for my first movie in a theatre. I don't have any doubt about this. It was the ten commandments and while mom no but my my mom just i don't remember the circumstances stances. I just remember we're going to move jim and we went to and it was and you may remember back then the ten commandments was so long there was an intermission like yes. Yes stern theater. The screen went black curtain went up and you went out and had fifteen minutes to. I mean that we don't really do that anymore but not very outlaw. No no such an epic film. I mean in probably in some certainly in some good ways but certainly probably some bad ways influence my narratives about god because it's so there's i mean the with the plagues end the yours is suffering in the egyptians being drowned though anyway <hes> but it was that was that a unique experience for your family or were you. Did you grow up in a in a movie going family or was this a situation where where because it was the ten commandments you. Your mom made a point to go see it. No we did see movies. I mean i i we saw i saw <hes> you know jungle book and pinocchio oh kyo and he's okay all of those sort of classics at the time i my mom would take us to see those but no it wasn't just because it was christian or anything i think it was just the movie see see yeah at the time and and that movie still it's still okay. It's a little corny in places but yeah it's definitely of its era and and <hes> the theology of as you mentioned is very interesting in in what sort of mainstream hollywood felt was the way to present and god as a presence on screen yeah yeah but definitely the holiness of god this sort of the majesty of god kind of power the power for sure for for sure <hes> it is a question just for you not for me because i am not a film critic but what was the first movie that you reviewed whom i i do remember this and it was interview with the vampire. The neil jordan directed film. Tom cruise and brad hit nineteen nineteen ninety four. I honestly i can't even tell you whether i gave it a positive review or a negative view. I don't i don't remember burst. Didn't i have not seen since <hes> but man. That was a very controversial one for that casting <hes> it was. I remember being very excited that that was my first paid assignment so that was that was the one for the local newspaper where i actually got a check for <hes> inflicting my opinion in the world. I realize this could really happen. Ha yeah that's great well. You've been at it a long time and men twenty five years of doing it <hes> well. Let's go ahead and just establish one thing right away. For our listeners. You are a christian right. I mean you are a believer and and so as a christian and a person who watches films and certainly as a film critic. I mean you watch all kinds of films. I kind of the big question that hey you have to address. If you're you know if it's christians talking about film is about limitations on what christians should watch. I mean just the classic question should the christians watch our movies <hes> <hes> so let me put you on the spot with that one yeah. It's the discernment question which is of absolute importance importance at i think the way i approach it though might be from a little different vantage point sort of a foundational way i approach discernment and <hes> it's really goes back to something we've just been talking about how we experienced movies as part of our families and how we were raised in in my home home culture christian home but culture was not something that was ever presented as <hes> something we needed to be afraid of a rather it was something that was a gift something to be enjoyed and alongside being discerning while we were doing that so it's almost it's it's just a different posture if that makes sense where when i get this question about are rated movies and such often the foundational assumption behind it is one of of fear and one of protection <hes> we need to avoid were thankful for that are because it's easy way for us to know it's it's dangerous and we need to stay away. <hes> whereas you know having this position of seen culture is a gift from god that <hes> you know human beings made in his image forgiven. Creative abilities have created these cultural artifacts that we can enjoy. It's just a different way of thinking about it. So then discernment comes in <hes> more more about what can we celebrate. What can we point to that is good in these things <hes> while also being honest about the ways that film can't of course influence influence our desires in unhealthy ways. It's not denying that that is out there. It's just not putting that as the foremost thing to be concerned about so so you know what it comes back to the particulars of your question movies rated r well <hes> i'll relate it to the subject of of the book movies are prayers. Some of my prayers prayers are rated r. I i i'm. I'm a fall in being. Sometimes i pray for the wrong things. Sometimes i use harsh language in my prayer. If i'm angry sometimes i pray in the wrong way right. I fall asleep during my prayers <hes> similarly our movies are rated r. There's good alongside the bad. There are things to be discerning about out in some are rated movies and there are things to be celebrated and it's not simply just pointing to specific content insane a movie with this piece of content. <hes> is is automatically something. We need to avoid <hes> i like that and you know i think about <hes> the bible itself because the the impression tori psalms which are the that's a big fancy word in predatory but if the slums of anger and violence the most famous one is the one that contains the line. This is in your bible folks folks who are listening but there's a i guess you'd call it a prayer. Where were the the psalmist says the god may their babies heads be dashed into rocks. <hes> i mean you don't get any more violent than than thinking of someone taking a baby. <hes> sorry even to be talking about it but hey it's in the bible as well as adultery and assaults in incest in the bible. Is you know my friend rich mullins chris singer songwriter. He used to often say hey man the the bible is r. Rated is full..

josh larsen chicago raiders wrigley field larson Augustine culture magazine alfred hitchcock jimmy stewart editor rich mullins michigan neil jordan publisher siskel Tom cruise jim indiana hollywood
"larsen" Discussed on Made for That

Made for That

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"larsen" Discussed on Made for That

"Real life and I want to feel the reality of it and the rawness of it. So I guess that's that's other things is yeah just being genuine and real about it. Cuz that's what I'm attracted to in people is is when they're real and if I meet someone who's who is putting on a on a mask or trying to be something else. It's so easy to disconnect life. I you know, you're making someone that I may not make an effort to come back and hang out with it's a passing moment. Yeah. I'm so attracted to the realism people. I am to attract a certain amount of Bravery to to not wear a mask because that's easier, you know, but life is both beautiful and very messy and we tend to try and hide the mess and it doesn't really make sense to me because everybody has one so, why do we do that? Yeah, I think that's probably it unless there's anything else that you can think of that you would like to say home. I think I think I'm good. Yeah, I'm feeling we had a we said some cool things. Yeah, I agree. It's it's it really is been such a cool conversation cuz I do a few things I guess not this in yet, but but interviews and conversations with people and this this has gone deeper it's gone. I don't know it's so natural and so easy and seem real so I think you're you're very good at what you do and you can draw this out of people. It's it's natural. Yeah. Thank you so much. I really appreciate that pleasure. Yeah. That's a wrap on episode 6. If you'd like to learn more about stew or check out his music, which I highly recommend you. Do you can find him on Facebook and Instagram at Stu Larsen and he is of course on YouTube Spotify and your usual music streaming platforms. I have one quick note for you about this episode before you go. I fact-checked my claim about turning the camera on for the first time while I was standing on the grass wall turns out I'm a bit of a liar. Don't get me wrong. I still didn't have a clue how to use it. But I did find some horribly amateur footage from Beijing that I clumsily captured before we made our way to all the next morning. I'm sure a little hyperbole never heard anyone but I still couldn't let that one slide. If you enjoyed this episode. I'd love it. If you left a rating a review on iTunes birth shared it with someone you think might love it, too..

Stu Larsen Beijing Facebook YouTube Instagram
"larsen" Discussed on Made for That

Made for That

05:45 min | 2 years ago

"larsen" Discussed on Made for That

"May I and use promo code made for that for 50% off for a year with the option to cancel at any time or if you'd like a free trial. You can directly email the CEO Adam at hired Hippodrome with the subject line made for that. Okay, let's get this episode started to 3. I approached Stu Larsen about being a guest after one.

Stu Larsen Hippodrome CEO Adam
"larsen" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

Pantsuit Politics

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"larsen" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

"This deal while it lasts. We are here with the lease. Larson alise. You reach out to us as part of our guest hopes to mission kind of called us out in a very graceful way, which I appreciated like you guys are touching on the fringes of sustainability pretty often, but not talking about it enough or in a lot of depth. So here you are to talk with us about it more and a lot of depth. And we responded, yes, because we're snared and we don't want to talk about it. 'cause we're so scared at least that's was my thought process. I was like, yeah, she's exactly right because I'm so scared I can go dark so fast when I think that's fair, we'll tell everybody who you are and why this topic is important to you. Sure. So I'm Elise Larsen. I'm a biology researcher at Georgetown University, but I'm also just a person living in Virginia, seeing the news that everybody else sees and it can't be scary looking at how climate change is already affecting us, and we really need to stop bearing. Heads in the sand or hiding from that fear and actually coming out seeing the hope and seeing the solutions and working together to start moving on those. Because honestly, the longer we wait to do that the worst it's going to be. So it's time we've waited long enough and we need to get moving on that. I study butterflies currently. I've also studied birds and. We see in the natural world that animals and plants are already responding to climate change. We see animals and plants shifting towards the poles to try to follow the temperatures and the climate that they're adapted to. And no matter where you look in the world, we're already seeing changes and the the situations where they can't move into a better place is where we're also seeing the declines. A lot of people associate climate change with polar bears. They don't have any further north to go. So it's happening here as well as their and it's time for us to really square ourselves and deal with that. The Alex here is my struggle. So I'm not a scientist if y'all are depending on me to figure out how to make the best battery. The world is in dire straight. Like I, that's not my my gift. That's not your job. That's not my job. I'm not a scientist. I'm a political person. I already vote my climate change values. I would never support a candidate who does not recognize climate change. I mean, I worked on environmental policy when I was on the hill. My old boss at the hill is a passionate environmentalist works for outdoors organization now. So like I'm I'm in politically, I can't contribute scientifically. I do what I feel like the best. I can't as far as recycling painting to my energy usage, reducing my meat intake. I do the things and so that's where I struggle is like, what. Can I do? I feel like if I swim around in climate change news and I don't need to be convinced. And so since I don't need to be convinced sometimes reading that stuff and talking about just depresses me. That's fair. It a lot of people feel that way. We're up against a a big challenge and it hearing that you're doing all of those things is wonderful. There's so many things we can do in our daily lives that do make small incremental changes, whether it's looking at renewable power or.

scientist Larson alise Elise Larsen Alex Georgetown University Virginia researcher
"larsen" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

Pantsuit Politics

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"larsen" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

"Only in having his name appear in academic journal articles about it. He was given the Nobel prize with another guy for his quote definitive role in discovering pulsars definitive. But history has corrected itself because Jocelyn bell Brunell was just awarded the breakthrough prize in fundamental physics along with its three million dollar award. Yeah, it's awesome. And she is going to use that money to create a scholarship for women minority refugee graduate students because of her experience. While I am also in a way, recognizing the correction of past mistakes and not only that is, but my grandma moment is also a little bit of complement the other side. I am grateful for American diplomats. And specifically, I am grateful that our current secretary of state Mon Mike Pompeo has nearly doubled the promotions of top American diplomats. He's trying to restore the health of the diplomatic workforce due to some decisions of his predecessor. Rex Tillerson. He is really working hard. I appreciate the effort to put our diplomatic corps back where it should be a really good work. Mike Pompeo I'm grateful for you. Recognize this is an issue and working to correct it next up. We are going to talk with at least Larsen a. biologist at Georgetown who studies butterflies, which I think is amazing about climate change and sustainability. Autumn has arrived at Maat cloth put a stylish spin on the season with classics like tweet blazer and quarter ROY jumper, not to mention bold silhouettes rich textures. And yes, plenty of plaid. Find a variety of looks in a full.

Mon Mike Pompeo Jocelyn bell Brunell Nobel prize Rex Tillerson ROY jumper Larsen Georgetown three million dollar
"larsen" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"larsen" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Larsen b the be was with our yes okay yes and actually you're right larsen b was rhode island larsen c anyway it was big it was it was very big so that you have ice sheets breaking out you have the receding glaciers you have the impacts on penguins we have elephants seals that have moved in from they're coming down the peninsula is it's warming their sub antarctic warmer species that are arriving at our station in the middle of the summer you can now have you know a bunch of big elephants seals laying around in the middle of the station do you know what that smells like a warm day i can't imagine and the arctic first seals are moving down extending their range so you have these range extensions going on so it's really a very dramatic impact on the community that you're seen with your own eyes we use them every day to learn design and strategize dry erase boards and now glass marker boards are must have in boardrooms conference rooms and classrooms but as sensual as these products are what you need even more is the knowledgeable and friendly service that you get from us marker board us marker board has the people that will help you select the right product specific to you no matter what specializing in custom sizes graphics in layouts us marker board is a full service shop with highly trained staff capable of takeoffs graphic work estimating and more they are able to handle any request no matter how large or small no wonder businesses colleges hospitals and contractors all rely on us marker board to help create unique collaborative spaces from start to finish visit us mark aboard dot com today and use the promo code geeks.

larsen b
"larsen" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"larsen" Discussed on WGTK

"Pile larsen started forty at these already up the fifteenth right now he's making life miserable for casey cain is cain tries to hold coal close air rather like his laos scheme blaming turn turn mighty the inside of three wide off to larsen kedo the middle and then curry not used to watching kyle larson past people at the bottom of the racetrack there in a battle for twelve it is now blamed taken that spot away from ryan blaney momentarily entering germ one starter he is gonna be pulled away from that group really quick now what hello cairo bush continues the lead this race across the stripe lap forty goes up on the board forty more before we head to the end of stage number one we talked before about having in the booth eric amaral first off eric it's good to see how you feel i feel great down glad to be back at the racetrack in hate that i'm taking the race in from up here i like it much better behind the steering wheel but it's great to be back how tough has that been for you on the sunday's not being able to get inside the 43 year worth saturday night and it still is tough it's it's thinks to be honest sit at home on the couch or to see here and watch the race but not much longer hopefully in the back behind the wheel as feel for fusion i can't wait the undying to get back in the race car i love driving in love racing i love being here with.

Pile larsen casey cain kyle larson ryan blaney race car larsen cairo eric amaral 43 year