35 Burst results for "Lars"

Ovechkin, Mantha lead Capitals to 4-1 win over Kraken

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | Last month

Ovechkin, Mantha lead Capitals to 4-1 win over Kraken

"The capitals have their first three game winning streak of the season after Anthony matha and Alex Ovechkin each had a goal and an assist in a four one verdict over the kraken. Ovechkin scored his 796th career goal into an empty net, leaving him 5 behind Gordie Howe for second on the NHL's all time list. Marcus Johansson and Lars Eller also scored at Charlie lindgren turn back 25 shots for Washington. Adam Larsson put the crack in the head late in the first period before Seattle suffered its third loss in a row. Philip grubauer stopped 34 of 36 shots for Seattle. I'm Dave ferry.

Anthony Matha Alex Ovechkin Marcus Johansson Lars Eller Ovechkin Charlie Lindgren Gordie Howe Adam Larsson NHL Philip Grubauer Washington Seattle Dave Ferry
"lars" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

MarTech Podcast

08:49 min | 2 months ago

"lars" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

"Starts with having teams that are connected. HubSpot helps your team feel so connected that can finish each other's sales pitches. Yeah, that kind of connected. The HubSpot CRM platform is designed to unite your data apps and teams in a single, easy to use system. So your teams can spend their time having conversations where they matter most, with your customers. To learn how HubSpot can help your business grow better, visit HubSpot dot com. I think that the classic funnel or the thought of how your growth strategy works is your finding prospects, you're trying to convert your prospects into leads and you're trying to convert your leads into customers. So when you are thinking about growth, I think most people think about how do I get more prospects? How do I do more awareness building and advertising, get people into the top of the funnel, assuming that they will convert all the way down at an equal rate, and that's never the case. Not all leads are created equal, not a marketing channels are created equal. So there's a couple different ways that we can think of growth. There is filling the top of your funnel, driving more bodies into your funnel. There is improving the conversion rate of your funnel and lastly, there is basically building the sort of virtuous cycle instead of having to be a funnel having it be a flywheel where your customers are not just coming in and bang you, but you're upselling them, and they're generating virality and they're bringing in more customers. So I think the CRM plays a role potentially in all of those different stages. Walk me through CRM's role at top of funnel, CRM's role at converting prospects to leads to customers, and then that latter piece as well. That's a good point that you bring up too. A funnel should never be thought of as a one and done thing that wants somebody goes through it and they're done and you have their money they're gone. And the concept of the flywheel is one that's been around for a while. And I think it makes a lot of sense. It's very difficult to model that flywheel approach. In a lot of ways, in reality, you'll have people that go through funnels and then they jump to different funnels when they complete one. So modeling this can be a little challenging, but that's what marketing and sales professionals do. That's why we get paid the big bucks, right? We get paid the what? The idea of providing the feedback for the top of the funnel, the CRM is really good in helping you figure out where you should put your money at the top of the funnel. Then once someone gets into the top of the funnel, the CRM is really important in getting those leads from marketing qualified to sales qualified. And that's where the lines of sales and marketing kind of blur, where the concept of a CRM and a marketing automation platform really are the same thing. You don't want to separate those. You don't want to have that data sitting in separate silos. Those two are so closely linked. You don't want to have them sitting in different morphs. So the CRM is a big part of that MQ well to SQL process. And then once someone becomes sales qualified, depending on how much of an interaction you have between your business and the lead, you'll have a better idea of how much automation you want to use, what sort of content you want to provide. The sales enablement part of that process so that if I'm a salesperson and I know that I have a lead that's at a particular point and I know that most leads to get to this point can use this amount of information that I have a way to automatically send that to them, make sure that they consumed it if they didn't have someone automated step to make sure that they actually do consume it and set up automated follow ups and all that. So you're looking much more on the older in that stage the original use of CRM and then you have following that you have the customer service side of things, which customer service may be involved in the sales process. If somebody has questions, so that's when you're dealing with things like live chat, phone calls, support ticketing, system or case management system. All of those things are connected to that process. And then service becomes more important after the sale. So the relationship spans all of those processes, all of those steps, and we have to make sure that we use the right software to connect all those steps together. And that's where the CRM really comes into play with the entire process. So it's more of a feedback at the top of the funnel and then more of an assistance tool for marketing and sales professionals for conversion. And then more of a user experience tool as you go farther down the sales process and then after the sale. I think that most people traditionally think of CRM as really being an LMS, a lead management service, right? It's something that gets your leads to the end of the funnel to buy something and reality, it is customer relationship management. It is not only building, but managing the relationships with your customers, the people that are going to and are paying you because you don't just want to get someone through the funnel for a one off purchase you want to continue to manage that. I think there's another important aspect and you alluded to this at the beginning. And to me, this is really where CRM serves as a growth strategy. It is the repository of all of your customer data and because you are able to look at your customers, you can mine for data and trends to start thinking of what that top of funnel marketing strategy should be. So what's the secret for getting your customer data out of your CRM and using it to influence your more top of funnel marketing strategies? Yeah, it's all math. And this is where the power of having data and the right data and all of the data really helps. Because if you're only looking at a part of the picture, like say you're only looking at web analytics or you're only looking at email marketing. And you ignore the other things like how people are responding to print or you ignore things like the customer service experiences. And things like that, then you're making decisions based on impartial pictures of data. Once you're able to gather all that data and as a team and this is where teamwork is so important as a business, you have customer service people and the customer service team, you have a sales team. You have a marketing team. And the marketing team will do some of the automation and then you've got other parts of marketing that will be doing the paper click and the SEO and all these different elements and a lot of times people that are using software in these various different functions of a business. Think only in terms of I want to use the software that I love that I want to use. And if anyone wants to be able to leverage that data, I can export it. The problem with that is that the exporting of that data and having it useful in a meaningful way in other departments is nearly impossible. In reality it just doesn't happen. So you have to get everyone's centralized on the same page using the same software. Once you can do that, then you can pull together the entire experience, then you can do things like with predictive analytics, being able to say, I know that we've had a hundred conversions of this particular product or service. And now we can go back and find out what those correlating factors are. What was it that made those people buy from us? You can look at the various different campaigns that brought them in. You can look at the various different elements that they went through. Did they hit a particular web page? Did they get a demo from a particular person? Was there a certain automated sequence of journeys or emails that they went through that correlated them to being more likely to convert? That's the information that you need to have to be able to make a data driven decision, not one based on intuition or what feels right. You want to look at the data and the only way to look at the data is if you have all of it and make sure that you can actually run the statistical analysis on what actually happens. In complete data is a curse. You can look at your email marketing campaigns and say, look, this email had the best open rate in the best response rate and the best click through rate, and therefore it is the campaign that we should be optimizing for and we should be serving to all of our customers. But if you don't understand how that given email campaign is driving people into and through the funnel and what the ROI is compared to some of your other marketing efforts, you're basically optimizing towards a false goal. It's important to not look at what is getting people close to the bottom of funnel, but getting them through the funnel and those are the marketing activities you want to use your CRM to replicate. And that to me is the secret of leveraging your CRM as a growth strategy. So that wraps up this episode of the mar tech podcast. Thanks again to Lars helgason, the founder and CEO of green rope. Join us again tomorrow when Lars and I continue our conversation talking about CRMs role in customer experience. If you can't wait until our next episode and you'd like to learn more about Lars, you can find a link to his LinkedIn profile in our show notes. You can contact him on Twitter where his handle is Lars helgason that's hell GE SON, or you can visit his company's website, which is green rope dot com dot com.

CRM HubSpot Lars helgason Lars LinkedIn Twitter GE
"lars" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

MarTech Podcast

07:45 min | 2 months ago

"lars" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

"Teams like pattern, sweetgreen, and Google who are saving more than ten hours per week using air, the leading platform for managing and automating creative operations. To learn more, go to air dot ink slash that's AIR dot INC slash martech. And one last thing I'll add before we get to today's interview, since you're into marketing podcasts, check out the marketing against the grain podcast. Join kit bonar and Kieran flanagan, the CMO and SVP of HubSpot's marketing department as they share their experience and the unfiltered truth about marketing that no one else knows about. You can listen to the marketing against the grand podcast wherever you get your podcasts or go to HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. All right, here's the first part of my conversation with Lars, helgason, the founder and CEO of green rope. Lars, welcome to the mar tech podcast. Thank you for having me. I guess I should say welcome back. You were a guest of our as a couple of years ago, and now you're returning not only as a guest, but also as a member of our sponsorship program, so let me start off by saying, welcome back and thank you for all your support of the mar tech podcast. Thank you. I think that one of the things that we see industry wide is the need for sharing information between people. You could call it education, you could call it training. You could just call it an exchange of ideas. I think the whole industry when it comes to marketing technology is in such a state of flux and there are so many different opinions and experiences and different ways to use technology to paint in what industry you're in or what company size you're in, that I think it's really important to have exchanges like this so that we can share ideas and just be able to learn from each other. I could not agree with you more the cliche way to restate what you're saying is every company is now a media company and that seems to be one of the tectonic shifts that's happening where all content producers were all distributing our content and try to build relationships because our customers are not coming inbound and going through our sales process there self researching. They are deciding what products they want to use off platform getting referrals, consuming content, maybe not just listening, and that changes how we think about all of our marketing data and it brings us to our topic today why CRM is actually your growth strategy. We're having a hard time getting people to get to our website, buying our performance marketing is getting more expensive. People are doing all their research off our sites on other platforms. So how are you thinking about using a CRM to not only capture the data for people coming to your platform, but to capture the experiences when they are off platform as well? There's only so much you can do off platform. But I think in the sense that you can control when someone comes to something that you can control. You want to be able to provide the information to your team so that they do the best that they can. You want to set your salespeople up for success. And I think that a lot of that comes from having the right technology providing the right information to the team members when they need it. And then having the automation tools that allow you to actually execute on whatever that strategy is. But so much of it comes down to understanding what's actually happening. Like you were saying, so many more research steps are being taken about our products and services before someone even reaches out to us now because there are all these platforms that have evolved, whether they're review platforms or they're just informational platforms or their companies that for SEO, they build these top ten products to do. Listicles. All of those lead magnets, you have to figure out as a company where you're going to gather leads from and then once you have control of that lead, then what do you do? And I think that's the challenge. And that's where CRM is so important because then what do you do? That makes the difference between converting at a 10% rate or at a 20% rate, which can have a massive impact on your ability to grow as a business. I think about growth and often we think about growth as filling the top of your funnel. How do I get more leads? How do I get more customers? How do I continue to build grow and have more relationships? Talk to me about what you think growth is and why is CRM an important component in that? So on the surface, you would think that a CRM is sort of a middle to bottom of the funnel kind of thing, because you're really managing the process of when someone gives you their information, whatever it is, whether they give you their phone number or their email or they walk in your store, you have a physical interaction with them or you meet them at a trade show or whatever. That's mid funnel type of interaction. But the reality is, if you measure it right and you are able to track where these people are coming from as a business that helps you define where you should put your money at the top of the funnel. So if you're going for efficiency and there's sort of like this old school macroeconomics terms where you can build a company for profit or you can build a company for revenue. And the two are often very different kinds of businesses. And you can think about the same when you're thinking about your sales and marketing strategy as well. Where if you're building for revenue, you're trying to get as many leads in the door as you can. And you've got systems in place to try and convert those leads, but really it's top, top, top of funnel. When you start to really use technology and look at how CRM can be used, it's really about understanding how to build your company for profit, which is really what we want as business owners, right? I mean, we want to maximize profit. We want to get the most leads that hit the top of our funnel down to the bottom. So there will be various different ways that we calculate what that process looks like. What that funnel looks like, depending on what we're selling, because there's sometimes we sell lots of different things as companies. Sometimes their services that require a lot more hand holding. And so what kind of leads do you want for those kinds of deals? Because they're going to be different than, say, something that is just like a product type of sale. So as a business owner, we have to take a step back and look at what are we selling? Why are we selling it? And how do we connect the dots between what we learned from our CRM? And what happens at the top of the funnel? So if we look at the example you're selling some sort of a service that may be fairly complicated, you may bring leads in through social media, they may come in through advertising, through SEO, PPC, they may have trade shows. If you've got all these different ways of bringing people in, and if you're selling a high touch type of a service, those leads will be different. They'll work differently with your team and you'll have different success rates, different conversion rates, depending on where they come from. So you may be able to analyze and say, well, we know that if we do say a competitive ad campaign on Google and we stack that up against a competitive ad campaign on Bing or we target people that search for a keyword or certain set of keywords that we think are highly correlated with people interested in our products or this particular service. We're going to have a variable number of cost per lead that comes in for each of those. But it's not enough to say the competitive ad campaign brought us ten leads and the normal keyword campaign brought us in 5 because you then have to look at the quality of those leads, what their conversion rates are with their average conversion values are to understand which one of those is actually where you should be spending more money. And you can't do that if you don't have a CRM. It's time for one minute break to hear from our presenting sponsor HubSpot. Creating great customer experiences starts with having a full picture and having a full picture

sweetgreen AIR dot INC kit bonar Kieran flanagan helgason Lars HubSpot Google Bing
Albert Pujols becomes just fourth player to hit 700 home runs

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 4 months ago

Albert Pujols becomes just fourth player to hit 700 home runs

"Albert Pujols has reached the 700 home run mark while leading the cardinals to an 11 nothing route of the Dodgers Pool holes did it by homering twice once in the third inning and another in the fourth It was his 14th home run since the start of August as the 42 year old Pujols appears ready to retire with a bang He's the fourth player in major league history to hit 700 home runs Joining Barry Bonds Hank Aaron and Babe Ruth Pujols finished with 5 RBIs while Lars newt Bart added a two run Homer in three RBIs Jose can Tana scattered 5 hits over 6 and two thirds innings I'm Dave ferry

Albert Pujols Cardinals Dodgers Barry Bonds Hank Aaron Pujols Babe Ruth Pujols Lars Newt Bart Homer Dave Ferry
Wainwright, Molina make history, then lead Cards over Brews

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 4 months ago

Wainwright, Molina make history, then lead Cards over Brews

"Signal was pitcher Adam Wainwright and catcher Yadier Molina start their 325th game as battery mates to set the MLB mark in the cardinals four to one win over the brewers Wainwright pitches 5 inches to pick up the win and says setting the record in St. Louis is meaningful I would have felt weird going somewhere else I'd look at myself in the mirror and just ask myself what am I doing You know like I belong here and this is where I belong and this is where I should have been and this is where Yadier should have been and has been and this is just home for us Know that Ariana and Lars newt bar hit home runs while Molina and Albert Pujols deliver run scoring hits for the NL central division leading Cardinals I'm Mike Reeves

Yadier Molina Adam Wainwright Wainwright Cardinals MLB Brewers Yadier St. Louis Lars Newt Ariana Molina Albert Pujols NL Mike Reeves
Grant Stinchfield and NRA's Lars Dalseide Share an Amazing Story

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

03:08 min | 5 months ago

Grant Stinchfield and NRA's Lars Dalseide Share an Amazing Story

"The National Rifle Association, a group I told you that I have had such an amazing relationship with, you know, I spent so much time at NRA TV. The NRA is important. I'll tell you they're out fighting for us, and they are important. They release this ad specifically calling out the media and this story, you have to hear it to believe it. Listen. I'd rather look like this than be lying dead next to my family. This right here is the only reason we're alive. No one ever told my story, and we all know why. My name is role on July 3rd this year. We're celebrating our freedom at our friend's house when the unthinkable happened. A neighbor we never met came in uninvited and started shooting at all of us right out of the blue. Before I can actually comprehend what was happening, one of our dear Friends was shot and guided instantly. Next thing you know, the shooter shot me right on the side of the head and through my left eye. Everyone in the house was screaming bloody murder and thought I was there. What felt like an eternity pass and then my eyes opened by God's grace to the sound of the shrieking screams of my wife, two daughters and friends who knew I carried a concealed pistol. The shooter broke away from the fight and started to reach for his second gun with my family lined up as his next victims. But I put four shots in this chest and sent him straight to hell. If I didn't have my gun, everyone in that house would have died. The news bands would have been front and center, but because I did even heard about it. Evil will always exist, and we are more ready to confront it with equal force. Now, more than ever. My name is ro Mendes, and I am a proud lifetime member of the National Rifle Association of America. So we would have never known about that story because the mainstream media is not going to tell that's powerful. The guy shot in the eye. He gets up, he saves his family's life because he's a concealed handgun license holder, carrying his weapon on him, puts four shots in that shooter and sends him straight to hell as he said. God bless him. He's blessed to be alive, by the way. Some people say lucky to be alive, lucky was a race horse at Belmont. That man's blessed to be alive. With that, I want to welcome in Lars daleside. He's a friend of mine, and he is a spokesperson over at the National Rifle Association. He joins us by phone. Laura's welcome to the program. Appreciate you having me on grant. Lars, that's a powerful story, man, and only the NRA is telling stories like that. Well, we actually got a little bit lucky on that though. One of his cousins lives a few miles away from NRA headquarters, granted to him got in touch with him. He told me the story we reached out to Raoul, and he was told me the story again and I was like, listen, this is something powerful and nobody's certain anything about it. And we'd love to be able to share this with more people. And he was more than willing to share. He thought it was important to get the message out. And you know, as he was saying and saying, he happened to be caring luckily because Arizona has constitutional carry.

NRA Ro Mendes Lars Daleside Belmont Lars Laura Raoul Arizona
Zach McKinstry homers as Cubs beat Cardinals 7-1

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 5 months ago

Zach McKinstry homers as Cubs beat Cardinals 7-1

"Zach mckinstry and Nico Horner were two of the cubs hitting stars in a 7 one downing of the cardinals that gained street belted a two run Homer and had three RBIs while Horner had three hits Jan Gomes drove in a pair for the cubs who have split the first four games of their 5 game series Lars nubar homered for the red birds and Corey Dickerson went four for four The cards dropped to 17 and 5 in August Rowan wick got 5 outs for the win after Luke Farrell had his first cubs appearance since 2018 Miles Michaelis took the loss I'm Dave ferry

Zach Mckinstry Nico Horner Cubs Jan Gomes Lars Nubar Corey Dickerson Cardinals Horner Homer Red Birds Rowan Wick Luke Farrell Miles Michaelis Dave Ferry
Cardinals beat Diamondbacks 6-4 for seventh straight win

AP News Radio

00:28 sec | 5 months ago

Cardinals beat Diamondbacks 6-4 for seventh straight win

"It's a 7 game winning streak for the Cardinals following a 6 four decision over the Diamondbacks Nolan Arenado laced a two run single in the 7th inning to put the red birds ahead 5 four Arenado finished with three RBIs to help St. Louis keep its 5 game lead over the brewers atop the NL central Lars nubar hit his first career leadoff Homer Tommy Edmond editor run scoring single in the 8th inning of the Cardinals 16th win in 19 games The cards posted their 7th series sweep of the season I'm Dave ferry

Nolan Arenado Arenado Cardinals Red Birds Diamondbacks Lars Nubar Homer Tommy Edmond Brewers St. Louis Dave Ferry
"lars" Discussed on Crypto and Blockchain Talk - Making You Smarter

Crypto and Blockchain Talk - Making You Smarter

02:37 min | 6 months ago

"lars" Discussed on Crypto and Blockchain Talk - Making You Smarter

"We're not putting our eggs in the rind and be basket or the UN basket. Putin, you're kind of crazy. So we're not sure we're going all in America. Your schizophrenic and you've been printing dollars furiously, we're not loving our matrimony with you at this moment. We're just going to go do something totally different. And that totally different might be Bitcoin. It might not be. But I don't see them going all in in the dollar, and now tomorrow we're going to be all in on China's currency or Russia's currency. I don't see that happening. What I do see, what I do see is that they will allow other countries to settle. Their oil purchases in their native currencies. Because of the loss of confidence in the U.S. dollar. But I think absolutely. That's some moment in the future. We will be settling things. There's a strong probability. We will be settling things in Bitcoin. Home transactions, oil transactions, national transactions, personal transactions. And I think the world would be better off for it by far, because it really reduces the amount of manipulation that we are. But maybe I should ask my husband to quickly register the Petro on coin market cap. That's right. Let's get a head start on this. Yeah. Maybe they'll make their maybe Saudi Arabia makes their own their own and they do their own crypto project. It'll be centralized just like just like a national currency. Just like DeFi. But it'll be on a blockchain. So we can carve in stone our decisions today. And then carve in stone a different decision tomorrow. Absolutely. Has anyone asked you if they can take your books and make them into, you know, movies, like Tom Clancy's novels. That hasn't happened yet, but if it did happen in the circumstances, we'll write. I'm pretty sure I would say yes. Well, it sounds like a lot of well listen, I will be first at the front of the queue, buying my tickets, and I will be absolutely riveted at that movie theater with my popcorn in hand. I would love to see your book on the big screen. That would be beautiful. Thank you so much for coming on to crypto and blockchain talk Lars, you are an amazing person. Thank you. You're very kind. I had such a good time. Oh, I'm really glad. Well, I'd like to thank everyone for tuning into this edition of crypto and blockchain talk.

Putin America UN Russia China Saudi Arabia Tom Clancy Lars
"lars" Discussed on Crypto and Blockchain Talk - Making You Smarter

Crypto and Blockchain Talk - Making You Smarter

02:18 min | 6 months ago

"lars" Discussed on Crypto and Blockchain Talk - Making You Smarter

"Or how many fly on airplanes versus the number of people who know how airplanes work. It's a little bit the same. Like we do things because life is hard to figure out. We necessarily rely on other people to solve hard problems for us. Like we need experts to do. Did you stuff? And they're right. They're human. But they get it mostly right. The number of plane crashes is not a huge number. The number of cars that spontaneously combust on a highway. That's a very small number. The average person recognizes when something profound has been created. I think this is the phenomenon that will that will take hold as the adoption curve increases. We will need experts to really deeply understand exactly what's going on. But we won't need every Bitcoin user to become an expert on exactly what's going on, right? You have to become an expert on how do you use it without exposing your keys and all the things. But there are layers of protection in the current financial system that don't exist in the Bitcoin world. It's not to say that they won't exist in some future iteration. It's just to say that there's a level of expertise required above that required to go to your bank and do something or to log on to your banking website. But I don't think that we need to have a nation of Bitcoin experts in order to have a nation of Bitcoin transactors. The ignoramuses in any like, if you ask me a question about certain things, I guarantee you will laugh at my absolute utter ignorance. There are so many things that I don't know the first thing about. And I'll give you some dumb stupid answer that will be really funny. If you ask me the right, it doesn't mean I don't know anything. And it doesn't mean I can't recognize value and expertise. And it doesn't mean that I can't change my behavior when it really does make good sense to do it. So that is a shift that when we're thinking about how long will this adoption curve really take? I don't think it'll be 7 decades long, right? I think things will happen slowly and then all at once. Actually, right now I'm going to do a disclaimer. Nothing that Lars nor I are discussing on this podcast can possibly be construed as financial advice. Yes. This entire podcast is purely for your education and entertainment. You need to do your own homework. If you can not still figure it out on your own, you

Lars
"lars" Discussed on Crypto and Blockchain Talk - Making You Smarter

Crypto and Blockchain Talk - Making You Smarter

04:46 min | 6 months ago

"lars" Discussed on Crypto and Blockchain Talk - Making You Smarter

"Hello, everyone. And welcome to this edition of crypto and blockchain talk. And I can not tell you how excited. I am to have with me a an author and other who has sold over a million books. This guy has such an amazing backstory. We'll get into all that because I got to know if some of him is in his books and we're going to talk about why he's on crypto and blockchain talk. We're going to get into all this, but first, let me introduce Lars emirate. Lars, welcome to crypto and blockchain talk. Thank you so much. It is a privilege and an honor and a pleasure to be here. I'm really excited. The privilege is ours. I am right now taking my hat off to you and I'm saying, I am so excited that you are here. Now look, let's just thank you. Okay, I've got so many things to talk about. Our lawyers are going to want to know many, many things. And I have a very good connection with my audience. And I'm going to use mental telepathy to suck those questions into my own brain and ask you these questions, and we're going to start with the following. Okay, so obviously you were in the air force. So what does that journey? How did you become a pilot? Well, I had absolutely no interest whatsoever in saying military. Until I was in the middle of my senior year in high school, actually in the middle of the football season, my senior year in high school, and our telephone rang, and it turned out to be one of the assistant coaches at the air force academy, and they were interested in having me come down for a recruiting visit. Wow. And at the time, it was only, I think, a few years removed from when air force was akin to a contender

Lars emirate Lars air force academy football
Gorman, Nootbaar homer as Cards beat Nats 6-2; Soto 1 for 4

AP News Radio

00:29 sec | 6 months ago

Gorman, Nootbaar homer as Cards beat Nats 6-2; Soto 1 for 4

"Nolan Gorman in Lars nubar hit back to back homers in the 6th inning of the Cardinals 6 two win over the nationals The redbirds led three to one until Gorman smacked the two run Homer off loser Annabel Sanchez Newt Barr's blast chase Sanchez St. Louis scored three in the third on a pair of ground outs in a wild pitch Miles Michael is allowed two runs in 7 innings for the cards who have their first winning streak in 13 days Then that's hit a pair of sacrifice flies but were zero for 9 with runners in scoring position I'm Dave ferry

Nolan Gorman Lars Nubar Annabel Sanchez Newt Barr Sanchez St. Louis Redbirds Miles Michael Cardinals Gorman Homer Dave Ferry
"lars" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

Talk Is Jericho

07:53 min | 6 months ago

"lars" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

"What is interesting too, because when you talk about the sound of punk rock, and obviously, you know, if you had to play word association, punk rock is fast, you know, and then just but that's not necessarily the real case because if you're talking about the Ramones, that comes directly from 60s surf rock. To me, you hear those melody lines that Joey was singing. Rock and roll high school, it's very much like, do you think the next it's the next, it's the next stage of that. Well, I think the punk rock was the two minute and 30 song again, you know what I mean? You know, punk rock was the anti guitar solo, or use them, you don't need to noodle. It didn't need to be free bird. You know what I mean? I mean, you know, Skynyrd's great, whatever. You know, but my point is is that it was like stripped down. Some of the stuff was political. I mean, if you think about punk rock and the shape in which it sort of accepted everything from GG Allen, who used to shit in his hand and throw it at the crowd to crafts, who was living on a farm, anti government singing, do they owe us a living. So you had everything in this big gigantic spectrum. And it was like, it was almost like a return to what rock and roll was supposed to be. It was supposed to be, you know, that soulful Aretha Franklin, Elvis Presley, you know, jammer, Sam and Dave, you know, this kind of stuff. It wasn't about, you know, oh, I listened to classical Bach and jazz. So it's like, you know, I wanted my stuff hard and fast, you know? That's kind of what my personality was, you know? So that's why me personally gravitated to the more extreme kind of music. That's why I love, you know, a lot of that's why I love cannibal corpse. That's why I love creator. That's why I love these fans. It might be look different, but it's that same feeling, you know? It makes you want to, you know, it's just something resonates in me with that more, you know, sort of intense kind of trip. It's interesting what you say, though, because the same thing happened in the 90s. Actually happened in the early 80s too, when Metallica and slayer came on the scene, but more specifically in the 90s when you're talking about kind of the end of not even just hair metal did of heavy metal completely. When grunge came in because the whole scene needed a purge and needed to reboot. That's kind of what you're saying punk rock did. When you mentioned Emerson Lake and Palmer in this free version and the scanner, they kind of cleansed it. Yeah, well, if you think about it, there's not a Metallica or a slayer unless there's a GBH in a motor. Of course, absolutely. All those thrash bands that I sort of give more of them credit than the grunge shit because the grunge thing, you know, was, you know, those bands, whatever. It wasn't really my cup of tea. And retrospect, looking back, I see how important Nirvana and those bands were. But at the time, you know, I'm not a fan. It's not that I don't understand the importance of them. But to me, it was kind of like Diet Coke version of what I really wanted to listen to. So that's just my opinion. It's not that I'm saying that I don't understand the culture will significance of what they did because it wasn't for those bands. They're what have been the door wouldn't have been open for bands like rancid and Green Day offspring that kind of stuff. But if you really look at those thrash bands like slayer and Metallica and testament and access, they're all drawn from punk. Yeah. It's punk rock with guys who knew how to play better than that. Really? And those scenes crossed over and that's why you got bands like DRI and even GBH made records that were more on that sort of thrashy tip and the whole crossover scene happened because of bands like slayer. But then again, there wouldn't have been those fans unless there was a GBH. I mean, I remember sitting with James Hetfield in when we did Brazil with them. And I was talking about we were talking about their latest record hardwired, you know, because we were on tour with them and I was talking about that song spit out the bunks. I love Metallica. And it's like, yeah, thank you, GBH. And that came out of his mouth. So it's like, yeah, he understands and he gets it. I mean, he was a fan. They might have looked different and running different place, but they were still drawing from the same things we were. Oh, yeah. They might have liked diamond head. I mean, that's the thing with motorhead. It's like, that's the band that's the most argued about by the punks and the metalheads. It's like the punks will claim that they're punks. And then the meta heads will claim that they're metal. And lemmy will tell you what I've told you himself. They were more of a punk rock thing because they were sort of against the grain kind of thing. Nobody liked them. They were voted the worst of the worst band in the world by their own press. Lim would also say too that The Rock and roll because that's what it all boils down to. But there was a crossover too. I remember even being a major metalhead, you know, 85, 86. We listened to dead kennedys because they're very fast and also just loved kind of the chaos of Jell-O by Afro his voice, his lyric. There was I don't even know if you've heard of this one. There was a Canadian punk band called the day glo abortions. You know, I saw him a few times. There you go. I mean, I don't know how big they were outside of canter even if they were being Canada, but somehow I remember the record was called here today, guano tomorrow. And we listened to that thing over and over and over again because it was, it was fast and heavy, and it was almost kind of funny. There was a comedy element to a lot of punk because dead kennedys had it as well. Take the shovel shovel. I work in here no more. It's just like, how could you not laugh at that, but in a, this is killer type of a way. Well, I mean, the Canadians always, you know, yeah, DOA, you had the forgotten rebels, you did abortions. I mean, I mean, honestly, Chris, there's probably isn't a punk band that I haven't seen. So, I mean, and I'm not saying that to sound like any statistical asshole, but that's just the truth. That's your thing. It was my thing. So, you know, I feel like, you know, bands like the toy dolls and even the Ramones, you know, they had a tongue in cheek kind of thing to them, you know, writing songs about horror movies or, you know, I mean, I fell in love at the Burger King, you know, I saw her at the Burger King fell in love by the soda machine. So it's like, it was about that innocence of rock and roll, you know what I mean? And I feel like the purity and then you had the political element. So that's what I was saying. It's like, you know, you had the GG allens in the crassus. So you could have anything in the middle. You could have the political stuff that was actually had a message. You could have the fun stuff that was kind of like, you know, Nelly, the elephant by toy dolls. I mean, and there was a lot of other bands that were doing kind of the same kind of stuff. And it was a tongue in cheek, you know, the punk rock sense of humor, you know, no one was sacred. Nothing was sacred. I feel like punk rock has meant so many different things to so many different people over the course of time. You know, since it's been around, but I feel like the essence of it was about, you know, being true to yourself, making a life for yourself on your own terms. You didn't have to conform to what society said that you had to do. And also I think there was a sense of humor that came with it. It wasn't about cancel culture and any of that bullshit. It was more about freedom of expression, the real freedom of speech, you know? Because that's why I think it couldn't have happened anywhere else, but in America, because we have that unique thing of freedom of speech. You know what I mean? Right. And we hold that as one of the basic foundations of this country. And I feel like when you mix all of what was going on in the climate musically politically, you know, with the economy and everything like that, this music was going to be born. And it was going to be born in a way that was going to be aggressive and hard. And also, but I also have a sense of humor with it as well. So I mean, for you to tap into the dig a little abortions, it's like the way that I tapped into, you know, holiday in Cambodia. I mean, come on, just the title in itself is sort of ironic in that sense, you know what I mean?

Metallica GG Allen Emerson Lake Skynyrd Aretha Franklin jammer Elvis Presley Joey Bach James Hetfield Nirvana Palmer Sam Dave lemmy Lim Brazil Canada Nelly Chris
What the Reactions to Clarence Thomas Post-Roe Reveal About White Libs

Mark Levin

01:37 min | 7 months ago

What the Reactions to Clarence Thomas Post-Roe Reveal About White Libs

"What the reactions to clarence Thomas post roe reveal about white liberals I said wait a minute where did this come from Columbia University Sociology department Which is like the sociology department you know the university of Beijing or the university of Moscow And they say here soon after the court handed down its decision in row that is the Dobbs case Some pro choice advocates began hurling outrageous and overtly racist remarks of the justice By Musa our carbide and Paul F Lars fell There were 6 Supreme Court Justices who voted to overturn roe versus wade they said The majority opinion was authored by justice Sam Alito But in the aftermath of the ruling there has been an intense and particular focus on a different justice Clarence Thomas soon after the court handed down its decision some pro choice advocates began hurling outrageous and overtly racist remarks In Thomas's direction including liberal evocations of the N word on Twitter Often to the acclaim of some other left aligned whites

Clarence Thomas Post Roe Columbia University Sociology University Of Beijing University Of Moscow Paul F Lars Justice Sam Alito Dobbs Musa Wade Supreme Court Clarence Thomas Thomas Twitter
Arenado, Cards hit 4 straight HRs in 1st; late HR tops Phils

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 7 months ago

Arenado, Cards hit 4 straight HRs in 1st; late HR tops Phils

"The Cardinals became the first team in major league history to hit four consecutive home runs in the first inning but they needed no one or an auto second blast of the day to beat the Philly 7 6 With two out in the first aeronaut Nolan Gorman Juan yipes and Dylan Carlson Homer of Kyle Gibson Lars not bar just missed leaving the yard one batter later The power surge gave the red birds a 5 nothing lead But the Phillies tied the game by the third inning Yairo munoz slapped a two run double and Matt verling had two RBIs for the fills The cardinals are back within one game of the NL central leading brewers I'm Dave

Nolan Gorman Juan Yipes Dylan Carlson Homer Kyle Gibson Lars Cardinals Philly Red Birds Yairo Munoz Matt Verling Phillies NL Brewers Dave
Capitals rally late, stun top-seeded Panthers 4-2 in Game 1

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 9 months ago

Capitals rally late, stun top-seeded Panthers 4-2 in Game 1

"The the the the capitals capitals capitals capitals come come come come from from from from behind behind behind behind to to to to upset upset upset upset the the the the Panthers Panthers Panthers Panthers for for for for two two two two for for for for a a a a road road road road win win win win in in in in game game game game one one one one of of of of the the the the first first first first round round round round of of of of the the the the Eastern Eastern Eastern Eastern Conference Conference Conference Conference playoffs playoffs playoffs playoffs T. T. T. T. J. J. J. J. Oshie Oshie Oshie Oshie scored scored scored scored the the the the winning winning winning winning goal goal goal goal midway midway midway midway through through through through the the the the third third third third period period period period Tom Tom Tom Tom Wilson Wilson Wilson Wilson and and and and Evgeny Evgeny Evgeny Evgeny Kuznetsov Kuznetsov Kuznetsov Kuznetsov also also also also scored scored scored scored Lars Lars Lars Lars eller eller eller eller got got got got the the the the empty empty empty empty netter netter netter netter and and and and VTech VTech VTech VTech valid valid valid valid check check check check stopped stopped stopped stopped thirty thirty thirty thirty shots shots shots shots Sergei Sergei Sergei Sergei Bobrovsky Bobrovsky Bobrovsky Bobrovsky kept kept kept kept forty forty forty forty in in in in the the the the game game game game with with with with thirty thirty thirty thirty four four four four saves saves saves saves Sam Sam Sam Sam Bennett Bennett Bennett Bennett and and and and Claude Claude Claude Claude Giroux Giroux Giroux Giroux scored scored scored scored for for for for the the the the top top top top seeded seeded seeded seeded Panthers Panthers Panthers Panthers who who who who finished finished finished finished the the the the season season season season with with with with an an an an NHL NHL NHL NHL best best best best one one one one hundred hundred hundred hundred twenty twenty twenty twenty two two two two points points points points but but but but have have have have not not not not won won won won a a a a game game game game one one one one since since since since nineteen nineteen nineteen nineteen ninety ninety ninety ninety seven seven seven seven I'm I'm I'm I'm more more more more in in in in Ruston Ruston Ruston Ruston

Panthers Panthers Panthers Eastern Eastern Eastern Easter T. T. T. T. J. J. J. J. Oshie Tom Tom Tom Tom Wilson Wilson Evgeny Evgeny Evgeny Kuznetsov Kuznetsov Kuznetsov Kuznetsov Lars Lars Lars Lars Eller Eller Eller Vtech Vtech Sergei Sergei Sergei Sergei Bo Bobrovsky Bobrovsky Sam Sam Sam Sam Bennett Bennet Eller Claude Claude Claude Claude Gi NHL Giroux Giroux Giroux Ruston
"lars" Discussed on Code Story

Code Story

03:09 min | 9 months ago

"lars" Discussed on Code Story

"Would <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Music> <SpeakerChange> have <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> painful <Speech_Male> suffer through the pain <Speech_Male> of turning people away <Speech_Male> at the door and say, hey, <Speech_Male> you're not within <Speech_Music_Male> our ICP. This <Speech_Music_Male> is not going to be a success <Speech_Male> for you, <Speech_Music_Male> mister customer. And <Speech_Music_Male> then I would have focused <Speech_Music_Male> very, very <Speech_Music_Male> narrowly on those. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> those ICP customers <Speech_Music_Male> because that would have <Speech_Music_Male> helped us have much <Music> more speed. <Speech_Male> That would have been the <Speech_Music_Male> biggest <Speech_Music_Male> thing that I would have <Speech_Music_Male> changed. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Last question, <Speech_Male> Lars. So <Speech_Male> you're getting on a plane <Speech_Male> and you're sitting next <Speech_Male> to a young entrepreneur <Speech_Male> who's built the next <Speech_Male> big thing. <Speech_Male> They're jazzed about <Speech_Male> it. They can't wait to show it off to <Speech_Male> the world. Can't wait to show it <Speech_Male> off to you right there <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on the plane. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> What advice <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> do you give that person <Speech_Music_Male> having gone down <SpeakerChange> this road a <Speech_Music_Male> bit? <Speech_Male> Okay, if he <Speech_Male> has built an expect <Speech_Male> thing, I'll just congratulate <Speech_Male> him and say, <Speech_Music_Male> go out and <Speech_Music_Male> crush it. <Speech_Music_Male> But if it's a <Speech_Music_Male> bit more like us, <Speech_Music_Male> where you sort of you have <Speech_Music_Male> built something <Speech_Music_Male> that has a fit <Speech_Music_Male> with a problem <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that exists in the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> world, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I would advise around <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> focus and I <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> would <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> challenge him <Speech_Music_Male> or her to <Speech_Music_Male> think about whether <Speech_Music_Male> he could <Speech_Music_Male> be more focused around <Speech_Music_Male> this. Can you <Speech_Music_Male> cut away <Speech_Music_Male> something? Can you focus <Speech_Music_Male> even <Speech_Music_Male> more on solving <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> one <Speech_Male> problem <Speech_Male> very, very, <Speech_Music_Male> very <SpeakerChange> well <Speech_Music_Male> for a very <Speech_Music_Male> specific <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> segment of <Speech_Music_Male> companies of people. <Speech_Music_Male> And I <Speech_Music_Male> would have, that's <Speech_Music_Male> the advice I would give <Speech_Music_Male> this early <Speech_Music_Male> on, have a lot of <Speech_Music_Male> focus. <Speech_Male> And then I think the <Speech_Male> flip side of that <Speech_Music_Male> is that you also <Speech_Music_Male> need to understand that <Speech_Music_Male> focusing <Speech_Male> here <Speech_Music_Male> that's about building <Speech_Music_Male> your early product, <Speech_Music_Male> but you <Speech_Music_Male> need to know <Speech_Music_Male> what the same time, <Speech_Music_Male> at least if you're <Speech_Music_Male> going to build a huge <Speech_Music_Male> company, you need <Speech_Music_Male> to know <Speech_Male> that this <Speech_Male> problem <Speech_Male> either is <Speech_Male> or will become a <Speech_Music_Male> very big problem for a <Speech_Male> lot of people later <Speech_Male> on. So you <Speech_Male> know that there's a big <Speech_Male> market out there, <Speech_Male> but don't <Speech_Male> confuse <Speech_Music_Male> your sort <Speech_Music_Male> of early ICP <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> with the size of the <Speech_Music_Male> market. <Speech_Music_Male> And this probably <Speech_Male> then <Speech_Male> when you're going to <Speech_Music_Male> talk to investors, <Speech_Music_Male> you will need to <Speech_Male> some of them you'll need to <Speech_Male> explain it to them or <Speech_Male> discuss it with them and say, <Speech_Music_Male> yeah, I mean we are focusing <Speech_Music_Male> on this very, <Speech_Music_Male> very narrow segment, <Speech_Music_Male> but it's actually <Speech_Music_Male> a huge, huge <Music> market. <Speech_Music_Male> And <Speech_Male> that's <Speech_Male> the advice I would give to that. <Speech_Male> Given that it was <Speech_Male> relevant, maybe he was <Speech_Music_Male> already great at it, <Speech_Music_Male> and then <SpeakerChange> I just <Speech_Music_Male> say congratulations. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> I think that's great advice. <Speech_Male> Well, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Lars, thank you for being <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on the show today. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thank you for telling the <Speech_Music_Male> creation story <Speech_Music_Male> of dream data. <Speech_Music_Male> Thanks no <Speech_Music_Male> I was great <SpeakerChange> being on the show.

"lars" Discussed on Code Story

Code Story

02:51 min | 9 months ago

"lars" Discussed on Code Story

"So okay, what is the future look like for dream data, the product and for your team? So for the product, we are moving in the direction of the grand vision that I was talking about. So we are moving in the direction of revenue automation. So for us, that means sort of taking the product from being a data platform where we provide a set of analytics or insights on top of it, we want to make some of those insights turn them directly into actions. So we want to take data, give it back to some of the systems that we got it from so that you can directly action the data. And that for us is helping companies automate revenue more and more and more. So that is what's ahead of us. From a scaling perspective, we're just skimming the company so we're going to build out our sales team, build out our product team. So we are in a typical rapid scaling journey. That's the path we're on. So it's going to be from 27 people to probably tripling that in 12 to 18 months. So it's going to be from here on, it's going to be a crazy journey. Let's switch to you, Lars, who influences the way that you work. You know, name a person you look up to and why? One person that's not, I don't know him personally, I met him a couple of times. So one person I look up to a lot of this market Kagan. So from Silicon Valley product group, he has been very influential in the way that I think about you can say building product but also about building company, so he is a strong advocate of doing very commercially focused in the way that you think about a product. And iterating, yeah, I don't know. He's been very influential for me, then I would also just point out like I have a couple of cofounders that I look up to a lot. They have some skills that I don't have. So I look at that and I try to emulate them. I would say being very practical, being high conviction, I'm maybe more of a fundamentally more of a thinker and they have very high conviction, so I look up to that and I try to emulate that because conviction is also important because that helps you have direction and traction, right? Well, if you could go back to the beginning, what would you do differently or where would you consider taking a different approach? I think the main place where I would consider doing a different is what I think the thing that I talk about about focus. So I would have focused more early on I would have basically stuck to that ICP that we had and I.

Silicon Valley product group Lars Kagan
"lars" Discussed on Code Story

Code Story

12:22 min | 9 months ago

"lars" Discussed on Code Story

"What's working is this whole product led at all bringing it in any business is a beneficial at all. Down to the very tactical level where you want to say, okay, this buying this key where it actually makes sense does it impact any customer journey other than becoming revenue. Think about a meeting where you have the head of product, head of sales and the head of marketing, and they are all discussing their contribution to revenue. And each of them names a number, when you add them up, it gives like 200% of the revenue that you made. That meeting was real and it happened. And I think it happens in a lot of companies. At some point you need to figure out what is actually saying that the truth, but at least like something that's operational that can help you make a decision. So we basically made the decision, hey, we need to figure out what is the impact of the different parts of the go to market. Like many tech companies, we had lots and lots of data. We had a data warehouse. We had data describing everything in the business, but we were missing this sort of model that would glue all those data points together in a meaningful data model that we could use for analysis. We went looking for a product that would fix it for us. And we couldn't really find one. So it turned that content we built something ourselves so that we could answer the question, right? And start working on what data driven way in that company, like many founding stories, we also just got frustrated that there wasn't a product for this that we had to sit down and do all that tedious work of cleaning up the data, joining it, analyzing and building models. We decided to basically take those experiences out and build a company around it. Let's switch to the MVP then, so tell me about the MVP. How long did it take to build and what sort of tools did you use to bring it to life? The experience from trustpilot when we were solving it inside of that company was you can say the first very first early prototype we have, what we would do is we would take the data from our tracking. So we used segment dot com for a tracking our users on our website and in our applications. So we had a lot of tracking data. And then we would take commercial data from Salesforce to describing the sales pipelines and the movements in there. And we would take some data from advertising platforms and we would put it all into a data warehouse and then we would process it into nice models. And that was essentially the text that we then took out and tried to build this early prototype around. So we knew how to build it because we've done it once, and then we went out and found a couple of other companies that acknowledged that they had the same pain and we actually went to deliberately looking for customers that were using segment dot com because then we knew that we'd be able to get the data. We didn't want initially to build a whole ETL tool and a tracking infrastructure before we could test something so we had to go look and we had to go look for someone who had enough data that we could build our prototype product or MVP with them. So we went looking for somebody who was using segment that way we could get the tracking data and they actually also had store tracking data from historical data and segment has an ETL product so that was a way to get the CRM data out and the advertising platform data out into the BigQuery and then we basically built hand built the model. That that was the MBP app building that and then slamming a set of Google data studio dashboards on top of it so that we could visualize the results. So you mentioned a couple of these in there, but I want to dive into them. Tell me about tell me about some of the decisions and tradeoffs you had to make in building that MVP. And it sounds like maybe choosing segment, not wanting to build a lot of or all of the infrastructure there. But walk me through some of those decisions you had to make and how you coped with them. I think the way we went about this, I feel that we had much fewer constraints than we have had later on. Because as we sort of moved into building a more scalable product, we had to make a lot of painful decisions and caught off a lot of features because we couldn't build all of it. But because of the path we took where we sort of stuff things into BigQuery and we built a fairly structured process of processing the data into the models we wanted. It was quite easy for us to modify that and I would say that potentially created a situation where there wasn't a lot of constraints on the MVP. I'm not sure that that was good, but at least they could sometimes it's nice to have some strength that means you have to make a lot of decisions early on. But we could actually build a lot of what looked like product because it was basically a handmade processing and model building inside a BigQuery and then a set of dashboards that we had built for customer on top of it. Maybe too few decisions were forced on us there. But then when we sort of went from, say, having proven to ourselves, okay, there is a problem, there are some people that want to pay for this if you said, okay, now we're going to go on a bill say the first version of the product. Then we had to make lots of decisions, right? Then we had to start cutting away features that didn't really make sense or that nobody was happy about or we just liked ourselves, right? This episode is sponsored by verb data. Dashboards need to be high quality, easy to create and simple. Yet developing them can tend to be the complete opposite. The team at verb wants to change that. Verb speeds up the initial dashboard building process and limits the ongoing maintenance required, so development teams can stay focused on their core product. With verb, you control how and when your data is ingested, you can build models across data sources. You can segment and transform your data all while knowing that the product utilizes encryption, secure storage, and isolates your data away from other customers. If you want to get a dashboard up and running in a few days, or replace an existing and slow dashboard, get started with verb now. Learn more about the product at verb data dot com slash code story. That's VE RB data dot com slash code story. This episode is sponsored by web app IO. Web app IO helps developers build world changing web applications. Faster than ever before. Add things like product screenshots, cypress test recordings, technical SEO health, and even full stack review environments to get feedback without being blocked by staging servers. Web app IO takes care of speeding up end to end test, disposable staging environments. And continuous integration, all in one place. You can focus on shipping website changes instead of managing your DevOps. Try it for free at web app IO slash code story. That's WEB APP dot IO slash code story. Okay, so then from that point you start moving towards that, right? And you start progressing the product and maturing it. How did you go about that process? And I think to put that in a box when I'm curious, is how you build your road map and how you decide it, okay, now this is the next most important thing to build. The way we thought about it was we have a long-term vision for the company, which I would say stretches way beyond thinking about attribution because for us attribution in a way is just one analysis on top of this data. So our vision is to use this dataset of this data platform for many different purposes in a company. And we call that revenue automation. And for us, attribution is just one of those. So I think for us, the main guidance for us and the north star that is our vision. So that is revenue automation basically enabling companies to automate as much of generating revenue as possible. That's a grand vision, right? So we use that for that and then we will make tactical positions of course. We'll try to see what can we then actually take to market what can we get customers to buy and pay for that fits inside of that vision? So then let's switch to team, Lars, how did you go about building your team? And what I'm curious about is what you looked for in those people to indicate that they were the winning horses to join you. So we started out, we were two cofounders that came out of trust pilot and then we were joined by one of the companies we showed the product like the early prototype to very, very early on with Stefan, who then became the third cofounder and then between us we had sort of a strong product knowledge or a capability for building product. We had a strong tech and scale scaling tech. That's hula and then we had Stefan who has a very strong commercial is a very practical marketer in many ways sort of represents the corporate soma that we selling. So we work three guys founding the company. And we raised some money so that we could hire some people. We of course were like, we were looking for things that we needed. We needed to iterate and go from this like the very sort of duct tape prototype that I described before. So we wanted to go from that to something that was slightly more scalable, not like scalable for a hundred customers, but just at least scalable for like 15 or ten customers. So whatever we needed for the next milestone. So we went looking for engineers, designers, because we didn't have any design content like any design skills in the team. That was the first thing we needed because we needed to sort of iterate the first prototype into more of a real product. And then we went looking for people who had entrepreneurial mindset that was what we would look for. Somebody who would also ideally thrive and chaotic environment because at that stage we got to be like 6 people and everybody's doing everything and you don't want someone who longs for stable processes and lots of procedures. You want people at that stage, you just want people who love that, there is very little structure and that you can be part of making a lot of decisions. I think that's absolutely critical in the early days too. If you have somebody to be able to wear multiple halves, be able to be flexible and to be able to learn quick. There's like something in that persona too that is just Gritty, right? That can just get in there and get it done. Also that. The desire to impact, I think, is very important. Thank you want to individually contribute to the success of the company you want people who have that motivation. This message is brought to you by immediate. Did you know that financial stress is impacting 9 out of ten of your employees performance? This means that the quality of your employees work is being compromised. And essentially, robbing your bottom line. That's where immediate comes in. Immediate helps businesses recruit retain and engage employees in a rapidly changing job market by providing on demand pay solutions. The immediate solution provides employees with on demand access to their earned but not yet paid wages. This is accomplished through simple integrations with the employer's current payroll and time tracking providers at no cost to the employer. The media is the premier on demand pay solution designed to improve the quality of life and financial well-being of employees. Allow employees responsible access to their pay when they need it most. Find out more about immediate at join immediate dot com slash code story. This message is brought to you by orbit. Do you have an online community? Do you get tired of bouncing around between tools, managing your community's messages and activity? Meet orbit. Orbit brings your community tools and data together so your developer relations team can build relationships, not spreadsheets. With orbit, you can grow and measure your community across any platform, whether it be slack, Discord, Twitter, through official integrations, open-source integrations, and compatibility with low code no code tools like zapier. You can connect just about any community tool to orbit, or you can build your own. Orbit gives you a single shared view of your community members and their activity..

Salesforce Stefan Google Lars Twitter
"lars" Discussed on Code Story

Code Story

01:37 min | 9 months ago

"lars" Discussed on Code Story

"Strategic business.

Eller scores, Capitals beat Bruins for 3rd consecutive win

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 10 months ago

Eller scores, Capitals beat Bruins for 3rd consecutive win

"Lars Lars Lars Lars eller eller eller eller had had had had a a a a goal goal goal goal and and and and an an an an assist assist assist assist in in in in the the the the capital's capital's capital's capital's third third third third straight straight straight straight win win win win for for for for two two two two over over over over the the the the Bruins Bruins Bruins Bruins eller eller eller eller snapped snapped snapped snapped a a a a two two two two two two two two tie tie tie tie with with with with twelve twelve twelve twelve forty forty forty forty eight eight eight eight remaining remaining remaining remaining any any any any set set set set up up up up Tom Tom Tom Tom Wilson's Wilson's Wilson's Wilson's career career career career high high high high twenty twenty twenty twenty third third third third goal goal goal goal very very very very satisfying satisfying satisfying satisfying of of of of course course course course netting netting netting netting a a a a couple couple couple couple of of of of big big big big goals goals goals goals with with with with with with with with Tom Tom Tom Tom and and and and and and and and mo mo mo mo I I I I think think think think we we we we have have have have some some some some we we we decided decided decided we we we had had had a a a good good good game game game going going going to to to feeling feeling feeling feeling feeling feeling good good good on on on the the the pocket pocket pocket John John John Carlson Carlson Carlson also also also scored scored scored Alex Alex Alex events events events can can can added added added an an an empty empty empty netter netter netter and and and VTech VTech VTech Bennett Bennett Bennett check check check stop stop stop twenty twenty twenty eight eight eight shots shots shots to to to help help help the the the caps caps caps pull pull pull within within within two two two points points points to to to the the the penguins penguins penguins for for for third third third place place place in in in the the the metropolitan metropolitan metropolitan division division division Curtis Curtis Curtis Lazar Lazar Lazar near near near call call call ahead ahead ahead to to to Bruins Bruins Bruins goals goals goals leader leader leader so so so mark mark mark kept kept kept the the the bees bees bees in in in the the the game game game while while while making making making twenty twenty twenty seven seven seven saves saves saves I'm I'm I'm Dave Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie Ferrie

Bruins Eller Eller Lars Lars Lars Lars Eller Elle Wilson Tom Tom Tom Tom Wilson Eller Tom Tom Tom Tom Mo Mo Mo Mo John John John Carlson Carlson Carlson Alex Alex Alex Vtech Vtech Vtech Bennett Benn Penguins Metropolitan Metropolitan Metr Curtis Curtis Curtis Lazar Laz Bruins Bruins Mark Mark Mark Dave Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie Ferrie
McAvoy's late goal lifts Bruins to 4-3 win over Capitals

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

McAvoy's late goal lifts Bruins to 4-3 win over Capitals

"Charlie Charlie Charlie Charlie McEvoy's McEvoy's McEvoy's McEvoy's power power power power play play play play goal goal goal goal with with with with forty forty forty forty five five five five seconds seconds seconds seconds left left left left was was was was the the the the difference difference difference difference as as as as the the the the Bruins Bruins Bruins Bruins won won won won for for for for the the the the ninth ninth ninth ninth time time time time in in in in their their their their last last last last eleven eleven eleven eleven games games games games four four four four three three three three versus versus versus versus the the the the capitals capitals capitals capitals the the the the man man man man advantage advantage advantage advantage was was was was created created created created when when when when Washington's Washington's Washington's Washington's nic nic nic nic Dowd Dowd Dowd Dowd was was was was called called called called for for for for throwing throwing throwing throwing his his his his stick stick stick stick with with with with just just just just two two two two and and and and a a a a half half half half minutes minutes minutes minutes left left left left David David David David Pasternak Pasternak Pasternak Pasternak scored scored scored scored twice twice twice twice and and and and Patrice Patrice Patrice Patrice Bergeron Bergeron Bergeron Bergeron also also also also had had had had a a a a goal goal goal goal for for for for the the the the Bruins Bruins Bruins Bruins the the the the capital's capital's capital's capital's rallied rallied rallied rallied from from from from a a a a pair pair pair pair of of of of one one one one goal goal goal goal deficits deficits deficits deficits but but but but took took took took just just just just seventeen seventeen seventeen seventeen shots shots shots shots on on on on Lena Lena Lena Lena so so so so mark mark mark mark Nicklas Nicklas Nicklas Nicklas Backstrom Backstrom Backstrom Backstrom Lars Lars Lars Lars eller eller eller eller and and and and Evgeny Evgeny Evgeny Evgeny Kuznetsov Kuznetsov Kuznetsov Kuznetsov did did did did the the the the scoring scoring scoring scoring for for for for Washington Washington Washington Washington I'm I'm I'm I'm Dave Dave Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie Ferrie Ferrie

Bruins Mcevoy Charlie Charlie Charlie Charli Washington Nic Dowd Dowd Dowd Dowd David David David David Paster Pasternak Pasternak Patrice Patrice Patrice Patric Bergeron Bergeron Bergeron Eller Eller Lena Lena Lena Lena Mark Mark Mark Mark Nicklas Nicklas Nicklas Backstrom Backstrom Backstrom Lars Lars Lars Lars Evgeny Evgeny Nicklas Backstrom Evgeny Kuznetsov Kuznetsov Kuznetsov
Oshie, Kuznetsov score in shootout, Caps beat Sabres 3-2

AP News Radio

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

Oshie, Kuznetsov score in shootout, Caps beat Sabres 3-2

"Shootout shootout goals goals by by T. T. J. J. Oshie Oshie and and Evgeny Evgeny Kuznetsov Kuznetsov sent sent the the capital's capital's passes passes Sabres Sabres three three to to two two Martin Martin ferre ferre very very and and Lars Lars eller eller scored scored in in regulation regulation and and VTech VTech vantage vantage check check stopped stopped twenty twenty nine nine shots shots for for Washington Washington for for a a very very got got the the tying tying goal goal for for the the caps caps at at five five forty forty one one of of the the third third period period with with an an assist assist from from Alex Alex of of education education the the caps caps of of earn earn points points in in eleven eleven of of their their last last twelve twelve games games safe safe for for Friday's Friday's four four two two loss loss to to the the penguins penguins who who co co Packer Packer Lew Lew Knin Knin made made forty forty saves saves for for the the sabers sabers who who have have dropped dropped seven seven in in a a row row I'm I'm Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie

T. T. J. J. Oshie Oshie Evgeny Evgeny Kuznetsov Kuznet Sabres Martin Martin Ferre Ferre Lars Lars Eller Eller Vtech Vtech Alex Alex Washington Penguins Penguins Packer Packer Lew Lew Knin Kni Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie
Sidney Crosby records 2 assists, Penguins beat Capitals 4-2

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Sidney Crosby records 2 assists, Penguins beat Capitals 4-2

"Four four players players scored scored goals goals interesting interesting Jarry Jarry made made twenty twenty nine nine saves saves as as the the penguins penguins beat beat the the capitals capitals forty forty two two the the penguins penguins gotta gotta Danton Danton Heinen Heinen goal goal in in the the first first to to take take the the lead lead they they added added two two more more in in the the second second on on goals goals from from Brock Brock McGinn McGinn and and Caspary Caspary Kapanen Kapanen who who added added his his sixth sixth of of the the season season to to make make it it three three nothing nothing Kapanen Kapanen had had gone gone five five games games without without a a tally tally the the capitals capitals got got goals goals from from Evgeny Evgeny Kuznetsov Kuznetsov from from Lars Lars eller eller in in the the third third to to cut cut the the lead lead to to one one before before the the pens pens Jeff Jeff Carter Carter added added an an empty empty netter netter lain lain cried cried heist heist Washington Washington

Penguins Kapanen Kapanen Jarry Jarry Danton Danton Heinen Heinen Brock Brock Mcginn Mcginn Caspary Caspary Evgeny Evgeny Kuznetsov Kuznet Lars Lars Eller Eller Jeff Jeff Carter Carter Washington
Cards match record with 14th straight win, rip Cubs 12-4

AP News Radio

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

Cards match record with 14th straight win, rip Cubs 12-4

"Hitting eight home runs on the day the cardinals swept the cubs in a double header running their MLB season high winning streak to fourteen straight the scores of the games were eight to five and twelve to four Lars nude bar had two of those home runs both coming in the night cap the fourteen straight victories ties the cardinals longest winning streak ever first accomplished eighty six years ago back in nineteen thirty five and with the two when Saint Louis is magic number for wrapping up a wild card spot is down to four David Shuster Chicago

Cardinals Cubs MLB Lars Saint Louis David Shuster Chicago
Incoming N.Y. Gov. Kathy Hochul Speaks After Cuomo Resignation

Lars Larson

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

Incoming N.Y. Gov. Kathy Hochul Speaks After Cuomo Resignation

"And less than two weeks speaks publicly for the first time since the resignation of governor Andrew Cuomo. Lieutenant governor Kathy Huckle says this promotion was not expected. But there's a day for which I am prepared. She says She spoke with Governor Cuomo, thanking him for his service to the state but in light of sexual harassment allegations against him She addressed his resignation. I believe it is appropriate in the best interest to the state of New York. Cuomo remains governor until August 24th boxes Gurnal Scott, an Indiana man charged with

Lieutenant Governor Kathy Huck Governor Cuomo Andrew Cuomo Cuomo Gurnal Scott New York Indiana
Walmart Offering Full College Tuition and Books for Employees

Lars Larson

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Walmart Offering Full College Tuition and Books for Employees

"News. WalMart is beefing up one of its employee benefits. Employees of Wal Mart are about to receive another education benefit. The company has been charging a dollar a day for its live better You college education program. Now the entire cost of tuition and books for approved studies will be picked up by WalMart. The company expects the move to impact 1.5 million part time and full time workers Also Johnson and Wales University, the University of Arizona The University of Denver and Pat Stream are now part of the WalMart program. Wal Mart is also adding business administration supply chain and cyber security to its degree and certificate

Wal Mart Wales University Pat Stream University Of Arizona University Of Denver Johnson
First-Time Unemployment Claims Fall to a New Pandemic Low

Lars Larson

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

First-Time Unemployment Claims Fall to a New Pandemic Low

"Jobless claims numbers come in at 360,000 new pandemic low and a decrease of 26,000 from the previous week's revised level. It's in line with Wall Street expectations. This is the lowest level for initial claims since March, 14th 2020 when it was 256,000, and the trend looks better. The four week moving average was 382,500. That's a decrease of 14,500 from the previous week's revised average

"lars" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"lars" Discussed on WDRC

"This is Lars Larson. Welcome back to the Lars Larson Show. It's a pleasure to be with you. You know, my dentist has reminded me for a couple of decades that You have to take good care of your teeth, and it's not just about your pretty smile. It's about making sure that you don't get things like heart disease, because that's one of the routes that some of that bacteria has to get inside your body. So I was kind of interested when I saw there's a medical study out there about a root for the covert 19 virus to get into your body. And it's because you don't take good care of your teeth. So I thought, Let's talk to the guy behind it. Dr. Sherman Malai, Um joins me now. Who's a dentist TVs written a study and I know it's like most scientific studies. It doesn't sound very penetrate herbal by the average person. The covert 19 pathway, a proposed aural vascular pulmonary root of SARS, cov to infection and the importance of oral health care measures. Doctor Welcome to the program and tell us about this is bad or aural hygiene, bad teeth, brushing one of the ways that people put themselves at greater risk. My Lord. Thanks for having me and I feel like this is such an important topic because it's something that no one even expected would even be possible that happen. So first of all. We think that we get cold it because it comes down our airway down our windpipe. Terrified trachea. You know that's not happening. What we're seeing is actually it's coming into our bloodstream first. Possibly so That's But the medical imaging is showing the CT scans are all showing is actually coming in down into the lungs in the area where the blood vessels are going into the lungs. This means Basically where the blood vessels come. They come from the mouth. So there's now we look at why you couldn't come from the mouth. We have a lot of saliva. That's where stars called the two.

Lars Larson Sherman Malai two Dr. one Lars Larson Show first 19
"lars" Discussed on The Know Show

The Know Show

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"lars" Discussed on The Know Show

"All the kings and queens related to each other about sir it goes all the trade moldy migrations and flows. And because it's a very small on this and by interest in china actually started much later. Because by first ev conviction i love my first. Passion is actually archaeology. And i started traveling around in in the eastern parts of the mediterranean greece especially turkey so i was locked in. What used to be part of the ottoman empire's or the lebron. You know that especially in syria syria. Many years for the war broke out. I know the country quite from the inside and So that would have been one of my roots. I mean i should say that. I mean that's also a message to all of those of you who Appropriate not sure whether he wanted to pursue academic path and with me it was by by no means clear that that's what i wanted to do was one of the things that i experimented with. Who's actually worked hostile before as us. So that's my a practical background. But the white working have assisted studying by myself. Flatten of greek little bit of Knowledge and then with that i applied for apologies h history. I did that and then it was by coincidence. Having studied about two or three years to my cause somebody offered me. That's back in the eighties. When was very unusual. Somebody offered me a ticket. For the transsiberian railway eighty. Us dollars to all the way to peaking an aging. And i okay. let's go for. It is the first year that after the culture of that you could actually travel by yourself but only in the city's areas and that's actually what did what did it from the. And then two years later he had so us. Nineteen eighty seven and i am studied a afghanistan chinese-language and And history history of asia. Because i had never studied for and by that time. 'cause i've worked before i was already in miami twenty so was relatively late. Most of the other students were in their eighteenth. So i'd subordinates. Granddaddy had.

miami china turkey eighteenth eighties asia two years later syria afghanistan first three years twenty first year one Nineteen eighty seven about two transsiberian mediterranean greece roots chinese
"lars" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

07:57 min | 2 years ago

"lars" Discussed on WDRC

"The Lars Larson show. Glad to get your calls at 866. Hey, Lars. How bad Exactly is America's border crisis now that China Joe Biden is now America's gatekeeper for it that we talk about that with Mark Morgan, Who's the former chief operating officer? And acting commissioner of U. S Customs and Border Protection and a visiting fellow at the Heritage Foundation. I've been trying to tell my audience that this is going to be extraordinarily bad news for America in so many ways, but how bad Well, how about a situation are we in right now, with an open borders, president well or salute to spot on? He's gonna be extraordinary. But here's what if you tell everybody It's not like what's going to happen. The extraordinary results are already upon its. I've already I've been saying the crisis is already here. Look right now. CVP just released its January staff almost 80,000 in the month of January. They're looking at over 3500 people trying to illegally enter the southern border every single day. By any definition. Those numbers are crisis level numbers. Remember J. Johnson, former secretary under Obama, then vice president, Biden said. How's it was a bad day. It's about the only thing from a policy perspective. I agree, But he says 1000. It was a bad day. We're getting 3500. That's crisis level numbers and the sole reason why this is happening because the president finds open border policies and rhetoric. If you come in here, we're gonna release you were going to protect you from awful deportation, and we're going to reward you with an amnesty experiencing DOC and free health care. Now you know that a lot of the rhetoric during the campaign was Donald Trump is evil because he built all those cages and then shoved kids into the cages on Lee Come to find out what a lot of has already knew. This is that they weren't cages. They were chain link barriers set up two separate people, adults from Children, things like that, who'd been caught illegally coming into the Country and that was actually created under the Obama administration. The Trump Administration inherited that and they said, We're not going to let people just come in and use a child. In many cases, not even their own child as the entry ticket to come into America and then dumped the child on the other side of the border s so they could be used in child trafficking or all kinds of awful things. But Biden made a lot of that. So how about that? How are the cage is going is the bite administration still operating cages of as long as as they chose the name for them? Exactly Lords and that zest another example of hypocrisy. So I was actually detailed over CDP. A good time with those facilities were being built. And at that time the President Biden I mean, President Obama and then Vice President Biden at that time were actually singing the praises of CDP about how quickly they have built those facilities. Because the facilities we have, you know, decades old were not designed House family and Children and they built this facility, which was called it, you know, like a mini Costco to care for these families, so it's just hypocrisy at its best. And then you bring up another point where the open border advocates in this administration doesn't want to talk to talk about the dark side where we're seeing the United States encourage incentivized and facilitating Illegal immigration and the dark side about it just as you described. Look in 2019. We had people renting and buying Children renting and buying them performing faith families because they knew then that you presented is a fake family you were going to get entering the United States never be heard from again. President Trump has all but ended that but President Biden was a stroke of the pen within a couple hours reinstated that were full on That poor poor poor poor steam ahead Well, and the problem is, I think, frankly, the Trump campaign did a poor job of explaining it. Mark you cartman from wrong, but I was trying to explain it this way. If the police in a community anyone America come upon a drug lab run by a man and a woman, and they have Children with him, the police arrest the man and the woman because they're doing something illegal. And then they turned the kids over to social services. And people would say Yeah, but Trump is locking kids up in cages, and I said no. What the CBP does is they take the man and woman who are doing something illegal crossing the end of the United States illegally. They separate the Children from them and hand them over to social services, so not a dime's worth of difference to how we treat American Children found in some criminal circumstance where the adults are committing crimes, and they're they're just child victims of all this. And the Children used either his entry tickets or coming in with Mom and dad. In some cases, not not all that those get handed over to sell, you know, to child protective services. Same result, whether you're a citizen, child or non citizen child and the right result to hand kids off from their criminal parents to to some kind of care that's decent. That's that's what, but they did a bad job of explaining that that's what they were doing. And it wasn't a different than what Obama and Biden had done because I don't disagree with you. And look you know this. This is from my perspective. This is ah, After 30 years of law enforcement, you know, I think we we didn't do a good enough job explaining we have open borders. What happened to the George coming across? I don't think we did a good enough job. Explained about the dark side that you know. Human smuggling turns into human trafficking, how the kids in the migrants themselves exploited to in light to buy the cartels and smugglers and abused as they make their journey. You know all that kind of stuff. How many migrants actually die on the journey trying to illegally cross I agree, and I'll tell you what, as a young police officer from all sends his department. One of the first things that I did with it was just a few months on duty as a new police officer. I had physically rip a baby. This was to rip a baby out of a mother's arms because child protective services had made the decision that the mother could not care for the baby. In fact, because of her carelessness, the baby was severely injured. I still remember that and that was well over. I think, 25 years ago, so large your spot on and that's just the truth. But again, that doesn't that doesn't fit the open border progressive left wing open borders strategy so they don't talk about it. And unfortunately, I'm talking to Mark Morgan, who used to be acting commissioner of Customs and Border Protection. Now with the Heritage Foundation, the mainstream media is going to carry water for these guys. They were happy to throw the cages story at Donald Trump on a regular basis. They ain't going to do that with Joe Biden, are they? No, They're not right now look, and that's why I keep saying that the crisis is already upon us that 3500 and let's let's let's added the turn back that go back to Mexico to avoid operation and those that get away every single day. It's more like 4500 Day. Where are they? Where are they going Back to J. Johnson against a Yeah, thousands of that day. Oh, it's a crisis right now, largely on Lee thing. The last finger in the dike is because president by because removed every effective tool in policy that was addressing the illegal migration. It's all gone. It's gone through the MPP, which ended catching release the whole nine yards. It's gone. Only thing remaining in deceiving. See order title. 42, which still allowed the border Patrol to apprehend folks on the borders, not allow them into the country and other facilities removed them back to Mexico. So look very simple. Several cracks in that and their lawsuits and they're already open border advocates calling for the removal of title 42. When title 42 drops when it goes away, that 3500 becomes a catastrophic crisis and a few days Tension releases full long We're gonna be handed off hundreds of thousands of days. Bus stops local shelters just like we did in 2019. You know, I'm worried to mark because I think about towns like McAllen, Texas. That's right there on the border, and there was a time there was a point where they were talking about 150,000 people in in in a year, and I think the number was 12,000 month and I said, Imagine your little town. Has 4000 people a week. Flooding into it, without resource is without money without jobs without anything and they're flooding through your town and imagine what it would do if 4000 effectively. Homeless people and Children are coming into your town. And you're saying we don't know what to do with all these people..

Mark Morgan Donald Trump J. Johnson 2019 January Lars U. S Customs and Border Protec Biden McAllen Costco 1000 Heritage Foundation 3500 Trump Obama 866 George title 42 Joe Biden 4500 Day
"lars" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

06:19 min | 2 years ago

"lars" Discussed on WDRC

"M. M W truth. He's Lars Larson. Welcome back to Lars Larson. Don't want to give you a little update on what's going on in the Senate and unconstitutional trial. Private citizen Donald Trump. The Senate has now voted by a majority that the effort is constitutional. I still don't have to agree that it is. But six Republicans have joined the Democrats and the two independents to say that his constitutional Bill Cassidy from Louisiana senator had previously supported. Rand Paul in saying it's unconstitutional. He is now flipped. So is the usual group of suspects. Susan Collins, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, the sellout rhino, Mitt Romney from Utah, Ben Sasse of Nebraska and Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania, all voting that it was constitutional. I guess that's the good news for the Democrats. The bad news for the Democrats. He is. They're still 11 votes short of either convicting Donald Trump or about barring him from any further vote run for office, So we'll continue to follow what's going on on Capitol Hill. But I want to talk about a bill that's in the House of Representatives in Washington, D. C and it's raised the concerns of a lot of you have written to me and I'm aware of the bill. I'm just not aware of whether or not it's moving or or appears likely to move its house resolution. 1 27. It is a federal bill and what it it's written by representative Sheila Jackson Lee of Texas, who's kind of lunatic, but she's a Democrat from Texas. She would impose a system of licensing of firearms and ammunition and for the possession of any firearms or ammunition. It would impose a license to display an antique firearm in your home. A lot of other crazy things. Dr. John Lott joins me. He is the president of the Crime Prevention Research Center. I serve on the board of that center without compensation. So I have a bit of a dog in the fight. And John is the author of so many great books, including Gun Control myths. Doctor line. Welcome back to the program. And what should Americans know about this House resolution? 1 27. Thanks. Yeah, it's good to talk to you again after being in Washington. I could just say Can it confirmed all my worst fears about the government? But, uh, you know, I don't think this bill is going to be going in place. Are there concerns that one should have about registration? Yeah, but not through this bill. As far as I know, I just looked it up a little while ago. I don't think she has any co sponsors even on her bill. And, um, uh, but Mork concern is during the campaign. Uh Biden promised to go and try to classify. Many semiautomatic rifles. Aske last three weapons. I know you know what this is, but a classroom weapon is basically been things like machine guns. Requires that you have to register them requires that you have to have a $200 feet. And, uh, so they would essentially be able to go and set up a registration and licensing system for Semi automatic rifles. Whether they can do that will be something that without legislation will be something that we would have to be determined by the courts. But they'd also include not only semi automatic rifles, but they also want to include magazines that hold more than 10 rounds. Just like you have. Silencers are Classified is a class three weapon. They wanna classified large capacity magazines, uh, the same way and that would also require $200 for them. And by the way, John that's a $200 annual fee, is it not? Or is it a one time? One time? It's a one time fee, but I think what you're thinking about during the campaign, Uh Biden in Kamala Harris talked about making it an annual C. Well, and and one of the concerns I've got is if you make it a class three. I don't have any class Three firearms. I know some people who do and they tell me because they anticipate this that any time the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms which should be a convenient store, not a federal agency, but any time they want to. They can. They could call you up and say We want to come and inspect your class three weapons. They can come to your home if that's where you have them, and they're allowed to go in and check all your paperwork and all your weapons, And if it isn't 100% squared away, you've got big problems, so that's what they would put on somebody. One stone, just a simple semiautomatic rifle. Or already does and with this apply to guns that are already in private possession or would only apply to those sold after a certain day. The way they were talking about. They would apply it retroactively toe all guns that you have. I mean, that's basically the way it worked with machine guns. You weren't grandfathered in and so they're trying to use the same language that's already in the act there to apply to semi automatic rifles. The thing people have to understand is right now. It also takes about nine months or so, maybe even longer, sometimes to go through the process to get approved, and there's really no reason why I should take that long. It's just the way bureaucracies work. I assume if they're going to go and add all these things to the list of what's classified is a class three weapon. It would make it a lot longer process more than nine months, so you could imagine. You want to go on by, uh, semi automatic rifle that they would class by as a class three weapons. You know? Good luck. I mean, maybe maybe a year or more before you'd actually be able to get approval for it. Well, And does that mean in the meantime, you're in some kind of legal limbo, or do they say you have a certain amount of time Because we're talking about literally. I don't know the current number. But the Honore says about 25% of all rifles producing the U. S. R A R 15. Other groups have said, is closer to 50%. And about a decade ago, there were maybe three or four million of these in the United States. Can you imagine the bureaucracy it would take to create a registry and force all Americans to bring in literally millions of rifles to be registered with the federal government..

Uh Biden Dr. John Lott Donald Trump Lars Larson Bill Cassidy Washington Senate Rand Paul Texas House of Representatives M. M Mitt Romney Pat Toomey United States senator Sheila Jackson Lee Susan Collins Louisiana Honore
"lars" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

05:55 min | 2 years ago

"lars" Discussed on WDRC

"Back to the Lars Larson show. It's a pleasure to be with you. And you know, I have to tell you I share with you some of the things that are my favorites. One of my favorite movies of all time is Braveheart. And I know there a lot of people who don't like Mel Gibson. I like Mel Gibson. I know he has his flaws. Well, Fortunately, God recognizes that all of us who are human? Have flaws, but he's done some great movies and that ranks among his best. I also like President Donald Trump, and he will have that title for the rest of his life, even though he's now left office, although as we speak, the Democrats are still planning to impeach him shortly or sorry. They've already impeached him. They're planning to convict him, which the U. S. Senate can only do tow a president. So I guess, even in the eyes of the Democrats, he's still president. Maybe they figured the election is not completely settled with that in mind. I recently read a great piece by Dr Larry Schweickart. Now you've heard Dr Schweickart on the program before he is, of course, the author of so many great books, but two among them the most recent of Patriots history. Well, that one is actually going into its 32nd printing half a million copies in print. It's very popular and his book about Reagan, the American president, and we might see some comparisons. Between Donald Trump's time in office and President Ronald Reagan. Both men I admire Dr Swaggered. Welcome back to the program. How are you? Thanks, Clark. Great to be back. So you wrote this piece on. It was published by uncovered. D. C. And I like uncovered D c a lot. And you draw a comparison between William Wallace the guy that was the central figure in Braveheart on DRoberts, the Bruce the first King of Scotland and Donald Trump, and I think people might find that an odd comparison. But I actually thought it was very apt. Which is why I invited you to come back on the show and talk about it. Well, you know, for four years, people have been saying, Well, Trump is Cyrus or Trump is this person in the Bible or that person in the Bible and I think it goes without saying that That Trump is a quote type of Christ. I'm not saying Trump is Jesus. But I'm saying that he left a life of wealth and luxury to try to make the world a better place and he was You know, persecuted and lambasted and betrayed for it. So there's a certain comparison there. But, um, what I saw about Trump was, it was aptly put by a guy on free republic. Which was that Trump ran the country, but he never ran the party. And I think that that was really troop. You look back. Probably the first thing you should have done was fire Ronna McDaniel. But whether she did a good job or not a good job, you know, still in question he needed to control the entire party apparatus, and he didn't do that. And then that led him to make some very fairly poor appointments in terms of Jeff Sessions, then later, Bill Bar in terms of Ray Christopher Wray in terms of Tina House full and so in the end, when he needed them, he didn't have the support of DOJ, the FBI, CIA or the military. Which was really troubling. Um and so I think when you look at Trump What did he do? He galvanized and united that deplorables the smelly hillbillies, the Scottish, uh, ordinary citizens. Who had no voice. And and brought them into an absolute fervor. Boiling 0.0, where 74 million of them turned out to vote for him. Who did he not really. Ever manage to secure He never managed to get the nobles. He never managed to get the elites of Washington in the party or kind of in the bureaucracy behind him. And I think this is what Robert the Bruce was able to do in Scotland because he himself is a noble He was able to take. William Wallace is face of inflamed ordinary people, The deplorables and united with that group of Klansmen and took some fighting. I mean, he had the really battled these other clans and and defeat them militarily, but eventually he got them. Behind him and united. I think that's what it's going to take next time around. Whether it's trump or somebody else to win is to unite those two wings of the conservative movement. I'm talking to Dr Larry Schweickart, who is the author of Reagan, the American president and now in its 32nd printing a Patriots history of the United States. So do you think that that Donald Trump didn't unite those two factors? The elites and I've never had a lot of respect for the way that some of the elites in the Republican Party and especially the country club Republicans or You know the the establishment Republicans behave with with people like like you and I think like you and me, It's certainly like me who view ourselves Just Americans may be a little bit of a libertarian bent to us that want the government to stay out of our hair stand of our business, um and and take a lazy faire approach, uh to to governing the country instead of wanting to regulate every single aspect of it. Why didn't trump attempt to do it? Or did he and did he fail or or did you just not understand the importance of having to get the party on board? I don't think he ever appreciated how much he needed not just a party, but a a loyal Kadre within that party and a Z, he said to Rush Limbaugh. You know, he thought that after a few weeks that the Lot of the hostility would die down and people pull together and unite at that reflected a fundamental misunderstanding of how in my terms, the other side is fundamentally evil that they don't want a better America. They want their America even if it's a smoking ash heap..

President Donald Trump President Ronald Reagan president Dr Larry Schweickart Mel Gibson William Wallace Republican Party Lars Larson Robert the Bruce Rush Limbaugh Dr Swaggered U. S. Senate America Ronna McDaniel United States Patriots Washington Clark Scotland
"lars" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

AM 570 The Mission

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"lars" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

"Lives and also supports Woman's right to choose life on Here's choices story. When I first thought that I was pregnant, I was having a lot of issues at work. So it really was not a great time to be pregnant if you will, and it wasn't planned, and I wasn't married, and I was terrified, and I don't know what to do. You know. So the first things at that point my life I was like, What am I gonna do with the child? You know I was I was 24, I think And you know, I didn't know what I was gonna do with the baby. You know, At that time my dad was in jail. Actually, he was coming off of being on drugs. Most of my life. I was trying to get ready for him to come home and help him stay clean, and that was like my main focus. Was working. My father is that now I got a baby on the way. I was thinking about getting an abortion. I mean, I was devastated. I didn't know I didn't know how to deal with not keeping a child. I didn't let alone. You know, I wasn't even ready for one. I was just an emotional wreck. And eventually I made a covenant with them. I came in, and I had an ultrasound. And when I came in, and I heard the heartbeat for the first time that changed everything. I mean, you don't think about anything like that. You're thinking about yourself until you hear that heart. They love that somebody else's life. So help you God I started putting my daughter is about to be three when I got here. How strong how hard you Lars and I felt like she was supposed to be here. You know what? It didn't matter what anybody else told me. It didn't matter if you know people who like you can't afford a baby right now. Are you gonna do with the child? And none of that matters anymore? I'm saying all that mattered was how I was blessed with the ability to carry a life inside of my body. And that makes this supposed to be here for something you know. To me. The ultrasound was the best part because Up Until that point. I did not think about anything but myself. I did not think about the bliss that I was getting what was inside of me and what I'm saying. So to me, that was perfect. Going through. The whole process was beautiful, you know, and I had to go pretty much do everything by myself. But it was still amazing because I wasn't behind myself. That's going with all the time. What time you got to have a.

Lars
"lars" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"lars" Discussed on WDRC

"Edmund. Welcome back with Lars Larson, Joe, and welcome to what we like to call conspiracy theory Thursday. I've got one that I want to debunk and I will got one that I want to add a little bit more information to Because I think there is some substance to it. After what happened in the nation's capital yesterday, I've got a few thoughts on that. And I think that some of you are right. There probably was antifa infiltration of the Donald Trump event yesterday, although I've also got some as I said, some information to go the other direction as well. We'll get to that in a moment. But welcome to conspiracy theory Thursday If you'd like to join the best conversation and talk journalism right here every day at 866. Hey, Lars. That's 8664395277 emails. Go to talk at Lars Larson dot com. Our Twitter pull. I know if you're a liberal, you probably haven't easy answer to this, but I think the real answer is much more complicated. Does President Trump deserve the blame for what happened yesterday in Washington, D c. I'd say no to that. And I'd argue that point with any nays here who wants to call in What people do in acting in a violent way, A based on speech or a speech that someone has given if you decide to go down that road, you might be going to a strange place because they're an awful lot of politicians in this country, including more than a few on the liberal side of the aisle who have done things like that, But I want to make sure you know where I'm coming from on this. So if you want to vote, the Twitter poll Just go toe at Lars Lars and show on Twitter or Lars Larson dot com. Our website If you don't like Twitter very well, it's brought to you by ultimate truck services. If you rely on trucks for your business,.

Lars Lars Lars Larson Twitter Donald Trump President Trump Edmund. Washington