35 Burst results for "Larry Page"

"larry page" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:19 min | 7 months ago

"larry page" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Of it Another small company called Google Part of it Back in the likes of Larry Page Sergey Brin Jeff Bezos and many more You really had a front seat to so much that is so substantial in our world today He has seen innovation and disruption up close and personal Now he hopes that same mentality can help us address and fix the climate crisis Door lays it all out in his new book speed and scale an action plan for solving our climate crisis now He told Carol and Bloomberg news cross asset reporter Katie Griffith that he set out to create this framework way back in 2006 after seeing the documentary an inconvenient truth with his then teenage daughter Mary I had gone with some friends in her to see Al Gore's epic movie that couldn't really the climate crisis I think in the global conversation 8 million people saw that movie but at dinner we went around the table and I had a number of my Republicans friends there And we talked about well is the world getting warmer Yes Is it man-made or not We had some disagreement over that at the time But then we asked people what they thought and when it came to Mary she turned to me and she said dad your generation created this problem You better fix it And I had no idea what to say or what to do I was speechless She said I'm scared and I'm angry And so I set out with my partners to understand climate technologies the markets the innovation the forces at work And over time we devoted over three of our venture funds $1 billion to about 70 climate tech startups And it was hard and looked for a while like the portfolio would fail but we stood by these entrepreneurs and today that the $1 billion is worth $3 billion in companies like beyond meat And other investments So what I learned from that is it takes guts and courage and staying power and it's hard But that was then and this is now And Tesla the 7th most valuable company in the world And innovations in the transition to a clean.

Larry Page Sergey Brin Katie Griffith Jeff Bezos Bloomberg news Mary Carol Al Gore Google Tesla
Land of the Giants: The Google Empire

The Vergecast

01:46 min | 1 year ago

Land of the Giants: The Google Empire

"In nineteen nine hundred. Nine marissa mayer was sitting in the most important interview of her life. It was at a startup called google. That needing was at their conference table in the main conference room at one six five university which also happened to be a ping pong table. Meyer would go on to become one of the most prominent executives and silicon valley from two thousand twelve to two thousand seventeen. she was. ceo of yahoo. The back in the late nineties. She was still a student at stanford about to graduate with a master's in computer science and google's cofounders. Sergei brin was not going easy on her sergei did all the talking and quiz mutants. We allow different computer. Science topics had me draw out. Like the graphing of k means clustering and and centuries and how to find the differences in the centers. And things like that. Meyer was a star student so she answered those questions problem. But there was another interviewer in the room and she noticed something was a little off with him. Larry seemed quiet and truthfully obviously somewhat distracted. Larry page the other founder of google. The pair wrapped the interview utterly. They had something else on their minds and the the door opens like you kind of hear. What's going on her side. Then i heard the call and say okay like who's going with us for the kleiner. Pitch kleiner is kleiner perkins the legendary venture capital firm. And i heard a lot of foot traffic heading out the door and then heather horns. The office manager reappeared and said i'm sorry. Larry and sergei had an important venture capitalist pitch this afternoon and they have taken the the majority of the company with thumb. So i think you're going to have to come back tomorrow.

Sergei Brin Marissa Mayer Meyer Google Stanford Yahoo Larry Page Pitch Kleiner Kleiner Perkins Larry Heather Horns Sergei
How To Make Better Decisions, Faster With Matt Bodnar

The EntreLeadership Podcast

06:40 min | 1 year ago

How To Make Better Decisions, Faster With Matt Bodnar

"Every day were making decisions. Now hopefully take our business to the next level. What do we do with this particular team member. How do we find the best vendor. What colors and fonts should go on the website for next marketing campaign and hundreds of other decisions like these that we have to make every single week. The stakes are high. We can't afford to make a bad decision from the ramsey network. This is the entreleadership podcast where we business leaders grow themselves their teams and the prophets. I'm your host. Daniel tardy am i guess. Today is matt bonner match the chairman at fresh technologies and he's done a lot of cool stuff. He's helped star businesses run businesses launch. New business turn businesses around and especially as passionate about helping businesses scale up from the startup stage to be in a big deal. He knows a lot about decision making strategy and how to align our behaviors with our goals. But he didn't start out in this space in fact he actually started out as a successful analyst on wall street. He was making a lot of money at goldman sachs and so. I was super curious to ask them. Hey matt why did you leave. One of the biggest influences in this is a book. That's influenced me tremendously. Was the four hour workweek. The whole tim ferriss thing and so reading that and really thinking about what do i want to do with my life. And and where do i wanna spend my time and and thinking about. I mean in a place like that you can see the trajectory. Stay here fifteen years. I'm back. I if i stay here twenty years on that guy etc and so i could see what the future looks like and all they wanted to do something more entrepreneurial and i had this epiphany i was reading this article on bloomberg about one of the founders of google. I forget if it was larry page or or sergei would basically set this thing. And they've saying you know which everyone is. The ceo at the time and their salary was one hundred thousand dollars and as a first year analyst at goldman. My salary was more than that. And so i read the article and i kind of had. This chuckled to myself as like a twenty one year. Old or twenty two year old. And i'm like. I'm so awesome like i have a bigger seat salary than the ceo. Google and then literally there was a comma and the next half. The sentence was like andy's worth twenty seven billion dollars stock or whatever and so it was just like an anvil like crushing on the head. That was like oh. You don't get wealthy from a salary you get wealthy from having equity in something and that was really. That was a big difference for me that that made me realize that having a having a high salary doesn't really mean it helps but but ultimately ownership equity is really where you generate the most value. So did that. Prompt you to think i wanna start my own thing. I wanna build something. My dad's a very successful restaurant tour and he he had been doing. A bunch of stuff in nashville. And kind of the southeast. Broadly for you know. While i was in middle school high school all that stuff and he was always when i was up at at goldman he was always like a bug in my ear. Hey come back and you know. Help me out. Come join me join me. And so eventually I answered that call in and move back to national got involved with him in a in a company called fresh hospitality which is an investment business. Essentially that invests kind of across the food and restaurant world and scales various different restaurant brands. How big was the team when you joined basically me my dad My brother and one other gentleman whose name was nikola haggas is basically four of us at the time and There for yeah. Yeah and i mean there were there were other. I mean we were essentially almost like a small private equity or venture capital firm and so I mean the operating companies that we invested in obviously had a bigger sure employees based but really that was it at the beginning. And and since then we've built this whole kind of ecosystem and infrastructure of businesses. You've worked with a lot of businesses here locally many that. I've personally been a patron and i remember martin's barbecue when we went when they were a little like double wide trailer out. South nolansville autobody shop was yes barbecue around. And nobody knew who they were. Unless you live like right in that little community and now i mean if if you know martinsburg if you've been in nashville you know martin's barbecue i mean it's just it's the spot that you go if you're a nashville I'd love to hear that story. You know i mean you you you guys. Clearly were part of them you know becoming a big deal and kind of putting him on the map And i know you guys do that with countless other. You know restaurants But how do you. How do you find the martin's barbecue when they're just this little local story and nobody really knows who they are. I mean we're we're at a point. Now where and i think you see this in a lot of different businesses where you get inbound deal flow right and so i mean we. We met pat actually through a A point of sale reseller that we that we had a relationship with was selling terminals and that he's a hey. This guy's got a really cool thing. You should go check it out and so we went and we went and just had lunch. They're checked it out and got to know him and You know helped partner up from from day. One when they were back over that little auto body shop and You know our whole thesis for for how we invest in a company's specifically within the fresh Platform is we have this whole ecosystem that we've developed over the last decade or so of everything from technology to accounting to Real estate expertise marketing the whole the whole suite of services that sit around a business and we go in and we ate we provide them growth capital but we also provide them what we call our intellectual capital of all those different things to help them scale up and so you know we. We plugged that infrastructure in and really helped him. I identify a great site. And that was their store nolansville. That they moved to that was across the street. The kind of bigger flagship store and then started very strategically looking at. Hey what are some other great opportunities for this brand and and really one of the biggest strategic decisions we made up martin was we ultimately decided that we needed to have a presence downtown and to to truly be a competitive player in the in the nashville barbecue space and plant our flag so to speak. We we needed. We needed something downtown in. That's how we ended up ultimately finding the property at martin's we call it rutledge but the downtown martins barbecue and and that's we now we sort of we. We jokingly referred to it as the mothership because it's it's this behemoth compared to the other typical martin stores but it's been a really great opponent of that business.

Goldman Ramsey Network Daniel Tardy Fresh Technologies Tim Ferriss Matt Bonner Nashville Nikola Haggas Larry Page Martin Google South Nolansville Sergei Bloomberg Matt Andy PAT Rutledge
"larry page" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"larry page" Discussed on WTVN

"A new podcast from our library of over 350,000 titles. Here's an I Heart Radio podcast preview. Imagine you have a dream and ambition. But you always feel like you're missing something a piece of the puzzle. You just can't put your finger on and then you meet someone. Collaborator, a partner, a kindred spirit or even arrival. A person that dares you drives you to create something truly inspiring that chemistry of two people in a singular pursuit allows you to achieve the success and fame you never could have on your own together. You make a mark on the world. I'm face daily. And I'm Rico Gagliano, and we're the host of the new series from wondering One plus one from the people behind Business Wars and Dirty John comes a weekly series about what happens when two insanely gifted people come together in conflict and then collaboration to create something truly transformative people like Lennon and McCartney, with working with Jones. Got into literature without meaning to and Google's Larry Page and Sergey Brin. You didn't like each other very much of the beginning, or that it would You tolerated each other. Yeah, I think you know, there is kind of obnoxious that very easy going when you get down to it. Really? Every great collaboration is a sort of love story sometimes for real, like Jay Z and Beyonc on with each six episodes, Syriza, we're gonna take you through some of these amazing stories. And will realize what about these power couples. He's farsighted geniuses, Thies creative soul mates made them so great and maybe what we can all learn from them..

Syriza Rico Gagliano Sergey Brin Jay Z partner Google Larry Page Thies Lennon Jones McCartney
"larry page" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"larry page" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"And then you meet someone, a collaborator, a partner, a kindred spirit or even arrival. A person that dares you drives you to create something truly inspiring that chemistry of two people in a singular pursuit allows you to achieve the success and fame you never could have on your own together. You make a mark on the world. I'm face daily. And I'm Rico Gagliano, and we're the host of the new series from wondering One plus one from the people behind Business Wars and Dirty John comes a weekly series about what happens when two insanely gifted people come together in conflict and then collaboration to create something truly transformative people like Lennon and McCartney, with working with Jones. Got into literature without meaning to and Google's Larry Page and Sergey Brin didn't like each other very much of the beginning or not it would you tolerated each other? Yeah, I think you know, there is kind of obnoxious that very easy going when you get down to it. Really Every great collaboration is a sort of love story. Sometimes for real, like Jay Z and Beyonce. KFBK Sacramento KFBK assemble a kind Sacramento's number one for breaking news, local news, traffic and weather news 93.1 kfbk. From ABC News. I'm Michelle Franzen president elect Joe Biden returning to Washington, D. C for his swearing in ceremony tomorrow. He and Vice President elect Kamila Harris will take part in pre inaugural ceremonies, beginning with the National Covert 19 Memorial Service..

Michelle Franzen ABC News Vice President Rico Gagliano Joe Biden Sergey Brin Kamila Harris Sacramento partner president Google Larry Page Beyonce Jay Z Memorial Service Lennon Jones McCartney Washington
"larry page" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"larry page" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Here's an I. Heart Radio podcast preview. Imagine you have a dream and ambition, but you always feel like you're missing something. Piece of the puzzle. You just can't put your finger on. And then you meet someone, a collaborator, a partner, a kindred spirit or even arrival. A person that dares you drives you to create something truly inspiring that chemistry of two people in a singular pursuit allows you to achieve the success and fame you never could have on your own. Together, you make a mark on the world. I'm faith daily, and I'm Rico Gagliano, and we're the host of the new series from wondering One plus one from the people behind Business Wars and Dirty John comes a weekly series about what happens when two insanely gifted people come together in conflict and then collaboration. To create something truly transformative people like Lennon and McCartney, with working with Jones. I'll go into literature without meaning to and Google's Larry Page and Sergey Brin. You didn't like each other very much of the beginning, or that it would you tolerated each other. Yeah, I think you know, there is kind of obnoxious that very easy going when you get down to it. Really. Every great collaboration is a sort of love story, sometimes for real, like Jay Z and Beyonce on with each six episodes serious. We're gonna take you through some of these amazing stories and will realize what about these power couples? He's farsighted geniuses. These creative soul mates made them so great. And maybe what? We can all learn from them. One plus one. Listen and follow this podcast for free on the I heart radio at number one for music, radio and podcasts, all in one. Here are the job R E M songs that you filmed up number three. The one I love. This one goes out to I know. This one goes out to the one I left behind. Number two. Losing my religion. That's me and corner. That's me on the spot like goose in my religion. Trying Keep you number one. It's the end of the world as we know it, and I feel fine..

Beyonce Rico Gagliano Sergey Brin Google partner Jay Z Larry Page Lennon Jones McCartney
"larry page" Discussed on The Mindless Morning Show

The Mindless Morning Show

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"larry page" Discussed on The Mindless Morning Show

"I really didn't like I I mean I'll be able to keep up with this with this show because I've seen enough to like be able to actually know some stuff but I didn't watch all of them. You're just a frank commit French until you watch it. It is what it is. I guess. I guess I'll try not to cry. Yeah. Now now I have another another story. And this also happened when I was super little but it was very memorable because it was a pretty hard core prank bat my Brother and cousin did and a couple of their friends, and I was just kind of tagging along. Tut. We got one of my brothers friends to think that all of us were murdered. While violently and he and here's how it all Kinda started. It was like they had landed I. Think they had been planning it for a little while because my cousin was. Part of the plan was for him to be acting really weird that whole day like just weird and not talkative and just kind of agitated and just just weird and it kept going and kept he kept playing his little part of being weird. And then. The friend that they wanted to prank, she left to go to her house, which was still in the neighborhood and my you there was no cell phones. Really it was just you know landlines. That's everybody. That's all everybody had it was like eighteen, ninety, six, ninety, seven, I was I was little seven, six or seven I was little. And we. She she which she went to her house, and then after she left, we all got covered up with catch up and. Made it look really bad like we were all just violently killed. And My. My brother, my brother's other friend who is with US called that landline at her house and she answered and she was saying you come back. You didn't come back. He's he's acting really scary he is. Oh my God has acted really scary and she was like, what? What was you what you need to come back you come back here and hung up. And she came back an open up the door and everyone is laying. On the couch there is. Including including me it was it was five of US including me. And my cousin was the one that was supposed to be the one that killed us and she came in and saw this horrific scene of. Everybody dead and it looked bad and my role was to be dead in the back bedroom and the reason why they did that with me because I was the one most likely to get up and be like. I was I was young you know. So. I just heard her like freaking out, and then my cousin was holding a knife and started banging on the window and banging on the back door and saying. Let me begging on it. And she was Rican. Al And I guess. Then they got up because she was starting to get like really like freaked out. So then they got a look we. To. Put her in a fucking sight word or my God dude. That's why she's at. She's still. No. No. No. This is like my brothers people I was just Kinda. there. But. I. Yeah. I. Remember the day were laughing but I don't know if she was but. She definitely was I. don't even think we will look back at it and Larry Page. Yeah that was horrible. That was terrible. I still have nightmares. Oh my goodness. Why? That was the great murder Ketchup Prank of nineteen, ninety seven..

US Larry Page murder Al
"larry page" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"larry page" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"Truly inspiring. That chemistry of two people in a singular pursuit allows you to achieve the success and fame you never could have on your own together. You make a mark on the world. I'm faith Bailey and I'm Rico Gagliano, and we're the host of the new series from wondering one plus one. And the people behind business Moors and Dirty John comes a weekly series about what happens when two vainly gifted people come together in conflict and then collaboration to create something truly transformative. People like Lennon and McCartney, with working with John got into literature without meaning to and Google's Larry Page and Sergey Brin. You didn't like each other very much to the beginning or tolerated each other. I think you know Larry's kind of obnoxious, very easy going with when you get down to it. Really Every great collaboration is a sort of love story. Sometimes for riel like Jay Z and Beyonce on with neighborhood. We're going on a real 9 to 3 working on a weekend like usual way off in the deep end, like usual. Swear they passed us. They doing too much haven't done my taxes. I'm to turn to Kind of pathetic or my risk going slipping was okay. So when someone black Oh, I tell you, man, 1000 Rose Worded to plus say my number, but I keep waking up. No. You see my text, baby, Please say something..

Larry Page John Sergey Brin Rico Gagliano Google Bailey Jay Z Beyonce Lennon McCartney
A Closer Look at Sundar Pichai: From Middle Class Indian Upbringing to Google's Head Honcho

WSJ Tech News Briefing

06:11 min | 1 year ago

A Closer Look at Sundar Pichai: From Middle Class Indian Upbringing to Google's Head Honcho

"Google and its parent company alphabet on the precipice of several major challenges regulators are expected to file antitrust lawsuits as early as this month and other example some faith company isn't as innovative as it used to be. A CEO of alphabet sooner Pechanga will play a key role in how the company navigates the headwinds, and while Pichai, is not nearly as in the spotlight as the other tech leaders. He's already had a long history Google, and by taking a look back, we can try and get some clues about how he might move the company forward a reporter Copeland joins us with an inside look rob. Thanks for joining me. Thank you. So, at the tech hearing before the House antitrust subcommittee earlier, this year Pichai himself as an immigrant sort of the picture of the American dream. And wonder if you could start by telling us more about the Chinese upbringing shore so Definitely outlier in many ways in Silicon Valley perhaps the most famous way that he stands out is that he was born in. India. So he grew up middle-class for India but not necessarily add western standards. He famously talks about growing up and getting in his first. Rotary phone. He is in such an older guy that the technology was just a lot less developed there. So he speaks frequently about the connection that he feels to technology and the knowledge that new technology can really change someone's life. So pettah eventually came to the US for Grad School. How do you find his Google? He worked relatively ordinary corp jobs until he joined Google right after its IPO google was not the Google that it is today it really was just a search engine. Quickly impresses people for his ability to one build consensus, which is true to this day, but also get the job done his first major job at Google. toolbar product. So before there was chrome there actually was an add on on your browser to search google. So his job was to convince companies like Dell when they sold you a laptop to have an automatic google search bar on there. So he's moved through the ranks since then becoming CEO of Google and then last year taking over as alphabet. CEO How did he make his way up the ladder? What's so remarkable is he's been at Google for sixteen years and we even though we're the Wall Street Journal have never done a full profile of him. So a big part of my task for the last few months was really unpacking who he is and how he got to this position and what really emerges is that Google was a place and still is a place with big personalities people who scream at each other people who say we should bet the farm on this or that and what sooner sort of did. was stay in the background, but he was also very careful that whatever he did it worked starting with toolbar but that extends to chrome the browser which he co lead and is now by far the most used web browser one of the big reveals of this reporting for me was that he's a very strategic person. It's not an accident that he stayed in the background for instance, someone who used to report to him. Told me early on in a meeting with with Larry? Page. who was CEO of Google before soon Dr Sooner made sure that they never disagreed in front of Larry. He really didn't want anyone to see any cracks and this also emerges in a lot of the people I spoke to some of whom sooner himself suggested that I speak to. But then when I got on the phone with them, they didn't seem to know him personally well. So he he keeps it very close to the vest. So it sounds like he's pretty deft at navigating the company politics now that he's in the top spot. What's he known for as a leader? So to a man to a woman ever and I spoke to said that sooner has a tendency in the middle of meetings to stand up and begin pacing in the middle of your presentation. He won't say anything necessarily sign that he likes or doesn't like it. It's just signed that he's thinking. So you can imagine people have spent weeks preparing for the CEO and he leaps up in the middle just starts pacing it can be quite disarming frankly this comes back to the criticism. Of Soon Dr to standing up in the middle of meeting and pacing as you think is not necessarily your traditional hey drive the car forward leadership. There's a big knock at Google today it's that and this comes from investors analysts even some executives of the company it's that the company is pretty much operating on autopilot. It makes almost all of its money from online advertising and you don't really have to do much besides sit there and the money comes in adding an extra add to youtube isn't exactly a high level. Decision. So the criticism is that sooner hasn't necessarily made the big move to position Google for the next decade on the other hand. When you have such a head start that Google has just not messing up is a billion dollar proposition. And what about as a coworker? What's he known for that? The best thing that's has going for him is that people genuinely like him in fact, one of his deputies Caesar. Gupta told me he loved sooner Pichai. He said the reason I stayed at Google this long as because of Dr He's someone that I trust. He moved to Jakarta because soon are asked him to. People. Say in this world where everyone is obsessed with Silicon Valley with what is happening in Menlo Park and Palo Alto and San Francisco that soon Dr a truly global outlook that he cares for instance, about Google pay in India where there are many multiples number of people using payment products in there are in the US. But tacitus surly had as much investment and one of the really fun things that is in the story is he's very much a creature of habit. You can imagine your CEO of of Alphabet you're traveling the world whenever he's in Korea he goes to the same burrito place an orders, the same Veggie Burrito. And in this world of he's hard-driving CEOS who appear in TMZ or go through high profile divorces. Everyone says that sooner Chai's legitimately just a kind nice guy.

Google CEO Pichai India Silicon Valley United States Larry Tacitus Jakarta Dell Wall Street Journal Copeland Reporter Caesar Grad School Korea Pettah
"larry page" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"larry page" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"But you always feel like you're missing something a piece of the puzzle. You just can't put your finger on and then you meet someone. A collaborator, a partner, a kindred spirit or even arrival, a person that there's you drives you to create something truly inspiring that chemistry of two people in a singular pursuit allows you to achieve the success and fame you never could have on your own. Together, you make a mark on the world. I'm faith Bailey and I'm Rico Gagliano. And we're the host of the new series from wondering One plus one from the people behind Business Wars and Dirty John comes a weekly series about what happens when two insanely gifted people come together in conflict and then collaboration. To create something truly transformative. People like Lennon and McCartney, with working with John got into literature without meaning to and Google's Larry Page and Sergey Brin didn't like each other in the beginning or tolerated each other. Yeah, I think you know Larry's kind of obnoxious, very easygoing when you get down to it. Really. Every great collaboration is a sort of love story, sometimes for riel like Jay Z and Beyonce on with each six episodes. Siri's We're gonna take you through some of these amazing stories and will realize what about these power couples these farsighted geniuses, these creative soul mates made them so great. And maybe we can.

Larry Page John Sergey Brin Rico Gagliano Siri partner Beyonce Jay Z Google Bailey Lennon McCartney
How Google Search Sold Out

Slate's If Then

04:13 min | 2 years ago

How Google Search Sold Out

"Adrian along with her reporting partner. Leon yeah wanted to measure exactly how often Google search results relieving back to its own answers or own products. It was already clear that Google was pointing users back to its own products more and more frequently over the last decade but the extent to which this was happening was unknown. So they started with the data. We grabbed the searches from Google trends from this several month period from October, twenty, nineteen to January twenty twenty, and it ended up being about fifteen thousand search queries, and we ran those queries ourselves captured the page, and then we analyze the page to see what stuff was. Google was not go where things pointing. So you did fifteen thousand searches, did you do them both on a desktop and mobile phone? We did actually we ended up analyzing just the mobile searches for the study because Google actually sees more searches on mobile. I mean the results are incredible I think that I. In one particular case, you did a search and if you're looking at it on iphone, nothing was pointing outside of Google was that right? We broke it down to ways we looked at the entire first page of search results, and when we looked at that, we found the average was forty one percent was google ecosystem stuff. We also looked at the first screen on an iphone ten, and when we look at just that I screen, we did find searches where it was all google stuff. On. Average. Nearly half of the first page of results from Google search directed the user to Google products forty one percent of the page on an iphone ten, sixty, three percent of the first page was Google's own content. This is a one hundred eighty degree turn from the search engines early design back in two thousand four Larry Page gloated that Google was better than its competitors AOL MSN because quote, their search engine doesn't necessarily provide the best results it provides the portals results years later, Google is doing the same thing that page criticized AOL for. There are basically two ways that will answer your queries directly on the page when you type a question. So, if you want to know when is Valentine's Day, it'll pop up just the date in a box and you don't need the source for that. That date comes from Google's knowledge graph, which is a database of what they call entities, basically people, places, things, ideas, and knowledge graph is from sources that Google really vets, and there is some degree of human saying okay. CAN WE TRUST CIA world factbook? Okay. We'll take all of their data. And put it into knowledge graph. The other way that you can get direct answers on the page is through a system called featured snippets, and this is where Google will look basically at the top ranking search result and grab some text out of the page and display it on the search results page. So you might get something from like wicky how it could be you know Ken Ken. My dog eat Sushi is an example of us. But you've used before I mean there's some of them are like, what are the symptoms of Covid but then some of them are subjective you pointed in one of your pieces to one where it said, how do I get a date right? Exactly I will save for the covid stuff and in general for health queries those usually go through the knowledge panel they try to be really careful about certain categories they call it your money or your life finance and health because. There's a lot of opportunity for misinformation and fraud that being said I have come across a lot of misinformation about MSG. For example, popping up in featured snippets, there's have been a lot of examples of misinformation or content ending up those featured snippets, which doesn't look great for Google, because when you look at it on the search results page it, it's got a box around it. It's at the top. It looks very authoritative and it looks like Google is endorsing this answer.

Google Larry Page Leon Adrian Partner CIA Ken Ken AOL Fraud
IRS Announces Taxpayers Can Make Checks Directly Payable To Any Corporation Or Billionaire They Want This Year

The Topical

02:48 min | 2 years ago

IRS Announces Taxpayers Can Make Checks Directly Payable To Any Corporation Or Billionaire They Want This Year

"The onion and onion public radio. This is the topical I'm Leslie Price. Mother fucker and we'll be right back. Hey, does anyone know who I talk to about getting my w two? If there's one thing everyone hates. It's doing taxes. However, the Internal Revenue Service recently announced a major change that they're hoping will make it easier this year for taxpayers to file OPR's financial correspondent Marcy Hammond joins me now with more on this marcy. What can you tell us well as lead the? IRS is rolling out a new system that will cut out the middleman so to speak starting this year. Year tax payers are instructed to just make their checks payable to any billionaire they want. It certainly does get rid of a step or two, but what led to the IRS making this change well irs funding has been cut by twenty five percent in the last ten years leaving the agency understaffed and under resourced. It takes a large workforce to get all that money into the pockets of the. The wealthy so from the tax agencies point of view. This change kills two birds with one stone. I spoke with Iras agent Marcia Krieg. Who explained how it works? Sending money to us have become irrelevant wasteful step. The IRS would cash taxpayers checks only for the funds to then be transferred to billionaires in the form of corporate subsidies, tax breaks and money grants for the corporations, but having tax payers. Payers right there. Check directly to Mike Bloomberg. Bill Gates or anyone in the coke family really streamlines that process so tax payers choose which of the nation's richest CEO's. They send their money to to be honest. It doesn't matter any of the five hundred and forty billionaires in the United States will do because your cash is eventually going to end up going to them anyway. However Payments Jeff Bezos. The fastest interesting, and how has it been working out for those who have already filed their taxes this year? Well I spoke to a few taxpayers, and so far they seem to think this new rule just makes sense. It was really easy. I paid my billionaire online turbo tax offered me some suggestions to choose from Howard Schultz Jack. Dorsey I chose the Elon Musk option and with just a click I deposited the money right into one of his. His offshore accounts I went down to H. and R. Block and ended up owing two hundred dollars to mark. Zuckerberg. I thought about fudging the numbers a bit, but facebook probably House on my financial that already in I. Don't WanNa on it. That brings up an interesting point. What if you owe a lot of money and taxes and the time to pay off or to get an extension? Well Billionaires Larry. Page Jamie, Dimon and the Walton family of. Of already set up their own tax, departments offer payment plans to tax payers, but just a warning. The interest rates are very high. It might be your only choice if you can't afford to pay. Just don't try to duck out on paying unlike the IRS, these tycoons wield a lot of power, and they will ruin you. Good advice but marcy I have to ask. This information has been out for a while now and today is tax day it. It seems like all. This information would have been more helpful to our listeners a few weeks even months

Internal Revenue Service Marcy Hammond Jeff Bezos Leslie Price Mike Bloomberg Marcia Krieg Bill Gates Facebook United States Dorsey OPR Howard Schultz Jack CEO Zuckerberg R. Block Jamie H. Dimon
5 Underrated Marketing Conferences You Should Attend in 2020 | Ep.

Marketing School

03:39 min | 2 years ago

5 Underrated Marketing Conferences You Should Attend in 2020 | Ep.

"Welcome to episode of Marketing School. I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel and today we're GonNa talk about five underrated marketing conferences. That you should attend in two thousand twenty and I'll start so the first one is traffic think-tank live so we've talked about this slack group where you know smartest. Seo's marketers in general a content marketers are hanging out. I love the Group. I still check it pretty habitually so they have a conference happening in Miami traffic. Think tank live. I believe it's May sixteenth. Check it out because I think they actually limit the amount of people that attend. I remember trying to get a ticket. I think a year or two ago and I just couldn't make it but traffic thing take live. It's ran by Nick eubanks. I think it's got Ian. Forget the name Super Smart. Seo Ian Matthew Barbie of hotspot nil our the next event that I would recommend that you attend. Then you're probably gonNA be like Neil. This isn't a marketing. Event is actually tech crunch. You have all seen Very few marketers have attended it. I've attended so many times the reason I like it. Is You figure out what's happening in your industry. That's going to disrupt you. And this just those disruptive things are actually easier to market and get traction to than if you critic something from scratch so for that reason you attending it. You'll fargo what's trending. What's new what's GONNA BE POPULAR? And if you jump on the bandwagon literally. It's ten times easier to mark something that's amazing or new and fresh than it is to market something. That's a copycat all right number. Three is baby bath water. They have a lot of different types of events of Croatia. I think doing Italy. They're doing New Orleans as well. It's a good excuse to kind of go to these spots usually want to go to but it's amazing marketers amazing ECOMMERCE SAS PEOPLE. That will be there so it's good to learn from different kind of industries and to be able to do it in somewhere like an amazing spotlight. Croatia. That's icing on the cake. Number Four I love. The Bullet. Row Conference series. If you live in the United States you probably have heard of it but you see some of the topics of the markers in the world there and the reason I love it is those people have to produce the R. Y. Without being guaranteed any money. Just think about that. They're spending their own money because they think they can generate an Roi. And if they don't they lose it on early pay per performance and a lot of observed cash flow issues takes months to get paid out but they have to spend the ad money right away. Bad the reason I would recommend it as those guys are super creative and they figured out how to grow with having a lot of budget constraints so just imagine what you can do. Have you can figure out how to grow faster within your budget constraints and also you can learn at affiliate world all right number five last but not least. This sounds a little counter intuitive but I recommend checking out the Ted Conference if you can. It's not a cheap ticket by the different perspectives. You're getting from the people that are there you have. I think Larry Page from Google walking around you have a lot of Just amazing people there to build relationships with each other and you get different perspectives. But also what you're seeing on stage to you're seeing the most groundbreaking things happening around medicine around artificial intelligence around and you get different perspectives of people coming from all over the world to so to be able to do that and figure out how that applies to your industry trends that are coming or things are happening around the world and in relationships that you build. It's extremely high quality like I remember. I was like a restroom minding my own business and I looked to my left and it is. It's radio right. The the Hedge Fund Guy from Bridgewater got a Rope Principles. So you have amazing people and you can go up to them and and talk to them as like. Oh but eric apply to marketing. It does apply because again a lot of marketing is just taking a lot of things from areas that you see twisting it a little bit and just applying to your business and the networks

Neil Patel Eric Su Croatia Group Marketing School Ian Matthew Barbie Nick Eubanks Miami New Orleans United States Bridgewater Larry Page Google Italy
YouTube ad revenue hit $15 billion in 2019, Google reveals

Daily Tech Headlines

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

YouTube ad revenue hit $15 billion in 2019, Google reveals

"Youtube generated nearly five billion dollars in AD revenue. In the last three months this is alphabets. I report was to try out the helm who took over as CEO of the entire company late last year after co founders Larry Page Sergei Brin step down from day to day duties. Google oh by Youtube in two thousand six for one point six five billion dollars but this is the first time that the company has broken out YouTube AD. Revenue numbers specifically Google says that Youtube has more or than twenty million subscribers across its premium and music premium offerings and more than two million subscribers to youtube. TV alphabet. Bundles those numbers into its others category. which which made up five point three billion dollars last quarter and also includes pixel phones and Google home

Youtube Google Larry Page Sergei Brin CEO
The time you lost watching YouTube ads last year netted Google $15 billion

WSJ Tech News Briefing

10:10 min | 2 years ago

The time you lost watching YouTube ads last year netted Google $15 billion

"The parent company of Gulu reported. Its earnings Monday night here to give us. The highlights is our technology news editor. Boda Boda thanks so much for joining US happy to be here all right so alphabets. Most recent report. Back in October was a bit disappointing. How did they fare this time? if you're Wall Street just slightly more disappointing with some shoots So one thing that was Wall Street was expecting Revenue to be a little a bit higher than it was and operating profits to be a little higher than it was. Now Mind you. Google is wildly profitable and has makes a ton of revenue just in the most recent quarter. Which is the holiday quarter Revenue was up seventeen percent to forty six point one billion so. It's kind of difficult to say that you know Google struggling by any stretch stretch But one thing that Wall Street had pressed alphabet for a long time to be more specific about where it's about where its revenues coming from and one thing that it did really league for the first time is really to break out specifically the youtube business and Google cloud in terms of revenue categories. And one thing that said it for you to the AD business isn't stallone Is Worth about fifteen billion dollars and Google cloud gave details on that as well and the idea is really. The clubmen is really important. because there's a google title is enmeshed in a really really difficult battle with Other cloud providers like Amazon with Amazon Web Services and Microsoft with your and Wall Street was really wanting linked to wanna Google to provide more details and just say like okay. Give us an idea of how well this businesses stooling so we can rate it relative to some of the other competitors this was the first earnings parts and senator betrayed took over as alphabet. CEO from Google Co founder. Larry Page last year. Pichai was obviously formerly the CEO of Google. Is it too early to have expected there to be any changes with his leadership or are we seeing some of this play out because of Him taking the helm so I think one of the things that he he mentioned on the call and this is something that obviously he was with Google so he was an insider very familiar with the business but one thing that at Wall Street analysts basically basically said on a conference call to say we welcome this additional disclosure. Like some of the you know giving a little bit more detail on some of the business units that That comprised like the alphabet machine. So that's one thing that they had pressed Sundar on in the company and the company delivered in that way but you know Sundar more you know big picture wise. One thing that he talked about was you you know he talked about what is investing focuses are and one thing obviously talked about artificial intelligence that being something that the company really wants to deeply invest in and he talked about really the you know the idea of doing more with data and so cloud computing is something that they've pushed a lot on We've reported Sometimes exclusively on the health partnerships to Google's reached. And you know basically Sundar said is we're going to reach even deeper into that So not just project. Nightingale which again is a project to work with essential health and to manage to manage crunch data for millions of patients across the twenty one St Hospital System but identified other partnerships. Like that and another thing that brought third call in kind of pointing to where strategy is going as activision blizzard. The video game company They recently announced a deal where they said okay. Well we want to stream these East sports matches on Youtube. Meanwhile activision will basically invest in US Google's cloud services and also use artificial intelligence tool. So Google wants to say like. Hey we don't want to just manage one thing for one business. We want to be a one stop shop but basically offer a bunch of different services to companies to make the value proposition. A Lot. A lot a better in terms of the Google Health Collaborations that you were mentioning. Is that something that they're already being able to monetize unclear so some of this is you know. They're trying to make an argument that we can add value to what you already do. So in some cases we WANNA manage data That's something that the their services services that Google is providing as part of a package now if a company wants to use Google as a cloud service provider and we WANNA put data in the cloud. That's something that obviously that they're you know. They're they're collecting revenue on There other parts of the alphabet enterprise like verily severely as life sciences company and. What's unique about this? Is they've taken outside. Investment vestment from tamasek which is Singapore's Sovereign Wealth Fund and they've also taken investments from silverlake which is private equity firm in the idea is basically to a look at different ways as to really impact the healthcare system beyond just Beyond just patient data so one of the things that that fairly is doing is they're looking at license engineering research search and as a part of that they're looking at like how how they're one look at additional ways to basically impact the healthcare system so some of this is going to look at Using am to improve drug delivery of some of this is looking at a I to improve clinical trials and the idea is to basically say okay. How can we use data and and a I to basically impact the healthcare system so some of this already having revenue impact for Google? But some of it is. They're making these investments to own these partnerships and basically we see this as a long-term bet that this can drive revenue down the row. These are obviously things. Though that have already garnished a lot of scrutiny. Both from people in the the healthcare community but also from regulators and Looking ahead to twenty twenty one of the things investors. I'm sure will be paying close. Attention to is has the increased scrutiny from regulators on all sorts of fronts so when facebook reported its earnings. They said they expected their growth to slow. Because of new legal measures from California And also in Europe how is alphabet addressing the way that legislation could impact. Its business moving forward. So one thing so so google didn't go They didn't give necessarily a number to say we think we're going to grow twenty percent Next year one thing they said is they kind of went across their business unit to say we think for search. There's going to be ample opportunity going forward. So what does that mean is that is that a lot of money is a lot more money than you're making now is it a little bit less Google basically positioning itself that it thinks it's bizarre that it's various businesses are going to grow And basically they're making investments it's to support that I think with on the Regulatory Front Google definitely said that it's going to cooperate with You know any broad probes inquiries that That it receives from entities like State Attorneys General or the Department of Justice or any or any other entity. And you know a lot of the regulators are looking being at Things that they're looking at you know Google's largest and the and the things that basically make this company so big and you know so it's looking at the the girth of online in advertising business and purported anticompetitive behaviour and in the big picture like Google is basically motoring along in thinking that you know it can man you know it can continue to invest in the business while managing these inquiries you know at the end of market closed today. A ghoul alphabet crossed a trillion dollars market value. Now now it's kind of wavered between their ethnic you reach that earlier this year and then trade at lower but you know the big picture these tech companies are you know for the most part Wall Street is seeing that you know despite everything that's going on in all the noise and all the frustration from regulators and some users you know Wall Street and investors still see these companies as a safe you bet for the most part Wall Street analysts think these companies are going to grow so you know based on company based on public statements and based on. Just you know how large it's GonNa it's GonNa Behar to disrupt Google and search. It's going to be hard to disrupt Google in online advertising just because it has so much of a market leader in so much So much of a installed install customer base. One thing that Google touted on its conference call is that it had a really strong holiday season. And with that you know Google is basically been investing and building out his platforms for consumers. So that you can buy more stuff within Google tools instead of like if you wanted a hotel if you want to book a flight instead of going to other airlines or other hotel pages ages you could just do it all in Google and you wanted. And they've talked about. Hey we want to find opportunities to allow people to make more money within youtube and you know the the the the value proposition for advertisers is great. Because it's like hey if you can get everyone here it just you know. Millions of people use Youtube. Everyday people already here if you can just put more tools and bake more ways that they can make more money inside of this. Why leave it seems like it seems like a good deal? It seems like it's setting themselves up for an even bigger conversation with antitrust just regular though and especially some of the Democratic candidates who've come out saying that they wanNA break up big tack. Did they make any comments about that on their call Not Not not to the extent you know in terms of addressing the inquiries. I think you know usually the companies and Google speaks in broad terms and you know and says hey you know the companies understand that they are targets. And you know they're not you know they see the headlines just as much as everyone else but I think in terms of their focused on The you know the businesses and the value proposition that they offer to consumers and folks and businesses well and you know they see You know they say that they're going to cooperate in any manner with any regulatory pro- which which makes sense but in terms of like going specific in? Hey we're going to change our approach because of Xyz you know for the most part you know the Probes are are just that you know. They're you know the attorneys general and you know folks from the DOJ there on a fact-finding mission. They're trying to understand. Not just google. Oh but from others like what impact Google had in the marketplace especially when in terms when it comes to anti-competitive conduct and you know from Google's perspective obviously there they they see themselves as being able to motor along and you know as these probes circle but for the most part there is. This isn't necessarily changing. How they're going to do their business unless someone tells them you need to change your business because of reasons? XYZ And tell then ample growth our technology news editor vote today. Thank you so much for joining

Google Google Co Activision News Editor Boda Boda Gulu CEO United States Sundar Larry Page Youtube Facebook Amazon Senator Stallone Europe
"larry page" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

07:23 min | 2 years ago

"larry page" Discussed on What It Takes

"Be okay and they could see. I was very energized and I thought we needed to get in at the very beginning not ways to your two. which was what I had left of my undergraduate course requirements? It's a path that was followed by a number of people during the the growth of the tech industry. And while it's many a computer majors. Fantasy Scenario Bill Gates advises against others following in his footsteps APPS. College was amazing. He says and if it weren't for the urgency of the moment he would have stayed now about the great. PC kabq divide. The truth. Is that apple's computers used to run on Microsoft software. All personal computers did all of them and I mean personal computers here in the generic sense. It was only later that the term pc came to designate IBM compatible computers. Computers in other words Non Max but in those early heavy Microsoft days the Apple Two ran on Microsoft basic the radio shack. TRS Eighty Ram on Microsoft basic Microsoft's personal computing. Software was the only game in town. But still they didn't charge very much for their contracts because they knew there'd always be plenty of work ahead making new versions and add ONS dance. The whole structure of the way we license things was that we knew we could write software more efficiently than if they hired the engineers themselves south so we always say he would spend half million developing not yourself. We'll license it to you for inexpensive price. We probably could have it had prior higher prices. But we were doing fine in fact that sixty five o two basic That Mark Chamberlain Chamberlain and I wrote we licensed to about twelve different people and so our profitability was huge. Even though it was a great deal will for apple per machine. They paid almost nothing. You know we believed that we could hire the best engineers. There was unbelievable amount of software offer to be written. And we could do it. Well we could do it on a global basis and The original customer base was the hardware manufacturers and we sold to literally hundreds and hundreds Over one hundred companies in Japan over one hundred companies doing word processors and industrial control type. Things we knew in the long run we wanted to sell software directly to users. But we actually didn't get around that till one thousand nine hundred eighty when we had our first sort of games and productivity software where that that people would go to computer store and actually buy the the software package that's when their mission statement became explicit. A computer cuter on every desk and in every home. Well Paul Allen. I had used that phrase even before we wrote the basic for Microsoft. We actually talked about it in an article. In I think nineteen seventy seventy seven was the first time it appears imprint where we say a computer on every desk and in every home and actually we said running Microsoft Microsoft software if we were just talking about the vision. We'd leave the Los last three words out if we were talking it internal company discussion. We'd put those words in. It was an easy and tempting calculation even in early days if you sat a computer on every desk in every home and you'd say okay. How many homes are there in the world? How many deaths are there in the world you know? Can I make twenty bucks for Every Home Twenty Bucks for every desk you can get these big numbers but part of the beauty of the whole thing was. We were very focused on the here and now should we hire one more person. If our customers didn't pay alias. We have enough cash to meet the payroll. We really were very practical about that next thing. And so involved in the the deep engineering that we didn't get ahead of ourselves they the everyday activity of just doing great software drew a sin. Dan and some decisions. We made the quality of the people the way we were very global the vision of how we thought about software that was very long term. But other than those things you know we'd just came into work everyday and wrote more code and hired hired more people it wasn't really until the IBM PC succeeded. And perhaps even until windows succeeded that there was a broad awareness that Microsoft was very unique as a software company that these other companies had been one product companies have hired. People couldn't do abroad set of things didn't didn't renew their excellent stint do research so we thought we were doing something very unique but it was easily not until nineteen ninety ninety five or even one thousand nine hundred seven that that was just wide recognition. That we we were the company that had revolutionized software. Remember what Bill Gates said in the opening of this episode people. Smart People Computer people thought he he and his High School Buddy Paul Allen were a little out to lunch when they envisioned a world with a computer in every home. Run a silly idea. The people would want their own computers. Whatever that they possibly do with them? Microsoft was at the center of the Personal Computer Computer Revolution in particularly in particular the creation of a software market where you went out to lots of companies and encourage them to write software for different applications nations mundane applications whiled applications. That idea that you would encourage people to be creative and build software. And there'd be a whole industry around that Microsoft lead that and no one else did. In retrospect it all seem so obvious but that was the genius of Bill Gates and Sergei Brin Larry Page who we heard from earlier in this episode they gazed into the future.

Microsoft Bill Gates apple Paul Allen Mark Chamberlain Chamberlain IBM Japan Los Dan Sergei Brin Larry Page
"larry page" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

14:34 min | 2 years ago

"larry page" Discussed on What It Takes

"What did we do on our computers before gook and computers themselves? What did they do before? Microsoft invented the software that allowed them into our homes. Well Google's only been around for a little over for twenty years and personal computers have only been widely available for thirty but how very hard it is to remember life before them. Bill Gates founder of Microsoft remembers though because a lot of people thought he was nuts for imagining a future where regular Taylor folks would own their own computers. It's very hard to recall how crazy and wild that was on every desk and in every home you know at the time you have people who are very smart saying why would somebody need a computer even Ken and also on who would run this company digital equipment. Who made the computer I grew up with and we admired both him and his company company immensely was saying that the same kind of a silly idea that people would want to have a computer Sergei Brin remembers to because just just a few years before he and Larry Page created Google? There wasn't that much available online to search through. Even if you did have a personal computer computer when I came to Stanford for Grad school it was really the birth of the worldwide web. I also didn't exist prior to that about ninety three and there was. Actually you know when you start your browser. You'd be on a page. That was what's new and that would list every new web page age. I know it sounds funny but it was literally the what's new page and like if you know whatever riverdale. Elementary School put their fish tank on the web that month. That would be the thing that everybody would look at I don't know sounds like a joke. Notes really true Uh there weren't that many people looking back then because there wasn't much to see you'd have to just check back every month and see what the new web page was But we do. We do all of us today kind of take it for granted that we can get information on pretty much anything anytime on this episode. The Tech Titans who delivered a revolution to our doors Microsoft founder and philanthropist extraordinaire Bill Gates and Google Google founders Larry Page and Sergei Brin this is what it takes a podcast about passion vision and perseverance that would not ought be possible without personal computing and lots of googling from the Academy of Achievement..

Google Bill Gates Microsoft Sergei Brin Larry Page Ken founder Elementary School Academy of Achievement Tech Titans Stanford Grad school Taylor
"larry page" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

14:34 min | 2 years ago

"larry page" Discussed on What It Takes

"What did we do on our computers before gook and computers themselves? What did they do before? Microsoft invented the software that allowed them into our homes. Well Google's only been around for a little over for twenty years and personal computers have only been widely available for thirty but how very hard it is to remember life before them. Bill Gates founder of Microsoft remembers though because a lot of people thought he was nuts for imagining a future where regular Taylor folks would own their own computers. It's very hard to recall how crazy and wild that was on every desk and in every home you know at the time you have people who are very smart saying why would somebody need a computer even Ken and also on who would run this company digital equipment. Who made the computer I grew up with and we admired both him and his company company immensely was saying that the same kind of a silly idea that people would want to have a computer Sergei Brin remembers to because just just a few years before he and Larry Page created Google? There wasn't that much available online to search through. Even if you did have a personal computer computer when I came to Stanford for Grad school it was really the birth of the worldwide web. I also didn't exist prior to that about ninety three and there was. Actually you know when you start your browser. You'd be on a page. That was what's new and that would list every new web page age. I know it sounds funny but it was literally the what's new page and like if you know whatever riverdale. Elementary School put their fish tank on the web that month. That would be the thing that everybody would look at I don't know sounds like a joke. Notes really true Uh there weren't that many people looking back then because there wasn't much to see you'd have to just check back every month and see what the new web page was But we do. We do all of us today kind of take it for granted that we can get information on pretty much anything anytime on this episode. The Tech Titans who delivered a revolution to our doors Microsoft founder and philanthropist extraordinaire Bill Gates and Google Google founders Larry Page and Sergei Brin this is what it takes a podcast about passion vision and perseverance that would not ought be possible without personal computing and lots of googling from the Academy of Achievement..

Google Bill Gates Microsoft Sergei Brin Larry Page Ken founder Elementary School Academy of Achievement Tech Titans Stanford Grad school Taylor
"larry page" Discussed on After Hours

After Hours

14:21 min | 2 years ago

"larry page" Discussed on After Hours

"Hi everyone you're listening to after hours. I'm young me and I'm here with Felix from me here guys so I have a question for both of you. How many people have asked you whether Mahir is saying? Hey Hey it's me here or hey it's me here number me here. You need to clarify digging Louise from my youth of how I was mocked so I was thinking of taping a new promo where I said. Hey Hey it's not me here is young here there you go before we get into this week. We have to say something about this email. We've been can't you mean listeners. Emails yes this before but every week. There's more and more your e Mail on every topic discussed and is incredible in its depth. I mean just take the one we got about this carbon engineering story. It's like a science education in one email you made and it made me want to dig into it even more so you feel like you're tapping into this incredible wealth of knowledge. which is it's fantastic? Such a delightful mix of these really really in-depth thoughtful comments about the content mixed with these quick little jabs about British baking show. Oh yes always on my side with this huge. Thank you one other thing. which we've ever mentioned is we have a redesigned website? which actually really has a lot of resources for listeners? Yeah it's called Harvard after hours dot com where we actually have catalogued our picks and you can obviously listen episodes and maybe we should figure out a way to enable them to comment and discuss so we can have the conversation that Felix's talking about you know in a more thorough way. Yeah it would be great to have some mechanism to share some of these emails with people. So we'll think about that as for this week. Mahir you came in with such an interesting topic. I kind of want to talk about airports and in particular I was walking. Maybe three quarters of a mile in JFK. And I was thinking to myself how much airports have changed in the last twenty years. There's and so I thought we could talk about airforce okay and then. This was also the week that Larry Page and Sergey Brin announced they were stepping down from their operating leading roles at Google so I thought we should talk about what that means for Google and alphabet greater here. Yeah so as I mentioned. We.

Mahir Felix Google Sergey Brin Harvard Louise Larry Page JFK
Co-founders hand over the reins at Alphabet

Daily Tech Headlines

00:21 sec | 2 years ago

Co-founders hand over the reins at Alphabet

"Alphabet announced that Google Co founders Larry Page pagent Sergey Brin will step away from their duties as CEO and president and Google CEO Soon Pichai we'll take on the additional role of CEO of Alphabet Page and Brin will retain in their board seats and controlling stock ownership and in their statement page and Brin said they will quote continue talking with Dr Regularly especially on topics.

Sergey Brin CEO Alphabet Page Google Larry Page President Trump
Larry Page and Sergey Brin step down as leaders of Alphabet

All Things Considered

03:06 min | 2 years ago

Larry Page and Sergey Brin step down as leaders of Alphabet

"Kelley it is a historic moment for one of the most influential companies of our time Google it's two co founders are stepping down here to talk about Larry page and Sergey Brin and their move it is in Paris technology correspondent chan and bond patient and family so tell me more what happened today yeah well it's the end of an era at Google Larry and Sergey founded the cook the company in nineteen ninety eight when they were Stanford University students I love the on a first name basis by the by the people in the valley are and if you think about in that with that way they you know they need Google it into one of the largest companies in the world it dominates online search and digital advertising in video just a few moments ago they announced their leading leaving their leadership roles now they they had already been playing less of an active role in the past few years Larry page in particular hasn't really been publicly at being present at Google okay but they say they'll still be active board members but no longer calling the shots that's going to be Google's current CEO send our Pichai he will be CEO of both Google and its parent company alphabets so why why would they step away from this company that's their baby well this is a company that they found it and that they have seen through a lot I think in part of it is the company's really changed over time it's not that sort of idealistic place that they started they've made a lot of money they've been focusing on other things and I think they say it say it's now time for new management to reflect where the company currently is where where is the current state of Google and what kind of shape will they be leaving it in as they stepped away well this is a very turbulent time right now it Google maybe the most turbulent in its short history you know Google is of course extremely profitable but it's facing a lot of challenges including from within their employees are really really unhappy there's been a lot of protests over range of issues contracts with the military contracts with immigration agencies one day in November last your twenty thousand cool workers walked out over sexual harassment and bad behavior by executives that they said was tolerated Google's always been known for this very open free wheeling culture employees were encouraged to speak out that that's been really cracked down on lately just last week for employees who were involved in protests were fired there's also external pressure from regulators who have been looking into just how dominant Google is in search and advertising some people even want to come from the broken up now there's no indication that they're stepping down is related to those issues but I think it's just another sign just how far Google has come from nineteen ninety eight when they started it right I mean it it sounds like a fascinating moment for a company that was famous for wasn't a motto don't be evil yeah I mean the this for very idealistic guys know they founded this company in their dorm room at Stanford it was built on this vision of helping people find information but it's grown it's not just the biggest search engine with the ninety percent market share it's an advertising behemoth it's a melting artificial intelligence there are self driving Google cars on the streets in Phoenix and they've knowledge this change in a letter to employees they said it's involved in matured and time to turn the page that is NPR Shannon bond

Kelley Google Ninety Percent One Day
"larry page" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"larry page" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Hey Jim just go with your money now some news at a Google and its parent company alphabet after today's stock market close alphabet CEO Larry page and president Sergei brain are stepping down from those posts both will remain on the company's board of directors page co founder of a Google will be succeeded as alphabet CEO by Sundar Pichai who will also continue to serve as Google's chief executive alphabet shares are fractionally higher in after hours trading in regular Tuesday action stocks fell for a third straight session the Dow industrials slid two hundred eighty points while the nasdaq composite lost forty seven and the S. and P. five hundred shed twenty well this would think you buy a lottery ticket that ends up being a size all winter but you don't realize it that's apparently what happened in Arizona the ticket but June fifth in good year Arizona was a winner fourteen point six million dollars worth with the buyer having one hundred eighty days to claim the prize no one showed up before the December second deadline it's the largest prize ever in Arizona to go on the claim that's your money now it may not be stomach issues for me it's intense gas or pain or diarrhea sometimes all at once over and over I spent years with the symptoms but could never figure it out no matter what I did they never went away so I decided to break it down for my doctor and get really specific about my symptoms we discovered that exocrine pancreatic insufficiency or ETI may be the reason for my stomach issues E. P. I. is caused by my pancreas it leads to diarrhea gas bloating stomach pain unexplained weight loss and oily stools the symptoms just don't go away but he can show up with even one symptom the good news API's.

Jim Google president Sergei brain co founder CEO Sundar Pichai Arizona exocrine pancreatic insufficie Larry chief executive bloating one hundred eighty days six million dollars
Larry Page steps down as CEO of Alphabet, Sundar Pichai to take over

Michael Medved

00:24 sec | 2 years ago

Larry Page steps down as CEO of Alphabet, Sundar Pichai to take over

"Some news at a Google and its parent company alphabet after today's stock market close alphabet CEO Larry page and president Sergei brain are stepping down from those posts both will remain on the company's board of directors page co founder of a Google will be succeeded as alphabet CEO by Sundar Pichai who will also continue to serve as Google's chief executive alphabet shares are fractionally higher in after hours

Google President Trump Sergei Brain Co Founder CEO Sundar Pichai Larry Chief Executive
Larry Page steps down as CEO of Alphabet, Sundar Pichai to take over

CNBC's Fast Money

07:09 min | 2 years ago

Larry Page steps down as CEO of Alphabet, Sundar Pichai to take over

"Eight. Melissa Larry Page stepping down as alphabet. CEO Sundar Pichai become CEO of both Google and alphabet in terms of the day to day. Unlikely to see major changes. Which is why you may not be seeing a lot of change in alphabet so that stock after hours now under the Google umbrella remember Pichai ran the establish businesses advertising cloud android software devices and he has been NCO since August of two thousand fifteen and since then alphabet sock has certainly sword relative to the broader markets but it has underperformed? It's big cap tech peers. Here's now since the company's financial restructuring remember split from into alphabet and Google alphabet became the place where the company's moon shop projects objects have lived. That includes waymo driving cars to drones Internet balloons and it's healthcare projects so perhaps guys the question now is what happens to those. Money losing initiatives will we see more financial disciplined under Chai and CFO. Ruth poor at who comes from Wall Street and has been known for more financial disciplined as page steps down. And does he also step away from those moon shots as well. That division again loses a lot of money and those traditional businesses like advertising pay for them. Melissa our ideas your thank you your Bosa been treating over this news up when it broke. I don't know half an hour ago or so. Karen what do you what do you make of this. I well I think it. It shouldn't be a huge change. I mean this is a very big my largest position actually. I've not really concerned about this. I do think due to talked about maybe more financial all of discipline I think we started to see this when they brought in report which already goes back for years and then we wanted to see more clarity and so they they they split into two and then we actually wanted to see a little movement on the balance sheet and they addressed it they could have done a lot more but they start to address it so I think they're doing all the right things just shows how important having a good succession plan is. There's still get to something like Tesla you think What is the succession plan? But I think they've done a very good job as investor. I feel like this is going to be not very much of a change. I think five years ago seven years ago. I think this is a much bigger deal. I think it's actually on the margin positive thing I think. Sometimes you need need a fresh set of eyes to current point report came in this stock. Thirteen fourteen fifteen stock meandered for long time. She came in. I think the stock was either side of six hundred dollars ars. It's never looked back for all. The reasons cited financial fiscal responsibility. And I think a new set of eyes is probably good thing them walking away. I don't think it's negative. I think of anything that's positive. Seventeen percent EPS growth traits twenty three times. Forward earnings seeming. Listen I know. It's not a blockbuster overstock but you look at it. Slow and steady wins the race for Google and I think we were with a whisper of all time highs. We actually might be making all time highs. We speak caresource. You're a couple of great points on twitter as she normally does on that Pichai was already in charge of Google Youtube for some time That page and brain have been sort of a wall with their own interests and they also still control the company. I mean to factor through through their stock. It's a dual class structure. So they still have control effectively. The company great points and it makes you wonder whether some of this has evolved out of the politics that the companies facing certainly there are headwinds on the regulatory side. There's enormous I tell. went to their core business and talked about that. I mean the control of costs whether it's through the tack costs or the cat backs. These are things that in. The last quarter of investors have become quite quite comfortable with what the company's been doing if anything that the secular businesses alive and well Google cloud is growing is going to be a major business. You worry about the regulatory maybe this is the guy you know. Maybe this guy to take them out of the limelight because they are the founders. They are the icons they are are. They are major major players in the politics of Silicon Valley. And what goes on beyond there and I think maybe this changes the tax a little bit and maybe this as the CEO position this opens up the opportunity to really go into a whole focus of where they really are because they are spending money in certain places. They're not everybody's always all that excited about so the reality is are they going to be spending more and putting more into you cloud. I think that is where they need to go. And I think they're moving in that direction I think they got the right. CEO and when you talk about financially fiscally their spending habits and everything. That's something. I think that much ruth might be able to step up now and really put in more dividend. Well Yeah it all this talk about free cash flow with just about every big company that we talk about on this desk all the time. And what are they doing with that and obviously a lot of acquisitions over time I'm all that type of thing but yes something like that Mel which I think would make a lot of sense. Look at how well that's worked for the apples of the world Microsoft's of the world forever. I mean that's something they should do. I have a question Russian now that are we going to many questions at many points in time. One particular question at this moment in time and that would be are we gonNA look back at this change angel leadership and think this was to alphabet what Saltine Adela was to Microsoft. I I don't think so why I I don't think Google needs to do what Microsoft needed to do and again there was already some momentum behind that change it Microsoft but Microsoft move to the public cloud everything that they've done to compete but maybe wrestles some of this away from Amazon and Google. I think has been well On. Its Way as we've all talked about towards this transformation it seems like it but I don't think it's the same thing I don't don't think so either because of the fact where has he come from versus where Saatchi and Adela was at Microsoft. And let's not forget. Google is a fine company alphabet to find company. Microsoft soft was not and they needed somebody that's going to transform from where they were to where they are now they hired the right guy. I think this gentleman now can step in there. He and report together can build this into a much bigger company and a lot of ways focused on cloud but that won't be the only focus they still have all these other areas all these other verticals that they bring in money Thinking the regulatory weight off the back of the company. I mean really unleash some bill that would be great. I don't think you're GONNA get for a while. I think to your point that those those two could potentially Them stepping back could ease things a little bit. Every they didn't show up. They chose not to go to Congress. I see if you know now. Now that it's up to them whether or not they would send someone but I mean. Just look at the France you know what started our tariff tax write was the digital digital tax here. So it's not a lot of clarity for a while. That's why the stock isn't higher. It's a piece point I wanNA say. It was flattering Microsoft. There wasn't doing particularly early. Well I mean it was sorta treading water with the broader market. He walks into stock. Is probably you know better than I. The stock is probably more than doubled under his leadership which is pretty significant if we have a conversation about. IBM Six months. We're GONNA have that same conversation if this is a watershed moment but with that said Piper Jaffray just in the shade today. Fifteen hundred dollars price target as did city city. Fifteen hundred dollars price target. You know I think on the margins. This is a positive thing. The regulatory aspects these two guys stepping down I think if nothing else probably alleviates Some of the pressure. Not all of it so I think if you're looking for reason if you need one more reason to buy the stock I think this is good

Google Microsoft Ceo Sundar Pichai Melissa Larry Page CEO Ruth Chai Piper Jaffray CFO IBM Saltine Adela Twitter Karen Tesla Silicon Valley France Congress
"larry page" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"larry page" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This sort of mini DL what would it look like considering possible from a credit perspective this is good news the planning for eventual out of this company really has to get back on a growth track him right the others are here General Electric is such an interesting story Bloomberg markets with laser from always involves weeding weekday mornings at ten eastern on Bloomberg radio Bloomberg business app and Bloomberg radio dot com Bloomberg the world is listening this is a Bloomberg market minute it was another down day for stocks is trade worries continued to swell the Dow Jones industrial average sank two hundred eighty the S. and P. five hundred lost twenty one the nasdaq composite tumbled forty seven a change at the top for Google parrot alphabet Google co founders Larry page and Sergey Brin stepping down from their roles as alphabet CEO and president but will remain on the board Google C. E. O. sandhar per child will also be alphabet CEO destination maternity stores are closer liquidation the retailer has one bankruptcy court approval to sell itself to marquee brands it would close the chain stores but keep the brand alive online Connecticut's public employee pensions will divest their holdings in gun manufacturers the pensions hold thirty million dollars in firearms company assets the state will also ask banks with which it does business to disclose their relationships the gun makers Larry Kaski Bloomberg radio open calendar what's my schedule looking like next Thursday you will be caught in an emergency flash flood between park and First Street what no no that doesn't work I'm.

General Electric Google Larry page Sergey Brin CEO president Connecticut Bloomberg Larry Kaski thirty million dollars
"larry page" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"larry page" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"On the Cape okay afternoon news as we continue with the check of your money Kelli brothers use which entities pervert and brothers Larry page stepping down as CEO of alphabet and Sundar Pichai is going to take over Sunder is the CEO of Google of course alphabet is the parent company he's now going to run both and Larry page is stepping down as CEO of course Larry page and Sergey Brin founded Google many years ago both worth even though they're relatively young still both worth somewhere north of fifty billion dollars so they still hold controlling interest in the company because the type of stock that they hold but change at the top at Google market overall today at lower after the president said at the NATO summit in Europe that perhaps we'll wait for the election to get do a U. S. China trade deal we'll see if that's bluster if they actually get something done but the market already kind of priced in at least a phase one of a trade deal may not happen this year it appears that out to eighty or one percent to twenty seven thousand five oh two at the worst point today the Dow is down well over four hundred points nasdaq down forty seven eighty five twenty the S. and P. down twenty points gold up sixteen fourteen eighty four now it's ten year bond yield one point seven two percent thank you Kelly six twenty two the new pizza program for international student assessment education rankings were released today according to a break down of the Washington post American teens continue to lag behind their peers in Asia and Europe in reading math and science suggesting that schools are not preparing them for the competitive global economy well I talked with to root canal she's an author and global education consultant to ask her about these latest statistics are scores in both science and eating has stayed stable and what is really surprising is actually that I mathematics score has gone down year after year and that's really troubling because what it really shows is that compared to the highest performing counterparts about in Beijing Shanghai John Dillinger John we are literally almost four years behind their fifteen year old and how do we account for this I would say basically we have a few issues that we're dealing with in the US I'm on a macro level and that is we have an equity problem whereby we are not equitably finding all of our schools right to those students who live in more affluent areas of higher property taxes those schools have the funds to support maybe better teachers with higher pay better facilities better professional development and so are lower performing students are falling so that's one area and another is that we don't really invest as much as we should in recruiting the best and the brightest you join the teaching profession and then we don't do very much to retain them nor do we give them a career path which which we need to do to invest in our professional development and in terms of teachers in the U. S. we are recruiting fewer and fewer teachers into the teaching profession and having a and the Christian problem and then what ends up happening is teachers who maybe should not remain in the classroom they're the ones who are and just to give you an idea teachers and let's say Shanghai on in Japan to qualify to become a teacher it is hard it is to pass the bar exam but US or to become a licensed doctor here so that's how well hi hi I should say how high the level of learning is to become a teacher but what about the students their discipline to study and learn well they do say that the results showed that we we would benefit from having a little bit more of a disciplined culture and a lot of that also comes from respect that we pay for teachers in this country so a lot of teachers are struggling to maintain that order in the classroom and it's it's it's very difficult for them but you know I don't want to sit here and claim the teachers as well because when they talk about when we talk about the credentialing for their education to become teachers they don't cover that material where is it when you become a teacher in these countries it has the following countries in East Asia that is part of the learning they learn all about child development and how to discipline how to change the curriculum lesson planning so it's not just about the content that you have to teach and that was at to root canals she's a global education consultant if you want more just going to keep you cannot come the afternoon news with Kitty o'neill coming up at six thirty the top stories this hour on news ninety three point one K. if we can live everywhere on the I heart radio app voices.

Kelli Larry fifty billion dollars seven two percent fifteen year one percent four years ten year one K
"larry page" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"larry page" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Larry page and Sergey Brin or stepping down from the roles within the parent company alphabet the search giant not needing to search far for a replacement sandhar per child the current CEO of Google and long time executive of the company will take over as CEO of alphabet in addition to his current role page and Brin announcing their departure into Google blog post today saying the company has involved in matured since its founding in nineteen ninety eight and if the company was a person it will be a young adult of twenty one and it would be time to leave the roost page and Brin will remain on alphabets board three bar ski fox news that apartment homeland security considering requiring that all travelers including American citizens be photographed as they enter or leave the country as part of an identification system using a facial recognition technology Massachusetts senator ed Markey already saying that he will introduce legislation to block the plan a new study finds people spend a lot of time in front of the television would you be lost without your T. V. A. what your family struggle to get by with only one the findings of a new survey commissioned by LG electronics finds that the average home has at least two TV's which are replaced on average every six years a Paul one research finds you spend about three and a half hours each day watching a recent survey of British adults finds they'll invest nearly seventy nine thousand hours of their lives watching movies sports news and their favorite TV shows fifteen percent claiming they have too many options and that they actually fight with their partners.

Sergey Brin CEO Google LG electronics Larry executive Massachusetts senator ed Markey Paul seventy nine thousand hours fifteen percent six years three bar
Larry Page and Sergey Brin step down as leaders of Alphabet

Pat Thurston

00:18 sec | 2 years ago

Larry Page and Sergey Brin step down as leaders of Alphabet

"Google co founders Larry page and Sergey Brin are stepping down from their roles within the parent company alphabet Google C. R. send our patrol I will stay in his role and also become CEO of alphabet page had been serving a CEO of alphabet and brand who I've been president of alphabet will remain on the board of the

Google Larry Page Sergey Brin CEO President Trump
"larry page" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

04:43 min | 3 years ago

"larry page" Discussed on EconTalk

"Mentioned I quote, Larry page. Founder of Google sake. A that eventually will have an implant we'll have influence on center head. Whereas we want want to a fact we just have to think of it. And we'll be told it is like I don't know what you mean by we Larry because like I'm not getting that input. I already. We're really close to there. And it's terrible. Because nobody knows anything still. I wanted to fend social media for a second. Which is I've spent a lot of time on here complaining about various times. But I have to confess that for all the negativity. I that I see on Twitter. It's a source of tremendous intellectual exploration for me because of the people I've chosen to follow and their creativity in their reading what they find uncover and on earth for me to explorer, and send me to and yes, there's some really unpleasant people. I've decided I'm going to block them. I feel horrible doing it too. So unnatural to me to block somebody who I I fear it might be blocking because I disagree with. And it turns out I'm blocking them because they're not nice at all. And not nice to me and make me feel bad. I don't really have to read with you're right. It's a choice. So it's liberating, and I've got a better feeling about. I'm only blocked to people. But it's somehow it's very empowering. In liberating. I think the fear so I'm not. So like you I I'm not so keen on that implant. I don't like having Alexa in my house who might be listening in. And so that whole thing creeps me out a little bit. And I think reasonably reasonably so, but what worries me is the silo ING of people into groups that only consume what makes them feel good about themselves who consume narratives. And so I think we're really good at figuring out things about whether or car is going to be a good car for us. This restaurants, a good rest. Good choice for me or this movie or the books that Amazon recommends for those gotten a lot that that's part of my life is gotten so much better than twenty five thirty years ago music for sure with Spotify. It's glorious. It's the political part the philosophical part, the ideological part that makes me nervous because. Truth about these things, anyway, they're all complex, and so people to all the narratives that make him feel good which is a human impulse. It's cheap doesn't cost them. A lot to be wrong. We can hold beliefs that wrong in in thrive. So that's what makes me on the ability to manipulate that implant the ability to feed people stuff that makes them angry. Sees the other side is not just wrong but evil that's what that's what I worry about. Yeah. I mean, I guess my I don't have anything redemptive to say about social media. But I what I do recognize and mourn is the exchanges that it replaces because just to kind of circle around to where we began. We're coming to the close here belonging really matters and belonging online is loser belonging something that we as mammals experience in physical proximity to one another and there are other the phone calls make difference FaceTime. With your granddaughter makes like there. There are plenty of incredibly fascinating and powerful technological devices that bring people together with one another. I don't mean to suggest that the only meaningful human contact is in a room together. But one of the things I took stock of a few years ago with the history of public opinion polling which actually write a lot about in the these choose because I'd written a long essay for the New Yorker about it and. Really interesting to me was one of the things when campaign started relying on in house pollsters, and lectured officials relying on in house pollsters, the political machine as it had been previously constructed which had plenty of problems with it attenuated significantly, and we are much more attenuated version of that. Because pollsters used to go door to door. Knock Gallup pollsters in the nineteen thirties when modern polling started have ninety minute conversations with people than when enough people got telephones. They started making phone calls. Well, not enough people have landlines anymore. So that kind of polling is is has fallen by the wayside. But now actually don't have to ask anybody anything, you can just find out, you know, what they believe through the acquisition of of.

Larry page Google Founder Twitter Alexa Spotify Amazon twenty five thirty years ninety minute
Google deletes + profiles of several executives including Larry Page

Latest In Tech News

02:15 min | 3 years ago

Google deletes + profiles of several executives including Larry Page

Shoshana Zuboff: Surveillance capitalism is eroding democracy

Recode Decode

04:17 min | 3 years ago

Shoshana Zuboff: Surveillance capitalism is eroding democracy

"What happened was even though it was widely understood that they had the best search engine even they were now under tremendous financial pressure. And even they're very swanky venture capitalists were threatening to withdraw support. And so long story short. You know, they went through a dark night of the soul. They had been very public about rejecting online advertising as a disfiguring force both in general on the internet and specifically for their search engine. But did like the purity of it at the being. And they really did they really did mean that and I do remember there's a story in fortune called chaos at Google. I remember it was what they doing owes with chaos and there and I remember thinking, oh, dear. Now, they're going to have to you know, there was pressure. You're right. One hundred dollars. Yeah. Yeah. So, you know, this kind of pressure. Really changes the situation for people. They're not the only ones who've experienced this kind of thing. But you know, then you're gonna make some tough choices. And essentially what they did was declared a state of exception. You know, that state of exception is powerful powerful concept. You get to suspend your principles, you know, in politics you get to suspend the parliament suspend the congress suspend democracy in order to operate under emergency. So they declared a state of exception. And at that point there was already a situation where they knew that they had a lot of collateral behavioral data that was leftover from people's searching and browsing behavior. The data was set aside considered ways not adequately stored or organize. But some people have been fooling around with it. Understood. It had a lot of predictive value under the state of exception what they decided to do. Was to use these data logs quote, data exhaust. For their predictive power combine those with their already frontier computational capabilities, and even in those days, they're were calling it a I you know, is a moving target as you know, better than anyone in every era. It's a I, but it keeps changing so combine these unused data with with their computational capabilities and use that to predict a piece of future behavior in this feature human behavior in this case where someone was likely to click, and whether we're going to do is now sell this to their advertisers coming out of the black box a product computational product that predicts this little piece of human behavior where someone who's going to click so those online advertising markets suddenly were transformed not just advertiser. Figuring out key words and where to fix their ads. Now, they're transformed into a different kind of market these markets if you just zoom out a tiny bit. What you see is that these markets are now trading in behavioral futures, they're trading in these tiny products that predict future human behavior against Pacific -ly here. Click through behavior. Right. So now, we have a logic. Where the surveillance capitalism is unilaterally claiming private human experience. Because of course, the the folks who are searching and browsing didn't know that they were exhibiting these collateral data or those data were being saved right, which they were because they would put them up on the wall Gogol they would if ever been there early and they had the scrolling queries. That's in the which way, and then you would watch them. And they would you could see that it was so valuable like it was like gold going, and they they spun it into gold, really they spun. It into gold. That's exactly what they did care and affect their stories about Larry page, actually worrying about that scrolling display in the lobby that it gave away too much of exactly how intimate and how insightful and how personal

Google Gogol Congress Larry One Hundred Dollars
Introducing One Plus One

Business Wars

04:48 min | 3 years ago

Introducing One Plus One

"Gotta tell you about a new podcast. They were all really excited about here at wondering it's called one plus one and in one plus one, well, they put you right in the middle of some of the greatest collaborations in history. Think of this is kind of the flip side in a sense. We're talking about people like Sergei Brin Larry page who created massive global companies like Google or think about beyond say and Jay z who live at the top of the pop culture's fear their team or even shack and Kobe one of the biggest sports duos of all time. We're talking about people who reached the very top of their fields. And in some cases, change the way we see the world, it's hosted by Rico Gagliano and faith Sailly. You may. Remember them from public radio? If you happen to have listened to that and Rico and faith chart the intense mysterious alchemy between these visionary minds all along the way, you're going to hear about the ups and the downs of these creative partnerships and something else to you get to learn exactly how they created. Something extraordinary. Just by coming together. You're about to hear a preview of one plus one about two seemingly ordinary dudes from Liverpool who come together and change pop music forever. I bet you know, who were talking about here while you're listening. Go subscribe to one plus one on apple podcasts or wherever you happen to be listening to us right now. You'll also find a link in the episode notes and don't forget to tell your friends about this. Marvelous new podcast one plus one. I mean, you never know maybe one of them will be the plus one to your own. Life's work. It's January nineteen sixty seven in London England, John Lennon is sitting at the piano and his home in the suburbs. Writing a new song? It's based on a newspaper account of a young socialite named Tara Brown killed in a car crash. John comes up with something he thinks will work. The John's having trouble finishing the song. So he heads on over to Paul's house just a few blocks from Abbey Road together. They finished John's verses and round out the tune by adding a fragment from one of Paul's then old number he'd never managed to us. As soon as John? Here's Paul sing that couple of he says. Yeah, that's it. This is how John Paul write music. Quickly intuitively, finishing each other's ideas. Sometimes they have trouble remembering who wrote what that's how closely they work together. But they're not done with this song yet, they wanna make it wilder more Avalon guard. Abbey Road studios, February tenth nineteen sixty seven and the Beatles. The most famous band in the world are throwing a party. Mick Jagger and Keith Richards of their so as Marianne faithfull, and Graham Nash. Oh, and a forty piece orchestra dressed in tuxedos, clown, noses and rubber bald caps. The bizarre attire is meant to loosen the buttoned up classically trained musicians. So they'll deliver what Paul wants? We'd like you to do some free form improvisation. The orchestra is confused by the request. They wanna please them after all he's Paul McCartney. But classical musicians don't really do free form improvisation. Producer George Martin steps in. Okay. We don't want complete free form we want each individual musician to climb from lowest no to highest at his own pace the orchestra nods. They try over and over to do what they're asked John dressed in a crushed velvet jacket and sipping wine from teacup watches from the sidelines. He wrote most of the sun, but he's fine. Letting Paul cokes the orchestra into performing what John calls and orgasm of sound. Paul tries to make John's concept come alive, urging musicians to randomly play an ascending scale growing louder until they climax on the same chord on the eighth try. They finally mail it. Everyone knows they've just witnessed something special.

Paul Mccartney John John Paul John Lennon Paul Cokes Rico Gagliano Sergei Brin Larry Liverpool Jay Z Google Tara Brown Apple Kobe London England Mick Jagger Marianne Faithfull George Martin Producer Keith Richards
"larry page" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

04:07 min | 3 years ago

"larry page" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Right. I mean, but, but it's true, you I'll only believe you're conscious because you're the same kind of thing that I am. And I know I'm conscious right? And that's probably a pretty good assumption. Right. And we can extend that that assumption to other mammals, right? You know dogs and carrying monkeys or probably also conscious. I mean, that's probably a good assumption. Right. But how about an aunt is an aunt conscious. Maybe an aunt is just a really good biological robot. Right. I mean, I is there any sense of what it is to be an aunt is there. Anything going on inside the dance tiny little Br. Rain that that gives it some kind of inner xperience. I mean, I I I would say there's a good chance the answer to that is no that it really is just literally a robot. Right. So who knows I mean, there's literally no way to know that right? But even would we're talking about biological systems. You know, it becomes very challenging when she moved down the food chain right for machine. Now, you're talking about a completely different substrate. Right. So how really know if machine is conscious or not. I mean, really the really maybe an unanswerable question. Yeah. I mean because so much of our our framework for consciousnesses based on this idea of pain, and the feedback loop associated with pain, and how it can evolve around those feedback loops, and that is not to say that that excludes all other kinds of evolutionary feedback. Loops that could be developed, right? Exactly. So I don't know if there's ever going to be like a turing test for consciousness how I mean, we have a machine that claims to be conscious, certainly. But it doesn't mean it really is conscious. Right. So I don't know if there's maybe someday someone will invent to kind of test for that. But it's it's a very open and fascinating question. And it's really that's one of the more interesting parts of the book. If you read the responses in that that particular discussion, I completely agree. And so there's several different questions. I I wanted to ask that we're up against time. You know, the person I want to know his opinion, the most on artificial intelligence is Larry page, and unfortunately, Larry page is now kind of like the most tight lipped person in technology. Do you have any idea what his perspective on artificial intelligences? I from what I've read and heard I've never talked to Larry, obviously. And he's become as you say. I think pretty reclusive now understand he's he's living on some island a lot of time or something. I mean, he's had a very very strong interest in it. He is the one that hired Ray kurzweil. Right. And then Ray talks about this a bit in the interview. And you can find more stuff online that that basically Ray was going to start his own company his own start up to work on some of the ideas from his book, how to create a mind, and he ran into Larry page and Larry said, why don't you come and do this Google because we've got the resources, right? And so clearly Larry interested, right? I mean, he I think he is very fascinated by this idea of artificial general intelligence, and of course, there's also the acquisition of deep mind, right, which he was also I imagine he's the guy that made the decision there. Right. So deep mind is arguably D single company that is for this along, and certainly has the most resources and the most talent to really solve this problem. And it's all under the umbrella of Google. I I mean, all indications are that Larry page has a very very strong interest passion in not just artificial intelligence, but artificial general intelligence. Okay. To close on the on the subject of your books in your curiosities in one of your books. You talked about the house cleaner as a role where this is actually quite hard to automate. But you gave the example of a lawyer a lawyer is not hard to automate because the lawyer is working mostly in the space of information. My sentence that we're finding out that that many of these information jobs are actually like the house cleaner..

Larry page Ray kurzweil Google Larry
Google's Larry Page backed flying-car start-up, Opener

Your Weekly Tech Update

01:20 min | 3 years ago

Google's Larry Page backed flying-car start-up, Opener

Uber trying out flying service by 2020 in Dallas-Fort Worth area

Techmeme Ride Home

00:56 sec | 4 years ago

Uber trying out flying service by 2020 in Dallas-Fort Worth area

"Uber is partnering with nasa to develop what it is calling a buber air service this would of course compete with kitty hawk a flying taxi company we've spoken about previously which is backed by alphabets larry page and which is working with the new zealand government to test its prototypes hoover hopes to begin testing its air service in the dallas fort worth area as well as the los angeles area by twenty twenty with a planned roll out sometime in twenty thirteen and google is a company with its fingers a lot of pies i know that you've been listening to this show in the edited order but that first segment on the show was the one that i recorded last just a couple minutes ago that was quite a bit of information to sift through and only a couple of hours hope it made sense i'll talk to you again tomorrow.

Nasa New Zealand Government Dallas Hoover Los Angeles Twenty Twenty Google