23 Burst results for "Larry Krasner"

Philadelphia police officer charged for pepper spraying kneeling protesters on I-676

KYW 24 Hour News

01:09 min | 2 weeks ago

Philadelphia police officer charged for pepper spraying kneeling protesters on I-676

"Are being filed against the Philadelphia police officer who was fired for using pepper spray on people who were marching on 6 76 during the recent unrest in the city of Philadelphia. The story from Cabo W's majority. The incident was caught on video during unrest in Philly June 1st Officer Richard Nicoletti was suspended with the intent to dismiss last month. The larger message is that we are lifting up the good and decent and hard working Police officers in Philadelphia by knocking ones who commit crimes out of the way, D A. Larry Krasner says. Nicoletti faces three counts each of simple assault, reckless endangerment and official oppression. We looked at the specific definitions of the charges, and we did not let strong feeling or emotion get in the way of the legal analysis. Officer Nicoletti says He was only following orders. Mayor Kenny and Commissioner Outlaw have both apologized for the use of tear gas and pepper spray to disperse the crowd on 6 76 The police union will support the officer in court union President John MK Nesby says Krasner is only interested in charging police officers and not the people who looted or set fires in the city. Mike Doherty, K Y. W News radio in

Richard Nicoletti Officer Philadelphia A. Larry Krasner Cabo W Mayor Kenny Mike Doherty John Mk Nesby Commissioner Endangerment Assault President Trump Official
Philadelphia SWAT officer seen pepper spraying kneeling protesters to be charged

KYW 24 Hour News

01:07 min | 2 weeks ago

Philadelphia SWAT officer seen pepper spraying kneeling protesters to be charged

"Attorney's office says charges are being filed against the SWAT officers seen on video pepper spraying kneeling protesters on the vine Treat expressway last month. Hey, why W's Mike Doherty joins us Live with a story I, Mike. Brendan, the district attorney's office confirmed Richard Nicoletti will face several charges for the incident. Caught on video. He was suspended last month with the intent to dismiss for the June 1st clash on the Vine Street Expressway. When a massive group of people marched onto the highway. There have been numerous apologies from the mayor and from the police commissioner for the use of tear gas and other tactics. Used to disperse the crowd. We're just getting this information now from the D A. So we don't exactly know yet what charges will be filed assault and reckless endangerment are likely to be included. The police union President John MC Nesby has blasted this decision to file charges, saying quote once again D A Larry Krasner is only charging Philadelphia police officers following the unrest in the city. Krasner refuses to hold unlawful protesters accountable Those who set fire and looted our great city. His top priority is to push his anti police agenda and quote MK Nesby says. The union union will will also also defend defend Nickelodeon Nickelodeon court. court.

Vine Treat Expressway Union Union Larry Krasner Mike Doherty Richard Nicoletti Vine Street Expressway President John Mc Nesby Nickelodeon Attorney Brendan Philadelphia Assault Endangerment
Philadelphia cop charged with beating Temple student during protest turns himself in

KYW 24 Hour News

00:59 sec | 2 months ago

Philadelphia cop charged with beating Temple student during protest turns himself in

"Philadelphia police inspector who who was was filmed filmed on on cell cell phone phone video video using using his his baton baton on on a a protester protester last last week week turned turned himself himself in in this this morning morning and and faces faces arraignment arraignment this this afternoon afternoon they they were were W. W. Simmons Simmons has has the the story story from from the the northeast northeast after after getting getting cheers cheers for for about about a a hundred hundred supporters supporters some some in in uniform uniform at at FOB FOB headquarters headquarters inspector inspector Joseph Joseph Bologna Bologna made made its its way way to to second second and and fifteenth district police with high powered attorney Fred Perry and F. O. P. president John make Nesby by his side make Nesby says what happened during the protest was unfortunate but he contests the severity of what happened when Bologna hit a protester with the baton clearly everybody saying in an upset about him striking this person in the head he never ever even came close to that it was a shoulder strike it's what we're trained to do district attorney Larry Krasner did not see it that way that's why his office filed felony aggravated assault charges against the thirty one year veteran of the force presence as a protester at Temple University student needed ten staples intensity jurors

Philadelphia W. W. Simmons Simmons Joseph Joseph Bologna Bologna Fred Perry Nesby Larry Krasner Attorney F. O. P. President Trump Temple University
Philadelphia - Suspected DUI driver charged with murder in crash that left 3-year-old child dead

KYW 24 Hour News

00:55 sec | 2 months ago

Philadelphia - Suspected DUI driver charged with murder in crash that left 3-year-old child dead

"A Montgomery County woman faces serious charges after police say she was driving under the influence and caused a multi vehicle crash leaving a three year old child dead and at least a half dealt another dozen other people hurt they would lose Justin Trudeau with the story district attorney Larry Krasner says it was Wednesday evening when Brianna right of Montgomery County was speeding on Frankford Avenue in Magee in the Mayfair section of Philadelphia he says the twenty eight year old impaired driver that went from sites like Bing a septa bus on the south bound lanes before crossing to the north bound lanes and hitting more vehicles ultimately ended in a six vehicle crash he adds as a result of that crash a three year old died and six others including a seven a nineteen year old were injured sources say the children were not buckled on their vehicles at the time of the crash right is charged with third degree murder homicide by vehicle while driving under the influence and resisting arrest among other charges Krasner's urging Philadelphians to not confuse impure streets in pure pedestrians as an excuse to speed or drive while

Justin Trudeau Larry Krasner Montgomery County Magee Philadelphia Bing Brianna Third Degree Murder
High-ranking Philadelphia district attorney staffer charged with child endangerment

KYW 24 Hour News

00:55 sec | 3 months ago

High-ranking Philadelphia district attorney staffer charged with child endangerment

"Philadelphia police charged a high ranking member of the district attorney's office with child endangerment their city hall bureau chief K. Y. W. Pat Loeb with the story according to the police reporting a Basil left her four year old daughter asleep in her car while she took a walk with her six year old on the Wissahickon creek trail Beslan's attorney Jamie fine says the allegation does not reflect the kind caring and loving mother she is we are confident he says in a statement that when all the facts are revealed her true nature will be vindicated he says she spent her life and career caring for and protecting people the case has been referred to the attorney general's office because of Babylon's role as policy adviser for DA Larry Krasner Krasner's office had no comment Basil on is the second member of Krasner's inner circle to be charged criminally in January mo vida Johnson Harrell pleaded guilty to stealing from the nonprofit while she was head of the DA's victim

Endangerment K. Y. W. Pat Loeb Basil Jamie Fine Larry Krasner Krasner Johnson Harrell Philadelphia Bureau Chief Wissahickon Creek Attorney
"larry krasner" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

01:56 min | 5 months ago

"larry krasner" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"From the ACLU and DA Larry Krasner are showing their support for recently fired public defenders for Montgomery County senator Chuck Schumer and Chief Justice John Roberts from the Supreme Court exchange barbs over abortion rights and recapping our top story no new taxes are included in Philadelphia's two point five million dollar budget this year but spending does increase by one hundred eighteen million that's all ahead in the next fifteen minutes good morning I might start to McLaughlin is at the end of their status one week after two top lawyers in the Montgomery County public defender's office were fired several groups are planning a rally in their support at the courthouse he one of the suburban bureau chief Jim Miller has the story reaction to the firing of chief Montgomery County public defender dean beer and a second in command kisha Hudson was swift fellow public defenders the ACLU even Philadelphia DA Larry Krasner accusing Montgomery County administrators of firing the two because they filed a brief in a suit in Philadelphia that was extremely critical of Montgomery county's cash bail system but a letter from Montgomery County chief operating officer leasehold these active beer just days before the firing paints a different picture stressing the administration supported beers work on criminal justice reform especially cash bail it also questioned several moves by beer including what the letter described as the misuse of county resources when beer in Hudson had interned scour police social media accounts for improper post that according to the letter was only done so the information could be given to our reporter at Philly voice in Norristown Jim Edward K. Y. W. news radio chief justice John Roberts is criticizing Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer as the Supreme Court debates a Louisiana abortion law a rally outside the Supreme Court yesterday Schumer had a scathing criticism for president trump's Supreme Court appointees I want to tell you gore's arch I want to tell you Cavanaugh you ever leave the whirlwind.

Supreme Court gore president Louisiana Jim Edward K. Y. W. Norristown Philly bureau chief senator DA Cavanaugh trump ACLU John Roberts reporter chief operating officer Montgomery county
Philadelphia had the highest number of homicides in 2019 in more than a decade

KYW 24 Hour News

01:23 min | 7 months ago

Philadelphia had the highest number of homicides in 2019 in more than a decade

"Twenty nineteen had the highest number of homicides in more than a decade in with a rising number of people shot nearly fifteen hundred the officials and citizens are frustrated it would of these crime and justice reporter Kristin Johannson has more on solutions when cities top law enforcer with coordination from city judges the district attorney's office is trying to ramp up the speed on non fatal shooting cases in Philly court rooms this is the way that my office can have an impact in its laying DA Larry Krasner which is to try to come up with systems within the court to take what might be a year long process of resolving issues in case and turned into more like six months how the message gets back to other people who may be involved in disputes between neighborhoods which she hopes drives down the number of people shot cries their rejects the notion that his policies are what perpetuate city violence and says studies he seen show gun violence is a result of poverty a lack of opportunity and lack of education and unless and until the city does something to go after the real foundation of these problems and we're always going to be having new cycles and reports that look like old reports that make these kind of hard nose claims about tactics that just don't work this spring city officials are expected to roll out a revamped version of what was known as focus deterrence which stems from operation ceasefire a Boston based gun initiative to target groups that are in a combative

Kristin Johannson Larry Krasner Reporter Philly Boston
"larry krasner" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

04:47 min | 11 months ago

"larry krasner" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Attorney Larry Krasner a staunch opponent of the death penalty once the court to officially strike it down our second thing the Coast Guard says it could take weeks if not months to remove a cargo ship that overturned while heading to see from a port on the Georgia coast in our third thing a spokesman for the Bahamas emergency management agency says that more than two thousand people have been displaced by hurricane Dorian they're in shelters in the country's most populous island you Providence also they September eleventh in a town in Bucks county will gather to remember the lives lost on that terrible day eighteen years ago they would have used him Jimenez joins us live from lower Makefield him it's going on out there good morning. good morning J. yes this is the garden of reflection Pennsylvania's official memorial to the victims of the attack and as is the case every year the ceremony begins at eight thirty in the morning that chronological remembrance of what happened at now eighteen years ago there will be prayer in music names will be read eighteen of the people killed in the attacks were from Bucks county nine of them from here in lower Makefield also tonight seven o'clock there is a candlelight vigil called a night of healing and hope so J. a couple different ways people can come to the park to reflect and remember all the lives lost and effective eighteen years ago as he would have used to minutes thank you so much he checks in with us from Bucks county will have more on that throughout the morning and a former Abington high school teachers getting jail time after sexually assaulting students is K. what have you Somerton bureau chief Jim Miller Montgomery County judge William carpenter told former Abington high school Latin teacher Thomas tumor he used his position of power to groom the student for the inappropriate relationship he sensed groomer to eleven have to twenty three months in county jail Coomer pleaded guilty to two counts of institutional sexual assault of corruption of a minor as sensing told the judge he was not making any excuses that he allowed a girl to make bad decisions and he acknowledged it was his job to keeper for making those decisions but prosecutor Bridget Gallagher says while Coomer did plead guilty it is clear that he blames other people including the victim and other people in the community that he has somehow been manipulated in this when in fact he was the manipulator grammar developed a relationship with a girl while on a trip to Italy according to testimony at his sentencing after this at the news another woman came forward and said he did something similar to her build a relationship with her on an overseas trip then continued it when they got home that case was outside the statute of limitations no charges but prosecutors argue it shows a pattern in Norristown Jim Miller K. whatever your news radio and Republicans are breathing a sigh of relief this morning in North Carolina their candidate won a very close special election and a house district that big for Donald Trump in two thousand sixteen. this commentary cable to be special contributor Larry Kane says the election makes North Carolina a key target for two thousand twenty accounts and the announcer interesting Republican Dan bishop defeated Democrat timbre Creedy fifty point eight to forty eight point eight one point in two thousand sixteen president trump won the congressional district by twelve points the turnout was moderate one hundred eighty five thousand votes it will be heavier and twenty twenty an example in two thousand sixteen the turnout was near three hundred thousand both sides are being low key in the results but a win is a win the White House and GOP could use some good news as the president faces lower poll ratings and possible swing state challenges and the president did show up Monday night in a rally to try and boost bishop there were two other candidates in the race you can minimize the impact of green libertarian candidates but they can force the outcomes of close races bottom line a decent turn up with a clear indicator that North Carolina can be considered in play provoke parties to that suburban vote in next year's historic face off Larry King KYW news right newly signed to England Patriots wide receiver Antonio brown has been accused of rape by former trainer. Britney Taylor said brown sexually assaulted on three occasions in two thousand seventeen in two thousand eighteen according to a lawsuit filed Tuesday in the Southern District of Florida Taylor brown that while the two were at Central Michigan University brown had just signed with the New England Patriots on Saturday after being released by the Oakland Raiders and the sports world particularly in Cleveland Detroit is mourning the loss of Fred McLeod and passed away suddenly on Monday night he was known in sports circles nationwide till then thank you for staying up with us good longtime sportscaster announcer friend the clown has died he did play by play for the Cleveland Cavaliers for fifteen years following a long stint with the pistons he called Cleveland's NBA championship in twenty sixteen and told his cameraman to keep rolling when Stanford's band was on the field back in nineteen eighty two a cloud also serve as a TV announcer for the Indians and Tigers cabs say he died suddenly but did not elaborate he recently celebrated his thirty sixth season in broadcasting version of the final four the cloud was sixty seven match point.

Cleveland Larry Krasner New England Patriots Attorney Cleveland Cavaliers Fred McLeod Oakland Raiders Florida Britney Taylor Central Michigan University Tigers brown sportscaster Detroit pistons NBA Stanford eighteen years twenty three months
"larry krasner" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"larry krasner" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Knowing your cumulus stations one is you weather traffic building collapse in the bronze seventy degrees mostly cloudy skies I'm certainly Kessler now what's trending on seventy seven W. A. B. C. and W. A. B. C. radio dot com a construction workers trapped in a building collapse in the Bronx emergency crews on the scene right now trying to rescue the worker officials say the second floor gave way at a building on east two hundred eight street in Norwood shortly before noon it's unclear whether anyone was hurt a judge is allowing Bronx prosecutors more time in the case of Rockland county father whose twin babies died after being left in a hot car the district attorney's office is still trying to decide whether or not to put the matter before a grand jury meaning the criminal case against thirty nine year old one Rodriguez of new city remains active it was late July when Rodriguez told police he dropped his four year old son off at a daycare in Westchester but forgot to drop off one year olds Luna and Phoenix leaving them in the car for more than eight hours prosecutors have six months to present a case to a grand jury who would ultimately decide if charges should be brought against the Iraq war veteran I'm Kristin marks for seventy seven W. ABC news an appeals court judges reinstating new Jersey's right to die law the judge reversed a Superior Court ruling that blocked the state's new law that took effect this month under the law a patient must be terminally ill was six months or less to live and be checked out by two doctors the plaintiff who brought the suit is a doctor and says this is a physician assisted suicide he's appealing to New Jersey Supreme Court Porter Rico is under a state of emergency as tropical storm Dorian barrels toward the island and builds toward hurricane strength NBC news Morgan Chesky is there it wouldn't take much to knock out power not just for parts of San Juan but especially those avoidable rural areas many of which are still struggling to recover from hurricane Maria which was two years ago crews ships in the Caribbean there already changing their sailing routes to avoid the storm meek mill is pleading guilty to a misdemeanor gun charge to bring closure to a case it's kept him on probation most of his life the thirty two year old rapper reach the plea agreement in Philly today after an appeals court threw out a two thousand seven conviction last month D. A. Larry Krasner to me the most important lesson coming out of it is that just as Mister Williams has involved in the last ten plus years the criminal justice system also needs to of all needs to grow and he needs to change mill whose real name is Robert Williams had already served two years behind bars he started a foundation that promotes criminal justice reform a down day on Wall Street the Dow down a hundred forty one points the nasdaq down forty six the S. and P. down fourteen points in sports the Mets host the cubs tonight the Yankees play the mariners in Seattle and I your forecast from the Ramsey miles to weather center going up to seventy four today dropping to sixty seven tonight tomorrow AT mostly cloudy with a shower too Thursday mostly sunny hi eighty one for the Ramsey miles to weather center currently seventy degrees in New York seventy one in dumont from the seventy seven W. A. B. C. news desk I'm Sara Lee Kessler next update at one thirty twenty four seven coverage of the all new W. A. B. C. radio dot com a W. A. B. C. traffic and transit report up next yes we really seventy seven WABC Thursday returns listen every hour starting at six AM Thursday to win tickets to see comedian George Lopez on September twenty first is on sale now listen this Thursday six AM till three PM for your chance to win free our seventy seven W. see the new doctor radio seventy so C. mobile and be entertained and informed ever you go the new seventy seven WABC mall WABC radio dot com for free history from the UPS store or Google play get all the local and national news as in Juliett and Bernie and sit in the morning news radio seventy seven WABC today the DKNY menswear collection features a work to weekend wardrobe of street smart essentials DKNY man has a broader range covering all men's wear categories including sportswear tailored clothing dress.

seventy seven W seventy degrees six months two years mill thirty nine year thirty two year eight hours four year one year
"larry krasner" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"larry krasner" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Accused of barricaded himself inside a home and shooting six Philadelphia police officers in the city's nice down by good section at his day in court we have two reports for you this morning including what the neighbors who lived through that experience on Wednesday I have to say about the whole thing we begin in court with K. Y. W. sent when Italy assault on law enforcement attempted murder reckless endangerment conspiracy and drug and weapons offenses those are some of the charges that thirty six year old marreese he'll is facing he's accused of shooting six Philadelphia police officers creating a standoff that lasted more than seven hours he allegedly fired dozens of rounds of police using an A. R. fifteen Philadelphia DA Larry Krasner warned on Thursday that he would most likely face enough charges to keep him in jail for life he was denied bail and is due in court again on September fifth internet leak Hey what W. news radio and the district attorney's office also told and one at that on Monday is going to be charges against four other defendants in that standoff case our second story tied to all this a mix of emotions were surprised at a community meeting in dies down tight older phone that shoot out standoff all the neighbors had one thing on their mind in that is listen to what we have to say we're just tired of all this that part of our coverage from KYW stomach death many were visibly shaken.

K. Y. W. assault Larry Krasner Philadelphia Italy endangerment A. R. thirty six year seven hours
"larry krasner" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

08:35 min | 1 year ago

"larry krasner" Discussed on WRVA

"And describe to you exactly how I felt as I was looking looking at the situation play out in Philadelphia last night and I I I know the police commissioner I went to school with Richie Ross we went to junior high school together in that high school together and we we played in the band together we played in the jazz band together I played basin he played the the tenor route alto sax we are the smaller one higher pitched one alto sax and very talented musician a great kid I mean this is you know forty years ago has but he was great guy and Richie went on to a very very distinguished career in the Philadelphia police department obviously rising to the rank of commission so as I watched him on television and I'm watching him in his he's wearing a a bomb squad flak jacket and I'm thinking myself will know what what what what's going on I wasn't aware exactly what was going on and I'm looking at the situation and I'm seeing it now come across a variety of social media feeds and then I'm getting text after tax after tax from from friends all over the country Hey do you know any of these guys have you heard anything and of course I start texting out to people I know now the in all fairness most of the guys I know with the exception I guess of of rich use the commissioner probably retired a long time ago I've got friends I I served with who have kids on the job you know one of my original partners one of my original field training officers his son is now a sergeant in the city and I'm looking at the description and I'm trying to see where it is right I can actually listen to much of it but I'm looking at the video and I'm looking for the markings on the car and I don't know how it is anywhere else but I can tell you I can still look at a patrol car in the city of Philadelphia ends and tell you where it should be and what district it's supposed to be what units so I'm seeing all these cars that are marked with an in and three numbers so let's it's Nathan one three three eight then one eight seven well Nathan is the call sign in the city of Philadelphia for the narcotics strike force so I know was a look at that okay there's some sort of drug connection to this and then I saw some cars that were marked twenty five so that's the twenty fifth district that's the east division I wanna get too bogged down in details but you know I kind of know where it is and I see the scroll that says I think one of them said brought in Butler another one said thirteenth in Butler and then another one finally said fifteen then but we're well in Philadelphia Broad Street takes the place of fourteenth street so that's where these two adjoining police districts are divided western side is going to be the thirty ninth district eastern side going to be heading into the east division twenty four twenty five twenty six and some looking I'm trying to figure out exactly what it is and then you know the scroll keeps coming I'm getting all these text I'm looking on Twitter now two police officers shot three police officer shot for police five six police officer shot and all I can do I'm sitting there and it's like oh my god do I know many of these guys likelihood is that they're younger than I am right I mean if I'm if I knew somebody probably be it a higher rank by this point but again I'm thinking about my buddy George was one of my my first partners one of my first field training officers and his son is now sergeant in that general area I thought all good lord so now I'm texting all these people and then I I realize via Twitter did the mayor of the city in the district attorney we're going to speak and I felt nauseous because I thought to myself they're not gonna be able to help themselves Larry Krasner who is the recently elected district attorney in Philadelphia is is a criminals friends like very few others he despises and made very clear that he despises law enforcement he's been that way for years and the Jim Kenney who is the mayor is essentially the Philadelphia version of build the blood he is a socialist and he is a cop haters copier and I thought I'd anyone here they have to say because I knew I knew to my core then they were going to turn this into some sort of left wing political rally Krasner thankfully last night didn't say a word that's a day he's saying all will of course we're going to prosecute this I'm gonna hold my breath I really am I'm gonna hold my breath to see what it is that the DA in Philadelphia does because I wouldn't be surprised if Krasner stands up and starts telling me about a terror what the what terrible childhood experiences the the the gunman had that the poor oppressed gentlemen who shot six of my brothers in blue that somehow some way he got a bicycle a Christmas so we probably should hold a cab that's the sort of bottom feeding attorney the Krasner is and always has been he's he's he's he's somebody who has built his career going after the cops and Kenny well Kenny couldn't help himself either he he had this sort of token for about the police well sure hope the going to be okay sort of you know dismissive and then he started on the guns it's the guns well this guy was only able to do it because I'm thinking this guy is a career criminal twelve arrests six incarcerations split between the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the federal prison system this is not a good guy and guns have nothing to do with it and then come all Harris jumps into it and then we've got that to mark Levin from northern Virginia who decides he's going to fund raise off of this and I thought that tells us everything we need to know right well we're going to talk a little bit about up by the way I was going to have to get all sorts of technical difficulties today with our a telephone lines we can explain to you why that is but we do so we're trying to get through this the best we can one thing that I have to tell you now is that we are down to the final eight tickets for politics implants yesterday this time I told you we had two dozen they're gone except for aids so if you want to go you got to get off the dime now go to news radio W. RBA dot com news radio W. RBA dot com get your tickets for politics and planes happens on September the twenty fifth it's at the funny bone in short pump nothing but free parking it's a great time obviously with me my buddy John reed from the morning show our pal Howard government president Obama's former ambassador to Belgium we have a great great time but they're a grand total of eight tickets left so I would imagine by the time we close everything out today it'll probably be gone so get them now if you are thinking about going okay newsradio W. RBA dot com I coming up at three thirty five hour Powell retired FBI supervisory special agent Jimmy Galliano will be along even further analysis on this a terrible situation shooting of six police officers in Philadelphia it is three fourteen Jeff Katz newsradio WRP we are on the path to twenty twenty.

Philadelphia Richie Ross twenty fifth three thirty five hour forty years
"larry krasner" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"larry krasner" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Down a request from district attorney Larry Krasner calling for the judge to remove himself from all criminal cases because he dated a former prosecutor a wide W. crime and justice reporter Kristin Jo Hanson has more the woman a former prosecutor worked in the DA's office but never had a case in front of judge Scott to Claudia when she was fired she filed the private complaint with the city for wrongful termination that's been cries they're filed a motion to have the Claudio remove himself from criminal cases but to Claudio has once again denied it pretty sternly writing his filing this sort of behavior suggests bad feet then realistically creates an appearance of impropriety none of the court but at the district attorney's office he adds that removing himself would be a massive disruption to thousands of cases because the argument would create a slippery slope for jurors with families in the prosecutor's office public defender's office and the police department to name a few cries there is merit to civil courts judge freezer route was Justin out show resigned from the bench in October Kristin Johannsen K. right W. news radio Pennsylvania lawmakers are working to tackle environmental justice and health issues affecting residents across the state it is K. Y. W.'s Justin Trudeau reports and putting a focus on disadvantaged community in Sylvania state Rep Malcolm can yada says his one hundred eighty first district which houses north Philadelphia is one of the many areas around the Commonwealth dealing with environmental issues whether it is pollutants in our air or in our water or the schools in the neighborhood facilities that are still dealing with issues of lad those tend to always be concentrated in communities where folks are low income Tuesday Kenyatta was joined by other lawmakers for policy hearing on environmental justice we have to say what can we do at a state level to ensure whether you're in north Philadelphia or you're in Pittsburgh the environment where you raise your family that it's a safe and clean one hundred elevators with urban creators of forming non profit she testified at the hearing about issue city for me has when it comes to pollution contaminated soil and water make growing food incredibly difficult at least healthy food can yada says they'll use the information gathered at the hearing to introduce new legislation to fight back against pollution and fiscally poor areas just a note okay why W. news radio nearly two dozen states have sued the trump administration of the EPA over the rollback of pollution restrictions a landmark legal battle that may reduce states abilities to choose sources of energy with lower greenhouse gas emissions a coalition of these twenty two states and some cities suing the environmental protection agency the federal lawsuit challenges the EPA in its efforts to roll back restrictions on coal burning power plants claiming the change undercuts efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and this regards the federal clean air act the rule changes designed to make good on president trump's campaign promise to revive the nation's coal industry and eliminates what had been an aggressive effort to reduce the energy sectors carbon footprint however the EPA is defending the revised rule saying it believes it will be up held in the courts I read in your reporting residents of a neighborhood in Richmond Virginia got a major surprise when they open their front doors to find television sets on their porches small older model televisions have appeared on the front porch is a more than fifty houses in an upscale neighborhood outside Richmond Virginia residents are tuned in thing is just a prank some college students who were just bored I don't know that what is he trying to prove that phone now but if people do anything people are weird one door bell camera showed a person wearing a T. V. shaped head gear while dropping off a TV set a similar incident happened at a nearby neighborhood a year ago Jim chrysalis CBS news six fifty week I'm hoping.

Larry Krasner six fifty week
"larry krasner" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"larry krasner" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"Slow and steady decrease in crime since nineteen ninetytwo it is unexplained you actually talked about that in your book which i read very nice book by the way thank you know but it's it's real you can get a bunch of criminologists in a room i've haven't talked to each other and there is no consensus on it but we do know that there's been a decrease in crime do i think that if there was a sudden increase in homicide for example in philly that'd be the undefeated well the interesting thing is there was and it happened last year it happened at the end of thirty years of draconian conservative prosecutors running the show and it is in a moderate decline this year as we're letting more and more people out of jail but that narrative that you just applied which is if there's a crime spike than the progressives are out doesn't seem to apply to conservative somehow all that they do is respond to a crime spike by saying what they've always said which is we're going to be tough on crime and they're okay oh yeah i mean the police are amazing about this i've i've watched this happened in new york where it's like if crime is up you need more police and if crime is down it's because the number of police you have a working and you better not cut back on please like it's always a one way ratchet it's a good system i got to figure out the other ratchet right i mean but here it's not even i mean it's not even the numbers in aggregate i watch this happened with bill the blasios here where two police officers were brutally murdered by this maniac who you know i'm sure you remember you know said he's gonna put wings on a pig and he keep i he shoots his ex and then he comes up to new york and he essentially sas innate to officers who are sitting in a car in brooklyn just an absolutely horrifying crime and i just got punch for the city and you know that was when the cops turn their back onto blasios when he went to the funeral i man i will tell you it's boop them it changed the way he bathed changed the way he talked really it was a turning point in some ways in that you know for better for worse but a turning point in how the mayor dealt with the cops how he talked about crime and in some ways it's like the the trauma and the horror always looms over anyone who's doing any job in the world of crime prevention at that's right i think that does happen i think a lot of the way these issues are dressed really does flow out of the history of yellow journalism and the reality that you know crime sell papers and therefore if crime goes up than the coverage of crime will go up seven x because that will sell papers and so it's become this comic book narrative about how something bad happened who can we blame let's blame the judge who should have had a crystal ball that he or she never had let's blame the prosecutor who should have had this person under the jail for doing retail theft before this person went out and did a homicide it's a false narrative at something that has to be taken on directly what we are doing is risk management and we are in many ways no different than medicine doctors are not going to cure mortality it can only improve conditions of life that's the best thing to do and we are not going to end crime the the issue is do we manage it well and that's the standard by which it has to be judged and not the anecdotal horrifying individual case that is not emblematic of what's really going on generally and it's simply a horrifying thing to read in the morning the power of the singular case which is really you know a central aspect of the narrative upon which mass incarceration built i mean i say this as someone who grew up every day and we'll go to the bus stop with the two tablets new york city they're right there in the newspaper boxes and often grisly crimes is that a truth about human nature's that are truth about the yellow journalism as you call it is it is it what what what is it in your mind i mean there's.

thirty years
"larry krasner" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"larry krasner" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"Price to the tax payer one hundred thirty five bucks a day simply because they were broke so we took we took those twentysix crimes and we created a presumption that we will never ask for cash that doesn't mean look i mean if you know charles manson shows up in philly and commits a minor offence and we know he's charles manson we're going for we're going for a bunch of cash bail we want jail right but it just means that the default position is we're not going to ask for it and the consequence of this was between the sentencing policy and the cash bail policy that in the first forty five days after we put these policies into effect we saw reductions in the county jail population of about thirteen people per day where the reductions before the policy went into effect where about six people per day the you know there was a doubling of the rate of reduction of people in our overcrowded county prisons as a consequence of these two policies and that happened forty five days into the administration it was an immediate effect and we are at the point now where philadelphia is ready to close one of its four county jails because there aren't any people in that you really and that's because larry crasner nope that is not because of me it's because they should knock it down and name it the larry crasner parking lot you know that that would be quite an honor i've always wanted to parking lot after me but no i mean it's there is there's a reason that reduction was at six before we did that right there is a a tendency in a trend towards de corporation some of it has to do with a particular piece of federal law it was a decision called aline by the us supreme court a lot of it has to do with the reality that you know california's going broke keeping people in jail and even though they were at the vanguard of giving people three strikes life sentences and things of that sort once they ran into the reality of what that means a decade or two later they decided to his time to let them back out you know it is not a sustainable situation to wait until everybody who used to be walking down the street is in jail that is also not a good outcome in any sense so people are getting increasing fed up with it but you know we can't wait thirty years to get this right there is in fact what king talked about there's a fierce urgency of now that we have to do these things right now we can't slow down we have to take that momentum like any good movement does and we have to move forward i wonder how much the the fact that crime has been declining generally for awhile creates the conditions in which you can do this and if there was a twenty percent spike in crime in philly next year you would be absolute toast i think that you know your point is well taken that since nineteen ninetytwo nationally there has been a frankly unexplained of you know the klein in crime there are many different theories and and by the way yes i have the greatest sociological mystery of our time it's like a miracle it would twenty three hundred people got murdered new york city when i first started going down to highsmith junior high school in nineteen ninety two and there was three hundred fifty or something last year nothing nothing else around anywhere declined by eighty percent or whatever the heck that is it is it is mysterious and i think it is a fair statement if you rejoin pfaff which i'm sure you have because you're talking about them but i think it's a fair statement that there was a brief period of time during the crack epidemic when an increase in corporation had a benefit that was very short live and what we have done since then is the political magnification and increase in incarceration while there was a.

forty five days eighty percent twenty percent thirty years
"larry krasner" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"larry krasner" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"Stay your hand which is real power and that is what fafsa is talking about so for example we're trying to get the mass incarceration and mass supervision and by the way pennsylvania's worse than the national average and the countries the worst in the world and philadelphia until recently was the most incarcerated of the ten largest cities and the poorest so these are real issues in philly here's an example we have more juvenile life for resentencing because the us supreme court determined that it was on constitutional to give a life sentence to a juvenile committed a murder so we have more of those resentencing 's than any state in the united states which means any country in the world it's that extreme and during this administration we're going to go through about one hundred and fifty of them and that means we sit around the table and determine whether the sentence we should recommend for the resentencing is fifty years or it's time served at you know twenty years we're doing this while looking at what the prior administration was willing to recommend before they left and sometimes the numbers we're recommending or ten years less sometimes it's the same even more but often they're going to be ten years less or fifteen years less we'll think about that for a minute you're looking at ten years times what forty two thousand dollars or maybe more for fifteen years times forty two thousand dollars you're dealing with a half million dollars six hundred thousand dollars and you're dealing with that in a city that has public schools that are starved for funding and you're making a decision about where society's resources are going to go and i don't have to get that passed anybody and the state legislature that is a decision that ultimately is up to me and when we look at all of these juvenile lifers who've been released in pennsylvania as a consequence of these resentencing out of all of them we have not one who is committed a series violent crime to the best of my knowledge only one who's committed any crime and we're dealing with recidivism at a at a rate that is essentially equal to a random selection of the population there are no more dangerous they're supposedly monsters who had to spend their entire lives in jail but there no more dangerous than the average person walking down the street that is i think an example of the kind of power we're talking about but there's also the power to say no i'm not going to pursue the death penalty and there's also the power to do a couple of other things we did one of which was after we looked at the pennsylvania sentencing guidelines and we realized how excessive and inappropriate they were we made a decision on range of offenses that are not sex offenses and not violent offenses we made a decision that are offers to resolve those cases should be below the bottom end of the sentencing guidelines why because those are the sentencing guidelines that gave us a seven hundred percent increase in jail population while the rest of the country was already drunk on five hundred percent they're just too high it's that simple but because of the way the laws are written in because of the discretion we have we can recommend to the court a sentence that is below all of that we can also divert more cases take them out of the prosecution process hold people accountable while not giving them a criminal record that will disable them from having ecconomic success from becoming economic providers from families that cetera and we also did something with cash bail that i think is really something that we're kind of proud of you know having looked at the example of dc where for thirty years they've had a very successful bail system that never included money we realized that pennsylvania's legislature wouldn't give us a law like the hat in dc that says judges cannot use money but what we could do as we as an office could make recommendations to judges in many different types of offenses that were not sex offenses and not violent offenses and not felony possession of a weapon we can make a recommendation ordinarily that we don't want any money and the way we did this as we looked at twenty six different crimes where ordinarily the judges were given between zero dollars one thousand dollars bail to get out of jail right which means the middle class people always get out the rich people always got out and the people who are completely broke and could not find two hundred fifty bucks stayed in jail for months at a.

pennsylvania ten years forty two thousand dollars fifteen years six hundred thousand dollars seven hundred percent five hundred percent one thousand dollars million dollars thirty years twenty years zero dollars fifty years
"larry krasner" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"larry krasner" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"That because it when i have done a lot i've talked to a lot of police officers in the course of my reporting and there's something that one police officer said to me once about every interaction you're having with someone having their worst day you know human behavior right like runs a spectrum from the most sublime and ecstatic and generous to the most violent horrible and you know most of your interactions with a few beings that spectrum it starts to like really torque your world view at a certain point or or or the way you think about people i think that's true when they lose to say as defense attorney who tried a lot of homicides i certainly had seen enough horrifying photographs right heard enough awful facts and seeing a lot of traumatize witnesses talking about something terrible that they had had witnessed but it is a little bit different when you are dealing directly and privately with the family who's lost their thirteen year old girl to a drive by shooting in which she had no involvement i mean that's just a very very hard thing for them to face and and it's hard thing for you to engage you mentioned other progressive da's this is kind of movement that's happened in this country i think some of the you know the sort of a lot of work in criminal justice reform is really started to focus i would say in the last in the last four or five years in how instrumental role prosecutors and prosecutors offices play in it there's a guy at fordham a really great scholar named john pfaff who talks a lot about the role the prosecutors have just kind of new miracle sense about even when you don't change the underlying laws and statutes prosecutors can charge more crimes and asked for more time and they can really drive mass incarceration almost singlehandedly independent of what legislatures or governors are doing and so there's been this response to try to elect people like yourself philadelphian other places would how you approached it from a policy perspective of of of trying to kind of reduce mass incarceration from your perch i think john is right you know the essence of the reason i don't really want any other job at government is that you have this tremendous discretion i don't have to get other people to agree with me to look at a case and say no i'm not going to charge that person or no i'm not going to pursue the death penalty that power is in the office and it's recognized by the us supreme court is being in the bones of that office so that's really important to be able to actually do things without having to get by in without having to log roll what policies that we brought about it's basically the the ability to say no or is the ability to.

officer attorney john pfaff us fordham thirteen year five years
"larry krasner" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"larry krasner" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"Don't wanna pull through actually called locking up our own which is about sort of the politics of crime in urban centers particularly in the nineteen eighties nineties and the rise of mass incarceration particularly among black voters and the complicated story there was about that and i wonder how you because the prosecutor that came before williams was african american you're a white guys running against the system in a city with a very large population of people who are not white what were those dynamic like it's really it's kind of a fascinating thing to experience because i guess you get sort of jaded as someone who's an outsider to politics and assuming that all black people are going to vote for black person and all white people vote for a white person and basically the people who voted for me were either much younger than me women or of color or all three i mean that's what it was the ones i could never reach look like me right so in there is it wasn't identity politics and you're absolutely right what forms writing about is true it is not the case that just because you elect a black person that person will necessarily be progressive this has a lot more to do i think with individual values and individual character and i'm not saying that to toot my own horn i'm just saying that you know stereotypes are bad they're bad when we apply them to whole categories of people and say they're dangerous and they belong in jail the bad when we apply them to whole categories of people and say they're poor because they're lazy but it's also bad when you say well every white politician is going to screw people who are of color it's just not true it's it's also not true to say every police officer is bad or every police officer loves the illegal stop and frisk there's a ton of police officers who happen to be african american and women and young so this sort of monolithic stereotypical approach to evaluating these things turns out to be incorrect and it's it seems to me to be much more about the life experience and the values and the connection than it is about anything else you win the primary which everyone sort of assumed like everyone's primary is going to be the is going to win the general philadelphia but then if i'm not mistaken like the police union just flips out when you win the primary right they flipped out before one of the before you win the primary but but tell what was the police union's stance on the candidacy of larry crasner well in the words of the president of the police union when he heard that i he said it was quote hilarious unquote now there's a reason there's a reason he said well i had it sort of a similar response i really can't fault them for that i'm not saying he's wrong but but at any rate there's a reason for that which is that unlike new york philadelphia has a monolithic police union that is the bargaining agent it is dominated by its white membership and frankly to some extent it's tired membership and the guy who's in charge of it happens to be someone i was deposing twenty years ago in a police corruption lawsuit because he was awful close to a bunch of narcotics cops who i won't go on and on but they invented an informant they stole a whole lot of stuff and they framed a lot of people so i mean it is what it is so he wasn't enthusiastic about your candida i know that's hard to believe i know it's hard to believe but i mean let's be honest the job of a union had to some extent is to avoid accountability on the part of its members this is a union who takes that to an extreme i think he had a personal affinity frankly for people who didn't want to be accountable and that's kind of how it's operated philly as a long tradition going back to a police officer who became the police chief who became the mayor named frank rizzo of police chiefs yelling into the era of the mayor and the sound coming out of the mayor's mouth they have been a political stronghold in philly even more so than in other cities and a lot of that has to do with what you were talking about is that district attorney's use fear not just to become the district attorney but they use it to become us senators and they use to.

twenty years
"larry krasner" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"larry krasner" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"Looking at my life's work and realizing that my life's work while it may have been entertaining and i may have done a lot of justice for individuals and maybe i helped create a space where free speech and nonviolent social change where possible my life's work wasn't really going to measure up compared to the grey things that had been done to whole populations of people that were holding society back and i found that pretty frustrating so you you decide to run to be the the chief prosecutor philadelphia this is correct okay what's that how does that decision happen i was watching another election i was about fifty six years of age and i knew everybody who was running it was a pretty unstable situation because the prosecutor seth williams was not under indictment but he was under federal investigation and that's why so many people are getting in the race and as i watched the candidates they were all ex prosecutors of one type or another and they really did not represent anything that looked like change not even frankly mild change it was a whole lot of chest beating footstomping about how we need to be tough on crime and put more people in jail with almost no specifics so i thought there was another person who might have run and if so i would not have run but she didn't then so eventually i sort of cast around a little bit wondering if i had a shot because in fact i had a good law practice and i was enjoying myself in many ways and i didn't want to do this for nothing and it looked like i had more support than expected mostly coming from all these activists who i had represented previously who were it seemed like they were willing to give back so once i realized there was some chance that this highly unlikely thing might happen that's when i jumped yeah i mean i just want it for people that are not in philadelphia like i remember being down in philadelphia and someone telling me about you and it was like get a load of this this story like the guy that comes to collect the anarchists when they outside city hall and sues the cups he's going to run for prosecutor like not as a joke but just as like a wild story that like obviously this individual will not be the next district attorney philadelphia but it's kind of interesting that that someone with that background would run like how'd you go from there to winning well i think the simple answers that every challenge is an opportunity and the voters were nowhere near on the same page with the political elite and they were nowhere near on the same page with criminal justice system as we have you know one of the more amusing things that i saw is we're going around with doing these forums there's like seven different candidates for da and there's they're almost all men there almost all white the guy glasses couple of and got a last name starting with a k right and we're we're in neighborhoods be in philly we're in neighborhoods that are that are overwhelmingly black and every other candidate is is trying to pound me because i haven't been a prosecutor and i am proudly proclaiming i haven't been a prosecutor i haven't been part of the problem and i would see all these older women open their purses and pull out a three by five card and a pen and they were writing down my name that was what none of these candidates guy remember which one it is which oh it's that's the one was not the process well that actually i mean the the math years interesting to just hearing you spell it out right like if you've got a crowded field of seven people because you're gonna primary you got credit feel seven people six in the next prosecutors and there's one guy who's not right that probably helps distinguish you to it does distinguish you of course being distinguished can take you to different directions right but it does this english you and i can't blame people for finding my candidacy hilarious or unlikely it was both.

fifty six years
"larry krasner" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"larry krasner" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"A an example in my mind of what's good about juries which is kind of a super brain of people who have specific knowledge and interests coming together but you know it also lets in the door people who have some pretty nasty attitudes and are willing to vent them in bad ways see you go to law school stanford law school do you come out of law school thinking i'm going to be a kind of like you know lefty crusading lawyer like what what is your what's the game plan there i came out of law school knowing i wanted to do criminal law i wanted to be a trial lawyer and i interviewed with a lot of prosecutors offices and a lot of defenders offices around the country and had several different opportunities so i really wanted to be a trial lawyer and do criminal justice but i did not think either side really had all of the truth i thought both sides had potential and what i found when i interviewed is usually i was a lot more comfortable with the defense attorneys that always but usually a more comfortable with them than the prosecutors you know there's a funny thing that happened my what my wife is a letter went and i was we were together while she was in law school and you went to stanford that's obviously an extremely good law school it's very prestigious it's sort of the top of the heap there's this really weird in interesting prestige thing that happens where prosecutor jobs are extremely high prestige in a way that defense attorney jobs are not was it like that back then it was i mean more than anything in law school the prestige jobs were the ones for big corporate firms that paid tons of money which is not really what i wanted to do and frankly not what i think my skill set is but yes in general view has been that you know public defender jobs for floppy hippies and us attorney's job right exactly well they're federal so they must be more more important than state court even though the truth is the vast majority of criminal cases happened in state court so there is that kind of snobbism in and that sort of notion that being a prosecutor is more important or better among many people and what is the thing that makes one the kind of high status highs prestige job is just power i think the answer is yes i also think there are there different groups i mean there are a lot of people who would never consider being a prosecutor and they view the public defender service in washington dc as being you know the greatest offs in the world and it's a truly great office that attracts them credible talent right so there are these groups of people who wouldn't consider the other side but most people who go to law school are fairly conventional to be honest then in their world power and government and being on the side of the corporation feels like the safe thing feels like the prosperous thing but they're not wrong about that so i think in general among most law students the prestige allies on the side of government and corporations tell me a little bit about your legal practice before you you decide to run for this position what kind of loitering did you do so i became a county public defender in philly which i loved for three years i became a federal public defender in philly which i did not love for two years then i became a private attorney doing civil rights and criminal defense i was in criminal court about four or five days a week for essentially the next twenty five years so thirty years of being in court very heavy trial practice lot of jury trials tens of thousands of clients and frankly i found it fascinating i tend to focus on things other people didn't for example i did a lot of pro bono representation of activists this goes all the way back to act up in philly and you know partly i think it was just the air that i was breathing in the nineteen sixties when i was watching the civil rights movement and i.

twenty five years thirty years three years five days two years
"larry krasner" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"larry krasner" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"Rather than a declare a mistrial put in an alternate that if they reach a guilty verdict of murder in the first with eleven that they won't try for the death penalty correct it was about the only thing that defense attorney did well with a difficult case but you know unbeknownst to us when we came back with first degree verdict there was no death so wait a second you larry crasner the great hope of the criminal justice reformers the nation over the sort of experiment that is happening in philadelphia of a new way of conceiving the application criminal justice europe i kind of professional or you know i don't know adult experienced the law was voting to convict a man on first degree murder knowing he might get the death penalty correct what were your politics like back them when you're sitting in that jury room very progressive very liberal you know but my obligation as a juror was to speak the truth and the truth was pretty clear we had her blood his fingerprint in her blood that fingerprint on the mir of her car which was outside of the hotel room where he was hiding and we had a whole lot of other stuff too including the house burned down on top of her and connection so there was no question about guilt there's no question about the rape but there was no question about the murder itself and in my mind there was no question that it was first degree which is what juries are supposed to do so that wasn't an issue the death phase of course is a totally separate proceeding and what would have happened i guess we can't really say because we never had that the liberation what how old are you twenty three jeez louise that's really young i was and they never would have put me on the jury except i was working as a carpenter they didn't ask what else i might doing they did not know i had law school applications underway but that was it so you're twentythreeyearold carpenter i mean i guess can you remember the the kind of wear your your head was at as you were doing this deliberating and thinking about what this meant yes i mean i actually have pretty vivid memories of a lot of it i've memories of you know one of the jurors now this is pennsylvania which does have a lot of conservative rural folks but you know most of us are more like east coaster nerves in our mentality i remember going in the back and the first thing out of the mouth of the guy with the cowboy boots and the big belt buckle was we have to get this boy needless to say he's referring to you know black defendant i remember a number of other comments that i interpreted as being racist and when a few of us disagreed with some of the other jurors we would have our own races or ethnicity is called into question it was it was.

"larry krasner" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"larry krasner" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"What's new in the great city of philadelphia oh all kinds of things we have a rebellious football team which is thrilling for me we also have a super bowl winning team which is unheard of for philly and that's kinda great how would you larry fifty seven fifty seven i wanna start like really early like where'd you where'd you grow up where'd you go to school or you're going to highschool born in saint louis i went to public school in saint louis and then my dad moved out to the east coast he was writer in an author and journalist and all that good stuff really and he got a job out on the east coast and we came out here and so i went to public schools in the philly area went to college in chicago came back to philly worked as a carpenter for year served on a death penalty jury in the area and then i went to law school in californian and came back to philly to be a public defender was there a relationship between serving on a death penalty jerry and go to law school well yes i had been thinking about it i think about a couple of things including strangely enough to minute's school and also divinity school yeah also possibly being a language professor but i kind of settled on law school because my brother said i liked to argue all the time and be because the experience of being on a death penalty jury was pretty compelling what about it well this was the first death penalty jury in the county since the supreme court's moratorium it was an horrifying case involving the rape murder of an elderly woman by the guy who basically was a handyman the involvement of the fbi was very extensive because the woman who was killed was the mother and fbi of fbi agent so the evidence in the case was kind of overwhelming the publicity was very high it was a crime in which the victim was white and the defendant was black you know there's a lot of racism involved in the jury's deliberations we were a sequestered jury so we're living in a hotel because the publicity was so high it was just a very vivid and compelling experience and what made it even stranger is one of our jurors was so mentally ill that he was removed from deliberations after they begin that occurred essentially because we were sequestered and he was on truthful about his need for medication so so about a weekend he started to dissociate and stood up deliberations and said that he could not sit in judgement on another person than the case followed through with the verdict from eleven instead of twelve but even though it was a verdict in the first degree it did not go to death face because the deal that had been cut a known to the jury was that there would be no death face in the event that eleven jurors gave the verdict meaning that the deal was cut that they go to the lawyers and they say we got a problem we've got a guy we gotta take out of there because he is disassociating and the deal was.

philadelphia
"larry krasner" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"larry krasner" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"The book at the most people who's going to throw the most people in jail who's going to save you from this figures how do you win election if you don't wanna do that well in the last few years a number of reform prosecutors have run races and one in some places in which their agenda and their campaign platform has been explicitly about rejecting a lot of the basic frameworks that have driven prosecutors for years they've run an agenda of reforming prosecutor's office of not throwing the book at everyone at offer people ways of diverting out of the criminal justice system of not prosecuting every low level drug offence the biggest city in america in which a candidate that has run for office and one is philadelphia in philadelphia there's a guy named larry crasner who is currently the district earning philadelphia and larry crasner is a fascinating dude because larry crasner is the last person in the world you would think would be the prosecutor of one of the biggest cities in america because larry crasner is a lefty lawyer lifelong defense attorney who's the kind of guy who shows up on the evening news because he's the lawyer for the anarchists that got arrested protesting that's larry crasner is and now larry crasner who is a crew believer in criminal justice reform and deconstructing the machinery of mass incarceration sits atop the office that produces incarceration in one of the biggest cities in america he is the rebel who has taken the palace and he now sits there at the desk making the decisions that the people that he spent his life battling against and critiquing used to make and now he has to be the one to implement his vision of what a more just and humane system looks like while also being the person the prosecutes crimes that takes alleged rapists and alleged murders and puts them behind bars that finds people who are accused of violently costing fellow citizens and decides how much charge them how long they need to be kept away from society he now has that that power in that control and so for this reason for both the policy reason which is close to my heart i wrote a book called a colony in a nation which is about criminal justice in the system that we created and for this dramatic reason as i think about the iconic nature of this sort of mythic story that's unfolding in philadelphia in front of our eyes i've wanted to talk to larry crasner for a long time earlier in the summer we did a town hall on race in philadelphia it was sort of pegged to the starbucks incident starbucks training and larry crasner was a guest and i got talking with him and invited another podcast and so larry crasner came on the show and the thing that you will see is that he does not talk like ball titian he is not carefully poll tested and you know watching what he says he is a true believer in the mission of what he is trying to accomplish and it is absolutely fascinating to hear what he's doing.

"larry krasner" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"larry krasner" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"For people that are not in philadelphia i remember being down in philadelphia and someone telling me about you and it was like get a lot of this this story like the guy that comes to collect the anarchists when the rest outside city hall and sues the cops he's going to run for prosecutor like not as a joke but just like a wild story that like obviously this individual will not be the next district attorney philadelphia but it's kind of interesting that that someone with that background would run like how'd you go from there to winning i can't blame people for finding my candidacy hilarious unlikely it was both of those things but it was both of those things if you think that the mainstream democratic party still has the answers which they clearly do not the only answers that they seem to have our how to lose elections while someone is brilliant and magnetic is barack obama can still win hello and welcome to wise is happening with me your host chris hayes so this episode of the podcast is really two stories in one there's a policy story and it's a policy story about mass incarceration criminal justice and then there's a dramatic story a kind of mythic story in the mythic stories a story about what happens when the revolution seizes the palace what happens when the rebels take the capital when they actually storm the halls of power and throw out the old regime and sit in the throne room and start making the rules so the policy story the policy story is about our country which is the most incarcerated country in the world per capita it is well there's a few small islands with a very small number of people that are more incarcerated but basically the most incarcerated country in the entire world and for years people have been talking about and critiquing this phenomenon we call mass incarceration the sheer number of people that we put in prison and then the even larger population people that are under what we call penal supervision's so those are people that are on probation or on parole huge huge huge numbers of people cycling through the criminal justice system and there's been a debate for one time about what the cause of the growth of mass incarceration was and in recent years thanks to some some really interesting scholarship a lot of folks in the criminal justice world has started to focus on one key part of the system and it's not lawmakers in state capitals passing passing laws although they have a huge effect and it's not beat cops making arrests although they have a huge effect the fulcrum that has been identified by a lot of the folks were crying to reduce mass incarceration and remake american criminal justice is the prosecutor it turns out when you look at the data when you study how it is that we have arrived at the prison population we have a huge amount of what's driving it are prosecutors and that's because prosecutors have enormous aggression in the american system to not charge people for crimes or to charge people for crimes to charge someone for one misdemeanor or to charge someone for three misdemeanors or to charge someone for two misdemeanors and a felony or to charge someone for a class a felony rather than a class c felony to throw the book at people and that discretion is in an office that is often remarkably unaccountable i mean da's as in this country attorneys prosecutors tend to be elected they tend to be re elected very low turnout elections the tend to be elected on campaigns that entirely trade on and traffic in the worst kind of fear mongering about the scourge of crime they tend to run exclusively on platforms they're going to be the toughest they're going to throw the book the most and then they create offices that have a culture of doing that and there's been this kind of theory that's developed among a whole bunch of critics of the system that really if you want to reform the criminal justice system in america one of the most powerful places you can do it is in the prosecutor's office and here's where we come to the story about the rebels taking the palace how do you get elected a prosecutor if you're the kind of person who wants to reform what it is a prosecutors do because the game is rigged the deck is stacked the entire way that for years that these campaigns have been run is who is going to be the toughest who's going to throw.

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