29 Burst results for "Larry Kramer"

Larry Kramer, Author and Outspoken AIDS Activist

Homo Sapiens

07:17 min | 2 months ago

Larry Kramer, Author and Outspoken AIDS Activist

"When you said earlier, you know people aren't racist via born into it the early. You can be talking about the stuff I think. Is You know? He's really cool and something else. That has been going on this week. been going on its beginning of pride month, and a lot of people have been talking about how stay was a riot started by queer people of Color. and. The solidarity we were shown by. People of color needs to be returned. Absolutely and also I feel it's really interesting. I feel like. I reached out yesterday a couple of people. Who I knew what I in protesting Eve's who we have. Lead no es mature. Yes, he's good at Jaipur on instagram. Yeah, he has been doing some really cool stuff, really amazing and I also. I'm worried for him. I mean he talked by. He was prepared to

EVE
"larry kramer" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

07:27 min | 2 months ago

"larry kramer" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"I WANNA. Talk a little bit about Larry Kramer's relationship with Tony Fauci. Because vouches, of course, he's helping to lead the response to the coronavirus right now and he also worked in AIDS at hd for years and years. And I feel like their relationship is instructive. Because it shows how two people can respect each other, even if they don't necessarily agree and they don't have to be nice to each other, they can push each other like I found the C. Span clip from nineteen ninety-three. Larry ANTONIACCI are they're together? They're talking about a new presidential aides. Task Force. and Larry Kramer is just so frustrated every time Tony wants to go to the toilet. Ten committees have to vote about giving him permission. That's what the glass why. There's not a cure for anything. He literally says to Tony Thou-. She he says the president is taking Tony's balls away I. don't want another dime. If somebody. The brain was there right now to to supervise how it was spent, you'd get a lot more bang for the buck I. I wonder if you can talk about their relationship and describe it because it seems so unique, but also very powerful. You know I think as we watched Anthony Fauci over the last three months. We've seen that he is an incredibly patient person who you know. We have decades of evidence to by the fact that entered Anthony's actually can withstand a lot if he thinks. Public Health goal is. Worth it worth withstanding that step and I think when you talk about the relationship between Larry Bremer and and voucher you. You have to give Voucher credit for never walking away from that relationship, he is someone who is willing to be excoriated willing to be yelled at and doesn't stop listening. The the lesson of his career is is really different. Does the lesson of of Larry Kramer's and it's not a lesson for activists. It's a lesson for the people who activists are yelling at angry at which is, don't prioritize your sense of personal injury or your hurt feelings. You know if someone is yelling at you angrily. Don't make the most important part of your. Feelings the fact that they're angry and you don't like being yelled at listen to what they're angry about and see if they have a point and be honest with yourself about whether they're right, and if they are right, figure out how to work with. Felt she kept coming back and Larry Kramer did not give up on having that fight, you know. He kept that relationship going privately because he knew it was important, he knew it was important to to the cause, and maybe he also liked him, you know. I mean I think there's no question that Kramer had respect for him. Yeah, you mentioned that that FAUCI memorialize. Larry Kramer this past week. He attacked me. He called me a murderer. He called me an incompetent idiot. Publicly, but then as I got to listen to what he had to say, and realized that he was making some very important points that we in the establishment needed to listen to We surprised by anything he said. I was surprised me about what she said was how warm it was about about Larry. Kramer wasn't the way he memorialize. Larry Kramer was not at a town of sort of. The grudging respect of an adversary, he clearly really liked him and respected him. I found this other moment of Larry Kramer. Talking and he's talking about what change looks like. It's from back in nineteen ninety-three. He's telling the audience you have power. Your power is your voice, but just before that he says something else which he talks about red ribbons. Any says I'm sick of them and I don't wear them anymore. Because instead of wearing a ribbon. He wants people to do something. And it stood out to me because this moment we're in now, I think a lot of people are struggling with what they can do. How can how can they be allies to the people around them? Like just this week? We had this instagram blackout. People just putting black squares house like I. Wonder what Larry Kramer would have thought of that. I would never want to speak for Larry because I still believe that he has the power to. Yell, at someone for getting it wrong, but I don't think that Larry Kramer a have been a big fan of the empty gesture or a visual gesture, whether it was a red ribbon or a a black instagram square that stands in place of actually doing something I especially don't think he would have been a fan of the point of that particular protest this week. Which is, everyone should stop talking. Act Up theme was silence. Equals death right right. Like gesture all activism and I'm not disparaging this for for people who want to do it like in some ways I think on a personal level. It is better than nothing I think there are probably some people who freaked out members of their family by doing that. You know like a a meaningless gesture for corporation can be a meaningful gesture for one particular person, so we shouldn't. We shouldn't imagine that you know. The impact of someone in a small red state town in Nineteen, ninety-three, wearing a red ribbon, and be the only person in his community to do it. That would have been real much more real than you know. A every single celebrity on the Golden Globe Story. It's not a one sought. Activism and forms of activism are not a one-size-fits-all thing, but he was certainly not a big fan of empty gestures. Kramer! Larry Kramer had the singular devotion to lgbt liberation. But the moment we're in now is about so much at once like there's a health crisis and protests against police violence and this economic devastation. I wonder if that complexity makes replicating what Kramer did. which was so focused? Harder. Yeah? I think I. Think it's really hard, but I also think it's. It's important to remember that what? Larry Kramer did was not. A completely worked out preplanned strategy that started in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, three, with eleven, hundred twelve accounting and anticipated. That would unfold. It was it was full of fits and starts was full of organizations that he started, and then had a bitter rift with you know it was. It changed along the way as the world changes, the plague changed, and so you know if there's a lesson for today for activists it's. It's probably that.

Larry Kramer Larry Larry ANTONIACCI Larry Bremer Anthony Fauci Tony Tony Thou Tony Fauci vouches instagram AIDS president FAUCI Golden Globe Story
"larry kramer" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

05:48 min | 2 months ago

"larry kramer" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"Part of part of Larry Kramer's outrage to me. It seems to come from the fact that he he had this privilege. He was white. He went to Yale. He had class status, but the AIDS. Crisis revealed that status could be ripped away. Is that the right way to understand him? I think it's a right way to understand him. Yes, I, mean it marry. As you said he was white male, he was Jewish, which was not in the nineteen fifties, necessarily a category of privilege, but nor was it in the nineteen fifties something that would exclude him from jail and exclude him from the halls of power so like. In some ways I think it is useful to Larry. Grammar as a white man of a certain generation who was comfortable with the idea of? Power with the institutions of. And who expected to to have it not only. Is that okay in my book for an activist? It's necessary I mean you know I'm married to Tony Kushner and he wrote a piece about Larry this last week in the New, York Times where he said that Larry was not. He was not a it all down activists, you know. He was prepared to raise institutions of power R.. A. Z. NOT OUR S. If, he didn't have access to them, but Tony wrote was what was the access, not the raising he wanted. In to the government. He wanted into the New York Times. He wanted people in powerful positions to hear him and open those doors, and he was willing to do whatever it took to make that happen and and I deserve to be here Rice's my place. Absolutely, I mean that the the word entitlement is so loaded to us right now, but Larry maybe because of his race gender time he lived in at maybe because of his circumstances, and maybe because of his personality, who he was self entitled to that kind of access to power. That kind of entitlement I think is really valuable. You belong there you have you have as much right to power as everyone who has power. For thirty five years, fighting for access to power is exactly what Larry Kramer did so two years after eleven, hundred and twelve in Canada was published in the New York Larry, did the first of the two things that were sort of perhaps his most lasting legacy is an activist which was founded Cuyo GMAC the game health crisis, and I believe a couple of years after that. He founded. The AIDS coalition to unleash power, which we now know as act up, and which is still around as GMAC. Act Up became an incredibly important protest group and GM HCC over the years and decades Moved from being a small local grassroots organization to you know a major national fundraiser and sort of center point for a gay activism. I think it's important to remember the anger. That act up channeled I wonder if there's one scene one protest that would do that for our listeners will The one I'm thinking of is Saint Patrick's Cathedral. Very famous protest where in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, nine them cardinal, John, O'Connor was giving a mass at Saint, Patrick's nearest city and act up. Disrupted it. They were specifically protesting was that O'Connor was against teaching, safe sex in public schools and fighting against the distribution of condoms and they they lay down in in the church. I mean and Saint. Patrick's is big..

Larry Kramer Tony Kushner Saint Patrick's Cathedral New York Times Cuyo GMAC Yale AIDS Patrick GM HCC O'Connor New York York Times Canada John Rice
"larry kramer" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

04:50 min | 2 months ago

"larry kramer" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"Era. Larry Kramer's life was shaped by pandemic and protest. Listening to old clips of him talking about HIV, it feels like he could be talking about the coronavirus. Listening to Larry Talk about his commitment. LGBT writes his words. Echo the chance that are filling American streets today. And Yeah Larry was tough uncompromising. But. Mark says there's something else. You can't make. Progress without. People like Larry Kramer. Today on the show remembering Larry Kramer. Because his life is full of lessons for today. I'm Mary. Harris, you're listening to what next stick with us? Hey listeners I wanna tell you about a new podcast from slate. It's called thrilling tales of modern capitalism. This show Zeros in on the daring, bold and weird ways. American companies have transformed themselves. Some of these stories are epic. Disasters Episode One is about how the Carnival Corporation, the world's biggest cruise line evades mishaps like the infamous two thousand thirteen. Cruise. Others are tales of skyrocketing success in an upcoming episode you'll learn about epic deems the maker of fortnight and how they spent years perfecting the perfect formula for a video game triumph for failure, every company has a story, and those stories are more thrilling than you might have imagined subscribe thrilling tales of modern capitalism on apple, podcasts or wherever you listen. Larry Kramer burned through his life as if he didn't expect to make it eighty four. He was a relentlessly hard worker as a writer and satirist. He was nominated for both an academy. Award and Pulitzer. But AIDS activism was his calling. Learn Grammar was an artist and he was activist most times. When you say that about someone, one of those things takes a back seat to the other. We have great artists who also contributed some activism to the world, and we have great activists who were also okay artists, but with Larry. You're talking about someone who was really important in both categories as A. He wrote Faggots, which was a really important step in gay novels in the Nineteen Seventies, and of course, the normal heart, which is a genuinely activists play, and a genuine work of art, which is an unbelievably tough combination to pull off and his art, like like faggots pissed a lot of people off right absolutely, Larry didn't write or do anything in the seventies or eighties without some gay people saying you're not helping the cause, you're hurting the cause. I mean the most the most famous essay he wrote piece called eleven hundred twelve and counting in the New York. Native, which was the first really major piece to sort of sound, a very very loud alarm from a gay man to. To the gay community about the AIDS epidemic infuriated a lot of gay people when it was published What was it that made people angry about it? Everyone was okay with shaking a fist at the Republican government, the Reagan administration, the scientific community, the medical community that was either ignoring this or demonizing people eleven hundred twelve and counting was that, but it was also a piece that said we have to wake up. Our community is sleepwalking through this Ed. We're walking into our own grants Larry really really took to task. People in the Gay Community who did not feel we're taking the AIDS crisis sufficiently seriously and Larry said we have to change our behavior because.

Larry Kramer Larry Larry Talk Gay Community AIDS Nineteen Seventies Carnival Corporation Mark Harris Republican government New York apple writer Reagan administration
"larry kramer" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

02:50 min | 2 months ago

"larry kramer" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"Hey everyone as we head into another weekend of potential protests I want to hear how you're doing. If you're going out to make yourself heard. How are you preparing to demonstrate in the middle of the pandemic? If you've already been out, there was the moment that stuck with you when you got back. Give us a call. Let us know where it two zero, two, eight, eight, eight, two five eight. Thanks now onto the show. When I think about Larry, Kramer the AIDS activists who died last week at the age of eighty four. I can hear his voice loud urgent filled with this. Anger. Play. Forty, MILLION INFECTED PEOPLE IS A. Old nobody active it. This is a clip that started making the rounds. Last week. It was recorded thirty years ago. Larry is expressing frustration with the pace of HIV, research and drug development. We are in the worst shape we have act ever ever been in. Nothing is working. None of that you thought meth green is working. One of the funny things about Larry Kramer. Though is that until he opened his mouth, he didn't read as particularly angry. Visually what you can picture is a very unprepossessing, looking white Jewish man with a set classes and have fringe of White Hair Marquez is. A cultural critic. I heard you were overalls a lot. We're overall a lot, he he he wore a lot of big of turquoise jewelry. So the visual does not quite match the firebrand that you might imagine the last time Marx Larry it was at a benefit for the gay men's health crisis. An organization Larry founded to fight AIDS Larry, was winning some kind of lifetime achievement award. And the. Evening went on for dairy very long time. It was one of those you know. Everybody gets a turn to taught. Benefits and Larry was the grand finale of course. Everyone spoke and he got up and it was this very warm, touching moment, and then he made this long speech, during which he's essentially like ripped into half the audience for complacency or their failures or laziness or or ineffectual -ality our shortsightedness. That was a very. Larry Kramer moment. He was not going to be sentimentalize D- by this huge crowd into this old deer who.

Marx Larry Larry Kramer AIDS INFECTED lifetime achievement award
Remembering Larry Kramer, an AIDS warrior on a soapbox and the stage

CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

Remembering Larry Kramer, an AIDS warrior on a soapbox and the stage

"Author and activist Larry Kramer died Wednesday in New York of pneumonia and academy award nominated screenwriter Kramer realized early on the threat aids pose to the gay community in the early nineteen eighties he founded the militant group act up known for its acts of civil disobedience on behalf of aids research anyway just a bitter campaign against top federal virus Dr Anthony Fauci Tony is got his bureaucratic suit on instead of his humanitarian doctor sued on whom he accused of

New York Pneumonia Dr Anthony Fauci Tony Larry Kramer
"larry kramer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:37 min | 2 months ago

"larry kramer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Helped found the gay men's health crisis where his derogatory oratory got him ousted and then act up which staged die ins in front of government offices Wall Street and houses of worship Dr Anthony Fauci then already head of the National Institute of allergy and infectious diseases at NIH recalled first this week I met Larry when he called me a murderer and eat it in the newspaper to him I was the face of the federal government he got my attention and I listened the federal official who had to weigh his words and the activist who hurled words like fiery torches became friends Larry Kramer wrote a heart stopping speech in his nineteen eighty five play the normal heart which dramatized debates of the time among gay men about whether to be visible in the struggle against aids I belong to a culture that includes Proust Henry James checkups the Cole Porter Plato Socrates a character declares really in through a litany of artists and writers before thundering these are not invisible man Anthony Rapp the actor told us that is a queer man he believes he owes Larry Kramer his life he was a galvanizing force that saved countless lives he said it made the world a safer better place for so many of us and Rebecca McCarthy whose novel the great believers about a group of friends living through the aids crisis in the nineteen eighties told us I hope Larry Kramer gets to choose between resting in peace and haunting every SOB on his list Larry Kramer lived with HIV for more than three decades he was eighty four when.

Dr Anthony Fauci NIH Larry federal government official Larry Kramer Henry James Cole Porter Plato Socrates Anthony Rapp Rebecca McCarthy National Institute of allergy
"larry kramer" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:07 min | 2 months ago

"larry kramer" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Let's see I will the through the county jail? Turn Mersal spend a week from good for things things would were guests? You know the only thing who sure own van took me down cellblock have to strip enough McClure. Who's me Um monkey suit and threw me lacquer Radin Coun- heard all sparrow with Bro Pin Wing. Now I know the reason. Why CAGE BIRD to sing exam and Davidson County jail mile man a cash to even though MMA should listen Zuma Mama maybe the impacts lodden again. This one is this one might be my favorite. Betty's Hud in the room is cold. Must Sell May Scott Call. She takes her in sleep so the got six weeks still. She's she said she beat her boyfriend. Wow now she sits and watches her. You'll laugh go down to the train. She's we can do David. San County jail hurl man a God cash to even go L. Listen to a Mama. Quit her laugh be. She went slutty.

"larry kramer" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:30 min | 2 months ago

"larry kramer" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Local from only got a heart and head on me that I just can't spa and it saw a way livery we're puts me in thing Say some buddies said for at home needs baby. Just give me one who were so. You may midwest turning to plastic comb. My hung started drinkin- when they had the WHO now it's liver failure and is man in flow. It saw can been oh the feeling instead something Blood or something in ACA drab Nashville.

"larry kramer" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:32 min | 2 months ago

"larry kramer" Discussed on Fresh Air

"No Reagan's Burns to the leader of Be First Time Baby Ball. They were May. I was just a child a the rain stone sports and Jesus and all the usual suspects. Tell me Mr Betty saying well have so to.

"larry kramer" Discussed on Making Gay History

Making Gay History

08:11 min | 2 months ago

"larry kramer" Discussed on Making Gay History

"I'm Eric Marcus. And this is making a history. It's now eleven weeks since my partner Barney and I began sheltering in place and this past week the official death toll in the United States from covid nineteen rose past one hundred thousand mothers and fathers children grandparents colleagues neighbors and friends people not numbers people. I've talked before in this series revisiting the archive about anger. How it can fuel action? How an anger is partnered with love? It can produce a kind of righteous rage that propels us those of us who lived through the AIDS crisis. Know about it. Some of US learned it from Larry Kramer who died this week in Manhattan where he's lived for. Decades Larry was famous for being one of the first billions to sound the alarm during that last epidemic. The one that began forty years ago he was on the front lines even before aids was called AIDS and became a global epidemic at swept away more than thirty million lives before AIDS. Larry was best known for his work as a screenwriter and author but the virus that was claiming so many lives in the political indifference political negligence that greeted it turned Larry into a very public activist. His friends were dying and he felt compelled to do something more than to just bury the dead and mourn their loss in nineteen. Eighty-two Larry co-founded a gay men's health crisis now known as GM five years later he co-founded act up the AIDS coalition to unleash power. Act Up came to be known for its brilliant use of public protests to bring attention to the epidemic by early nineteen eighty nine. When I I met Larry AIDS take in more than sixty thousand lives. Most of them. Gay Men Larry quickly earned a reputation as an uncompromising firebrand with a fierce temper. I'm not proud of it. But that kind of person generally inspires me to run in the other direction. I was more than a little anxious. I approached the door to Larry's apartment in a building that fronts Washington Square Park in New York. City's Greenwich Village. As I said when this episode originally aired I got myself worked up. Nothing I brace myself for a tornado and found the teddy bear. Here's the same. Larry welcomed me into a spacious apartment and showed me into his all white book line living room and I took a seat opposite him across a broad desk as I said at my tape recorder and attach the Mike to his shirt. We talked about how we both had wanted to find a husband early in life and settle down and that led us back in time to Larry's memories as it confused and Unhappy College student in the Early Nineteen fifties. I pressed record interview with Larry Kramer Thursday January twenty six thousand nine hundred eighty nine at the home of Larry Kramer in New York City. Interviewer is Eric. Marcus tape one side one. When I went to Yale I thought I was the only gay person in the world and tried to kill myself because I was so lonely. Did try to What am I think that was fifty? Three was the year my freshman year. Yeah is awful. I mean I do want to go back that far curious because I was a college student on seventy six desperately unhappy. We're at Vassar College. There were there were a lot of gays. They weren't that many people think there were a lot if there were so many gays. Why was I so unhappy? Miserable person and And deaths seemed very appealing at moments during my freshman year when I was dating a woman in making off the man by in life and fifty three must have been much more difficult than seventy six at Vassar. You can even start in shifty. Three Easter I knew I was gay. I think from the day I was born and I think that there have been I. I now know that there were isolate. They were experiences all through before. I even got to Yale. And they were all covert in guilt. Inducing on on everybody's part so the it seemed as if all those early years were spent trying to deny these feelings the feelings would sort of get to strong erupt in and I would have an experience. Which would autumn always make me feel guilty in one way or another and then you put it you become. Sylvia's would come down for a while a week a week or two and Yale was awful. There was a gay bar called parolees. It was awful the time when I finally have the courage to go there. It was only two blocks from campus. But it was a million years away. It was very dark and grey and inside and smokey and and filled with old old older man and I only went the once and somebody picked me up. A car drove for like hours before we found a place that was quiet to do it and then he drove me back where you didn't say a word all of that list of yourself. I eight two hundred aspirin. Oh my God talk about slow and Miss. You must have been pretty miserable to swallow two hundred and yours anymore. Will after you wanted out. Was that who knows. It's a scene. I'll never forget the scene of taking pills the Yup and find you're still better. I didn't wake up. I I went to bed and I got scared and I call. The campus. Police came took me to the hospital and put myself and that was in woke then I fell asleep and I woke up in a room with bars and after grace new haven hospital and there. Was this very unpleasant hospital psychiatrist. Who said all right Mr Cramer? Why did you do it and I go fuck yourself or words to that end he said? I'm now you're not going to be let out of this hospital until you tell us why you did it. And I just had a few rubbed me the wrong way and I wouldn't have told who who knew why I did it anyway. So my brother who's always sort of looked after me came and got me out and he was friends with the dean of Freshmen. My brother had been the before me and And it was you know ordinarily when something like that happen you were shipped off to go join the army really in those days. Yeah and then you come back to Yale and you've grown up but they let me stay. If I went to the University of Coyote. Just his name was Dr Fry Clement Fry. And he was about in the sixties he had silver hair and it was a good looking man he whereas reptiles button down shirt and You just knew that. He cared more about Yale and he ever did about you and And I told him of this experience that I had had of had been invited to go to the room of two of my freshman year. Two guys freshman year that I had met they somehow mercifully had found each other and they were living in this room and I was invited for tea or something and I walked into this room and the room. You know how awful freshman rooms are. Well they had done their room and it was painted all black and there was a everything has been taken out of the room. Except you know a low mattress was which was black and there was a perfect coffee table with with a rose in a vase. That was.

Larry Larry Kramer Larry AIDS Eric Marcus Vassar College AIDS Yale Manhattan US Dr Fry Clement Fry United States Greenwich Village Unhappy College partner Barney New York City
"larry kramer" Discussed on Making Gay History

Making Gay History

06:59 min | 2 months ago

"larry kramer" Discussed on Making Gay History

"I've talked before in this series revisiting the archive about anger. How it can fuel action? How an anger is partnered with love? It can produce a kind of righteous rage that propels us those of us who lived through the AIDS crisis. Know about it. Some of US learned it from Larry Kramer who died this week in Manhattan where he's lived for. Decades Larry was famous for being one of the first billions to sound the alarm during that last epidemic. The one that began forty years ago he was on the front lines even before aids was called AIDS and became a global epidemic at swept away more than thirty million lives before AIDS. Larry was best known for his work as a screenwriter and author but the virus that was claiming so many lives in the political indifference political negligence that greeted it turned Larry into a very public activist. His friends were dying and he felt compelled to do something more than to just bury the dead and mourn their loss in nineteen. Eighty-two Larry co-founded a gay men's health crisis now known as GM five years later he co-founded act up the AIDS coalition to unleash power. Act Up came to be known for its brilliant use of public protests to bring attention to the epidemic by early nineteen eighty nine. When I I met Larry AIDS take in more than sixty thousand lives. Most of them. Gay Men Larry quickly earned a reputation as an uncompromising firebrand with a fierce temper. I'm not proud of it. But that kind of person generally inspires me to run in the other direction. I was more than a little anxious. I approached the door to Larry's apartment in a building that fronts Washington Square Park in New York. City's Greenwich Village. As I said when this episode originally aired I got myself worked up. Nothing I brace myself for a tornado and found the teddy bear. Here's the same. Larry welcomed me into a spacious apartment and showed me into his all white book line living room and I took a seat opposite him across a broad desk as I said at my tape recorder and attach the Mike to his shirt. We talked about how we both had wanted to find a husband early in life and settle down and that led us back in time to Larry's memories as it confused and Unhappy College student in the Early Nineteen fifties. I pressed record interview with Larry Kramer Thursday January twenty six thousand nine hundred eighty nine at the home of Larry Kramer in New York City. Interviewer is Eric. Marcus tape one side one. When I went to Yale I thought I was the only gay person in the world and tried to kill myself because I was so lonely. Did try to What am I think that was fifty? Three was the year my freshman year. Yeah is awful. I mean I do want to go back that far curious because I was a college student on seventy six desperately unhappy. We're at Vassar College. There were there were a lot of gays. They weren't that many people think there were a lot if there were so many gays. Why was I so unhappy? Miserable person and And deaths seemed very appealing at moments during my freshman year when I was dating a woman in making off the man by in life and fifty three must have been much more difficult than seventy six at Vassar. You can even start in shifty. Three Easter I knew I was gay. I think from the day I was born and I think that there have been I. I now know that there were isolate. They were experiences all through before. I even got to Yale. And they were all covert in guilt. Inducing on on everybody's part so the it seemed as if all those early years were spent trying to deny these feelings the feelings would sort of get to strong erupt in and I would have an experience. Which would autumn always make me feel guilty in one way or another and then you put it you become. Sylvia's would come down for a while a week a week or two and Yale was awful. There was a gay bar called parolees. It was awful the time when I finally have the courage to go there. It was only two blocks from campus. But it was a million years away. It was very dark and grey and inside and smokey and and filled with old old older man and I only went the once and somebody picked me up. A car drove for like hours before we found a place that was quiet to do it and then he drove me back where you didn't say a word all of that list of yourself. I eight two hundred aspirin. Oh my God talk about slow and Miss. You must have been pretty miserable to swallow two hundred and yours anymore. Will after you wanted out. Was that who knows. It's a scene. I'll never forget the scene of taking pills the Yup and find you're still better. I didn't wake up. I I went to bed and I got scared and I call. The campus. Police came took me to the hospital and put myself and that was in woke then I fell asleep and I woke up in a room with bars and after grace new haven hospital and there. Was this very unpleasant hospital psychiatrist. Who said all right Mr Cramer? Why did you do it and I go fuck yourself or words to that end he said? I'm now you're not going to be let out of this hospital until you tell us why you did it. And I just had a few rubbed me the wrong way and I wouldn't have told who who knew why I did it anyway. So my brother who's always sort of looked after me came and got me out and he was friends with the dean of Freshmen. My brother had been the before me and And it was you know ordinarily when something like that happen you were shipped off to go join the army really in those days. Yeah and then you come back to Yale and you've grown up but they let me stay. If I went to the University of Coyote. Just his name was Dr Fry Clement Fry. And he was about in the sixties he had silver hair and it was a good looking man he whereas reptiles button down shirt and You just knew that. He cared more about Yale and he ever did about you

Gay Community the Times The New York Times Alvin Dr Freeman Paul Popham Larry Math Mabel Mercer Yale AIDS Gail community leader Dr Fry Dr Fries Nyu Rapoport Massu Bush Donald Beverly
Revisiting the Archive: Larry Kramer

Making Gay History

06:59 min | 2 months ago

Revisiting the Archive: Larry Kramer

"I've talked before in this series revisiting the archive about anger. How it can fuel action? How an anger is partnered with love? It can produce a kind of righteous rage that propels us those of us who lived through the AIDS crisis. Know about it. Some of US learned it from Larry Kramer who died this week in Manhattan where he's lived for. Decades Larry was famous for being one of the first billions to sound the alarm during that last epidemic. The one that began forty years ago he was on the front lines even before aids was called AIDS and became a global epidemic at swept away more than thirty million lives before AIDS. Larry was best known for his work as a screenwriter and author but the virus that was claiming so many lives in the political indifference political negligence that greeted it turned Larry into a very public activist. His friends were dying and he felt compelled to do something more than to just bury the dead and mourn their loss in nineteen. Eighty-two Larry co-founded a gay men's health crisis now known as GM five years later he co-founded act up the AIDS coalition to unleash power. Act Up came to be known for its brilliant use of public protests to bring attention to the epidemic by early nineteen eighty nine. When I I met Larry AIDS take in more than sixty thousand lives. Most of them. Gay Men Larry quickly earned a reputation as an uncompromising firebrand with a fierce temper. I'm not proud of it. But that kind of person generally inspires me to run in the other direction. I was more than a little anxious. I approached the door to Larry's apartment in a building that fronts Washington Square Park in New York. City's Greenwich Village. As I said when this episode originally aired I got myself worked up. Nothing I brace myself for a tornado and found the teddy bear. Here's the same. Larry welcomed me into a spacious apartment and showed me into his all white book line living room and I took a seat opposite him across a broad desk as I said at my tape recorder and attach the Mike to his shirt. We talked about how we both had wanted to find a husband early in life and settle down and that led us back in time to Larry's memories as it confused and Unhappy College student in the Early Nineteen fifties. I pressed record interview with Larry Kramer Thursday January twenty six thousand nine hundred eighty nine at the home of Larry Kramer in New York City. Interviewer is Eric. Marcus tape one side one. When I went to Yale I thought I was the only gay person in the world and tried to kill myself because I was so lonely. Did try to What am I think that was fifty? Three was the year my freshman year. Yeah is awful. I mean I do want to go back that far curious because I was a college student on seventy six desperately unhappy. We're at Vassar College. There were there were a lot of gays. They weren't that many people think there were a lot if there were so many gays. Why was I so unhappy? Miserable person and And deaths seemed very appealing at moments during my freshman year when I was dating a woman in making off the man by in life and fifty three must have been much more difficult than seventy six at Vassar. You can even start in shifty. Three Easter I knew I was gay. I think from the day I was born and I think that there have been I. I now know that there were isolate. They were experiences all through before. I even got to Yale. And they were all covert in guilt. Inducing on on everybody's part so the it seemed as if all those early years were spent trying to deny these feelings the feelings would sort of get to strong erupt in and I would have an experience. Which would autumn always make me feel guilty in one way or another and then you put it you become. Sylvia's would come down for a while a week a week or two and Yale was awful. There was a gay bar called parolees. It was awful the time when I finally have the courage to go there. It was only two blocks from campus. But it was a million years away. It was very dark and grey and inside and smokey and and filled with old old older man and I only went the once and somebody picked me up. A car drove for like hours before we found a place that was quiet to do it and then he drove me back where you didn't say a word all of that list of yourself. I eight two hundred aspirin. Oh my God talk about slow and Miss. You must have been pretty miserable to swallow two hundred and yours anymore. Will after you wanted out. Was that who knows. It's a scene. I'll never forget the scene of taking pills the Yup and find you're still better. I didn't wake up. I I went to bed and I got scared and I call. The campus. Police came took me to the hospital and put myself and that was in woke then I fell asleep and I woke up in a room with bars and after grace new haven hospital and there. Was this very unpleasant hospital psychiatrist. Who said all right Mr Cramer? Why did you do it and I go fuck yourself or words to that end he said? I'm now you're not going to be let out of this hospital until you tell us why you did it. And I just had a few rubbed me the wrong way and I wouldn't have told who who knew why I did it anyway. So my brother who's always sort of looked after me came and got me out and he was friends with the dean of Freshmen. My brother had been the before me and And it was you know ordinarily when something like that happen you were shipped off to go join the army really in those days. Yeah and then you come back to Yale and you've grown up but they let me stay. If I went to the University of Coyote. Just his name was Dr Fry Clement Fry. And he was about in the sixties he had silver hair and it was a good looking man he whereas reptiles button down shirt and You just knew that. He cared more about Yale and he ever did about you

Larry Larry Kramer Larry Aids Aids Vassar College Yale Manhattan United States Dr Fry Clement Fry Greenwich Village Unhappy College New York City Grace New Haven Hospital GM Marcus Aspirin
Larry Kramer, playwright and AIDS activist, dies at 84

KCBS 24 Hour News

01:04 min | 2 months ago

Larry Kramer, playwright and AIDS activist, dies at 84

"Writer playwright author gay rights activists and aids activist Larry Kramer has died of pneumonia at the age of eighty four here's Jim Chevy our reporter once described Larry Kramer as the game worlds leading apostle of unrest certainly he was an active he co founded the group's gay men's health crisis and act up in the nineteen eighties in response to the aids epidemic and Kramer's writings were meant to stir up the audience his play the normal heart portraying the pain of HIV still even though Kramer's set out to be confrontational he told CBS news it was not easy making a full of himself in front of others but you know you kind of think of the greater but Jim Shannon B. C. B. S. news Kramer and his husband architectural designer David Webster have been together since nineteen ninety one they were also a couple back in the seventies act up said the Kramers raids helped inspire a movement and Elton John said today that we've lost a giant of a man who stood up for gay rights like a

Larry Kramer Pneumonia Jim Chevy David Webster Elton John Writer Reporter CBS Jim Shannon B. C. B.
"larry kramer" Discussed on The Daily Beans

The Daily Beans

07:32 min | 2 months ago

"larry kramer" Discussed on The Daily Beans

"Jordan's corn beans I have just got a few updates for you today. Kind of a shorter one I store that I've got for you all is about what's starting to happen with voter registration numbers so. I hadn't even thought about this until I read this article and it so now in hindsight obviously something that was going to be a problem but basically voter registration numbers are just completely like flat lining all across the country and normally in the months leading up to an election. Like this is when you would start to see them skyrocket through all the various ways that people do that there's a lot of in-person stuff mainly in that's kind of what the issue is is. How do you effectively registered people? You know grassroots voter. Reg Organizations is one of the main ways that people wind up getting registered. The people that you see outside of grocery stores or in your communities just going door to door in communities for example when that stuff isn't supposed to be happening. There's a huge consequence that we're starting to see in those numbers the DMV for example Naturalisation ceremonies being postponed. When you get like I think I'm pretty sure. This act exists in some form and a lot of states but I think in Nevada. It was called like the motor voter registration act or something or maybe that was California. I think it was Nevada. Point is when you essentially like do any sort of business online like you get your license. I had to do is check a box. Basically to say that you want to be registered to vote and there's a lot of you know legislation like that that's made it super easy for for certain parts of the population to to register. Dmv's are like closed everywhere. You can only go in if you have an essential thing that you have to do which fun fact everybody guess what my license has been suspended for the last like six months and I didn't know and After go get it reinstated. So that's fun. That's just a side note. I'm an idiot. It's I didn't pay some fucking stupid parking ticket or some shit and it's my fault but I really fucked myself there anyways. There's a bunch of people right now. That aren't being able to vote and it's scary. It's very scary because we were looking at an election. That hopefully was going to be the biggest voter turnout. We've seen in many many elections in now. It's just looking like this. Could be a really big factor in that not being the case. So if you can Dear part. I'm sure there's GonNa be stuff going around on social media like campaigns online campaigns grassroots organizations. They don't stop the work that they do. They do such amazing work but Cher it as he sees something. That's like reminding your friends or yourself to update at your new address or or just maybe some people registering for the first time. Maybe you have kids. That aren't getting their licenses or something but they still need to register. Think about that stuff. Think about maybe who your life you could help and we can try to help kind of pick up the slack. That's being caused by the stay at home owners right now in the voter registration area. That story number went story number two comes out of Rent and evictions. And what's starting to happen now? Is You know when lockdown? I started a lot. You lose. People lost their jobs. People still don't have their jobs. Obviously paying rent was not even on the table and so there were the sort of postponing of evictions in now in a lot of states. They're starting to resume addictions which is just cruel and makes zero sense to me because they're doing that without any kind of other plan for giving people aid. It seems so arbitrary and unhelpful. It's like when they said. Oh Yeah Even when they did something to like help in quotes it was like yeah. You don't have to pay rent for three months. Oh but then as soon as citizen three months is up you three month's rent okay. Thanks what did you think? I was fucking. I was just bathing in the money. DidN'T WANNA give it to you like obviously I don't have the money. It's the least helpful thing and now as a follow up to the least helpful thing now. They're actually beginning to evict people and they're starting to put out those notices that it's going to happen. I saw one coming out of. I think it was the state of Oklahoma I saw them announce on. Yeah Oklahoma City. The sheriff's announced that they were gonNA start enforcing eviction notices this week and the tone was apologetic. Keno just like. It's suck that we have to do this but like we're going to be as respectful as we can't everybody in reluctantly so I imagine a lot of people are going to be carrying out. These orders. Fucking sucks it's it's awful and when you have stay at home orders that are still in place. You're literally putting people out into the streets. Which just in the humanitarian census. Just awful and in just cruel like I can't. I just really can't think of any. I understand that the economy still needs to go round right. I. I obviously understand a landlord. That's like well. What am I supposed to do you know I I have? I have bills to pay to. That's completely fair. This shouldn't fall on the landlord's because honestly landlords unless you're like a massively wealthy landlord you're still probably sitting in the middle class in a lot of these cases landlords also don't have the capital to be able to do anything really either to help people in a lot of cases. I feel like this is where governments failed us so much. Is that states in. They're doing this stuff largely because the landlords need to pay their bills and they're not getting any breaks either in it's just as chain of people not getting any breaks in. It's a tragedy and I don't know I don't know what I guess. It's going to be like an individual maybe state by state assessment of how to handle that. I don't know like or maybe it's county. I'm not familiar. With the breakdown of local state government you know workings specifically in Lake. Who would be responsible for coming up with kind of solution? All I know is that what's happening right now with them. Starting to enforce evictions is just completely unacceptable and my heart goes out to anybody. That's in that position. We have a lot of listeners. I guarantee some of our listeners are experiencing this right now and I'm so sorry and I just. It sucks. Feel so powerless. All around the people that are with you and your heart and then you all in. It just is horrible so I hope that if this is affecting you you're in a place that has some resources somewhere and there are some options available to you but point is they're just getting right back to it. Texas Supreme Court ruled that addictions could begin again recently. So in some places it's already.

DMV Reg Organizations Nevada Jordan Cher Oklahoma City Texas Supreme Court Oklahoma California Lake
Larry Kramer, playwright and AIDS activist, dies at 84

Ron St. Pierre

00:16 sec | 2 months ago

Larry Kramer, playwright and AIDS activist, dies at 84

"Larry Kramer and trailblazing gay rights and aids activist is dead at the age of eighty four Kramer who had various health complications through the years died yesterday from the Monia he was credited with shifting the national response to the aids crisis in the eighties and

Larry Kramer Monia
"larry kramer" Discussed on The Daily Beans

The Daily Beans

02:12 min | 2 months ago

"larry kramer" Discussed on The Daily Beans

"For Thursday. May Twenty eight twenty twenty today. The Department of Justice drops insider trading investigations against three senators voter registration plummets due to covid. Nineteen Republicans sued to stop proxy voting in the House. Kevin McCarthy ask Democrats to pull their FISO. Bill POMPEO's advisory board. Kaley mcenaney is a hypocrite. Rod Rosenstein will testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Flynn could lose even if he wins. And we find out why it could be hard for pence to pardon trump. I'm your host. Ag Hey everybody it's ag We're doing some remote recordings today Everything is going well here. I want to remind everybody of. Let's see tomorrow's a cocktail Happy Hour. We're going to do a live. Crowd Cast Q. And A. Session. We do this every week. This'll be I think the tenth week that we do this This week steam is the masquerade. Where your masks? We WanNA see your masks You have to wear them the whole time. Obviously if you're indoors and also today on the show I'll be interviewing Glenn Kirschner former Federal Prosecutor. Msnbc legal analyst former Army Jag Jordan's GONNA give us a cove update in the block. And I'm going to be joined by Amanda Reader for the good news in quarantine confessions. I also wanted to say to see. Just this is so great. Congratulations to the voices of our city. Choir they earned the Golden Buzzer from Terry crews on America's got talent last night They're going straight to the final show and voices are choir is a choir of homeless folks here in San Diego. We had them record ringtone for us and You know we've been donating the proceeds from that ringtone to them Since that time. And they were on America's got talent last night and they got the Golden Buzzer. Congratulations voices of our city choir. You've earned it and I also want to dedicate this show to Larry Kramer Co founder of act up which is working to end the AIDS crisis. He died today in New York at the age of eighty four and we honor his memory but before we get to the headlines and the pardon discussion we do have some updates from Jordan Coburn. So let's hit the hot notes pot notes hello.

Kaley mcenaney America Larry Kramer Co Flynn Bill POMPEO Department of Justice Senate Judiciary Committee Rod Rosenstein Jordan Coburn Kevin McCarthy Glenn Kirschner Jag Jordan Msnbc Amanda Reader advisory board San Diego founder
"larry kramer" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:37 min | 2 months ago

"larry kramer" Discussed on KOMO

"Day after Twitter slap factcheck mornings on two of president trump's tweets the president threatened to impose new regulations on social media companies or even close them down the president continues to push a double bunks conspiracy theory involving former congressman Joe Scarborough I will I'll Republican senator Joni Ernst says the president should tone it down I'd love to rub a little Iowa nice off but certainly it gets media attention the White House says Mr trump will sign an executive order Thursday related to social media separately a three judge panel of the Washington DC federal appeals court upheld the dismissal of a lawsuit that accused social media and tech giants of conspiring to stifle the political views of the far right back in the eighties when HIV aids became a crisis playwright Larry Kramer used his angry voice to raise theater goers consciousness of it later forming the game men's health crisis and then act up Larry Kramer died on Wednesday many remember in play right now aids activist Larry Kramer best known for his play the normal heart Elton John said in a statement that we have lost a giant of a man who stood up for gay rights like a warrior Lin Manuel Miranda writes on Twitter that Cramer was an extraordinary writer Rosie o'donnell called him an American hero Kramer was diagnosed with HIV in nineteen eighty nine he died of pneumonia Larry Kramer was eighty four Jason Nathan's and ABC news Hollywood this is ABC news homeowners time nine oh four R. como traffic every ten minutes on the force used Tama Fulton Notley terror as the northbound five exit two eastbound highway one oh four is closed for roadwork and will re open at five.

Cramer Tama Fulton R. como ABC writer Washington DC executive Joe Scarborough Hollywood Jason Nathan HIV Rosie o'donnell president Twitter Lin Manuel Miranda Elton John Larry Kramer Mr trump
AIDS activist and "The Normal Heart" playwright Larry Kramer dies at 84

News, Traffic and Weather

00:37 sec | 2 months ago

AIDS activist and "The Normal Heart" playwright Larry Kramer dies at 84

"Back in the eighties when HIV aids became a crisis playwright Larry Kramer used his angry voice to raise theater goers consciousness of it later forming the game men's health crisis and then act up Larry Kramer died on Wednesday many remember in play right now aids activist Larry Kramer best known for his play the normal heart Elton John said in a statement that we have lost a giant of a man who stood up for gay rights like a warrior Lin Manuel Miranda writes on Twitter that Cramer was an extraordinary writer Rosie o'donnell called him an American hero Kramer was diagnosed with HIV in nineteen eighty nine he died of pneumonia Larry Kramer was eighty

Larry Kramer Elton John Lin Manuel Miranda Twitter Cramer Rosie O'donnell HIV Writer
Larry Kramer, groundbreaking author and Aids activist, dies aged 84

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

03:13 min | 2 months ago

Larry Kramer, groundbreaking author and Aids activist, dies aged 84

"A man named Larry Kramer died and he's not a household name except in some households. he is in mine. He was the CO founder of gay men's health crisis which is one of the first and largest AIDS service organizations ever. He was also and this is what he'll go down in history for for he was the founder of act up which is called the AIDS coalition to Unleash Power. And what act up did what they aim to do was unleash the power of the communities that were being killed hand over fist by the AIDS epidemic in its first years an act up tactics in the mold of Larry Kramer were impolite and pushy and often Cathartic and ultimately very effective. There's really been nothing else like it in my lifetime. How would you define the objectives of we want to end the AIDS epidemic? Simple as that plane. Simple cleaning some by whatever means necessary. We tried being nice. I think we've had to resort to these tactics because nobody listens quite frankly we now have some seventy chapters around the world with over a quarter million members. So I think what's happening is that the backlash is not against us. The backlashes against the system more and more people are so furious that they perceive the government. Not doing anything in this case is is the is the end so desirable that any means justifies well. We are a non-violent organization. I don't think we're here to to make friends. We're here to raise the issues no matter what you do. X. Number of people are going to approve and x number. People aren't so you might as well get your message across the best way you can. You would allow. You're not making friends. I would allow that. Aids is a very complicated issue and that we are now at last beginning to make friends. And as I said I think the groundswell of new chapters of new members is very similar to what happened during the Vietnam War where people got so angry at the government that they were forced into this frustration. And I think that's definitely what happening now. It took fifty took ten years for the first one hundred thousand cases the next hundred thousand cases. They're all going to happen. In the next fifteen months took ten years for the first hundred thousand cases the next hundred thousand cases are going to happen in the next fifteen months and our case with this epidemic took three months to get to one hundred thousand dead in the last epidemic to kill tens of thousands of Americans and the AIDS epidemic. Act UP WAS ABOUT. The people most affected by the virus speaking for themselves rather than being ignored or spoken for or worst of all spoken about it was also about unapologetic uncompromising anger at government response. That was slow and stupid and callous and not driven by science and ultimately fatal to thousands of US peaceful. Yes but angry loud at times. Profane unafraid confrontational confrontational protests backed up by willingness to do the real work of ending the epidemic

Aids Larry Kramer Co Founder Aids Coalition United States
"larry kramer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | 2 months ago

"larry kramer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Larry Kramer wrote of love agony and anger in the early years of age it was the subject of much of his work as writer and activist he was a founder of the game men's health crisis and later the group act up whose public confrontations demanded attention and urgent action to address the growing H. crisis forty million people we are in the we have ever been in he was passionate often loud but he was hurt looting when he took on then prominent aids researcher Dr Anthony Fauci Kramer label funky and incompetent idiots the two would later come to mutual respect and even friendship today file T. one of the leaders of the White House coronavirus task force spoke to Judy about Kramer I'm very sad that we lost him he is just an extraordinary man he changed totally by his extraordinary iconoclastic and theatrical ways of doing things he changed the relationship between the afflicted community with a given disease and the scientific and regulatory community that has such a great impact on them he said you can't be separate you got to keep us in the tent we've got to be in there with you grammar dealt with illness for much of his adult life he was infected with HIV and separately liver disease and novelist and nonfiction writer as well at his death he was working on a new place centered on the current pandemic Larry Kramer was eighty four years old still to come on the newshour.

Larry Kramer Judy researcher Dr Anthony Fauci Kramer White House liver disease
Larry Kramer, Author and Outspoken AIDS Activist, Dies at 84

WBBM Early Afternoon News

00:19 sec | 2 months ago

Larry Kramer, Author and Outspoken AIDS Activist, Dies at 84

"Center writer Larry Kramer has died he was an early aids activist who chronicled the pain of the epidemic in the play the normal heart Greenberg who founded the group gay men's health crisis in nineteen eighty one he was eighty

Larry Kramer Greenberg Writer
"larry kramer" Discussed on AP News

AP News

11:17 min | 2 months ago

"larry kramer" Discussed on AP News

"Please write an aids activist Larry Kramer has died at the age of 84 his husband David Webster tells The New York Times Kramer died of pneumonia I marquees are a letter with a look at creamer's career Larry Kramer earned an Oscar nomination for his 1969 screen play adaption of the DH Lawrence novel women in love he also wrote the screenplay for lost horizon and the plays the normal heart the destiny of me and sissy scrapbook Kramer and his friends founded the group gay men's health crisis in 1981 to address the aids epidemic before it was even known as aids in 1987 he founded the aids coalition to unleash power or act up a group that pushed for policy changes to help people living with aids

Larry Kramer David Webster pneumonia creamer The New York Times Oscar Lawrence
Larry Kramer, playwright and AIDS activist, dies at 84

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 2 months ago

Larry Kramer, playwright and AIDS activist, dies at 84

"Please write an aids activist Larry Kramer has died at the age of eighty four his husband David Webster tells The New York Times Kramer died of pneumonia I marquees are a letter with a look at creamer's career Larry Kramer earned an Oscar nomination for his nineteen sixty nine screen play adaption of the DH Lawrence novel women in love he also wrote the screenplay for lost horizon and the plays the normal heart the destiny of me and sissy scrapbook Kramer and his friends founded the group gay men's health crisis in nineteen eighty one to address the aids epidemic before it was even known as aids in nineteen eighty seven he founded the aids coalition to unleash power or act up a group that pushed for policy changes to help people living with aids

Larry Kramer David Webster Pneumonia Creamer The New York Times Oscar Lawrence
"larry kramer" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:04 min | 2 months ago

"larry kramer" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Mayor of Minneapolis is speaking out being black in America should not be a death sentence this officer fails in the most basic human sense the FBI joining the investigation of the incident according to the Minneapolis police department officers were initially called to the scene Monday on a report of a forgery in progress and again those demonstrations in the streets they want justice for the suspect who died in police custody the U. S. fight to find a cure or a vaccine for corona virus has been dubbed operation warp speed by the White House for some that is too fast and it suggests that cutting corners might impact our health a new AP poll along with the north center for public research finds only forty nine percent of Americans would actually get a clover nineteen vaccine if one were made available today a fifty six year old Melanie dry this is one of the poll responded she's worried about potential side effects he recorded nineteen back to me within a year or two who is causes me to fear that it will be widely tested Aston side effects more than thirty percent are unsure if they get vaccinated another twenty percent would definitely refuse we also heard from doctor Collins director of the national institutes of health the wants people to know that safety is not going to be compromised for speed with any potential vaccine I would not want people to think they were cutting corners because that would be a big mistake I think this is an effort to try to achieve efficiency gains but not to sacrifice Reiter corps serving high hopes for the moderno vaccine now in human clinical trial phase moderna right in our backyard Cambridge mass but now we're hearing from one of the patient in patients in the trials he's a twenty nine year old guy from Seattle young man this is twelve hours after getting his second dose of this experimental vaccine from Madera his fever spiked to more than a hundred and three degrees he fainted they had to bring him into the ER now he did recover in a day but again expressing concerns about potential side effects from this potential vaccine in the rush to find a silver bullet writer an aids activist Larry Kramer has died his husband says the cause was pneumonia he was eighty four CBS is Steve Caton looks back at his life writer Larry Kramer brought dramas to life in books on screen and on stage in plays such as the normal heart but it's the passion and activism Kramer brought to the fight against aids that is his true legacy he co founded the group gay men's health crisis in nineteen eighty one at a time when the disease was nil and mysterious most of the country doesn't know about this cancer a few years later Kramer raise the stakes his.

writer Seattle Cambridge doctor Collins Aston aids Steve Caton CBS pneumonia Larry Kramer Minneapolis Reiter corps director Melanie White House forgery FBI officer America
Larry Kramer, playwright and AIDS activist, dies at 84

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:47 sec | 2 months ago

Larry Kramer, playwright and AIDS activist, dies at 84

"Playwright writer an aids activist Larry Kramer has died CBS is Steve Caton writer Larry Kramer brought dramas to life in books on screen and on stage in plays such as the normal heart but it's the passion and activism Kramer brought to the fight against aids that is his true legacy he co founded the group gay men's health crisis in nineteen eighty one at a time when the disease was new and mysterious most of the country doesn't know about this cancer a few years later Kramer raise the stakes his new group act up in bracing confrontational tactics prominent aids researcher Anthony found she said there are two eras in American medicine before Larry and

Writer Larry Kramer CBS Aids Anthony Steve Caton Researcher
Larry Kramer, author known for his AIDS activism, dead at age 84

KCBS Radio Midday News

00:38 sec | 2 months ago

Larry Kramer, author known for his AIDS activism, dead at age 84

"Plate right writer and aids activist Larry Kramer has died CBS is Steve Caton writer Larry Kramer brought dramas to life in books on screen and on stage in plays such as the normal heart but it's the passion and activism Kramer brought to the fight against aids that is his true legacy he co founded the group gay men's health crisis in nineteen eighty one at a time when the disease was new and mysterious most of the country doesn't know about this cancer a few years later Kramer raise the stakes his new group act up

Writer Larry Kramer CBS Aids Steve Caton
Revisiting the Archive: Vito Russo

Making Gay History

07:42 min | 4 months ago

Revisiting the Archive: Vito Russo

"So then you were involved in activist activities through the early Seventies. What was happening by nineteen seventy one? Seventy two seventy three was that I was in graduate school in cinema getting a masters in film At the same time I was working days at the Film Department Museum Modern Art and I was heavily involved with the GAY activists alliance so those three facts sort of conspired to make me realize that I wanted to write a readable accessible book about the history of the ways in which lesbians and gay men have been portrayed on the screen especially in mainstream movies which reach most people. Because I felt that our image was at the root of Homophobia that people will be taught that the things about us as gay people. That simply aren't true when they were being taught this by the Mass Media. Buy Movies by whatever and that. If I could address that that that would be what I can do to help. What was the reaction? The book was published. I heard comments from people in Hollywood. Who say you know? This is a very important book. Because what you've done here is you've illuminated the ways in which we have not dealt with this subject dealt with whatever and. I wonder often I mean I have no way of perceiving whether or not the book did any good in terms of its actual impact on movies because I still see most mainstream Hollywood films. As homophobic history has brought us to a point where AIDS suddenly intervened and AIDS has thrown a monkey wrench into any progress. That Hollywood was making in the seventies and now people adjusts a scared to deal with the subject at all or be homophobic in the extreme. And you just can't go to a movie in which they don't slip in some fad joke. I mean a great film could be made about the tragedy and drama and the courage this community in the face of a fatal disease in my life. I've never seen such courage the way people are bearing up losing their friends. There's a story there. There's a movie there are many movies. They're they don't WanNa make you know because it's not happening to the real people the general public heterosexuals When did you become aware of the issue of as now? Let's talk about you personally. Affected you in quite dramatically yeah and I- steering territory. That WanNa talk about this new problem telling me In retrospect now that we all look back on it because of probably geography and Politics. I was and my friends probably knew about AIDS before most people in the country because of where we are placed there were a group of people who knew each other from fire island. I had met a guy named Nick Rock. We play cards occasionally and like myself was a collector of films. Nick was probably the first person I knew who died of AIDS. But we didn't know that that's what the disease was at the time. And it was only nineteen seventy nine. We were told that nick died of cat. Scratch fever which does not kill you. You know it's just not possible. The fact of the matter was that he had no immune system the dive cat scratch fever. It was about eighty two or eighty three when I really. The bulk of the bad news came to us and then my boyfriend got sick. And that was the beginning of an even more intimate involvement from me. Four of eighty four eighty five again. Jeffrey got sick and wanted very much to be in San Francisco. Geoffrey Geoffrey grew up in. Pittsburgh went to San Francisco state and loved. San Francisco. Didn't WANNA leave their and our relationship we've lived together for five years. We moved back and forth. Been Jeffrey got sick. He wanted to choose to be sick in San Francisco. And so I got a job at the San Francisco AIDS Foundation and I lived in San Francisco Jeff. Jeffrey was sick for a long time. A year and a half. I didn't know what to do to save him. You know when you love somebody you always feel like they're not GonNa die as long as you're with them you know I mean if you stay with them and you take care of them that they won't die and I really felt like you know against all rational truth. I could save him. Jeffrey became at the end. Very unmanageable emotionally. And psychologically. He was very difficult to live with and I was sick myself and so became a constant battle of how much stress I could put myself under. 'cause I was ill and eventually I had to go to Australia. I was booked to do a lecture at a Gay Film Festival. I was on my way home. They couldn't reach me. I was on route from Melbourne to Honolulu. They didn't know where to reach me. He was dying. He was in San Francisco. General and I couldn't get a flight out of Honolulu for twenty four hours. There was no space and when I arrived in San Francisco he had died the night before the last time I saw Jeff. He was in a drawer at the morgue. Nee opens it out. And they showed me him and I spent a few minutes him and I held his hand and said goodbye devastated by the fact that I wasn't with him and couldn't reach him and didn't see him before he died and also and I miss him terribly. I mean just terribly. He's been gone almost three years now and I'm still sick. I'm very lonely. You know it's hard to live alone and be sick alone and as many of your friends as you have and I have good loving friends and a great support system people cannot be sick for you know and they can't suffer you and they can't be with you all the time. Jeff had you during the time he was able to do and he did. Have someone fulltime you. I took him to the hospital and I took him to the doctor and I fed him and I cooked. I mean I. I did what I wanted to do but then Jeffrey was gone and I was alone and you get a cat by herself and there was nobody takes care of me who the hell is going to get into a relationship with somebody WHO's probably. GonNa die soon you know they don't WanNa put themselves through that. Most of the people who my friends are dead. Most of my friends are dead and at this age. That shouldn't be on forty two. Yeah and it's not natural by any definition of the word natural. It's natural at this age to have lost most of the people love. And so you throw yourself into politics. The images I've seen of you in the last couple of years. Why senior on television. I seen you in a very very activist. Roy Yes so it's been a hasn't been aged Has I was One of the people along with Larry Kramer and Vivian Shapiro and Tim Sweeney and a couple of other people who founded act up which became a whole new phase of activism. Not only for me but for the community in general and it's a new kind of activism because it's created a coalition which we would never able to achieve in the seventies stacked up is composed of gay people and straight people women and men black and white you know and effectively act up has been a very interesting experience because all these people have one thing in common and they want to put it into the AIDS crisis when by any means possible.

San Francisco Jeffrey Aids San Francisco Aids Foundation Jeff Hollywood Nick Rock Film Department Museum Modern Honolulu Geoffrey Geoffrey Australia Fire Island Fever Pittsburgh Melbourne Larry Kramer NEE ROY
"larry kramer" Discussed on The Takeout

The Takeout

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"larry kramer" Discussed on The Takeout

"Somebody has got to be given the power tony knows what to do is hands are just tied behind him and his beat every time tony wants to go to the toilet ten committees have to vote about giving him permission that's what the dwells while there is not a cure for anything the nih is liz a cesspool of bureaucracy because congress would still has tided it at every at every turn a little to set up on that i major garrett you listen to the ticket out our guest you're at the tasty dieter doctor anthony fauci of the national institutes of health that's a sound bite from 1993 aids activist larry kramer was talking about what he hoped dna each and talk to fouts you could accomplish dealing with hiv aids and he made his comment about the bureaucracy at the nih and tony knowing what to do but having committees overseeing was that truth then dr fao fowdie is it less true now and help our audience understand what it was that you confronted with the aids virus what you did what many did and where we are with that now the uh speaking that you heard from larry kramer who is really very interesting because larry was the the essentially the iconic activist who felt that the government was going too slow in responding to the hiv aids epidemic and he was very a con a classic he would tear down anything that he thought was a thority and in some respects that was productive veras he had a point he had a point and he had a point and he he is now is and has been for some time a very very dear friend of mine but he would not hesitate to just blast me publicly because to him i was the face of the federal government i was the federal government he wanted me 'cause he was impatient understandably so to essentially he told me you should chain yourself to the white house fence and tell them that you don't give us a billion dollars and do all these things for hiv aids that you were going to just quit in front of everybody united's telemedicine allow.

tony nih congress garrett anthony fauci larry kramer fouts dr fao fowdie larry hiv federal government liz white house billion dollars