17 Burst results for "Larry Klein"

"larry klein" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:44 min | 2 months ago

"larry klein" Discussed on KGO 810

"Tribal. We've studio in Burlingame. We have the latest on the wildfires burning in California authorities have confirmed the deaths of at least 25 people from fires that have scorched over 3.3 million acres. And destroyed over 4200 structures. More than 1700. Firefighters have been battling 25 major wildfires or clusters of complex fires, as well as two extended attack wildfires. Of the major fires in Northern California. The largest fire in California history has grown in acreage, but not in containment. Thie August Complex fire in Mendocino County has burned 839,000 acres, and it's still 30% contained. Same goes for the North Complex fire. It has burned 280,000 acres and his 36% contained and the creek fire in the Sierra National Forest is 80% contained in this burg 228,000 acres. I'm Teri Raskin's Geo leaders from Palo Alto to Gilroy are calling out large health care system's claiming they're making it difficult to get tested for covert 19. Sunnyvale Mayor Larry Klein thinks providers such as Kaiser HC Healthcare Center Palo Alto Medical Foundation, another private hospitals have dropped the ball and really disappointed with With several of their capricious decisions or policies, which, whether it's you know the multiple hoops that they made a resident's jump through for before approving testing or just flat out turning down testing requests. As a result, a new health order in Santa Clara County requires those providers to make it easier to get tested and to step up the number of tests they give. Hospital leaders say their hands are tied and that a chronic shortage of testing supplies means tests have to be saved for those who need them. The most. I'm Paul Rodgers, kgo 18 have a traffic update sponsored by Ponderosa Homes. Ponderosa Home sales offices are open Thursday to Sunday 10 a.m. to 5 P.m. at Sycamore, Unpleasant in Elissa, Gary Ranch and.

California Palo Alto Palo Alto Medical Foundation Ponderosa Home Mendocino County Ponderosa Homes Santa Clara County Burlingame Northern California Sierra National Forest Teri Raskin Paul Rodgers Larry Klein Kaiser HC Healthcare Sunnyvale Gary Ranch Gilroy
"larry klein" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:12 min | 2 months ago

"larry klein" Discussed on KGO 810

"And step up a number of tests they give. Sunnyvale Mayor Larry Klein thinks major health care systems have dropped the ball on testing. I've been really disappointed with with several of their capricious decisions or policies, which, whether it's you know the multiple hoops that they made a resident's jump through for before approving testing or just flat out turning down testing requests. A new health order expands the definition of essential workers to include teachers returning to the classroom in coming weeks. We're getting a better idea of what Halloween is gonna look like. Thanks, Tio, East Bay County that look like it's going to be a scary is Brett Burkhardt reports. Contra Costa County health officials are advising families against trick or treating haunted houses are big gatherings this Halloween. They say the disease can be spread by close contact, and it's difficult to maintain a safe distance on porches and doorsteps. They suggest alternatives such as dressing up and having a remote costume party by Zoom or Skype. Families can also dress up the yard. So neighbors Khun Drive by or walked by the house to enjoy the holiday. Brett Burkhardt kgo A. 10, a Bay Area based company went public today and the results were nothing short of astounding. It's the biggest software I po ever As the company that provides technology for major cloud vendors debuted on the New York Stock Exchange today. Shares for snowflake trading under the symbol snow surge more than 150% from its initial price of $120 and trading was actually halted briefly due to volatility. Investors were anticipating a monster I Po for San Matteo based snowflake. A company that has been generating over $500 million in annualized revenue. Snowflake Software technology allows clients too quickly, analyze and share data as needed. Rather than rely on hardware. I, mark Nieto, traffic weather and Maura the path Thurston Joe. Next on KGO. The days are getting shorter, and you can feel it in the air. Yes, it's that time of year. Pumpkin is finally back A Duncan. It's the cozy You've been craving all summer. Long now in your cup of Duncan, pick up all of your pumpkin favorites like the signature pumpkin spice latte or a pumpkin ice coffee and bakery items like pumpkin doughnuts.

Brett Burkhardt Duncan Snowflake Software Larry Klein Khun Drive Sunnyvale East Bay County Bay Area Costa County San Matteo mark Nieto New York Maura Thurston Joe
"larry klein" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

03:25 min | 3 months ago

"larry klein" Discussed on KCBS All News

"The world see a definitive end to the Cova 19 pandemic coming in the form of a vaccine, there has been a small but vocal contention. Two people fighting against all forms of inoculations for years now, Dr Alex Casler is chief of pediatrics for Orlando Health Physicians Associates. A lot of people in medicine say that vaccines are their own worst enemy because Most people nowadays in the age of you know, parenting and bringing the Children and for vaccines are young enough that they've never seen most of the vaccine preventable diseases like measles or hooping cough. But now those same people are seeing a terrible virus that can be stopped with an effective vaccine. And so maybe that's a silver lining to this situation. Of course, there are also people denying that the Corona virus is a problem in the first place from a look at the Freedom Angels Facebook Page, the Activists who have protested vaccines at the state Capitol are now asking people to stop wearing masks. The group did not respond to our request for comment. Megan Goldsby KCBS the census will continue counting people after a federal judge in San Jose put a halt to the Trump administration's plan to bring in person counting to an end. His case. CBS's Jim Taylor the details irreparable harm to the American People Judge Lucy Coast as that's the risk we run by relying on inadequate data from an uncompleted census. The ruling over the weekend puts the kibosh on administration efforts to shut down the census at the end of this month. So the extension to the end of October. Originally approved by the administration, it will stand and prepare yourself for a census Week of action daily Sky Billboard flights and Census Office calls it guerrilla marketing tactics on the ground that California does reported more than 90% response rate to the censor's eight states, mostly in the south. Still under 80%. Jim Taylor case. CBS. Meanwhile, Sunnyvale leaders are trying to encourage more walking and biking in that city. KCBS is Betsy get part has details of an ambitious plan just passed by the City Council. The city of Sunnyvale estimates that only 1.5% of all its residents bike or walk to work or school. Now the City Council has voted unanimously toe up that percentage to 10% by 2030. They're planning to create more and safer walkways and bikeways at a recent council meeting one member of the public Who bikes to work was critical of current cyclists, safety glasses an unsolvable problem for any city, but compared to the neighboring cities, Sunnyvale by Krauts are an embarrassment. Mayor Larry Klein and avid cyclist believes the proposed plan will be a boon to the environment. You know, trying to just basically deal with the crisis of climate change right now, so So I'm happy to see that is put in is a goal. The plan will focus on major boulevards, including El Camino Riel and Tasman Drive in the Silicon Valley Bureau. Betsy Gebhardt, KCBS president. Trump says he is willing to fund his own reelection efforts, and there are reports he may need to CBS News White House correspondent Stephen Portnoy reports amid reports his campaign is suffering a cash crunch. The president says he'd be willing to dip into his own pockets. Whatever it takes. We have to win. The New York Times reports his campaign appears to have Ready spent more than $800 million of the 1.1 billion it had raised through July. We needed to spend more money up front because of the pandemic and the statements being made by Democrats, ex campaign manager Brad Par Scale is now being described as a profligate spender. His replacement,.

CBS Sunnyvale KCBS Trump administration City Council Betsy Gebhardt Jim Taylor American People Trump Census Office Dr Alex Casler Cova Orlando Health Physicians Asso president Stephen Portnoy Larry Klein Judge Lucy Coast
"larry klein" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

03:35 min | 3 months ago

"larry klein" Discussed on KCBS All News

"People have been eagerly awaiting a vaccine for the Corona virus. But what about the group of people known as anti vaxxers, who are scared of vaccines? KCBS is Megan Goldsby reports. Some experts say that group is about to get smaller. The problem over the past few decades is that vaccines have been called their own worst enemy, because most people nowadays in the age of, you know, parenting and bringing Children and for vaccines. Our young enough that they've never seen most of the vaccine preventable disease. The doctor Alix Casler is chief of pediatrics for Orlando Health Physicians Associates. So, having seen Cove ID? Yes, I think it may reignite the interest in vaccines, of course, says Dr Maria Rave in chief of emergency medicine at UCSF when the covert vaccine does come out I hope that people will trust it enough to get it and that they will listen to their public health expert. That, of course, has not been a given since the Corona virus hit the US the Freedom Angels or a California group that has protested against vaccination requirements for Children at the state Capitol and on their Facebook page, you confined calls for people to take off their masks. I did not respond to our request for comment. Megan Gold Speak KCBS. Have you answered the 2020 census yet? You're going to get a little more time to do so over the weekend, A federal judge in San Jose stop the Trump Administration's plans to wind down in person County. Get the details now from KCBS Jim Taylor. The count continues pre pandemic. It was supposed to end more than a month ago Cove. It 19 changed all that an extension to October, 31st approved, but the administration changed all that pushing for a wrap up by the end of this month. Federal Judge Lucy Coe, agreeing with civil rights advocates inadequate data collection could cause Americans irreparable harm. There would seem to be an argument for keeping the count going. While many states like California do report more than 90% of households responding, Ah, handful have response rates under 80%. The lowest being Georgia and Alabama. This week. The States Census Office here promises what it calls guerilla marketing tactics on the ground. Jim Taylor, KCBS City of Sunnyvale has an ambitious goal reporter Better give Heart tells us It's trying to get people in the habit of not using their cars getting 10% of commuters and residents out of their cars and onto bikeways and walkways by 2030. That's the plan approved unanimously by the Sunnyvale City Council, currently on Ly about 1.5% of all Sonny, though residents bike or walk to work or school at a recent council meeting, there were complaints from the public about the current setup for bike safety. Here's one cyclist who bikes to work. Do you think that most people in the city are willing to die? Your crummy bike lanes and crosswalks where some truck can run us over through carelessness or callousness. Mayor Larry Klein lauded the ambitious plan to make Sunnyvale safer. I'm a big cycling enthusiast, I've been working for more walkable, more walkable Sunnyvale. For years, the city will focus on heavily traveled Tasman, Dr El Camino Riel and Fremont and Hollenbeck Avenues for improvements in the Silicon Valley Bureau. Betsy Gebhardt KCBS Alright, let's run down some covert 19. Numbers were seeing a drop improving positive test rates that are in line with the nationwide trend, according to Johns Hopkins Nationwide, New Case reports just dropped below 25,000 for a single day, the first time that's happened in about three months here in California. The new case count is still climbing, but at a slower rate than it was just a week ago. Well,.

KCBS City KCBS Sunnyvale California Jim Taylor Trump Administration Sunnyvale City Council Alix Casler Megan Gold Betsy Gebhardt Dr Maria Rave Johns Hopkins Nationwide States Census Office Orlando Health Physicians Asso US UCSF San Jose Larry Klein Lucy Coe Facebook
"larry klein" Discussed on CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"larry klein" Discussed on CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

"So I get back to my hotel one forty five there's nobody in the lobby the young lady who works there like we're on. I was going to say I am basis this point, but I don't actually know her name, but she she would know mine, and so I can just wave at her. And I say bring you the case down in a second. So that's the first thing I gotta do go to my room pack up the radio climate bring it back down to her. Then I gotta go back, and I have to take a shower 'cause I got makeup on. And I want that off of my face as quickly as possible. So that's what they do that. There's a there's a there's a order to everything I do then I have to update the top twenty five in one. And I have to write a two hundred and fifty words at the top of that new comments the teams because we had Maryland lose in and somebody else lip Marquette lost. There were actual adjustments to the rankings. So I had to do that. And then I'm listening to this new podcast over my dead body is what is called or they had a new episode release yesterday. So then I was like, you know, what while I'm packing 'cause I pick up the night before because I don't want to case over sleep. I don't wanna have to do it in the morning while I'm packing. I'll listen to this new episode of over my dead body that was just released yesterday. So now that's forty minutes knock that out. And then I write these things in what I found is for me, sixty seconds of talking about two hundred fifteen words, so you write three of them, you know, you're up around seven hundred words of of script, and then you've got a record them and they have to be recorded as flawlessly as you can. So if you stumble over one word you hit delete and start over and by the time you look it's like four forty five. You're an organized disaster. My friend. Then I ate I'll get like three hours fifteen minutes. I landed back in Memphis, and then I have to immediately take anything that I planted on taking the cleaners after take it like right after I land because. Because I can't I take it to the cleaners next to my radio studio 'cause I don't go home when I land that would make no sense because I live south of the airport. And if I take it if I'd wait to take it to the cleaners near my home. That's not I'm not going to get it there till Friday, and they might not have it ready 'till Monday. I can't risk that. So I take it to the place by the cleaner. So I pick it back up on Friday when I get off radio. So that's the thing. I have to do when I land, and then I got to the studio, and I swear to God, I haven't done this. I don't think ever, but I I parked my car and locked it. And laid the seat back and just went to sleep I slept in my car for about an hour. That's how I realize I looked ridiculous. I got to the point. I didn't even care. I just needed to like close my eyes. Can just I can I picturing the picturing the gym from the office gift. Just Larry Klein. Except it's you and you got your glasses on in your eyes are bloodshot because you're on two hours and forty seven minutes sleep. And I know you gotta go on the radio show. I'm surprised that. It's like the first time, I feel like that would be a once a month thing with you. So that's all I usually able to sleep on the plane a little bit. But for whatever reason I just did not sleep on the plane this morning, even though I was on. No, I was on no sleep. I just stayed awake. The whole time and worked and so. I didn't catch any you know, using like an hour on the plane and that'll get me through the day. I didn't get any of that. So by the time it was like two thirty this afternoon. And I had radio starting at four. I was like I set the alarm on my phone in my car for like three thirty..

Larry Klein Marquette Maryland Memphis forty seven minutes fifteen minutes forty minutes sixty seconds three hours two hours
"larry klein" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"larry klein" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Larry Klein, he's a busy, man. He's a four time Grammy award winner music producer songwriter bassist and sometimes the teacher his catalog runs. Deep in his collaborations are wide. He's worked with Joni Mitchell. Leonard Cohen Bob Dylan the Brazilian performer. He's married to Luciana Soza and Herbie Hancock who you're hearing. Now in Hancock one album of the year in two thousand eight for this recording river, the Joni letters. We managed to catch up with Larry Klein and talk about his collaborations last week. He was holding a series of masterclasses at the Berklee college of music clients favorite singers to work with those whose talent is enigmatic and passion for music is contagious. One of them is Madeleine Pero the first time, I heard Madeline saying I was just completely floored. The everybody notices that she has a resemblance to Billy holiday in her sound and didn't these kind of things which I think are are sort of sitting on the surface there. She listened to Billie holiday while. She was learning how to sing. But underneath that. I heard something that was incredibly deep and poetic and totally unselfconsciously. That's one of the things in a voice of a singer that I'm really attracted to is is a lack of self consciousness, a lack of in a sense ambition more of a feeling that when you're listening to them. That what they are doing comes from the deepest part of themselves, and his honest, and with Madeleine I thought that right away think of a song that she sings where we can hear that. And tell us how you help build on that when you are producing her. I mean, the first thing that comes to mind is a song called I'm alright which I co wrote with Walter Becker. We wrote expressly for Matty, she had just exited a relationship.

Larry Klein Herbie Hancock Leonard Cohen Bob Dylan Joni Mitchell Madeleine Pero Madeline Walter Becker Madeleine I Luciana Soza Matty Billie
"larry klein" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"larry klein" Discussed on The Frame

"Poems to original melodies. She spoke with frame producer Jonathan Shiffling recently about her latest album called the book of longing. It's dedicated mainly to the poems of Leonard Cohen who is also a close family friend. I'm Luciana Soza and Brazilian gesture. After. Boy trees always been with me. My mother was a poet and assist and the thing. I remember most about our household this many many instruments lying around people come through town and leave things and corners bags with things in it percussion guitar and books, many many many books. My mother was a veracious reader in love reciting poetry. So in midst fight that we would have five siblings. I'm the youngest. She would stop by going into some kind of poet by Brazilian poet cutters. Dodgy quarter could Alina these great Brazilian shoot. Just sort of startled us. And then the fighting would stop me. Saint forced. He goes. I have to say I was not an educated musicians when I came to the United States. I was eighteen I went to Berkeley, I could barely speak English. Really? So I kind of left words for a long time, and it was really interested in wordless music and singing along with instruments. Doubling lines. But then once I became more comfortable with that. Then I felt like I could go back to poach. And also, I think after came to L A married Larry Klein whose record producer in baseball. He's again, like, my mom and reader and loves boa tree. And it was really good friends with Leonard Cohen. And you know, I find that that also helps me arrive at this moment with this recording. So when they Larry my husband brings home this book, and it's one of these things that I just kind of carried around, and it was in the car with me, and I was going here, and they're going on the road and carrying around and just loved the there's a drawing of Leonard's on the front. I love the cover in the first poem in the book is the book of longing. And it's just remarkable. I think there's a sense of rhythm in his poetry. And that's what attracts me to it. Can't make. The system is Shaw. I'm living on. Witch. Follow the from to. Does here the the pressure. The call. When I set a poem to music, it's always the same. I start by falling in love with it. And then I memorize it. And then I walk around. And it's it becomes a part of me. And and then I think it's mine really fool myself into thinking I wrote this because I have to in order to take liberties that I need to take. And so I just repeat align a few times. And then my hands kind of sit at the pianist certain way, and then a rhythm comes and then melody cops. And I find that the most primordial thing that we have the most primary thing that we have been in life is rhythm. It's the walking that we do. It's right. As the breathing though. Do we are commanded by better be day? Every second..

Leonard Cohen Luciana Soza Larry Klein producer Alina Saint Jonathan Shiffling United States Berkeley baseball
"larry klein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:46 min | 2 years ago

"larry klein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"About it all of this quickly starts to make a lot of sense because whether he's acting making music or just sitting down to do an interview with public radio host. There's one thing that's very clear about Jeff Goldblum. This guy loves to entertain one of my favorite interviews of twenty eighteen went back into the office, every producer on the show was raising their hands. Enjoy take a listen to this my conversation with Jeff Goldblum, Jeff Goldblum. Welcome to Q, Tom powered thank you. It's my pleasure to be on your cue. And I must ask. What is what's what's you in reference to Q Q, I know JAMES BOND movies. There was a Q. And he was the funny guy who gave them all the gadgets. Wait a minute. That have something to do with that. No. Maybe it's cue for question, man. I think it's Q and A, and this is the q side of it. All so you're doing a show called Q. I'm doing a show called a yeah. Yeah. Exactly. You've been you've been doing your entire life and had no idea. That's right. And now we'll mix them up like chocolate peanut butter and see how they go together. Jeff when did you? When did you learn how to play the piano? Well, there you go. Well, when I was ten years old in Pittsburgh, my mom and dad gave all us four kids lessons. So Tommy, I'm used to come over to the house, and I'd run through my Charney and color, and you know, Beethoven sonatas and be a kind of bad student. I didn't know the joys of discipline. But then in a year, so I have to syllabi for it. But I would dread the dread him coming because I really hadn't practiced. But then he gave me an arrangement to alley cat. And I think I became familiar with this idea of syncopation for the first time. Although there was something in me that already liked it. My mom at Easter time. We'd go Easter time is the time for eggs in the Tampa exits east. I don't know where she got guys like, yeah. Yeah. That's me. That's I like that. So anyway, I sat and played until I learned alley cat and the same with deep purple and stairway to the stars. And and that was it. And then we had fake books hanging around the house, and I learned how to learn about chords a little bit and how to read elite sheet and improvise and then I secretly. I got myself some cocktail lounge jobs around Pittsburgh, believe it or not. And I was like fifteen and that was it. But at that time had already decided, you know, passionately to be an actor if I could and I went off to New York at seventeen, but I always kept a piano around, and I snuck it in some movies and plays and things like that. And then about thirty years ago started to play out and about with musicians, and do these so-called gigs, and it's evolved into something that drew the attention of the lovely Rebecca Allen and Tom Lewis at Decca who were working and who work with Gregory reporter with whom I played a song on the Graham Norton show while publicizing four ragnarok. They saw it and said, gee, maybe we should fly Los Angeles talk to Jeff hook him up with Larry Klein, the great producer. And that's what happened, and that's how we did this album believe it or not. It Jeff is it to where is the two roads. Diverged in a yellow would here was it a path between acting and music at one point or another. I love any question that carries within its poetry. I'll give you my answer by saying Hileman came riding up to the old in dog. Wait a minute. That's not going any place once upon a midnight, Jerry. I sat at the piano, but I'd already decided to be an actor. And yes, they were two diverging roads. But no, they really didn't diverge. They've only coincided and and cross trained each other. But like I say it was my only wish to be an actor. But while I was doing that all the time I was actually playing so I I was playing playing playing and even now. You know, I try to fill my days with acting and and get a meaningful employment here here and there which luckily right now is a particularly fertile time. But every day I wake up, and I play the piano in a change changes. Thank goodness. My mom gave us lessons 'cause it's changed my life. And it changes my days when I start by playing an add music to the day. You know, it's it's interesting to talk to you about that. Because I do this every single day. I go in and I interview folks, and I asked cues as you as you've rightfully pointed out, and then every Sunday, I have a standing gig at a bar in Toronto where I sit down and play Irish traditional music with my friends, and I have to admit there's a there's a great eggs hail. Whenever I do that. I don't advertise it incorporated as part of this gig. But there's a great exhale, and I feel like a different part of my brain is being triggered. So is it the same way for you? Exactly you and I are two piece of pod. It's a different kind of music, of course, different as, you know, a different kind of mysterious enjoyment and deep soul tonic, but you play traditional Irish music. That's right. Yeah. Like what name is name is song. My hey or smiling. What do you play like jigs and reels that play instrumental music? Oh, like big like seducing cinnabar of that. Like, how would it go? Did it lady deleting that leader needle alum? That's one of. You've just made my whole day, happier. I love that. That's fantastic. I'm gonna come in here. You should if we can maybe we can play together. There's lots of piano in Irish music. I'd love to. Yeah. Come on. Leads leads me then so kindly to some of the guests that are on your record that don't play Irish music. You have Imelda may on this while I believe Irish Haley Reinhart, and of course, Sarah Silverman. Take a listen to this entertainment. Another.

Jeff Goldblum Pittsburgh producer Tom Lewis JAMES BOND Haley Reinhart Tampa Sarah Silverman Toronto Hileman Larry Klein Graham Norton Rebecca Allen Tommy Imelda New York Jerry Charney
"larry klein" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"larry klein" Discussed on The Frame

"Poetry's always been with me. My mother was a poet and lyricist and the thing I remember most about our household is many many instruments lying around people come through town, leave things and coroner's bags with things in it percussion guitar in books, many many books. My mother was a veracious reader in loved reciting poetry. So in midst fight that we would have five siblings. I'm the youngest. She would stop as by going into some kind of poet and by Brazilian poet cutters. Dodgy quarter could Alina these great presiding poets shoot just sort of startled us. And then the fighting would stop. Safe. I have to say I was not an educated musicians when I came to the United States. I was eighteen I went to Berkeley, I could barely speak English. Really? So I kinda left words for a long time, and it was really interested in wordless music and singing along with instruments. Doubling lines. But then once I became more comfortable with that. Then I felt like I could go back to poetry. And also, I think after I came to LA I'm married Larry Klein whose record producer and bass player. He's again, like, my mom avid reader loves poetry and was pretty good friends with Leonard Cohen, and you know, I find that that also helps me right at this moment with this week order. They Larry my husband brings home this book. And it's one of these things that I just kind of carried around, and it was in the car with me, and I was going here and there and going on the road and carrying around and I just loved the there's a drawing of Leonard's on the front. I love the cover in the first poem in the book is the book of longing. And it's just remarkable. I think there's a sense of rhythm in his poetry. And that's what attracts me to it. I'm living on. Thank god. From to. Does. The pressure. When I set a poem to music, it's always the same. I start by falling in love with it. And then I memorize it. And then I walk around. And it's it becomes a part of me. And and then I think it's mine I really fool myself into thinking I wrote this because I have to in order to take liberties that I need to take. And so I just repeat a line a few times. And then my hands kind of sit at the piano and then a rhythm comes. And then melody cops. And I find that the most primordial thing that we have the most primary thing that we have been in life is rhythm. It's the walking that we do. It's right. As the breathing though. Do we are commanded by better be day? Every second. <music>? I ended up setting seven of these poems to music, and I went to Leonard and asked him if if I could continue and maybe make a recording of it. And he he declined slightly his head. No. And it was devastated. But they stayed with me, and I didn't go any further because I knew that maybe this would be an impossible project, and I want to fall in love with it and then be disappointed over and over again. But I ended up asking when I did my record in two thousand fifteen called speaking in tongues. It was a record all wordless. No, no words at all. But I had these two poems that I really thought would fit so L on the record. And I asked him again in this time he said, yes. Slept at my sleep. I've done death. When Leonard passed away. It was a family member had died had been at our wedding. I mean, it's just you know, I felt close to him because I so admired him, but it was it was quite sad.

Leonard Cohen Larry Klein United States Alina Berkeley producer
"larry klein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:35 min | 2 years ago

"larry klein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Was Herbie Hancock's cantaloupe island performed by Jeff Goldblum and the Mildred Spitzer orchestra from the debut album, the capitol studio sessions suggest why was that the opener? Well, you know, Larry Klein saw art show. We were already doing things. Fifties. Sixties blue note stuff, but many other things he said for this record. I think maybe, and we all started to talk and John Mastro to who's wonderful who's been the band manager and kind of director, we all kind of talk, and he had a very Larry start to have a very clear idea about what songs we should kind of focus on. And then we record them. I don't think we had a a an order in mind. Maybe when we recorded those at night or two we did cantaloupe island early. But that all kind of find it's it's order and way until Larry started to mix the refuse songs that we recorded that are jettison from the album felonious monk. Thing or two and just because it just became clear and creatively obvious that that might have been something. Good to start that was his view. Anyway, everything he did. We heard it went. Yep. Yep. Really good, really good. The vibe is of alive club. Did you recreate a live club at the capitol studios. We did we went into studio. A and b for people who, you know, those are some of those places where Frank Sinatra the Beatles recorded, and we turned it into production designed it a little bit turned into a club. So it could recreate because all we've ever done is this live thing, which is now half. You know, fun, spontaneous hang out and jazz. Jam and yeah, that's what he wanted to do. And he said, we should get it. And have it really be? Spontaneous. And that's what we did. And people showed up, and you know, who showed up the second night Stevie Wonder. Oh, hey Stevie Wonder how how do you go play the piano and Stevie Wonder shells? He didn't stay. He was having his wife. We we came to know him a little bit my wife, and I went on this cruise this Paul Allen Kruse sometime ago, and he was the long with other very interesting people that I'll I'll tell you about he Stevie Wonder was the surprise guest performer, and we he was just totally thrilling I got to meet him for the first time having a door to my whole life talk about soundtrack I played for once in my life on a forty five over and over again when I was a kid and all of his songs anyway, met him. He was so sweet to me have you ever met him. I've never met Stevie Wonder oh my God in heaven. Cheese. I saw him play. Once I was in Los Angeles in the early mid seventies around the mid seventies. I saw Gil Scott Heron live at the Roxy on sunset strip. And Stevie Wonder was there and sat in on drums. For a song or two. Anyway, I met him, and he was very nice we've gone to a couple of birthday parties with for his daughter and been hearing there. Anyway, they were gonna case wife was gonna come and and they were having something or other, but he dropped in. And he said how how about that? That's great. Yeah. I know said it feels like you're doing the right thing music. God's telling you go Jeff fourth and play. Well. Just being on the planet as the same time. As him means. We're doing something right is somehow gracious event. We're speaking with Jeff Goldblum about his new jazz album, the capitol studio sessions, and the name of your band is the Mildred snits sir orchestra. She's a real person. Correct. She was yeah. She passed away a little bit ago. She lived to be one hundred and some of course, he did. Sister. She was a friend of the family's in Pittsburgh friend of my mom's used to come over. And was a kind of a ahead of her time lady, she would exercise get down on the floor and do a lot of things. Anyway. I had seen her since I left Pittsburgh. But when we started to play out and about and a few years after we started we we were asked to do the playboy jazz festival at Hollywood ball. And before then we'd purposely been kind of under the radar. Just you know, we just wanna play that's it. And they said, well, we got to put a name and a program, and I thought for a moment and said, well, I like that name Mildred Setzer orchestra's, we're not an orchestra of. That's a funny joke, and we called ourselves that. And it's gonna stuck with us. It's a great sounding name you like it. Well, you know, you kind of get a vibe Mildred sniffs. Are you kind of you know, you're going sort of back in time a little bit does because there's only people certain vintage name like Mildred and EDNA. Yeah. I love I love names EDNA. Breadcrumbs. Yes. It evokes a certain. Yeah. I think. Yeah. Mildred mildred. Mildred that Sarah. The whole enterprise has a very lounge feel to not allow but lounge like what's lush lousy is when you're sort of you know, the Tannen drunk guy with the with the bowtie Lucy's kind of a little bit leering. Whereas really I never heard that. Yeah. Allow Laos does that describe the the the mood or him the character? He's allow no it's an adjective is very loud. It's kind of a guys getting kind of lunch with you. I was across the room. But I think he was getting a little environment where it was what you Laotian fire. Yeah. I never heard that really using it correctly. I am right. L O U C H L O U C H O, LA LA Luz lounge. It's probably the lounge Lau. I know allows and lose what's lose. I think that's an Olympic sledding sport. That's sledding. That's the lose Lau. I think lounge, but it's lounge there's a certain likes lounging us about the found. And when I saw the artwork I was not surprised wearing a white dinner jacket. Oh, thank you. Very right. Did you did you think about? What you wanted to wear even if we didn't see it. Did you think about what you wanted to wear? Yes. Well, we filmed some of that when we when we recorded it. But I didn't wear that. When I was doing it. I wore you may say some of the footage here, and there I had some kind of Blackie tuxedo on with a black roughly shirt, maybe in a bow tie. But these days, I I like to think about what I'm gonna wear. I yeah. Yeah. And then we did that photo shoot from which that that. You know pictures taken. And I thought a lot about what I wanted to wear for the photo shoot. I like to get my picture taken these tests. Isn't that stupid? But I like to look at this like Carter, I'd jackets I've been looking my whole life for a quarter a jacket like this. I fought about a quarter a jacket. I've had ones I throw them away. This is set which find that sailor. Oh, oh, we're speaking with Jeff Goldblum about his debut jazz album the capitol studios. Sessions did your mom work in radio. Oh, yeah. The legend has it. Yes. But I think that was after we all the kids left the house. I wasn't around. And I she must have done a little bit of that. Yeah. The time before what? After my time before her timing women on radio before her time. Well, yes. Well, you know, you know, he was a, you know, she had latent and unexpressed potential in her. She was she had these four kids starting when she was nineteen or twenty. Wow. Yes. And she had a prodigious life force and a. You know, and a wit and verve that you know, could have been expressed in all sorts of ways at another time. And I think about that and the power of that and her power. Interests me greatly. It's interesting when we think about our parents as humans, not parents. Yes. Well, especially now that I've got kids, you know, it certainly transforms your, you know, your idea of them, you know. But isn't that something? No, she was interested. She was speaking of sewing machines. She would make things all the time. You know, there are crafty domestic crafty things, but she was always brimming with something she was tell you. She wanted to be well, she was in a play the legislators in western for came from Weirton, West Virginia. And and she was in a school play the story goes and she played an old woman. And there was a scout. Who that could have been what kind of person from New York City who came sarin the play said to her mother after we must. She must go to New York. She must be an actress her mother said absolutely not no, no way. And that was the end of that. But she had her dad had made her some steps with her name on the Shirley, Jane tomatoes was their last name. But Shirley, Jane steps and she do her tap dancing up and down the steps. I'm sure like a million other women, but I think she you know, she had a lot of things. So maybe after we left the house. Yes, I think she wanted to go best. She did go back to school. She became also legend has no real experience. When I I wasn't around. She became a sex therapist. Yep. Yep. And then she did something on radio. She talked on on the radio. Yep. How about that? And she taught me how to fight and defend myself. She came I was having trouble at school was up kid with David Schwartz. He was kind of giving me a rough time or something she said jet Jeffrey, sometimes she'd call me, Jeffrey, you've gotta you gotta here's what to do. I have a punch idea for you. You have to go David David put up your hands like this like you're just kind of to do nothing. And they'll be ready that way, they'll be poised. And then when he least expect you got to get get him get him when he doesn't expect it, and I said, well, okay. So she said practice, we practiced a little bit of martial training. And nice said, well, there's a problem though. Is he going to be at school this? Yeah. I said this is probably is always with this other kid kind of tough kid, berry Reese, and they're together. She said don't worry about very Reese, I'm gonna drive you there, and I'll take care of very Reese. Sushi drives the she drives me over there. And I said there she says that them. Yeah. That's them. She says, okay. Let's go. I go out of iside. I say David she gets out very starts to follow. She comes out. She goes berry berry Kamerhe she holds berry, and I go, and I do that punch that she taught me I said David Cameron. I there was up against the school door said career wacko. I gave him one right in shops and his his teeth God, bloody. And I listened his teeth. I like that you and your mom we're going to rumble. How about that story? I don't know. I don't know if that puts me in a in a horrible. Your mom sound wonder. She was great just a tremendous person and somebody who had a rich life as a mother and a family member and had her own rich life, so Sarah silverman's on this record. Yes. How does she get involved? All she's great. I've known her, you know, when I hosted Saturday Night Live. She was there as a writer in the mid nineties. We've been in touch with each other you'd ever since she was pals with Garry shandling as was I. Let's see. And then we did a couple of things together show or two and then she does a special show at Largo. And she asked me, I think one time to be part of that show. And I said, hey, I do this song that I learned for a charity event with somebody else that's taken from that. Sammy Davis Frank Sinatra version of me, and my shadow that they did together that's recorded. Let's learn I know the one part if you learned this other part, maybe we could do that. She learned it. If you go on YouTube now, you could find us at her apartment rehearsing it for the first time before that occasion. And we learned it then. And then when Larry Klein, and I when we were talking about who could be guest singers like we have at Rockwell sometimes. So I think we should do that on the album to I said how about Sarah Silverman. Yes..

Stevie Wonder Jeff Goldblum Mildred mildred Larry Klein Sarah silverman Frank Sinatra berry Reese Mildred Setzer Herbie Hancock Pittsburgh Mildred Spitzer LA LA Luz lounge Gil Scott Heron Laos John Mastro YouTube Garry shandling David David Roxy
"larry klein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

14:59 min | 2 years ago

"larry klein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Eight twenty NPR news and the New York conversation. Hello everyone. And welcome to all of it on WNYC. I'm Alison Stewart. Our first guest today is the inimitable Jeff Goldblum. You know, actor Jeff from his unforgettable roles in blockbuster films like Jurassic, Park independence, day and more recently. Thor ragnarok, but once a week for the past twenty years jazzy, Jeff Goldblum has played a jazz piano with his band, the Mildred snits her orchestra gigs at a Los Angeles club. And now he's released his debut album, the capitol studio sessions on Decca, featuring guest stars like Sarah Silverman and Haley Reinhart the capitol studio sessions is out now, Jeff when did you start playing piano? Alison, I started to play when I was I think tennis I grew up in Pittsburgh with four four of us. And our parents my dad, the doctor Harold, my mom, Charlotte gave us lessons. I talked to the piano a little bit. And that's when I started to play. I wasn't the best student in the world. I had some facility for coordination wise, but I was undisciplined. I didn't know how to practice in between one week. Lesson on the next and Tomoe would come over. And. I'd be burning with shame. And he'd say you didn't practice say? That's right ten I'm sorry. But until he got couple years into it after I played some scales. And a couple of you know, got some chops up a little bit. He gave me a piece with syncopation in it. This thing alley cat. You do. I took piano lessons for a very long time. You did. And my shame of how I practice was my piano, teacher lived across the street. Oh my God. Kickball? Oh, no Alden road. Oh, wow. Practice. Alison birdie Johnson still there birdie Johnson. Where's Alden road? Glamorous Montclair, New Jersey chairs you daren't and what happened? So so then you you played for years and you still play occasionally, what do you play not? Well, it's whatever I play. But you like to play you have a piano in your house. Do do you? Yes. I do. I got your interview got a couple. Yeah. So anyway, so he gave me. So how'd you how'd you know, alley cat? I think just from you know. No. Do you know what movie they use that in in one scene? Oh, this is trivial too hard. Can I can I have a clue? Yes. Yes. Brian Doyle Murray had a part in it. Also, Malara Walters had a part in it. Oh, man. Also now, I'm gonna get closer. I'm gonna give you better close. Also, David Letterman had a little scene in it. Oh, what is it? Just don't don't David Letterman signed by my monkey by my monkey. And here's the title role was played by Chris Elliott, and he was the cabin boy cabinet. Oh my goodness. Yeah. Where I was going. Where are you going? Really at one point. Chris Elliott cabin boy is being humiliated. They're playing alley. Record. And they're throwing beer cans at his head and making him dance. Anyway. But anyway, I played that song got, you know, fell in love with jazz. And then sat and figured I'd you know. I'd said as long as it took to learn to play that. And that's what I got a little better. And then I started to get jobs and cocktail lounges around Pittsburgh. But this is the around the same time that I'd already decided to be an actor as a career, but I was playing for fun. And then the story goes that I went to New York and got into acting, and but kept a piano around snuck it in a movie or two or a player to and then thirty years ago started to play out and about with a real musicians and have been doing that whenever I'm not working for the last thirty years. We currently have this this residency at Rockwell if you come out to Los Angeles, and then I was promoting far ragnarok about a year ago, Gregory in London, I was on the Graham Norton show, Gregory porter. The great Gregory porter was promoting this NAT king Cole album. And they said, oh, he's going to be on the show with you. Do you wanna play piano just to him, and you and you can accompany him doing this NAT king Cole thing? Mona lisa. I said, yes. And I played and his label Decca and the great people there. Rebecca Allen and Tom Lewis. It said, hey, maybe we'll do it now with Jeff and they talk to me. And that's what we did. And so we have this album coming out called Jeff Goldblum. Orchestra the capitol studios. Sessions. We did it at that famous capital records building in Los Angeles and Larry Klein hooked up with producer Larry Klein, Dino Larry Klein, I think I do I think I do. Yeah. Well, he's a great award-winning producer spectacular guy. And he SARS show and said, you should do it live at that place because we could get good sound and capture the spirit, and we got great people are ordinary band our regular band with James king on the saxophone and Kenny Elliot on drums, and Alex Frank on the base and John story on the guitar. Did I mention everybody we added to Joe bag great organ player and and a chill. Bronner's a great trumpeter who's on our album, and then we have singing guest singers Imelda may if you know her Haley Reinhart sing some songs, and and Sarah Silverman. And I do a little duet. On it. And that's the album, and it's out this week as a lot of banter with you and Sarah hitter. Pat, you hurt all you heard the album. Oh, I've been up and down seventh avenue over the past few days. You did. And it's a it's a it's a it's makes you Bob. Yeah. It gives you makes you wanna kick up your heels Kelly style, you listen really do dance to not. Well joyous. That's so sweet. I'm so glad you you like it. Yeah. I get a kick out of it myself. And Larry Klein thought, hey, I like what you guys are doing when he came to see our show this is jazz. And it's not insubstantial, and it's not cheesy cabaret stuff. But it also has a fun like it used to be or it is here. And there in ways that I miss it's really fun, and lively and spontaneous, and has some minute after pack a lot from that answer. You what you want unpack alarm? That answer. I like that unpacking business when did that phrase in the news business start to proliferate because it sure has I see I hear people because I watch a lot of news. I saw you as you know, on the news, and, but this unpacking business, you aren't saying that ten years ago. I think it's because the idea that there's so much put into one space that you need to separate. So that I know if you're unpacking your your suitcase over here, my shoes here, my socks, not everything is squished because it's been in the overhead or underneath us all have gotten thrown together. Right. Unpack it one piece at a time. And you, and I are both, you know. Humble students of tidying up to an anti clutter and interested in the you know, the dangers of Harding to of keeping too many things around. So anyway, let's let's unpack. And they do something other something else before we go on, you know, what people say these days and this just happened recently. But now, it's everywhere. Phrase wise, they start an answer with. So have you noticed that when did that happen? And what you'll ask me something I'll say so would guy it's the it's a transition. Yes. Of course, people think it's better than the. So I was it's as if well, let's pick up the conversation. So he caught me mid action. So something like that it used to be as a consequence. So it used to be only used or most most commonly used. Well. Yeah. I I'm here in New York. So I may as well see some theater, right? You know as David sedaris was here about an hour ago. I love you're kidding. And I knew I was feeling some vibration that is delighting me. I love those sedaris is all all of them all of them. And he has a whole list of words, he's he's banning. Hey, that's my that's what I was getting out. I've begun my list. I didn't even know about that. Yes. Well, let's we won't unpack it. Let's just not banning unpacking yet. I like you. I like you said I want to say this. I just got a text from the from the control room. I have a little box here where they can talk to me. This is terrific quintessential Goldblum. Oh. You know, that reminds me I was talking to Ben's did not drop names. I was talking to Ben Stiller. I think he said this is a while ago. And I think he said it ironically about himself. Maybe not you be the judge. I said, oh, you know, Ben, I love when you did that I mentioned some moment or something he said, oh, yeah. That's vintage me vintage me. Yes. What's going on? Uh-huh. What was it like to grow up in Pittsburgh? Oh well. Well, because Pittsburgh is somewhat of a sort of a hip more cosmopolitan foodie town, the university is doing incredibly well nowadays. Yeah. What was it like when you were feeling it wasn't so much that and I saw my piece of the elephants the elephants trunk or the tail because I didn't get around everywhere. I left when I was seventeen before I turned eighteen. I grew up in west homestead a little suburb. And it was I had a great time in it. Really? There were woods. You know? It's deciduous. Is that the right word back there? It's a different kind of plant life than out west. And there's lots of woods in Pennsylvania. And I love tramp and through the woods. I read books about Daniel Boone and Davy Crockett, and I loved it, and my friend, and I would play all kinds of stuff and we'd go down to the field and play sports all all day. And I went and saw Roberto Clementi play at Forbes field in those days my dad, and I had season tickets to the Steelers games, I say every home game that they played back when they weren't would had never won a game. And then I had some talent for drawing, and I took special art classes and in Carnegie museum. Oh, wow. Which had the biggest collection of dinosaur bones. Then maybe now still I would go through this. Great museum and go to my special art class on the weekends. And my dad would pick me up that was absolutely magical. I went to this camp. Chatham music day camp that opened by the outside my school and kind of provincial neighborhood opened me up to a whole bunch of other kids and other kinds of instruction. That was great. My mom would take us to see ballet when the Bolshoi ballet would come through. Pittsburgh. We'd see real theater. One of the things that made me fall in love with that. We're exposed to the arts. My parents would drive to New York City and come back with cast albums and playbills. And and like that we'd we'd we'd do that. And so I went to to this camp and fell in love with with acting there decided to be an actor. And then Carnegie Mellon University was part of it. I went to the we went to these courses between ninth and tenth and tenth eleventh grades, and that was I just deeply in love with that campus and everything there, and this is in the mid sixties. So now, this takes me the early part of my life was in the fifth is worth fifty two. So you can imagine Pittsburgh, and the culture and the world in America in the suburbs in the late fifties. When I was that age, the age of your son, and then in my teenage years, my hit puberty and Woodstock was happening. I two older brothers. And it was just kind of fantastic. And then I came upon this acting life and creative life just as America was hitting sixty seven sixty eight. Wow. So the world was blowing open was that second year that I went to. I was I was falling in love with acting on. And I remember the morning that Bobby Kennedy was killed. And there were a lot of people in our school in our camp who were working on that campaign. So it was very disturbing and enlivening you wanted to leave though you want to leave pits. I wanted to get out. Yes. I did. I had this. Well, I wanted to stay there. Actually, I applied to Carnegie Mellon University. And they turned me down, and I had to scramble around and somehow went to New York City. My mom helped me to go look for schools, and I had this interview with Sanford Meisner, and he took me on at the neighborhood playhouse. And as it turned out once I went to New York, I realized that it all happened. Happy accidentally. Happily accidentally and being in New York on my own was the best thing. I wanted to get out of what did I want to get? I mean, I was glad that I was there. But when I was Pittsburgh. Yes. I wanted to go to that school. But yeah. Part of me wanted to was dreaming of romantic and far travel neither outside in the real world or inside myself. And so I wanted to go go places anyway found myself in in New York as what happened it also sounds like your parents were sophisticated people in the outside world, if you're describing Pittsburgh in the late fifties early sixties, they could have just said, no, we're here, but they brought New York to you or soundtracks, and they clearly let you explore all kinds of things they certainly did. And I know what I was gonna guy. I've got you may have noticed in the middle of my excitement. I was like drooped for a second. Because I was I was gonna say something that I forgot. That's what made me droop. I realized I was gonna say not only did they go to New York and bring back cast albums, but but movies cinema in shady side. Squirrel hill and Oakland there were art cinema houses, and they would take me before. I. Was ready to see them to see the came out? I am curious yellow of you know, that movie and environmental art, movies and foreign movies and sexy movies in adult movies..

New York Pittsburgh Jeff Goldblum Larry Klein Carnegie Mellon University Sarah Silverman Haley Reinhart David sedaris Alison Stewart David Letterman NPR Chris Elliott Gregory porter Ben Stiller Tomoe Alison Brian Doyle Murray Harold Decca Los Angeles club
"larry klein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

15:26 min | 2 years ago

"larry klein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Was Herbie Hancock's cantaloupe island performed by Jeff Goldblum and the Mildred Spitzer orchestra from the debut album the capitol studios sessions suggest why was that the opener? Well, you know, Larry Klein saw art show. We were already doing things. Fifties. Sixties blue note stuff, but many other things he said for this record. I think maybe and we all started to talk and John Mastro to who's wonderful. It's been the band manager and kind of director, we all kind of talk, and he had an Larry start to have a very clear idea about what songs we should kind of focus on. And then we record them. I don't think we had a a an order in mind. Maybe when we recorded those at night or two we did cantaloupe island early, but I didn't kind of find it's it's order and way until Larry started to mix at the refuse songs that we recorded that are jettison from the album felonious, mum. Thing or two and just because it just became clear and creatively obvious that that might have been something. Good to start that was his view. Anyway, everything he did. We heard it went. Yep. Yep. Really good, really good. The vibe is of alive club. Did you recreate a live club at the capitol studios. We did we went into studio. A and b for people who know those are some of those places where Frank Sinatra the Beatles recorded, and we turned it into you know, production designed it a little bit turned into a club. So it could recreate because all we've ever done is this live thing, which is now a half. Fun, spontaneous hang out and jazz. Jam and yeah, that's what he wanted to do. And he said, we should get it. And have it really be? Spontaneous. And that's what we did. And people showed up, and you know, who showed up the second night Stevie Wonder. Oh, hey Stevie Wonder how how do you go play the piano and Stevie Wonder shells? He didn't stay. He was having his wife. We we came to know him a little bit my wife, and I went on this cruise this Paul Allen Kruse sometime ago, and he was the along with other very interesting people, and I'll show her I'll tell you about a Stevie Wonder was the surprise guest performer, and we he was just totally thrilling I got to meet him for the first time having a door to my whole life talk about soundtrack I played for once in my life on a forty five over and over again when I was a kid and all of a sudden things anyway met him he was so sweet to me if you ever met him, I've never met anyone God in heaven cheese. I saw him play. Once I was in Los Angeles in the early mid seventies around the mid seventies. I saw Gil Scott Heron live at the Roxy on sunset strip. And Stevie Wonder was there and sat in on drums for a song or two. Anyway, I met him, and he was very nice we've gone to a couple of birthday parties with for his daughter and been hearing there. Anyway, they were gonna case wife was gonna come and and they were having something or other, but he dropped in. And he said how how about that? That's great. Yeah. I know said it feels like you're doing the right thing was the music. God's telling you go Jeff go forth and play. Well. Just being on the planet is the same time. As him means. We're doing something, right? Is somehow gracious so vent. We're speaking with Jeff Goldblum about his new jazz album, the capitol studio sessions, and the name of your band is the Mildred snits sir orchestra. She's a real person. Correct. Does. She was. Yeah. She passed away a little bit ago. She lived to be one hundred and some of course, he did. She says she was a friend of the family's in Pittsburgh friend of my mom's used to come over. And was a kind of a ahead of her time, ladies, you'd would exercise get down on the floor and do a lot of things. Anyway. I hadn't seen her since I left Pittsburgh. But when we started to play out in about a few years after we started we we were asked to do the playboy jazz festival at Hollywood ball. And before then we'd purposely been kind of under the radar just we just wanna play at said. And they said what are we gonna put a name and a program, and I thought for a moment and said, well, I like that name Mildred stetzer and orchestras we're not an orchestra. That's a funny kind of joke. And we called ourselves that. Let's sick stuck with us. It's a great sounding name you like it. Well, you know, you kind of get a vibe Mildred snits there. You kind of you know, you're going sort of back in time a little bit because there's only people of a certain vintage named like Mildred EDNA. Yeah. I love I love names EDNA. I'm dropping breadcrumbs. Yes. Mel that. It evokes a certain. Yeah. I think. Yeah. Mildred mildred. Mildred that Sarah. The whole enterprise has a very lounge feel to it does not allow but lounge like what's lush Lage's when you're sort of, you know, the ten a drunk guy with with the bowtie Lucy's kind of a little bit leering. Whereas really I never heard that. Yeah. Lot allow Loesch does that describe the the mood or him the character? He's allow no it's an adjective is very loud. It's kinda right guys getting allow with you was that guy. I was across the room. But I think he was getting a little bit allow should virement whereas Laotian fire. Yeah. I never heard that really using correctly. I am right. L O U C H L, all you c h LA LA LA Luz lounge. It's probably the lounge. Lao? Laos? I know allows and luge what's luge. I think that's an Olympic sledding sport. Oh, that's sledding. That's the luge sh. I think lounge, but it's lounge there's a certain likes lounging us about the sound. And when I saw the artwork I was not surprised wearing a white dinner jacket. Oh felt very right. Did you did you think about? What you wanted to wear even if we didn't see it. Did you think about what you wanted to wear? Yes. Well, we filmed some of that when we when we recorded it. But I didn't wear that. When I was doing it. I wore you may say some of the footage here in there. I had some kind of Blackie tuxedo on the black roughly shirt, maybe in a bow tie. But these days, I I like to think about what I'm gonna wear. Yeah. Yeah. And then we did that photo shoot from which that that. You know that pictures taken. And I thought a lot about what I wanted to wear for the photo shoot. I like to get my picture taken these days. Isn't that stupid? But I like to look at this like this quarter. I I've been looking my whole life for a quarter a jacket like this. I thought about a quarter of jagged I've had ones. I throw them away. This is set which find that. Oh, we're seeing with Jeff Goldblum about his debut jazz album the capitol studios. Sessions did your mom work in radio. Oh, yeah. The the legend has it. Yes. But I think that was after we all the kids left the house. I wasn't around. And I she must have done a little bit of that. Yeah. The four-time before what? After my time L before her timing women on radio before her time. Well, yes. Well, you know. You know, she was a, you know, she had latent and unexpressed potential in her. She was she had these four kids starting when she was nineteen or twenty. Wow. Yes. And she had a prodigious life force and a. You know and a wit and verve that could have been expressed in all sorts of ways at another time. And I think about that and the power of that and her power. Interests me greatly. It's interesting when we think about our parents as humans, not parents. Yes. Well, especially now that I've got kids, you know. It's certainly transforms your purse. You know, your idea of them, you know, but isn't that something? No, she was interested. She was speaking of sewing machines. She would make things all the time. You know, there were crafty domestic crafty things, but she was always brimming with something. She was I'll tell you. She wanted to be well, she was in a play the lead. She was in western for came from Weirton, West Virginia. And and she was in a school play the story goes and she played an old woman. And there was a scout. Who that could have been what kind of the from New York City who came sorry, the play said to her mother after we must. She must go to New York. She must be an actress her mother said absolutely not no, no way. And that was the end of that. But she had her dad had made her some steps with her name on the Shirley Jane was their last name. But Shirley, Jane steps and she do her tap dancing up and down the steps. I'm sure like a million other women, but I think she you know, she had a lot of six. So maybe after we left the house. Yes, I think she wanted to go, but she did go back to school. She became also the legend has it. I have no real experience. When I I wasn't around she became a sex therapist. Yup. Yup. And then she did something on radio. She talked on on the radio. Yeah. How about that? And she taught me how to fight and defend myself. She came I was having trouble at school was up kid with David Schwartz. He was kind of giving me a rough time or something she said jet Jeffrey, sometimes she'd call me, Jeffrey, you've gotta you gotta here's what to do. I have a punch idea for you. You have to go David David put up your hands like this like you're just kinda of do nothing. And they'll be ready that way, they'll be poised. And then when he least expect you got to get get him get him when he doesn't expect it, and I said, well, okay. So she said practice, we practiced a little bit so martial training. And and I said, well, there's a problem. Oh is he going to be at school this? Yeah. I said this is probably always with this other kid kind of tough kid, Barry Reese, and they're together. She said don't worry about very Reese, I'm gonna drive you there. And I'll take care very Reese, she drives me over there. And she says that them. Yeah. Yeah. That's them. She says, okay, let's go go out of iside. I say David she gets out very starts to follow. She comes out. She goes berry berry chimera she holds Barry. And I go, and I do that punch that she taught me I said David Cameron. There was up against the school door. I said chimera wacko. I gave him one right in the chops his his teeth. God, bloody and I- loosened his teeth. I like that you and your mom we're going to rumble. How about that story? I don't know. I don't know if that puts me in a horrible. Makes your mom sound wonder if she was great was just a tremendous person and somebody who had a rich life as a mother and a family member and then had her own rich life, so Sarah silverman's on this record. Yes. How does she get involved? All she's great. I've known her, you know, when I hosted Saturday Night Live. She was there as a writer in the in the mid nineties we've been in touch with each other ever since she was pals with Garry shandling as was I. Let's see. And then we did a couple of things together show or two and then she does a special show at Largo. And she asked me, I think one time to be part of that show. And I said, hey, I do this song that I learned for a charity event with somebody else that's taken from that. Sammy Davis Frank Sinatra version of me, and my shadow that they did together that's recorded. Let's learn I know the one part if you learn the Saudi apartment we could do that. She learned it if you go on YouTube now, you could find us at her apartment rehearsing it for the first time before that occasion. And we learned it then. And then when Larry Klein, and I when we were talking about who could be guest singers like we have at Rockwell, sometimes it, so I think we should do that on the I said how about Sarah Silverman. Yes. I love her capture that not only musicality, but fun to maybe the two of you could you know? Converse in a way that might be cute and besides sing. And we all got together at my house, the three of us, and in my back guesthouse where I have a little keyboard there now, and we ran through it a couple of times, we altered the novelty lyrics that akara couple of times that I had an idea to about and the next week. We did it that was it. What track on the record NAS your favorite? But as the one you like to listen to the most, well, it's just come out. So I I haven't really been listening to listen to you know, I mean, which one's the most fun to perform how about that. Oh, yeah. 'cause we because I play it every day now because what we're gonna do on the road is stuff from I keep investigating that. Because really several of those songs were new to me. And at the time, you'll see if you see any footage of us playing. I'm reading reading it off a chart of elite sheet, you know, an improvising from that, I know them now because I've played them every day and have investigated the more deep. That's what you gotta do. You gotta keep playing them and seeing more things more possibilities. You know? And let's see what do I like to play every day. And then we play them out in about. Oh, the smart thing we were playing as Charles Mingas song style John Times Square. I like, oh, I do like this is a song. I'd never played before this album that Larry introduced me to Marvin Gaye song that don't mess with mister t it's called. And I had heard it. I I'd known that soundtrack from trouble, man. I do believe where it appears. I, you know, don't mess with Missy very sexy. Slow kind of grind de kinda. I kinda love playing that these days. Yeah. I like playing a bunch of this thing that till Bronner does I can't wait to see him again in Europe because he plays. This gorgeous, trumpet, melody on it never entered my mind to an accompaniment that I do and have now gotten a little better out that I love when I like the way we did it on the album too. She that's a nice song. And if you know the lyrics to that, do, you know the lyrics? We don't sing it. He plays it. But I sing it to myself when I practice it. And and I think about it now with while he plays it. I'll bet. Oh, it's you know, you know, once I laughed when I heard you saying that I'd be playing solitaire uneasy in my easy chair. It never entered my mind..

Larry Klein Jeff Goldblum Stevie Wonder Mildred mildred Sarah silverman Barry Reese Frank Sinatra Laos Pittsburgh Herbie Hancock Mildred snits cantaloupe island Mildred EDNA Mildred stetzer Shirley Jane Mildred Spitzer John Mastro David David Gil Scott Heron
"larry klein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

14:45 min | 2 years ago

"larry klein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And welcome to all of it on WNYC. I'm Alison Stewart. Our first guest today is the inimitable Jeff Goldblum. You know, actor Jeff from his unforgettable roles in blockbuster films like Jurassic, Park independence, day and more recently. Thor ragnarok, but once a week for the past twenty years jazzy, Jeff Goldblum has played a jazz piano with his band, the Mildred snits her orchestra a gigs at a Los Angeles club. And now he's released his debut album, the capitol studio sessions on Decca, featuring guest stars like, Sarah Silverman and Haley Reinhart capital studio. Sessions is out now, Jeff when did you start playing piano? Alison, I started to play when I was I think tennis I grew up in Pittsburgh with four four of us. And our parents my dad, the doctor Harold, my mom, Charlotte gave us lessons, I took to the piano a little bit. And that's when I started to play. I wasn't the best student in the world. I had some facility for it coordination wise, but I was undisciplined didn't know how to practice in between one weeks. Lesson on the next and Tommy Armour would come over and. I'd be burning with shame. And he'd say you didn't practice, Maxine? That's right. But until you get a couple of years into it after I played some scales. And a couple of you know, got some chops up a little bit. He gave me a piece with syncopation in it. This thing alley cat alley. Alica? You do. I took piano lessons for a very long time. You did. And my shame of how I practice was my piano, teacher lived across the street. Oh, my God kickball or no Alden road practice. Alison birdie Johnson still there Johnson. Where's Alden road? Glamorous Montclair, New Jersey. Cherish you. I'll be darned what happened. So. So then you you played for years and you still play occasionally, what do you play not? Well, it's whatever I play you like to play you have a piano in your house. Do do. You are. Yes, I do. I gotta interview. I got a couple. Yeah. So anyway, so he gave me. So how do you? How do you know alley cat? I think just from titan. No it goes to the. The you know, what movie they use that in in one scene, or this is trivial is too hard. Can I can I have a clue? Yes. Yes. Brian Doyle Murray had a part in also Malara Walters had a part in it. Oh, man. Now, I'm gonna get closer. We'll give you better close. Also, David Letterman had a little scene in it. Oh, what is it? Just don't David Letterman signed by my monkey by my monkey. And here's the title role is played by Chris Elliott, and he was the cabin boy cabinet. Oh my goodness. Yeah. Where is going? Where are you going? Really at one point. Chris Elliott Gavin, boy is being humiliated. They're playing alley. And they're throwing beer cans at his head, you know, and making him dance. Anyway. But anyway, I played that song got you fell in love with jazz. And then sat and figured I'd. I'd sit as long as it took to learn to play that. And that's what I got a little better. And then I started to get jobs and cocktail lounges around Pittsburgh. But this is the around the same time that I'd already decided to be an actor as a career, but I was playing for fun. And then the story goes that I went to New York and got into acting, and but kept a piano around snuck it in a movie or two or a player to and then thirty years ago started to play out in about with real musicians and have been doing that whenever not working for the last thirty years. We currently have this this residency at Rockwell if you come out to Los Angeles, and then I was promoting Thor ragnarok about a year ago, Gregory in London on the Graham Norton show, Gregory porter the great Greg reporter was promoting this napkin call album, and they said, oh, he's going to be on the show with you. Do you wanna play piano, just him, and you and you can accompany them doing this Natkin call thing Mona Lisa? I said, yes. And I played and his label Decca and the great people there. Rebecca Allen and Tom Lewis. It said, hey, maybe we'll do it now with Jeff and they talk to me. And that's what we did. And so we have this album coming out called Jeff Goldblum. Mildred snits orchestra the capitol studios. Sessions. We did it at that famous capital records building in Los Angeles and Larry Klein hooked up with his producer Larry Klein, fine. I think I do I think I do. Yeah. Well, he's a great award-winning producer spectacular guy. And he star show and said, you should do it live at that place because we could get good sound and capture the spirit, and we got great people are ordinary band our regular band with James king on the saxophone. Kenny, Elliot on drums, and Alex Frank on the base and John story on the guitar. Did I mention everybody we added to Joe bag great organ player, and and till Bronner is a great trumpeter who's on our album, and then we have singing guest singers Imelda may if you're not her Haley Reinhart sing some songs, and and Sarah Silverman. And I do a little duet. On that. And that's the album, and it's out this week as a lot of banter with you, and Sarah Kidder, Pat, you heard oh you heard the bopping up and down seventh avenue for the past few days. You did. And it's a it's a it's a it's makes you Bob. Yeah. Makes you wanna kick up your heels Kelly style. Listen, really, do you dance to not well? Enjoy it. That's so sweet. I'm so glad you you like it. Yeah. I get a kick out of it myself. And Larry Klein thought, hey, I like what you guys are doing what he came to see our show this is jazz. And it's not insubstantial, and it's not cheesy cabaret stuff. But it also has a fun like it used to be or it is here. And there in ways that I miss it's really fun, and lively and spontaneous and has minute after pack a lot from that answer you unpack along. That answer. I like that unpacking business when did that phrase in the news business start to proliferate because it sure has I see I hear people because I watch a lot of news. I saw you as you know, on the news, but this unpacking business. You aren't saying that ten years ago? I think it's because the idea that there's so much put into one space that you need to separate. So that I know if you're packing, your your suitcase over here, my shoes here, my socks not everything is squished because it's been in the overhead or underneath has gotten thrown together. Right. Unpack it one piece at a time. And you and I are both, you know, humble students of tidying up to an anti clutter and interested in the. You know, the dangers hoarding to of keeping too many things around. So anyway, let's let's unpack. And they do something other something else before we go on. You know, what people say these days this just happened recently? But now, it's everywhere. Phrase wise, they start an answer with. So have you noticed that when did that happen? And what you'll ask me saw the say so would guy it's the it's a transition. Yes. Of course, and people think it's better than the. So I was it's as if well, let's pick up the conversation. So he caught me mid action. So something like that it used to be as a consequence. So it used to be only used or most most commonly used. Well, yeah. I I'm here in New York. So I may as well see some theater, right? As Steve it's Darris was here about an hour. I love you're kidding. And I knew I was feeling some vibration, delighting me, I love those sedaris is all all of them all of them. And he has a whole list of words, he's he's banning. That's my that's what I was getting out. I've begun my list. I didn't even know about that. Yes. Well, let's we won't unpack it. Let's just not batting on Baghdad. I like I like you said I just want to say this. I just got a text from the from the control room. I have a little box here where they can talk to me. This is terrific quintessential, go blue. Oh, oh. Oh, that reminds me I was talking to Ben didata drop names. I was talking to Ben Stiller. I think he said this is a while ago. And I think he said it ironically about himself. Maybe not you be the judge. I said, oh, you know, I love when you did that I mentioned some moment or something. He said, oh, yeah. That's vintage me vintage me. Yes. So what was it like to grow up in Pittsburgh? Oh, well, well, because Pittsburgh is somewhat of a sort of a hip more cosmopolitan foodie town, the university is doing credibly well nowadays. Yeah. What was it? Like when you were growing feeling your wasn't so much that and I saw my piece of the elephants, you know, the elephants trunk or the tail because I didn't get around to everywhere. I left when I'm seventeen before I turned eighteen. I grew up in west Hampstead a little suburb. And it was I had a great time in it. Really? There were woods. You know? It's deciduous. Is that the right word back there? It's a different kind of plant life than out west, and there's lots of woods in Pennsylvania. And I love tramp and through the woods. I read books about Daniel Boone and Davy Crockett, and I loved it, and my friend, and I would play all kinds of stuff and we'd go down to the field and play sports all all day. And I went and saw Roberto Clementi play at Forbes field in those days my dad, and I had season tickets to the Steelers games, I say every home game that they played back when they worked would had never won a game. And then I had some talent for drawing, and I took special art classes and in Carnegie museum. Oh, wow. Which had the biggest collection of dinosaur bones. Then maybe now still I would go through this. Great museum and go to my special art class on the weekends. And my dad would pick me up that was absolutely magical. I went to this camp Chatham music day camp that opened by that outside my school and kind of provincial neighborhood opened me up to a whole bunch other kids and other kinds of instruction. That was great. My mom would take to see ballet when the Bolshoi ballet would come through. Pittsburgh. We'd see real theater. One of the things that made me fall in love with that. We're exposed to the arts. My parents would drive to New York City and come back with cast albums and playbills. And and like that we'd we'd we'd do that. And so I went to to this camp and fell in love with with acting there and decided to be an actor. And then Carnegie Mellon University was part of it by went to the we went to these courses between ninth and tenth and tenth eleventh grade, and that was I just was deeply in love with that campus and everything there, and this is in the mid sixties. So now, there's takes me the early part of my life was in the fifth is more than fifty two. So you can imagine Pittsburgh, and the culture and the world in America in the suburbs in the late fifties. When I was that age, the age of your son, and then in my teenage years might hit puberty and Woodstock was happening. I two older brothers. And it was just kind of fantastic. And then I came upon this acting life and creative life just as America was hitting sixty seven sixty eight. Wow. So the world is blowing open. Was that second year that I went to? I was I was falling in love with acting. And I remember the morning that Bobby Kennedy was killed. And there are a lot of people in our school in our camp who were working on that campaign. So it was very disturbing and enlivening you wanted to leave though you wanted to leave pits to get out. Yes. I did. I had this. Well, I wanted to stay there. Actually, I I applied to Carnegie Mellon University. And they turned me down, and I had to scramble around and somehow went to New York City. My mom helped me to go look for schools, and I had this interview with Sanford Meisner, and she took me on at the neighborhood playhouse. And as it turned out once I went to New York, I realized that it all happened. Happy accidentally. Happily accidentally and being in New York on my own was the best thing. I I wanted to get out of what did I want to get? I mean, I was glad that I was there. But when I was Pittsburgh. Yes. I wanted to go to that school. But yeah. Part of me wanted to was dreaming of romantic and far travel. Neither outside in the real world are inside myself. And so I wanted to go go places anyway found myself in in New York as what happened and also sounds like your parents were sophisticated people. Yeah. Yeah. In the outside world, if you're describing Pittsburgh and the late fifties early sixties, they could have just said, no, we're here, but they brought New York to you or soundtracks, and they clearly let you explore all kinds of things they certainly did. And I know what I was gonna guy. I've got you may have noticed out in the middle of my excitement. I was like I drew for a second. Because I was I was going to say something that I forgot. That's what made me droop. I realized I was going to say not only did they go to New York and bring back cast albums, but but movies cinema in in shady side, and squirrel hill and Oakland there were arts cinema houses, and they would take me before. I. Was ready to see them to see the year? It came out. I am curious yellow of you know, that movie and art movies and foreign movies and sexy, movies and adult movies..

Pittsburgh New York Jeff Goldblum Larry Klein Sarah Silverman Haley Reinhart Carnegie Mellon University Steve it Alison Stewart Tommy Armour David Letterman Maxine Alison Chris Elliott Decca Harold Los Angeles club Brian Doyle Murray Sanford Meisner tennis
"larry klein" Discussed on Your Art Sucks

Your Art Sucks

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"larry klein" Discussed on Your Art Sucks

"And it's also known to the locals as the hammer. Hamilton was once a fluent steel town the fell into hard times in never really recovered. The good thing about the hammer. It said it seen a recent resurgence. That's been led by small businesses. But more importantly by art and artists in nineteen Eighty-nine though such a movement wasn't centralized. Although arts have always been a large part of this town. And so it was that India was born into the city while I would love to be able to tell you more about Indio not a lot is known. And for good reason reason, I'll get into shortly. But what is known is that India had recorded the firm. I half of his debut album big harvest in Hamilton and there he worked with local musicians as well as David Rhodes David Rhodes was at one time. Peter Gabriel's main guitarist, and he also worked with legendary folk musician Joni Mitchell, so it appears that India had some in the Canadian music scene to be able to work with high caliber artists for the second half of the album. India wanted to record it in Los Angeles with producer Larry Klein and Larry Klein also worked with Peter Gabriel and Joni Mitchell as well as Bob Dylan the entire album took two months to record. And after it was released the main track hard son became a little bit of a hit reaching his highest number ten on the Canadian charts molest Beclere, the Canadian music landscape. Well, it dwarfs in comparison to that of the US chart. It's a simple matter of population density. I mean, Canada has thirty million the US has three hundred million. It's a big difference. And unfortunately for the countless great Canadian music artists. It's hard to make a living. Even with tarp. Topping songs the US is and always will be seen as the inevitable next. Leap up to really prove yourself as an artist. But for.

India US Joni Mitchell Hamilton Peter Gabriel David Rhodes Larry Klein Indio Los Angeles Bob Dylan Beclere Canada producer two months
"larry klein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:43 min | 2 years ago

"larry klein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Sarah Silverman singing me and my shadow you'll find that on the debut album from Jeff Goldblum in the Mildred snits orchestra the capitol studio sessions. It reminded me of I think it was the second or third, Tom. Tom waits records where it was recorded in a studio, but you brought an audience into the studio why was it important for you to have a crowd around? Yeah. You know, somebody told me that yesterday, I turned me onto it. And I looked it up. I'd never heard before Nighthawks at the diner is that the name of boy, I love him and love I loved that record. And I thought. Yeah, this this maybe it's a little like ours. Well, it was all Larry Klein's idea, the producer. But we only played live really are banned our ever evolving band over the few decades. And and then of course, he also brought until bronner's. Speaking of guest artists on the trumpet, and our Joe bag on the organ joined us in our regulars Kenny Elliot on drums, and Alex Frank on bass and James king on saxophone and John story. But he he said, gee, he came in and heard are stuff that we do at this place called Rockwell by the. If you're ever or any of your listeners, come to Los Angeles. We play a weekly gig here on Wednesdays on doing tonight, in fact at Rockwell in Los feelers, and he heard it, and he said, gee, I love what you guys are doing jazz wise, it's sort of it's not cabaret. It's kind of there's some substance to it. I mean, the guys who are I play with terrific. And then you're playing, you know, Charles Manson's loneliest monk, and and which I really like, but but people come and they're having a good time. You make it accessible, and it's fun in a way that reminds me of other things and some many things of yesteryear that were social and and really intoxicating and fun. And let's let's do that. He says I want a recorded at the capital records building because I think that's a very fine and wonderful place anyway and a good place to get a good sound and will fill studio. A and b as we figured it out with the tables and make it like a club like you're doing here, and like you've been doing, and that's what we did. And so what you're. I heard there was kind of a spontaneous. It's all spontaneous. When we do it tonight. And these Wednesdays, it's I don't know what we're gonna I don't even know the set lists and they play and I kind of play along, and then I talk to the audience not really even an audience. We just kinda hang out together and play games together. And then share this music. And oftentimes we introduce some of this music to them because they're they've come for one reason or another, but it's we have a grand old time in any way. Larry climb said we should make the album try to catch that spirit and the album, I think going back to the two roads diverged sometimes I feel like in the in the history of jazz method. I'm any kind of expert in the history of jazz. But it feels like you can go two ways. There was degrade Showband tradition and people getting up and putting on a show for the audience. There is also I would say like, you know, the more more academic sitting down at the piano quietly everyone's staring at the floor focusing on their instruments. I do I do find something even though I don't want in any way imply that you're not all hotshot players. There is something sort of refreshing about hearing that show showmanship. Side of things have you imagine that must be good for you too. I do like it. I I guess I like the balance which which maybe we've hit between certainly these other guys have devoted their lives to playing and and are masterful at it. And and not so much. I mean, I always tried to make my acting a little. Being being private while in public. But I know what that means. Well, you know acting teachers will tell you have to achieve a state of aloneness solitude as if you're having the scene with this other person. That's not really meant for it being witnessed, and so the then the accidental audience when added feels like an eavesdropping is taking place. That's something. Like that. Is that what they phrases Wade being being a public solitude public solitude something like that? Anyway, when I play I don't know. I I, you know, I don't get out every night of the week. And I just enjoy it came out of my enjoyment or nothing intentional. Really? It just came out of my enjoyment. When I go out, and I like to see who's there, and I get to talking to them, and I like to share this music with and sort of make sure that everything we're doing or that I'm doing kind of is in communication with the other musicians. But it also is shared with them. That's just what's naturally fun for me. So maybe there's a nice balance. We we get a kick out of it. Jeff, I'm happy you brought it back name because it has been twenty five years since drastic park, by the way. Congratulations. Thank you so much. Thank you so much. Yeah. What is it? Like the twenty five years later to see that film. You made you know, way back then before the war still has such importance to so many people before the war. Well, it's so sweet. I mean like, I really didn't want to be an actor. And I'm lucky that I've stayed. Let's active for all this time. And now, I feel like I'm on the humble student, and my great teachers, sandy Meisner said it takes twenty years of continual work before you even can call yourself, an actor, and then a lifetime if you're lucky of of progress, and I feel like I'm on the brink of my best stuff, and it's nice that I've been that. I've worked with great people and interesting people and creatively stimulating and educational people. And that it has somehow like when we were talking about with music reaches people, and they get some replacer out of it. And and it's sweet when they come up to me, and hey, they put that statue of me in London to commemorate the twenty fifth anniversary. Did you see about that shirtless in Malcolm shirtless? Jeff Goldblum after a dinosaur attack a statue made of you. How do you feel about that fantastic? Wonderful you've really embraced interacting with your friends online. Like you've embraced the. Memes about yourself. There's there's something about that. Well, it's taken me by surprise. I only got involved with social media a little bit ago, and I and I post on Instagram, but then I at the gig. I take pictures with people. And and then I see what they've if they've posted it the next day, but I like to see people's tattoos of million drawings of me, and I just get a kind of a kick out of it. You know, for one reason or another it's people are very very sweet actually before we go. I want to close off with a something that occurred to me while I was listening to it. And maybe I'm making too much of a leap here. But I feel like jazz from the music that I've made jazz is best made in close collaboration with those you trust like you create the right environment. And you're able to be spontaneous and creative and trust the people. You're you're being spontaneous. With are the parallels with good acting there as well. Yes. And of course, of course, you have to trust those people. But you know, I think the healthier you are could the more quickly you're able to trust and people if you sort of extend your trust, then their trustworthiness comes into play a little better. Sometimes I find I like a room full of people. I've never met before. And somehow, I don't know why at this point. I kind of fall into an immediate kind of intimacy. I don't know why. I mean, if you're playing music or boy, all sorts of barriers and paranoia, and insecurities and self conscious. Mrs drop away don't they and in the acting field to if you're playing a story, and and and acting out something poetic and meaningful. Well, then. Yeah, you know, oftentimes, I find like in the circus. I kind of you find yourself with people you've never met before. And sometimes you have to act out a love scene with them or some sort of, you know, it's interesting human challenging problem solving requiring intimacy and and full freewheeling interaction somehow, but you don't even know the people, but because you're working on this story that you extensively both care about everything gets opened up and with music too. That's a good answer. Isn't it? It's a solid answer. Jeff goldblum. It's been nice talking to you as nice talking to you mister power. It's lovely. I'll see you in person sometime. I hope we'll have you come to Toronto. You should come up and hang out. Well, I will. I love Toronto. I made the fly there. My wife is from Toronto I go and visit the there and her mom all the time. And I love all things. Canadian fantastic. Jeff what a joy wasn't talk to you. You're so sweet. Thanks, tom. Famous called caravan as originally performed by Duke Ellington, I think in nineteen thirty six and then one of my favorites. It was a first recorded by a group called Barney regard and his jazz Peters. But there it's performed by Jeff Goldblum and his group of caravan his debut album. Jeff Goldblum's comes out on November ninth. It's called the capitol studios. I'm Tom power is back right after..

Jeff Goldblum Tom power Toronto Larry Klein Sarah Silverman Rockwell Mildred snits orchestra bronner Los Angeles Charles Manson producer Duke Ellington Joe bag sandy Meisner Larry climb Kenny Elliot John story Showband Wade Alex Frank
"larry klein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:32 min | 2 years ago

"larry klein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Even just sitting down for an interview with the Canadian public radio show. There's one thing that's clear about Jeff Goldblum is that he's always entertaining. Jeff goldblum. Welcome to Q. Oh, Tom powered thank you. It's my pleasure to be on your cue. And I must ask. What is what's what's Q in reference to Q Q? I know JAMES BOND movies. There was a Q. And he was the funny guy who gave them all the gadgets. Wait a minute that have something to do with that. No. Maybe it's q- question, man. I think it's Q and A, and this is the q side of it. All so you're doing a show called Q. I'm doing a show called a yeah. Yeah. Exactly. You've been you've been doing your entire life and had no idea. That's right now, we'll mix them up like chocolate peanut butter. See how they go together. Jeff when did you? When did you learn how to play the piano? Well, there you go. Well, when I was ten years old in Pittsburgh, my mom and dad gave all four kids lessons. So Tommy, I'm only used to come over to the house, and I'd run through my Charney and color, and you know, Beethoven sonatas and be a kind of bad student. I didn't know the joys of discipline. But then in a year, so I have to civility for it. But I would dread the dread him coming because I really hadn't practiced. But then he gave me an arrangement to alley cat. And I think I became familiar with this idea of syncopation for the first time. Although there was something in me that already liked it. My mom at Easter time. We'd go eastern time is the time for eggs in the Tampa exits east. I don't know where she got guys like, yeah. Yeah. That's me. That's I like that. So anyway, I sat and played until I learned alley cat and the same with deep part and stairway to the stars. And and that was it. And then we had fake books hanging around the house, and I learned how to learn about chords a little bit and how to read sheet and improvise and then I secretly. I got myself some cocktail lounge jobs around Pittsburgh, believe it or not. And I was like fifteen and that was it. But at that time had already decided, you know, passionately to be an actor if I could and I went off to New York at seventeen, but I always kept a piano around. I snuck it in some movies and plays and things like that. And then about thirty years ago started to play out and about with musicians and do these so called gigs, and it's evolved into something that drew the attention of the lovely Rebecca Allen and Tom Lewis at Decca who were working and who work with Gregory parter with whom I played a song on the Graham Norton show while publicizing Thor ragnarok, they saw it and said, gee, maybe we should fly to Los Angeles. Jeff hook him up with Larry Klein, the great producer. And that's what happened, and that's how we did this album believe it or not. Jeff is it to where the two roads diverged in a yellow would here was it a path between acting and music at one point or another. I love any question that carries within it some poetry. I'll give you my answer by saying Hileman came riding up to the old indoor wait a minute. That's not going anyplace. Once upon a midnight, Jerry while I do. I sat at the piano, but I'd already decided to be an actor. And yes, they were two diverging roads. But no, they really didn't diverge. They've only coincided and and cross trained each other. But like I say it was my only wish to be an actor. But while I was doing that all the time I was actually playing so I I was playing playing playing and and even now, you know, I try to fill my days with acting and and get a meaningful employment here here and there which luckily right now is particularly fertile time. But every day I wake up, and I play the piano and a changes. Thank goodness, my mom, gave us lessons 'cause it's changed my life, and it changes my days when I start by playing an add music to the day. You know, it's it's interesting to talk to you about that. Because I do this every single day. I go in and a interview folks, and I asked cues as you as you've rightfully pointed out, and and and then every Sunday, I have a standing gig at a bar in Toronto where I sit down and play Irish traditional music with my friends, and I have to admit there's a there's a great exhale, and I feel like a different part of my brain is being triggered. So is it the same way for you? Exactly you and I are two peas in a pod. It's a different kind of music. Of course, a different as, you know, a different kind of mysterious enjoyment and deep soul tonic and way to communicate directly to people's gizzards somehow as we know, and but you play traditional Irish music. That's right. Yeah. Like what name is name is song jigs and reels that play instrumental music. Oh, like like seducing Singapore of that. Like, well, how would it? Go it lady data leading that latent leader need elite elite Lutton data com. That's one of them. You've just made my whole day, happier. Daily edited deliberate deliver I love that. That's fantastic. I'm gonna come in here. You you should if we can maybe we can play together. There's lots of piano in Irish music. I'd love to. Yeah. Come on. Leads leads me then so kindly to some of the guests that are on your record that don't play Irish music. You have Imelda may on this while I believe Irish Haley Reinhart, and and of course, Sarah Silverman. Take a listen to this is top entertainment, another.

Jeff Goldblum Pittsburgh Tom Lewis JAMES BOND Tampa Haley Reinhart New York Sarah Silverman Larry Klein Hileman Toronto Singapore Graham Norton Rebecca Allen Tommy Imelda Charney Jerry
"larry klein" Discussed on World Cafe

World Cafe

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"larry klein" Discussed on World Cafe

"You wanna make sure that you're neutral energy? Not not a female energy, not a male energy, just neutral, you know? And so I think that's the struggle. Yeah. And I would think like sometimes in situations where you might be the only woman around that there are things that you can let things that maybe don't feel so k. but you don't want to change the vibe or you don't just not wanting to be an energy that other people. I don't wanna be a buzzkill. Exactly so, but, but you also like maybe have a personal line, I don't know. So how do you navigate those those sort of situations? It's just case by case. I mean, I think in the beginning I was very preoccupied or very concerned about making sure that everyone felt comfortable. I mean, and and people can say, oh, well, people should get over it and it's like, well, I don't know that they showed. I mean, this is their money. This is their time in their studio. If there's a client that doesn't feel comfortable creating around a woman. I might wonder why that is, but I'm not gonna question it. You know. So I did used to spend a lot of time worrying about making sure everyone felt okay with having me around laughing at all the jokes, making sure that was a good, hang so that it wasn't an issue. I think now looking back on a few things that have happened. I wish that I had been more more firm about some things are had stood on the other side of some lines. You know, I think we get it into our heads as women that we have to let these things slide. Because like I said, we're trying to be cool. We don't wanna be that girl, but I think the positive thing about everything that's been happening in the culture right now is that we're realizing we don't have to be, and it's okay. It's okay if something rub you the wrong way to say, you know what? That's that's not okay. Yeah, yeah. I mean, this is what we've been trying to figure out, you know, as a culture for a long time and we still haven't figured it out. So we're still learning. I think I hope that we're getting closer hope. So hopefully, hopefully I wanted to to sort of cloth by talking about a recent album that you were lied engineer on an exceptional album called soul is I can't spring. That's good record. It really is. Tell me a little bit about working on that project. Yeah, it was so much fun. Larry Klein producing who's a legend, and he was just like, oh, if it sounds good, do whatever you want. So that was really fun. And then Kanza a wonderful singer, and the band was great. So the whole thing was just a ton of fun. And I felt like the we captured some special moments on that record. Can you pick one of those special moments and tell me, I guess maybe about your your personal touch, like how, how we can hear your personal touch on what this is. As far as my contribution to this record sonically. I think that I made some nice elections on microphones for the instruments that they were used on and not necessarily microphones typically get used on those instruments, and I was very grateful to Larry. Forgive me some freedom with that, but in particular, the piano, I mean being one of them and I use, I use a lot of ribbon Mike, so and Larry loves under Pano Mike. So that's always cool. What literally under the under the piano feathering those in with, you know, the Mike's on top of the piano can create an ice five. Let's pick a song off that record, which one should we play. Let's play fall guy. All right. We're gonna go out on that one and I'm going to save an Esa part. Thank you so much for being here. Thank you so much. Pleasure. Great of the world cafe. Will be Farka. Knew and phones. Anything all God. Do what you want to if you just a mover will come over. The see. I'll be fall. No..

Larry Klein Mike Farka engineer Esa Kanza