20 Burst results for "Larissa"

"larissa" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

04:56 min | 9 months ago

"larissa" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Eight hundred nine nine native and the russa give us a scene from things giving play Maybe people haven't had a chance to see it but there's a lot of great things that happened. Take us to a scene. Yeah actually the play opens with When i actually now skipped a different one actually there's a scene that is Between two there's the two main characters are well-meaning white people And there were a couple now that really over the top. You know super liberal. They know better than anybody. White folks and When my favorite scenes it's actually in a collection of with monologues from from a group called kilroy. But i've heard scene and seven monologue but it's about the two of them trying to reason why they're allowed to not use a native american to play a native american character and and it just. It's i enjoy it. 'cause it's just showing the acrobatics. That folks go through to justify what they want. Basically they wanna use a non native american person native they to read base and they go through this really convoluted left liberal are Acrobatics mentally to finally justify that actually having a non native american play american characteristic white thing to do because they're post host you know racial society and all these and they just put themselves in such circles that and that's really what this whole place. There's a lot of ridiculousness but was ridiculousness. I've actually heard in the world. And i think we all have you know that people can justify what they want and make it sounds like make it sound like a good thing and it shows how even the best meaning people can justify really bad things but make it sound. Good and make it sound like. They're trying to do us a favor when obviously they're not but they they turn it around on themselves and that's actually one of my favorite scenes These two people getting getting to that and so then they get to feel good about themselves again for doing the wrong thing which is a lot of about. And you do a lot of this in in your work of really kind of flipping things around. I also mentioned what would crazy horse do. Another one of your place. Tell us a little bit.

russa
"larissa" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:58 min | 9 months ago

"larissa" Discussed on Native America Calling

"I'm tara gatewood from blow playwright louis. A fast horse is with us today. And she's a twenty twenty macarthur fellow with multiple other awards under her belt. Have you seen one of her place. Maybe you have some questions for her. Maybe have some kudos dial in now. One eight hundred nine nine six two. Eight four is the number and so larussa. I'm wondering too about creativity during a pandemic Any thoughts about you know your ability to tell story even through these tough. Yeah because it's definitely been challenging. I've In dealing with Having family members that have had covid during his time. I've had some large trees. Where i honestly i just wasn't able to be creative at all and i just took the pressure off myself. I did the business side of my work. I needed to make sure everything was paid. And then i I just took the pressure off myself and was really honest with people and said look i. I'm gonna need a break. I i have to take care of my family right now and People have been very understanding. And i'm fortunate that i was financially able to to do that when i needed to. But in between have also been really using the time in between two very creative We're working in south dakota with a trilogy of plays that i've been doing The first one with cornerstone theater company and michael. John garcia as my partner is we did the first one in los angeles. The second one was in Arizona and.

tara gatewood John garcia south dakota los angeles Arizona larussa louis partner
"larissa" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:01 min | 9 months ago

"larissa" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Wipe into native america calling from studio forty nine in albuquerque. I'm tara gatewood. See changle coda playwright. Larussa fast horse wrote the popular place. The thanksgiving playing. And what would crazy horse do for her many accomplishments she also just won a macarthur fellowship. He comes as an unrestricted cash price in this hour. We'll talk with orissa about what she's working on now in how the fellowship might steer her future work as an artist right after the news. Throw the spotlight on. Melissa fast horse. This is national native antonio gonzalez fourteen indigenous candidates ran for us congress. This year with six winning races as wyoming public radio's savannah mar reports. Even those who were unsuccessful. Made an impact. Several democratic native candidates ran in deep red states and lost to republican incumbents that includes polit jordan of quarterlane tribe who was the lone indigenous candidate for senate and lynette green bowl whose northern arapaho and lakota and was the first native person to seek. Federal office in wyoming. Green bowl says her candidacy inspired young people on the wind river reservation. I could tell that gave them joy. They were excited to see someone who looks like them. And who's comes from their community. But in for such a i see elliott chavez is a reporter for indian country today she says candidates like griebel brought important issues to the table that otherwise might have been ignored like the impact of the pandemic on tribal communities. Just being on that stage mentioning those issues reaches so many people in states that otherwise might not hear about these things. Chavez added that need of congressional candidates in wyoming utah in idaho performed better and raised more money than expected. I'm savannah mar as votes. Continue to be counted in arizona. Democratic native organizers say they saw record registration and turnout in the northeastern part of the state which includes navajo hopi and apache lands. Thirty paid native organizers worked in five counties for months to get out the native vote to a five voted democratic janey perish is director of the navajo hopi campaign for the northeast arizona. Native democrats renate voter co critical..

wyoming Larussa elliott chavez tara gatewood navajo hopi campaign arizona albuquerque antonio gonzalez america orissa senate director reporter idaho utah
Judge sentences ex-MSU coach to jail in Nassar-related case

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Judge sentences ex-MSU coach to jail in Nassar-related case

"The former head gymnastics coach at Michigan State University has been sentenced to jail for lying to police about what she do about abuse by university Dr Larry Nassar Cathy Clegg is said at trial that she did not remember being told about abuse by former Olympic and Michigan State University doctor Larry Nassar she was found guilty by a jury in February of lying to police and today she's been sentenced to ninety days in jail and eighteen months of probation Nassar was sentenced in twenty eighteen to forty two hundred and seventy five years in prison for decades of serial abuse to hundreds of athletes several of Nassar's victims testified the greatest knew about the abuse two of them spoke ahead of the sentencing Larissa Boyce sekaligus held up a piece of paper in front of her when she was sixteen and older if she filed a report there could be serious consequences for her voice that she was representing her sixteen year old self was silenced and humiliated and all of the hundreds of girls that were abused after her I'm Jennifer king

Michigan State University Dr Larry Nassar Cathy Clegg Larry Nassar Jennifer King Larissa Boyce
Judge sentences ex-MSU coach to jail in Nassar-related case

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Judge sentences ex-MSU coach to jail in Nassar-related case

"The former head gymnastics coach at Michigan State University has been sentenced to jail for lying to police about what she do about abuse by university Dr Larry Nassar Cathy Clegg is said at trial that she did not remember being told about abuse by former Olympic and Michigan State University doctor Larry Nassar she was found guilty by a jury in February of lying to police and today she's been sentenced to ninety days in jail and eighteen months of probation Nassar was sentenced in twenty eighteen to forty two hundred and seventy five years in prison for decades of serial abuse to hundreds of athletes several of Nassar's victims testified the greatest knew about the abuse two of them spoke ahead of the sentencing Larissa Boyce sekaligus held up a piece of paper in front of her when she was sixteen and older if she filed a report there could be serious consequences for her voice that she was representing her sixteen year old self was silenced and humiliated and all of the hundreds of girls that were abused after her I'm Jennifer king

Michigan State University Dr Larry Nassar Cathy Clegg Larry Nassar Jennifer King Larissa Boyce
"larissa" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"larissa" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Especially with just one Kidney Macfarquhar staff writer for the New Yorker. The you talked recently to ABC. Were what's going on here. Abe has volunteered to subject in a vaccine trial. A particular kind of high-risk experiment called a human challenge trial and his mother is pretty worried about it. I totally admire and respect your desire to help be I just don't know how safe it is right. But you just had your kidney out in July. Can't imagine that be safe. I mean but basically I WANNA put my name down and it is a trial comes and experts team that I am fit actually to be part of human challenge trial than than I want to do it walk file. I follow you and I understand that you want to help. And that's the way you've always been but it's I think I feel sort of broader sense of obligation or almost like a principled obligation that the I know that there needs to be people who are willing to step up and and I just feel this urge to be one of those people or framed the other way I guess. Why shouldn't it be me I guess having one kid is a pretty good reason. Yeah because he's a year doing this for the universe. You are my unit. It's invalid it hard to round. You just need to know more you know. Just who's doing the testing how much cover the exposing US and other any other people who volunteered besides you. Yeah Yeah they're sixteen thousand people over sixteen people now who have volunteered people. In my hometown of Carlisle's.

Kidney Macfarquhar US Abe ABC staff writer Carlisle
"larissa" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

09:43 min | 1 year ago

"larissa" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"In and they got a lot of bills she's writing for any money yet strong and is making fifty eight thousand and they're trying to figure out how to reverse the idea of too much going out and so I asked the question Larissa what is it you need to amputate so the question has been whether or not we should sell our home that we owe about a hundred and eighty nine thousand on it and I think the house has appreciated quite a bit since we bought it five years ago happiness sixteen twenty a month and your take home pay on fifty eight thousand is what a month a month and that's like about five thousand no no five thousand month the sixty thousand a year that would not be your take home pay on fifty eight thousand yeah so I think so it's it's forty forty eight hundred or five thousand eight if there is a little bit days because cold more so you're saying the fifty eight thousand is not your income that is your take home pay that's our take home okay all right and so is he in so one fourth of that would be somewhere around twelve and a fifty dollar she of a house payment that's a little bit high what do you own your cars we don't have any payment on a card what are the hours you have well we have about fifty thousand dollars in student loan debt we owe about fifteen thousand dollars to the IRS because of waiting tables and not cutting taxes and getting behind on payments and then we in the past three years and Harrison have racked up about thirty five thousand dollars in credit card debt since we've had our what sun sun you're out of work for a little while okay in center thirty five thousand in credit card debt yes okay so what we have is an income problem your house payments not out of control it's all the other debts that are run you down you can sell your house and if you've got enough equity with clean of a bunch of this that that's a short way out I probably would rather see you guys do some things to increase your income I would try that for a year R. A. I and you know take extra jobs and different jobs and that kind of thing your song writing unless it's going to produce revenue may need to sit on the shelf a little bit well you go make some money but let's get your income up for a year and see if we can make a turn on this all right in the lobby of a Ramsey solutions Matt and Mandy are with us Hey guys welcome to the Ramsey solutions lobby thank you what do you guys live we're from Sunfield Michigan very cool good for you and here to a debt free scream yes it should be paid off thirty nine thousand six hundred fifty four dollars and seventeen cents I love it how long did this take ten months good for you and your range of income during that time we were from ninety five to one oh five okay what kind of debt was this it was my temper tantrum debt your temper tantrum doubt we had done day if it is for a while and I really wanted to have the house remodeled I was it's a very small house it's not a huge and I was just sick and tired of it and decided that I wanted it done so it was a camper to live in while we're doing it and our home remodel okay and then you decided in ten months ago in reverse I have a temper tantrum about debt yeah I was really mad at myself for it after it was done I love to have in the house done but I was furious because I knew better and yeah so we just decided to get his own terms and be done cool and we joined our brother and sister in law after we had talked him into doing that before saw okay so they were already on the path we were further shame you so where were you during this ride working okay cool very cool so what do you tell people the key to getting out of that is stick to it stick to it diligence on make a meal plan and shop at Aldi okay all during the ten months yes okay who also who were your biggest cheerleaders are brother and sister in law okay yeah and what got you started on this originally originally I was a single mom before I had met him and I had student loans and I just wasn't sure how to get through it so someone had introduced me to you and so then I had talked to him about it and we really wanted to make a better path and we just kind of got off from time to time and finally decided it was time to get it out and get it done okay Turkey given our money to the banks yeah yeah really sick of paying interest and stuff how's it feel now that you're free feels great it feels amazing this trip has been great cool cool so when you were covering the forty when you said forty thousand there was emotion in your voice was set from it was a lot of there was some some struggles I lost my brother in September yes it does I never wanted to be more debt free then it first you know I couldn't do it my gosh that does change your mind it really does Yellen's living like no one else or later you can live like no one else can give like Alfa yeah while I didn't want my mom to have to carry that burden and she she did it so but never again never again you've changed your family tree yeah when you have a moment like that that's the I've had it for ever moment I mean that that one that one Sears deep on the heart and you'll never go back you'll never go back it's not a Dave Ramsey thing anymore at that point it is a Mandy and Matt thank you we are not doing this anymore because you can you can tell in teacher grand babies at same last month and now it's a kind of those are milestones or markers were there's a tipping point in your life so I'm probably all well done well done you've gone through some roller coasters and Jim Hanisch to not September fifth September fifth I like it that's good it's a good it's a good way to get there and because it's permanent it is permanent some times of it's too intellectual and there's not enough emotion on the spiritual in your transformation then it doesn't stick yeah and you fall off the wagon you won't fall off you're you're done and we do have to give Jesus a lot of the credit because he's walking right alongside us the entire time seven a man that's exactly right well well done guys thank you very well done we got a copy of Chris Hogan's book for you every day millionaires they are on your way that's the next chapter we're hoping jumper chapter two is closed we're moving on to chapter three yes there we go and we'll show you how to do that signed by Chris himself it's a number one bestseller and it's all the millionaires got to be there and they do the stuff like you're doing and you know a lot of them that we interviewed had that kind of a moment where of some kind words emotional readers say ana I am never going to be here again I'm never going to be here again I remember I remember one of mine I had several but interamerican express call my house and asked my wife what she would stay with a man that wouldn't pay his bills the collectors trying to be nasty to get our attention and she called me crying at the office agreeing with the host so because those are to go to Florida and whip a collector so yeah but I'll never forget that I mean that was thirty years ago and I've never done business American Express lance but I paid that bill he did he did win that part of the argument because it made me so mad I paid it but on I thought you know what I'm never going to be here again okay if American Express calls my house now it's a wrong number you know when you have to have those things those those deep anger hurt type emotional things where our joy it's a some kind of an emotional thing where you just go we're never going back you guys have had it so yes I'm sorry about your brother thank you well done you guys Matt and Mandy and the three kids names and ages we have gallon is nine this is Austin faith they're both seventeen awesome very good so faith Austin Gavin Matt and Mandy from Lansing Michigan forty thousand dollars paid off in ten months making ninety five to one oh five counted down let's see here debt free scream three two one one this is is done well played very well played so you need to get yourself in a position you I'm talking to you you need to get yourself in a position that you can impact those kinds of situations because you're not many see not even if you this is the room she's I get asked all the time about what people need to.

Larissa
"larissa" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

07:01 min | 1 year ago

"larissa" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Well where do we fit in this country is we? Don't we're not currently learning enough about that in history books are seeing that in media and so it's important for the newer agreements to know that. Okay maybe you don't care but you should care for your kids because they're going to go through all these questions and it's important for them to know because they are Americans and that's where I think you've done an a an incredible thing for your daughter because she's had a front row seat and she's actually in the movie. Yeah of seeing a mom and dad who could say nothing could just kind of do whatever you WanNa do. But you've you've put a huge amount of yourself. You made all kinds of sacrifices not just to tell the story of I mean I know how this thing started like. Let's go to Mississippi so are has some some little hole aging life? But I think you've given her something bigger than that now. We even if that wasn't your original intent rain you've given her examples of what ordinary people can do when they feel like something needs to be done. Something needs to be said and to see the fruit of that and I just I get chills thinking about how she's GonNa turn out the you know how how she's going to take that gift that you've given her and it's just like our generation didn't grow. Our parents didn't do that right. These went to work kept their heads down all those things you cut out of the movie. Screenings Bob that was kind of like you're doing another screen initially with finding Cleveland. That's kind of your parents were saying. And they're like they're ready. Saw once people care people want to see the movie. Well it it definitely is our prayer that that our daughter sees what we're doing and sees that there's that there's there's importance to these types of stories and I think she has because she goes to a dual language Chinese school right now but there are non Chinese people that go to the school and she can't really tell them apart other than the fact that they might look a little different but to her. She thinks they're all Chinese in their darker skin. Like you're the outside who's so and so. He's at the white kid and she was like. I don't know what the why Chit Is. What's that mean like? I'm like well like disease. Lighter skinned or lighter hair. Oh yeah that's the kid with the light hair at the light hair green eyes race and categories and discrimination. I mean that's definitely taught because when you're your kid you tell the difference. You don't you like me. You have dark-haired you have light hair that's that's all as the Chinese girl with darker skin right. So it's I want her to have. Obviously she won't stay that way forever. It's not gonNa be this innocent. She'll understand that their differences. But I think we`ve. I've talked to her about. She started asking questions about our film. She's seen are filming. She wanted me to tell her all of world history by showing a youtube video. And what happened to this world all of world history and can you find a video and I'm like you have your whole life to learn and you may not even learn everything. How much time do you have? But but she does have a desire to learn more about what history is and you know what what start what was going on in the past and she asked us she asked us like. L. Can you tell us tell me about my? You know our family history. Do I love those stories and I'm like well. You have so many six minutes to a what was funny is at one point. She watched part of the movie and was giving critiques. She was like oh I don't like them. I'm like the music here. I don't like the music here. And why is Uncle Ed or wise daddy like talking to talking about Uncle Edwin and identifying him? It's he doesn't need to do that because you see him. And I was like okay. Film critic director we also hope for the film is that we can be example of of just average people doing something that's beyond hopefully average. I mean sure we've had a little bit platform with their music But honestly you know we're not Steven Spielberg. You know we're not We're not Ken Burns yet. No we're friends with his brother. Yeah we don't have. We don't have a perfect named after West for editing. But you know we. We're trying to do something with a little especially with finding Cleveland. Which was made on? Nothing was a little short film. It was making such a big impact and so with the feature film. Were hoping the same thing and again. There's tons documentaries out there. You know I mean. Obviously we're not American factory. That just won the Oscar and was produced or executive produced by the OBAMAS right by us. He watches this. He wanted to to the right. But the fact is we told a story that hopefully will resonate and again people may never know like our names but we hope that. The effects of the film are felt for generations. Were on the kin-fong punt. Yes so they're gonNA ornate so tell folks How they can follow the film on social media more social handles our instagram and facebook are at. Far East deep South but because twitter has that limit we are far east deep so only because he couldn't fit basically keep typing until you can't type no more Far As deep zone actually off by one letter. We AREN'T. We could've been parties. Deep Sassou outs. Oh I got you so. As far as deep so on twitter Faris Deep South Dot Com is our website and you can also watch our trailer. That's on there and find all the information sign up on our email list updates of where we're going to do screenings on our website and links back to find in Cleveland as well as they want to go back to our past and check that out but yeah we send out regular updates to people that are email us and on social media We we hope people will continue to follow our journey and see where our film goes out to the festivals. Yeah Yeah so the first one if you're up in that San Jose Silicon Valley area This is your opportunity to show up by some tickets. That's what we're hoping for a sellout crowd. We we know a lot of people coming out sports. Yeah great knows going to be disappointed. Now thank you thank you. That means a lot so we got. We got the endorsement appenafren. We're done well again. Thank you so much for coming back on the show again Back WHEN WE FIRST TALKED ABOUT FINDING CLEVELAND? None of us had any idea where that road would take you and I think I landed in an amazing place. And if it's not currently set to show up in your area listeners. Talk to some people who can make it happen. More people need see this film and I I.

Cleveland Mississippi Uncle Ed Steven Spielberg twitter Ken Burns youtube Bob Uncle Edwin director Oscar San Jose Silicon Valley OBAMAS instagram facebook executive
"larissa" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

12:01 min | 1 year ago

"larissa" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"We were very deliberate in crafting. The story in a way that included not just you know the Asian viewpoint but we have African Americans talking about experience with Chinese. The people that were white in the community talking about the Chinese. Because I think it's important for us to tell her story in the context of everyone else And so that people don't just like that's just a Chinese story for us. It's really like well. This is an American story. It's really you know for everybody. It is universal so last year I taught to the president of the N. Double ACP in an Albuquerque New Mexico and he was interested and then a few about a month ago I taught to the the president of CPI here in Pasadena and he's also interested so we're really China. We weren't really want this to be film. That's not just about Chinese people Chinese Americans but really just Who we all are in this country. And how how? We have more similarities than differences. And that's really what we want. Yeah we knew we. We know we can't solve race relations with one movie but we're GonNa try our darndest to contribute to the dialogue in the conversation of racial reconciliation. We can't fix on the first one. The sequel. That kind of leads me to my last question. Which is you to have been laser focused on this making this movie. And you're getting to the finish line at the world. Premieres coming up right all the stuff of what happens for Director Larissa? Lam You know. Is there another film project? What about produce? You know executive Baldwin Right. What or is this like? That's kind of one of our creative endeavors but we have still all these other interests and so if we never make another film that's okay. Yeah you know. I think there's part of me if you would ask me this like six months ago I would be like. Oh my gosh. I don't think I'm making another film again because I wasn't sure how it was going to turn out. Now that it's turned out decently I feel a little bit more confident that I can to another one. I think it really comes down to if if one people help fund us to. There's a lot of wonderful stories around the country that we've discovered that are not about our family or even the in in the context of some of the people that we interviewed in our film Then I'd love to tell more stories That have that intersection of History and family stories and you know Immigrant identities or the Asian American experience I think also for me Being a musician economist. Out a little bit so part of me will go back to writing some music and performing And you know got the TB Ho side store. I just I joked with baldness I just WANNA show up on set somewhere in a recording studio and somebody telling me what to do. He's tired of telling me what to do so now she wants to be told. That will last very long. But we hope we get to do some other projects. We have some other ideas that are brewing in her head. Once we kinda get this this baby out the door completely now. We're trying to finish up another short film that you know. You're you've interviewed a Jason Poon. Yeah Yeah so. We did a short film. We're trying to finalize that. Oh he's very talented. Yeah Yeah and I have a personal goal to tour with Hamilton. Oh that's so. You can hold me. Accountable accountable isn't that we're writing a musical tastes. And and I think some other things that are related least to the film is we've got A. He's got to write a book about the experience. Mom and just so much stuff that we just couldn't tell in the film than I think You know we're going to write a book. There's a coffee table book. His grandfather. We found these amazing photos that he took through this journey. It's not in the film. We actually didn't talk about it in the film but what we discovered was like my grandfather was actually like the town photographer. Hey and he took great photos. You appreciate you know zero negativity Chelsea manning take it out those and actually Jason helped me scan all and so we have high definition four resolution high resolution photos of these and they look like they come straight out of like one of those those those those cancel Adams or or Norman Rockwell. Ish White people mostly white people that are in these photos Americana feel. They paid him to take their portrait. Paid for a favor for them but he just he's really great photographer. And you know The done family had a envelope with his name on it and there is like photos of his grandmother and photos of these of these other people that he took. And so you know we'd like to put together a little. Maybe federal exhibit companion piece in Coffee Table Photo Book. Because it's really remarkable again. We didn't get to do. Put that in the film but it's it's kind of a nice little piece of history of people. Don't think of the ancient Chinese people of Mississippi wearing like you know grabbing people. But you know again. It's a slice of life in the early. Nineteen hundreds of the period Western dress and and just really really great Americana evoking you know so. That's there's a lot on the plate. I could probably sit here and talk for hours of what we WANNA do. But I don't know what to do but yeah vacation would be nice and and hearing all this. I mean. Pardon me can't help but wonder if more Americans who right now think that America in the past was great because white people you know if they would learn stories like this maybe America. Yeah it was great because we had a lot of people right and that people found a way to live together even though there were historic prejudices. And what have you? They built trust bridges right. They established relationships and over time. They came to be a community right. And it's just like that simple little simple little lesson I think is lost on US right. Yeah I think a Lotta People Today. Are you know you see all the stuff on social media and all these you know? These young people have these high lofty goals about fixing our future and and they have no idea what the past was like. And what we like to say. Is You know you really need to learn and know the past before you can understand why we have the present and only then. Can you go out and fix it to make a beautiful tomorrow and I think there's a lot of people trying to make a better tomorrow without understanding the past and they have no understand? Naw Understanding of what got us here and so I think history you know just the other day I was watching something about like some some racist acts between Some blacks in a Chinese old man walking down the street right house and I'm thinking what. If both Chinese ambulance understood the relationships we had during segregation when there were all these laws against us and and we lived together. You know both of us can live on the same team and all farm together. You know you we let you in the front door you know gave credit and you couldn't you couldn't do any of that at a white store. We trusted you. You know and we. We live together and we stood up for each other. If only people knew that today would they look at each other? You know would. Asians look at black the same way as blacks would look at Asians today. You know what would we allow? We're like brothers. You know well. I been thinking about that because a I just interviewed. And this week's episode is with the CODIRECTOR. Just chuck of Chinatown rising. Oh Yeah Yeah Right. And and some of the footage that his father shot way back. When was when the Black Panthers were helping out in Chinatown right interesting right? Yeah and I'm like that that's really fascinating however I would think that those of us who have longer routes in this country so we're not first generation right even if didn't directly happen to us the the the very point you you raise Baldwin. I think is still salient. Right is psycho. Yeah yeah maybe it wasn't me but there were my generation. My parents generation. They work with the blacks. I think more recent immigrants who from Asia. Who Don't have that history. It's still gonNA fall on deaf ears because like. I don't know what you're talking about I. I didn't benefit from any of that right. And they did. They did and so one of the strong points in Chinatown rising is they said you know we Chinese head wake up to realize there without the civil rights movement like even. Some of US wouldn't be here right that that you know they finally had to relinquish some of that Chinese exclusion act. And what have you made? And so he says but it's just too easy to skip that part of the story and and not have any sense of gratitude or connection to the African Americans who really paid a absolute right and and it was. You know strength in numbers right. So the African Americans just population wise were greater than the Asians in this country and so they needed to be the ones to kind of help pave that way. Obviously there there were. There were Chinese marched with people during the Chinese Civil Rights Movement. But really it was the Led by the African American community that led to us having what we have today freedoms yeah so part of my wish is that this film would also find an audience among the more recent Asian immigrants Because they're now part of this country part of the story they get looped in whether they realize it or not. The rest of the country can't tell off right so so and you know I think you're greater. Point is all Americans regardless of how long you've been here regardless of what ethnicity on paper it's like all of these stories are part of the American tapestry right. None of US got here all by ourselves. Right RIGHT AND WE'RE NOT. We have no future that that is rosy or good. If we're all thinking I don't need those other people may in fact it'd be better if some of them all of them would just leave? Yeah Yeah right so so I feel like that's that's a really huge point that you're making is we. Don't WanNa get a wise this film in just the Asian American Studies Corner. Right and I think that's brilliant. I think that's that's absolutely necessary. Like no no no. No this is part of the American story. It's just part that's never really been told. And and so. How does that shape our understanding of this country and who came to this place good and bad right and how we might go forward in a better well and I think you know. Part of the problem is our own communities sometimes in trying to kind of boxer selves in to this Asian quarter. I mean we talk about newer immigrants. I mean I have a different story. My parents are first generation. So I they they were born in China went to Hong Kong and then came here for graduate. School kind of the typical. You know newer wave of immigration post civil rights. And and so. I think in my vernacular growing up they always would say like American this American that you know those Americans. Even though they were American citizens I was born here referring to you know non Asians right and so I think it's changing how we talk about ourselves right and the Asian community where they don't like the newer immigrants they they also feel like they don't belong or they kind of keep to themselves thinking like. Oh Yeah like oh. This is not this. We're here just as visitors ray. Where there's a long legacy in this country that they don't know about and again they have kids. They're here and then they russell like just with the identity questions that that that we bring up in our film we do that with you know Baldwin or myself where it's like okay..

Baldwin Chinatown China Jason Poon president Chinese Civil Rights Movement America Albuquerque US TB Ho Asian American Studies Corner N. Double ACP African American community Pasadena Director New Mexico Black Panthers Asia
"larissa" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

10:52 min | 1 year ago

"larissa" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"We knew score and final score and music was wonderful too. Long composer was amazing He's Emmy Award winning like the the biggest composers. Yes but yeah I I just. I sat there watching my dad. I sat behind him so he didn't see like I sat slightly behind him and then looked like to the corner of I still see a little bit of his face. Yeah right and his body language watching that the whole time and I would just say. When is he going to cry if he cries? When's he gonNA look what he's mad when you start like shaking his head right but he was still almost the entire time for your time? He didn't start crying like he was. He started tearing up and and this is not what you see from a father. Chinese very traditional. Yeah yes so it was. I think it was Oddly enough I think he he really loved the movie he like at the end at the end it was like a little bit of silence and then every he looked at the recent he goes like that looked like a real movie people that the other thing that he really really wanted to get out with the whole message of the Chinese exclusion act because he really felt like more people need to know about that. But I was really nervous about is very personal as you seem like. There's a lot of you know. Even though we said he's really closed off for some reason he opened up to me He was. I hadn't crying so much and I think most of ended up on in our film and originally didn't in a previous cut. I didn't have him on camera as much cranks they just thought like. Oh is he gonNA be okay with that? We shouldn't earlier cut to his Baldwin's brother Edwin just because I was like. Can you just watch just to make sure that like Dad's not going to be upset about anything and Edwin actually said he's going to love it? I'm just I know there's so many personal things in the one bit. Where Hyun your mom? Kind of like sue. You're not the one digging this out and I was like. Oh Gosh is this going to be like too sensitive yeah? I wasn't sure if you WANNA see small argument on screen again. That's what humanized here right. You're not. You're not creating this facade right and that and that was real like everything with Charles was real and you know you couldn't stage that and so I think I was relieved. I that was the biggest worry I had was like. He's GonNa hate it and we're not able to release. I forbid it. We would have wasted a lot of money. And I've heard that happens other filmmakers before where like they didn't they didn't secure their life rights to like their subject. Because I didn't actually we didn't get them actually sign sorry form signed a form but he did give us some money for the film so we're grateful that was a vote of confidence And he's been supportive now but I was very very very nervous. I'm so glad that he he likes it and hopefully he understands now that this is. It's bigger than him really intact after after cynical. We're going to Mississippi that's festival and he was like. Are you guys going to Mississippi as a? Yeah we're GONNA go well. I want to give you a check to donate to the Chinese Museum because I'm very thankful for everything tonight. I'm like Oh that's cool. Yeah I guess he's happy with how things are going so I think even this isn't too much of a spoiler but I think even the making of behind the scenes of this journey his kind of echoed in the film at the end of the street with Baldwin and his father in the relationship. Because I'm that's something that I wanted to portray too because it it did. I mean they still have their disagreements generation only culturally. He's still doesn't like rap music now he doesn't and we actually had an original line. Originally there was a line in the film. Where Baldwin said that but I think again back based on feedback things that we thought were funny and jokey like not everybody owner financially father down or just like that was kind of just a Corny joke and so we took that out But I think that it's it's okay to not have absolute full resolution. But that that you're in a better place It did bring them closer. You know maybe they're not quite best friends yet and they'll never quite understand each other but at least they're in a better place than they were when they started the Philly. Yeah and again. That's kind of more of an Asian ending world. Yeah the courts not fully resolved right instead of everything gets tight lever after right. And that's just real. I mean and so we wanted to make sure we portrayed that accurately because I know we had more Disney Disney fide ending. At one point they topple ee. Ever after no. Where do you want this film to go? I mean it's it's it's this. This now finished feature length version is making the festival rather the things. Are you ever seeing it? Limited engagement in theater. Or are you gonNA start talking to Netflix or are you gonNA TALK TO PBS? How's it work? Yeah I mean some of those conversations have already kind of begun. We would love to do you. Kind of limited run engagement at a in theaters It does cost money To do that so we if we did that we probably working with the distributor And we need to get some extra sponsorship because what people don't realize it's very expensive to get a film into a movie theater But we have maybe the interest I know a lot of people wanted to like book out theaters we went. I scream a finding Cleveland in Chicago. Last fall and everybody there was like if you come back we will buy out of theater to show your film and so we made start partnering with a lot of organizations to do kind of a limited run in that in that regard we are talking to some distributors. We already have one. That's interested in having a meeting next week. Pbs 'EM WE talked with some programming. Which would fit very well total So that's a very high possibility and of course whether it's Netflix. Or some other streaming platform were open to that. I mean I think the the the end goal is to get as many people to see it We know that education will be a major part of it because of the history. I mean really. Our overarching goal is we want to influence the way history is taught we all learn about segregation And in the south but no word do we normally hear about Asians were impacted and honestly not just Asians but every person that caller that wasn't applicant American and so we want to kind of really see a change in the way history of Todd. I know it's kind of ambitious. Can White No. It's not just black and white a lot of shades of gray a yellow and brown inbetween So that's going to be a long. I mean it's going to be a long-term efforts so it's not just going to be. You know we're showing it for a year and it's going to be gone but we're going to be doing this for several years of of really trying to make a huge influence in the education system and especially if we did what we did with thirty. Minute DOCUMENTARY WITH FINDING CLEVELAND. I mean if we did a hundred shows with just thirteen minutes. I'm hoping that we can do even more with a full length film because that's where the prestigious and obviously it's a much higher quality product again. We didn't know we were making him the first time we WANNA make you know educational curriculum to go along with it. You know. Hopefully we can get licensing to a lot of the schools and of schools. Don't have money for it and hopefully we can fundraise so that donors can sponsor licenses for schools so that schools can have this as part of Educational Curriculum. And we've already have several museums that want to do In libraries that want to do Screenings so like Huntington Library Smithsonian So again the public community outreach Aspect is very strong. The educational component is very strong. And so you know. We're not just happy of making Nice Film. We really want as many people to see it as possible Do either one of you feel qualified to come up with all the educational materials or is that something that you would bring in some when you know? I think our six year old daughter's going to write curriculum for us now. Whatever she thinks is right. Now we're going to work with teachers And I know. There's there's several people that we know in organizations that have written curriculum in the past. So you'd like to bring them into the fold and One of our goals is to kind of put together a little education consulting committee for Advisory Committee For our film because we really want to I mean for the most part our film I think is appropriate for junior high and above Just because of the content because the kids are learning about the side of history any earlier than that and You know we really want to make sure that we get it right Like with everything else. Journo the film but I'm thinking there's also a use in college level absolutely campus. You know have you had any conversations. Even preliminary ones with the Asian American study centres at the various universities and colleges. That had them. We're we're definitely going to try to do that But what's more important I think is just the American studies classes no One of the professors that we ended up pulling into our film duck. Vaas he actually. He's white and he teaches American history in Missouri. One of the universities up there and he's actually changed his. They don't have Asian American Studies in the middle of Missouri. For some reason I don't know why the three agents already took those and they're majoring in engineering but But he was like you know what this is. An this is an important topic. So not only. Did he decide to come on board and be a consultant about American history on our film and and be a part of our film? He said he went to his his His committee here his department and they changed their curriculum to include Chinese in the South American history at Asian American so. I think that's that's a goal. I mean we. We have worked with a few Asian American studies departments in the past showing our short film. Finding Cleveland on and we will continue to do so with the new film but Yes that is our goal is not just a hit the Asian studies but the history department Of of all the universities. Because I think it's important for everybody to learn and that was kind of what we wanted to do intentionally to like. That's that's why our world premieres at Cinta Quest And we will be announcing while. We're at Cinta Quest Which is which Asian American Film Festival is going to have film festival. Premiere will be making that announcement at center quest. Yeah I think that's one of the things that we in in showing other film we were in one classroom at USC. For the Asian American Studies and I think ninety percent of the students there were of descent you know and so which was fine but again I think with our film..

CLEVELAND Baldwin Asian American Studies Netflix Emmy Award Missouri Mississippi Edwin Chinese Museum Disney USC Hyun consultant Huntington Library center quest Charles Philly Advisory Committee Todd
"larissa" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

10:32 min | 1 year ago

"larissa" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Thinking honestly I felt and and this is the story with the first film. Finding Cleveland I was originally just brought on to be the music composer. And then I kinda saw first Broadway just to be the babysitter the bank the first trip. Yeah actually I MRS SIPPY LIKE. We were going on a family vacation. You take care of our daughter. Yeah like you just the way. We're just going to go to these places just follow okay okay. And then. When things started happening I was like what's going on. Why are there Chinese and Mississippi? Why a lot of Chinese and Mississippi? Why is there a museum here? You know with China of Chinese Mississippi And then I saw I cut of the short film and I was like. Oh no this is this is not gonNa work and so reworked the short and then when we embarked on doing the Fisher. She's mentioning my first cut. Oh Yeah I took a first. The first director was fired And we actually contemplated hiring another you know more experienced director on this feature and I just felt like you know what I I felt like. There was a certain story I wanted to get out. Of course it took a lot of different terms from what I initially felt. Just just you know. Imagine just as I mentioned before but but I think good storytelling as good storytelling. So whatever goes into plays you know movies. It's character Even though it's a documentary there are character arcs with Baldwin with his father under brother and his brother. And there's you know you've got the supporting characters and so there's n you have these moments. And so am I think just. I've always been really over analytical so I think that served me well in this so taking as a fan of cinema for so long I just try to take those principles that I learned from watching score says e or from you know watching Steven Spielberg. Or Whatever. Directors out there that What did I think was going to make a good story and kind of tried to apply that and you know what makes a good story a lot of times. It's like is how does it end up relating to your audience so like you know you watch like avengers you're like I can't relate to him. He's Captain America. Or He's whoever right. I can't really to a superhero because I'm not a superhero. But the way they tell the story we can all identify with ups and downs of each one of the superhero character. And I think that was my dilemma. Was like how can you make a movie where people can feel the same way? I felt right. Feel the same way my family felt when we made this these discoveries and then I think what we found ours. The resources will put together to where When People Watch the film sure there watching me and my family but at the same time. They're thinking ahead. This could be my family's soon and possibly could be my family. Maybe it was maybe and the comments. We were getting even with finding Cleveland and then when we started doing these tests meetings we did a test. Comedian Mississippi with Within the fifty minute version of fifty short version eight years ago and we brought him to the to the predominantly black schools and. We showed him to the students there. And we're like well. Let's let's see how they feel right when you have a bunch of African Dalton. They've never all been out of Mississippi. A lot of them have never seen Chinese people before. Because the Chinese don't live there anymore And they connected to the film and then they asked questions in fact One of the questions. One of the kids asked me was like I really related. He said how does it feel to not have a father like how does your does your dad feel about not having a father and I did not know how to answer that question because he was this little know. Black Kid was asking from the perception that he never had a father so he wanted so he identified with our film. Not because he identifies with Chinese people he identified with it because the story of being fatherless shirt the situation yeah and and I have to also thank all our consultants and people that we brought in Friends of ours were filmmakers Who really gave a lot of great feedback and helped me along the journey? Obviously me this is being might my first feature so I can't take all the credit because we had some great editors that were consulting us as well on that it worked on major TV shows and films and so there are a lot of people that helped us along this journey to kind of craft the film to get it get it to where hopefully it'll resonate with a lot of people. I think one of the differences when you're shooting a DOC versus a an entertainment film especially if it's the terminus cinema verite where you're basically just shooting whenever you say you just kind of shooting from real life Yup 'cause I've done those those that one of the challenges is. How do we know when we're at the end of our movie? That was never a question. Larussa had her way. We'd still be. That was my job as a producer was like come on. We're running out of time and we're running out of money. Yeah so we need to finish this up. Yeah well as I mentioned before when we went when we went to shoot October two thousand sixteen in Mississippi I thought that was the end of removing because it was really just focused on you know the Chinese and Mississippi Bowden's family and Mississippi and then we took that trip to be national archives and and there is a lot of footage that we did shoot in San Francisco to didn't make it interphone because at some point it became world. This is too much of. It's becoming a different film altogether. That's an important news as you know it is and that might be another story to tell another time and a lot of people were also encouraging us to just like you knew all this extra footage. Don't feel like you have to use all of it here like you could maybe do a series down the line where do web videos and little episodes so they like we didn't have to tell every story every little nuance because I think every seen in our film could be expanded Like an extra half hour you know because there's so much content and so we just wanted to make sure we didn't overwhelm people and I will say this I was actually talking with my editor and thinking. Oh my gosh in some sense if we had a script of like a narrative film a regular Yunan fictional film it be so much easier because we know exactly where we're going but we'd like shuffled the smell and we had posted it notes on the wall where we the sequence of events happened a little bit different. I mean we pretty much went. Sequentially timeline wise. But there's certain things like you know some of the interviews and stuff that got shuffled around and it really was. It was a major balancing act so it was hard really hard. Yeah when I was Teaching my concerns my storytelling approach to preaching one of the things. I was always telling his. I said you're always gonNA find way more material than you can possibly fit either a in the time slot that you're given and that's a reality that some preachers just don't care about and number two. There's a limit to how much your audience can track a great so so I said so you do your research and then this doesn't come from me because it's kind of a harsh terms. His knee half decide which babies to kill. You've given birth to all of these choices. Know they're all precious as like you know once the lights go down and the movie star people in the audience are are at your mercy in the same way. That congregation is at the mercy wants. The preacher starts right and and it's like so you have to be ruthless. Be You ever get to the show you have to leave. You're the one that has to make those tough decisions and you know. I think it's great that you're open to input from these professionals and also because it'd be easy to get really sensitive. Yeah well this is my film who knows what better than me right all the time but you. I think you you obviously yielded that because again. I. I can't believe that this was your first feature length film direct because it just seems to me like a very professionally jot. Well-done John. Cue Thank you. Yeah we'll give you one example of where you know. Input is very helpful especially from a different perspective. You know we had some African American friends. Watch the film especially in you know one of you know. He's actually won some Emmys for documentary series and we had early on. We had testimony from some of the white members of the community and were out in. We're asking them like what did you think about the Chinese? And they were hard working and they were they were really. You know they helpful. They're good people which again it's a compliment. You didn't think anything. But then they they said like she's like we don't have a problem with it but the black community might have a problem where it's like. Oh so then what are the? What are the African Americans Lazy? You know yeah exactly and so. We took out every single reference to Chinese being hardworking. Because again I don't think he needed to be said most people you know but but it was so quote unquote sensitive and sore subject. Painful force a white person to make a compliment to somebody that was Chinese that we didn't want to alienate are African American audience. I mean it was obviously my discretion. I could have left it in there but I really wanted to make sure that our film I mean we. We can't please everyone but we wanted to make sure our film was going to be something that people were going to shut off immediately and say like oh well. Chinese are better than the propaganda. I know it's like and and that was not what we wanted. We wanted to make sure that we got input from not just the African American community but people are white are editor was white and so there were times where he was like like we thought like. Oh we didn't need to explain something and he's like I have no idea what that is. You need to explain that to me. You know. Like China We didn't quite explain exactly but we all rap song says American born Chinese. 'cause I think Oh I think we took out that reference at one point we had somebody say ABC. But we had to take that because we never defined what. Abc because I think we know a ABC means. American born Chinese are white white editor. He's like I have no Jackson five street so things like that. Were very helpful to get like outside perspective. Yes so they're fresh eyes and ears. Yeah right so we don't lose anybody or offend anyone Zahn kinda curious like Baldwin. What was your mom and dad's response to the finished film? I was so nervous. Oh my gosh he was like Oh yes so I think I spend more time watching. My Dad and I was watching the film soda. He actually had not seen what you saw. Oh yeah he saw the previous version. Okay and we're very version..

Mississippi editor Cleveland China Baldwin ABC MRS SIPPY Steven Spielberg director Captain America Larussa Jackson producer San Francisco Zahn John Bowden
"larissa" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

06:07 min | 1 year ago

"larissa" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"We talked about The lumber says rice case and we had so much more history in there but we realize the essence You know what people found more must fascinating was aside from their families journeying discovery how they got to. Mississippi was also the relationship the unique relationship between the black and the Chinese community which hasn't really been told in the way we've told it in our film and actually in the beginning I was thinking. Well do we really make this into a full length feature film because I was telling the resells like okay? I care about me I care about my family Belykh. Who else would want to care about me? I'm just I'm just Baldwin Chew. May maybe I'm rapper. Sometimes right but like who? Who who really is that? A little self-indulgent and your dad especially your very humble guy very low key in fact I had a tiptoe around him filming some of the stuff. Yeah and my dad would always say like. I'M A NOBODY. I'm not famous. I'm not powerful just me but to me. That's what makes this film so universally moving. Okay be because I'm a big believer in well told stories and I believe that the more specific a story is the more universal. It turns out to me right so when you try to just water everything down right and it speaks to. Nobody and I felt like especially now in the feature length. Version the focus on your father as quite as he has as little as he says he is to me a riveting person to follow because he really doesn't know these things like he and he has huge vacuum in his kind of emotional cell of your last time. I saw my dad. Wounded allows one just like didn't even care about me and so he's maybe tried to wall it off but it's a very live and so to actually have your cameras there and the way you cut it and all this kind of stuff it it draws you in as of. You're even if you're not Chinese right now because I'm Chinese. I have my own family story. I don't know any of my grandfathers and then some of the stuff that you were talking about seeing your daughter being hugged by your dad right and it's just like wow yeah so so there's those kind of touch points but but I feel like he's such a relatable figure in his own unique way and I think you did as director the re. I think he did a wonderful job helping us. Really start to be interested in him and care about what is happening to him. Yeah well now. Thank you. My my Charles. Chew Baldwin's Dad. He was a tricky guy to kind of get to open up and say no honestly the sit down interview that we did once interview with him. I tricked him into some other stuff. Like you know a lot of the footage in in. There's one where he's at home. He's looking through photo albums and county memories we. I actually honestly did think that I'd end up using that in the film. I just turn the camera on. We were there just to kind of get a record of what he would say but sometimes I what would. We did some screenings and showed some earlier cuts of the film. Everybody's like we want more. Charles we WANNA know what he's thinking I don't know what he's because he doesn't share it and so But those little moments that I captured just kind of in a really just a home video way that I think told a lot and so I ended up adding in a lot of footage just because people wanted to hear to hear from him to see him react and so his Aachen. Having mom on camera helped a lot because she was kind of like his voice like she was saying everything that my mom likes to do that. I'm pretty classic they would say shoot completely opposing thanks classic and so my mom was a my side of the well and I think that's what evolved is W- this film took. I think I honestly had a hard time about August of last year. We didn't add previous. Cut IT and You know it was good but there is still something missing. We got a lot of feedback from our test audience and some other friends and I was racking my brain. There's something missing about the story. That's just not quite right yet and what I think. What really did it for me is changed my whole perspective is. It's like you know what this is. This is Charles Therapy session. Ted's I mean I really looked at from that viewpoint. Were his arc really was where does he start? And where does he end up? You know not just with his own feelings with his father but obviously his relationship with Baldwin too and so when I kind of changed my viewpoint as opposed to just telling because I think the first film was finding Cleveland is all about the discoveries like everything and so I thought I think we first approached it like oh the discoveries. Amazing as you mentioned. He's like it's so cool. We found this and we found that and we found that and like and for some reason. It just wasn't holding together in the same way that I wanted to but I think once we framed all those discoveries more around the emotional center of dad and Charles just like this is his story and how he's coping with with these discoveries. That really kind of changed. The I think the dynamic of the film so alluded to this early on now I want you to talk a little bit more loose. I mean how did you do this? Your background is music singing. Tv hosting You know what I've always been in a sense of a student of film I mean. Ever since I was a little girl I watched a ton of movies and I was. I read every single like entertainment magazine and trade as a kid and I think I watched all the DVD commentaries of directors cut And then I did drama in high school in eventually I was. I did direct several plays drama director at my church Way Back when and so. I think there was a little bit of a director in in me how I did this. I tell me what to do. I was.

Charles director Chew Baldwin Baldwin Chew Mississippi Belykh Charles Therapy entertainment magazine Aachen Cleveland Ted
"larissa" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

10:59 min | 1 year ago

"larissa" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Exclusion files and certificate. I'm not saying what thunderbirds true. But needless to say we can't tell the audience this. We ended up finding a treasure trove of information about Baldwin's family. Most we couldn't even cram into because it was just like one hundred pages worth per person family member into our in our film. We couldn't put that in but it really gave us a sense of what happened to his family. So as a result of one of the most discriminatory acts in US history targeting. The Chinese we have a written record of bombs family. And that's a silver lining. I mean of course. We wish that never happened but the family was never separated. But when we talk about family separations now people would ask why why we. Why was her family separated? We actually know yeah and I think one of the things was first. We weren't sure if this was just my story. Is it just my family story? And then so we started talking to Historians and trying to get an understanding of what were times like during that time. What we're what we're family conditions during those days and then Then we start talking to other people and we realize you know it seems unique to us because we've never heard it seems unique to the rest of the world or at least you know we seem like the rest of the world that because they haven't heard it but then actually we looked the I think the archivists said like we have like thousands of these files right here. Right and then there's more in Seattle and there's more in southern California Riverside hasn't had basically whenever the point of entry that you know if you're Chinese and you're traveling between are actually inner out of the United States. You had to go through Obviously immigration at the time and they would keep these files and you'd get questioned you know before leaving the country after coming back into the country and so there was a written record of all these what they called interrogation. Because there's a lot we're not just talking about here. You go up to the airport. You go through customs. They ask you like three questions. Are you carrying any meeting fruits? Um Wh- When did you leave? Are you carrying any type of disease? And that's pretty much it like that. They they were like fifteen pages worth of questions. Might my uncle Henry Yager up in Sacramento like you bowman. So he's really into this stuff so he was the president of the Chinese historical society and so he went to San Bruno Bunch years he went to Bancroft Library first and then they redirected him and so on the only person in our extended. Family has any interest in this size. Michael Henry so it was like he was almost weeping that that I wanted xerox copies of his hundred pages. And it's like all the interrogations on Angel Island and then it's like I got names of like ancestors five generations back because that was part of the quiz exactly. Yeah and the other thing was that I found out was how this guy named wing Goo. Who'd always been in our family extended gatherings how he was not actually related to us because he was the twelve year old boy. That's my grandfather brought this paper side. Yeah Yeah and there's like how I look. This makes no sense. I don't know and it's like no one ever explained it to me and then I am going through page by page ray. There's this twelve year little boy. He's getting ask all the questions. Yup You had to memorize all the answers. Even though it wasn't really about his parents house lane so that when I when I saw you guys actually do that. I haven't made the trip myself. I was like all. That's the treasure trove. Yeah and it's pretty remarkable because you know I mean when we went there. I mean literally. It'd been one hundred years since anybody had opened that file gonNA fall apart because it's convenient white gloves and all they actually give us glow. You can't carry anything into the archives can only carry a pencil. They'll give you a pencil and pad but you actually have to put your stuff on a walker like it's pretty. The security is pretty strict San Berno. And then I've been to the one in DC as well and that was even more like Fort. Knox don't make you call ahead. And they do a background check where you can just show up that day. I mean they're not I'm going to come out. You can listen to the public library. It's a government building. It's public access by the chances of finding something just by walking is going to be hard so I think it's easier more efficient if you unless you live already can stop in and talk to a researcher. Okay well we did. Is We contacted them? First and then talk to a researcher and they said like these are the names that we think who they called my grandfather and grandma to give them all right spelling. And then yeah. Yeah I was looking up to see h you right. And they found nothing because that's not what they were called book so I want you to explain because early on in your film. There's the headstone of your grandfather and great-grandfather and it says low blue. Do Iran. Your Dad's at you. You're a two and I understand but explain to people who don't understand how it is that your ancestors have a different last name than your family. Yeah surprisingly it's actually quite common. There's a lot of people that have a lot of Chinese people that have the wrong last name and is because we know but a lot of people don't know that our family names come first so for me. My name in Chinese would be like Chew Baldwin Baldwin. Chew so my great grandfather's name was Chew Joan Liu so his name was really Lou as his first name was really Lou John or or you can call them John Lew but in America. There were like well. If you if you read your name chewed on Lou then Lou must be your last name and then so that's how they started putting all this paperwork together then. Finally when my grandfather came his name was chew. Kim Chong but there are just like but you just call me Kim Jong. That's my name. Okay Kim Shaw. Your Dad's name is Liu. So you're name's Lou also so they got it wrong the second time right so basically my dad. When he finally was able to come over to the country he was like A. I understand that Lou is not my family. Shoe is my family name. So when he naturalize he changes okay. Because I've never seen a version spelling of Lou L. O. U. I there is a L. E. W. Ray right like if it was like. That was so puzzling to me now. Thinking back to I don't know about today but immigration people. You know it's a pretty simple job. I would think people coming into this country. You're supposed to record their name okay. Why wasn't there any training about people coming from Asia? Their family names translators. Their translators bothered to tell people. Yeah I mean maybe we take it for granted today that we're a little more educated but maybe back then they just really didn't know they just they just. They just literally transcribed their name because the funny thing is if you go even further back right or maybe around the same era like if you look at the documentations for like the transcontinental railroad i. They're like oh every place I for. Some reason is But that's the Knicks play Ju- Joe Right off on. Whatever how everyone in China's got the first name simpler that way but then then we saw a second. Call your body. Yeah Yeah So. That's there are a lot of things that got lost in translation. Let alone I would assume then that your great grandfather grandfather. They knew that wasn't their last name. But because that was now legally their last now why they just they just rolled with data. They just rolled with it. And I mean we actually one of the families that is featured on our film We had an interesting time. Labeling everybody because the brothers name is Chow. The father's name is Joe Tongue in but spelled i. m. and then the oldest brother was is happy. Am I M M so like all three of them? All related had different last names partly because things got translated like the real last name is Chow because one of them had it. One of them didn't originally name was joe 'em but that's Chinese sing. Joe Saint Joe Charity. How so again? Their last names wrong to suggest that was interesting. Because we're like. Oh my gosh. We're going to confuse so much. So we had to label them as easily as we could. And it'll be the same thing with I mean in. Finding Cleveland is showed that My my grandfather's store was bought by the done fam- right but does not a Chinese last name either D. U. N. That's the same thing they were like. Well we're not done. We're chows right but they're also they called. Us Dunn's because my grandfather you know that lady's grandfather father was was Joe d- done with child like in Chinese was child. Something done they are thinking. The grandfather's comes to immigration. And he's only in those few words is and he says the officer we done. Y- Oh okay almost missed with only you could say that so you know what we're talking about right now is like you got a lot of questions that actually raise more questions for yourselves that this there was much more to this story right to explorer to discover right more questions that need answers and I mean I think there's some practical considerations As you have a certain budget for a short film right And then it's like okay you know and We've got our mind when we're going to be done shooting at all this stuff and now it's like how many more gotta go back to so we thought originally so. How did you that adjustment? I mean this thing exploded. Maybe that's too much but expanded that the very expanded. Well what's funny is. We had so many people that had seen the short film and they're like well. I can't. I can't imagine this being longer like when we kept telling making a longer film they just thought we were gonNA just stretch out fifty eleven minutes. And so there'd be like twenty more minutes explaining. He should have paid a final. Like our new film is not just an extended cruising. We go way beyond that. In an honest lead there was so much more history and so many more interviews and stories that we couldn't even include. I mean we probably have forty fifty hours of footage that we just didn't end up using because the bottom line is this. Momo's about Bowden's family and we were seeing the history through their eyes and I also think like we were kind of just. We didn't know anything when I went to Mississippi and so in the last four years we collected all this knowledge of this history and background that I think we wanted everybody to know and unfortunately we had an earlier version but we threw everything in there and it was just too overwhelming fire. Hose out. No exactly we talked. We talked about Kim Arc and birthright citizenship..

Chew Baldwin Baldwin Lou US joe Chew Joan Liu Angel Island researcher Kim Shaw Henry Yager Joe Saint Joe Charity Lou L. O. U. xerox Chow Seattle Kim Jong Bancroft Library Kim Arc Sacramento Joe Tongue wing Goo
"larissa" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

06:29 min | 1 year ago

"larissa" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Guest today are the lamb in Baldwin? Chew and they are here to talk about a movie that I once knew as finding Cleveland and I think it was two plus years ago. Yeah yeah because it was still had an office at fuller seminary. That's where you came are very very first screening of it actually got a little bit better and But yeah our little low budget. No budget film. That's turned into a seventy six minute feature. Yeah called far. East deep. South is a terrific title. Thank you One of my time marker is. Your daughter was like two and a half. That's right I see six and a half now. So yeah that's exactly correct right so. I just I just know this has been a journey and there is kind of the world premiere screening at. What does it sin? Quezon cynic West Film Festival up in Redwood City and San Jose. So there's three showings I'm on up front. We'll say it again at the end it's going to be March seventh and March eighth and March fourteenth. Okay we'll be there. We'll be at all okay so people can go too far as far as deep South Dot COM to check out the screenings and actually the time and how to buy tickets and all of that all okay so again. I listened to that episode initially today and I was like. Oh even my introduction. I was right on the cusp of leaving my my office. And my job at fuller and kind of working through retiring as a pastor. So we've been part of your journey. Yeah all right so this is interesting to me. How much has changed in my life meant because now in my home studio? I've been retired for over two podcasts superstar. Now you look exactly the same actually look better Wow Wow less less stress. Probably yeah definitely less stress. So so what? I'll give you my first impression when I saw that. Eleven minutes something. It always felt like a trailer but more importantly to me. It's still kind of felt like a home movie right. Which was okay now. We're making a movie so I watched a couple of weeks ago. The completed feature length film and it just blew me away. 'cause this this is a documentary film. It happens to be focused on one family especially your Father Baldwin this this whole journey but the transformation from how you originally were shopping it around right to what is today as is about to make its world premiere. I want to hear that story. Yeah well it's it's been a long journey. I mean initially. I think we started out. Just going on that family vacation as we shared with you the first time You know this is now five years ago. We took the fateful trip as a family. Trip to Cleveland Mississippi. Just to go visit Baldwin's grandfather and great grandfathers grave site and what turned into just kind of a series of amazing discoveries. Without spoiling too much for the audience we just discovered not only connections. People had to ball family but also these historical revelations. That's why we did the first film and you know people started asking us after we had a a lot of success. Touring that shortfall. Even though it was a low budget kind of home video for some reason I think the story of discovery in the distort story of reconnecting with your roots in an unlikely place really struck a chord with people and so We did over one hundred screenings since we saw across the country. I mean we even went to the US Department of Education just last. May So we're going up to the upper echelons of government and people leadership with a home video with the home and going going into schools and just seeing how different classrooms and universities are now trying to incorporate the story of the Chinese Mississippi after seeing our film we knew that you know it was shortfall. And you know like people. Just don't take short film seriously and we got so much traction out of that that we really felt like we need to do a feature film especially since after we left that first trip we discovered so much more. Not just about Baldwin's family but also how the interesting dynamics between the African American community and the Chinese and the south and just that historical aspect that we didn't have time in eleven minutes to unpack and honestly at the time. We didn't even know how much that history just really impacted all of us. Yeah and I think it was really When we started this journey and we and people started asking US those questions. Well what about this? How did this happen? Why how did you get the Mississippi? What happened after you left Mississippi? Did you meet anybody else like all these questions were coming up during our Q? And A. Session for the thirteen minute finding Cleveland and it led us to really ask. Well what did happen? Why did it happen? All we knew for finding Cleveland was what happened on those two days lessons and so we started really asking those questions. We went back to my father and said like. Hey what's going on like you know what happened. How did you get there? How did you get here? You know why didn't you ever tell us? We have to go define Cleveland and then we started doing more research and I think one of the one of the screens was in New York. Yes I think that was a strong point when we went to New York and we showed the film and somebody and somebody said to us. We'll have you ever been to the National Archives. Were like national. Chinese people would be in there. Yeah I don't I don't know. Have you been to the one in San Bruno which is in New York next San Francisco? And we're like what's there they'll have you seen the exclusion files for your family's exclusion five and and that's where you know. There is that the whole idea of the segregated south and during the Jim Crow era that was one aspect of our story. But then all of a sudden you're trying to question like why was their families separated and then the Chinese exclusion act came into play and so we took a little field trip to the national archives in and honestly I actually had stopped filming in. I think it was two thousand sixteen. We went to Mississippi for the last time we had film crew out there. We did all these wonderful interviews with people there and I thought my movie was done. And then we went to the National Archives in San Francisco a San Bruno and then we uncovered exclusion files and certificate. I'm.

Cleveland Mississippi Baldwin National Archives fuller seminary San Bruno Chinese Mississippi New York San Francisco US US Department of Education Chew Quezon Jim Crow Redwood City San Jose African American community
"larissa" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

10:50 min | 1 year ago

"larissa" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Baldwin shoe and the recent lamb they are co host of podcast love discovery and dim sum and check that out on apple and all the podcasts platforms. It's an enlightening podcast about love history. Entertainment Chinese food and whatever else enters into their fevered creative minds. But we're we don't talk about their podcast On this particular episode This is actually a follow up Of An episode. We did a couple years ago About a documentary film that they then called finding Cleveland that has now been completed called. Far East deep South. And you're going to hear a lot more about the journey of basically what it took to take This initial footage. That was never intended to be a movie for other people to see and As they continue to research in meet a people who had ties to Baldwin's family's past in Mississippi It became obvious that this was a much bigger story that needed to be told and data as you'll hear me say in the interview. I just super impressed with both of them The team that they have formed and especially with the Reza a cinch This is a new half that she's wearing as director of a documentary film It's just a fantastic and so Folks are going to have a chance to see the world premiere of this final version of the movie at cynic West Film Festival up in the Silicon Valley San Jose area This coming weekend so You can listen to the episode after my introduction and to hear more details about all of that I also wanted to let all you listeners out there who are big instagram. -Ere's no that for last month or so my co-producer Alison. Chang has made us instagram Present if I can say that Yeah we have a presence on instagram now. A called Asian America podcast and so please follow along You'll see links to things on our facebook page and little comments and articles and interesting things about the previous and current guests but You know we are trying our best to increase our social media presence so If again this is something that you do. I'm not a big instagram or but Allison is and so I really encourage you to check that out and follow us there as well a couple of weeks ago my wife and I had a chance to go out to dinner before choir practice and We Park our car in the Old Town Pasadena. Parking structure next to the church and then we wandered a couple blocks Kind of heading in a direction of familiar places and we happened to cross in front of restaurant that we'd never seen before The color scheme was red and white. I had this Japanese American feel to it and it was also called by a Japanese sounding name. I won't name it but the the Tagline Under the name of the sign said The Best Teriyaki in Pasadena. Now you know we've had Teriyaki for years and years and years. I'm we're not necessarily you know kind of people that have to go out there and get Teriyaki but we said hey you know it's a new place it's close and You know fingers crossed the top. It's good so we can come back here and maybe even bring some folks from Church so we go in and does very clean and find out from the two lady said a running this that they're the CO owners in it spun only open As of that point about fifteen days so obviously they were excited with the only ones in there at the time. It was a little bit early for the typical dinner crowd. But we weren't so we went ahead. My wife ordered the chicken Teriyaki beef Teriyaki and yes the. It's the typical griddle thing where they're doing the meet up right when you order it and that that little kind of chopped up Cabbage and carrots and onions also done on the grill on the site and they only put better vice and very very generous portions his problem when we took our first bite of this. We both looked at each other. We said this is not Teriyaki. I mean this taste like Teriyaki at all. It was salty. Not Sweet my wife can put it this way. She said this is kind of like when we're back in college in the dorms and the dorms cafeteria declared that it was Asian food night and this is like something they would call Teriyaki but it is not teriyaki right and then the rice was not Japanese. Rice it was more I would say Middle Eastern rice if that makes sense if you've ever had falafel or a shish Kebab or something like that the kind of vice it comes where it's more of a kind of grains that don't really stick together at all so then you know as we're paying more attention to these two co owners has more people kind of wandering to place orders. It seemed to us will definitely these two proprietors were not asia-american not Japanese American. They seem actually more like Middle Eastern American and on on the one hand. You know They they were saying to one of the customers that they're very proud of the fact that they had actually mix their own teriyaki sauce which they use non GMO. You know Blah Blah Blah kind of source ingredients and so was much healthier Our problem was okay. That's drew a take word for it but it's not Teriyaki and then you're sciences. It's the Best Teriyaki in Pasadena in so you're already kind of putting yourself in this category. Now I started feeling like I was up against a personal dilemma Because you know obviously they really wanted to make a good impression on some of that really customers especially Asian American ones. Do I say anything to them do I do I tell them that? This is like dorm food. Who's right now? I could have started off with something very positive and say you know I. I really honestly want to commend you to for not culturally appropriating. Japanese rice in making your Teriyaki. You're using rice. It seems to me is is more coming from your cultural background That being the case I think this would have been a perfect situation. Where if you had used japanese-american rice no no one Who's coming here for the best? Teriyaki town would have Accused of being you know stealing Japanese culture. I think in in this case this. This really needs to be happening here. You need Japanese rice and so I could start off on the very positive I guess as positive and then kind of got into the fact that the sauce that they have you know very proudly concocted themselves is nothing like teriyaki sauce the more debated. Oh my gosh you know it's like how receptive are they going to be you know? Do They WanNa hear this at this time. Then you know the flipside is will have someone especially Asian American. Who knows what Teriyaki beef and chicken is supposed to taste like? If someone doesn't tell them then the other customers eventually gonNa tell them and by just not coming back anymore and they'll go out of business so I didn't say anything. We walked out. They smile thanked thanked US profusely. You know we. We waved and gave them that kind of Japanese. No like Oh you're going to be back and it's like later. I actually had a dream a couple of days later where I actually wrote down some of my suggestions in a piece of paper and I slid under the door for the opened not confrontational. I was telling our twenty year daughter about this and because she likes to eat town. She's home from college and she said dead issue just give him a bed yelp review. So we're we're having this conversation and haunt about doing that then. She kind of retracted that well. That's to public that that that maybe she just send the YELP message. Now you can do that so let me tell me. I looked them up on yelp and they had like eleven reviews and they've already been given four and a half stars out of five so obviously there are people out there who've tasted this food that don't have a problem with it at all And I actually started typing a yelp message to them to kind of look what I've explained to you here and then I just stopped i. I don't know if it's just a capitalistic mentality of let the market decide rate. I mean may we're not GONNA eat there again. If they don't change shout they do this but if they get four and a half stars out of five from there. Verse Eleven reviews. Maybe they'll survive. You know that's that's not my concern or maybe it's not about being this this kind of capitalistic thinker. But maybe it's just more you know. I don't want to make waves on the Asian Asian American Because I I don't really know what they do with that feedback and you know I take again. I'm taking it up to them. They obviously is not a franchise in by. They came up with this idea and somewhere along the line you know. They got encouragement. And maybe some financial backing to do this dream. But I think it sure would help the their future success a lot if they would have gotten feedback from people who are Asian American one and two who actually know what.

Teriyaki yelp Pasadena Asian Asian American We Park Baldwin Cleveland Asian America Mississippi instagram apple Old Town Pasadena facebook Alison Reza Chang US director Allison
"larissa" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

06:31 min | 1 year ago

"larissa" Discussed on KOMO

"York on Monday here's ABC's Alex stone in Los Angeles Harvey Weinstein still faces rape charges here in California involving women who say he assaulted them in LA and Beverly hills some of his accusers here in LA are now speaking out celebrating the guilty verdicts on two counts in New York actress Roseanne our Cassidy is truly a landmark moment for survivors of rape accuser Larissa Gomes in my mind I no longer trapped in a hotel room with Harvey Weinstein forever because I am here now with all these fierce women find streams legal team says it will appeal the New York verdict Alex stone ABC news Los Angeles the price you pay for potatoes could be going up at the grocery store it's happening after ten million dollars of losses of potato crops in the schedule valley come was Abby Oconee has how this could affect the economy across the region and that's right it's called the red chief that sherry Nelson has farmed in this gadget valley for more than fifty years growing potatoes is his passion four five different varieties in the aisles Jerry gases that he lost up to twelve percent of his potatoes this year due to the relentless rains early in the fall on me as I've ever gone through in the fall across this canton valley experts say that farmers were unable to harvest an estimated three square miles of potatoes those losses are valued between five and ten million dollars meanwhile Jerry wouldn't be surprised if that number was fifteen million or higher hello through your mind I replanted in next year when you're going through something like that to Tate is typically bring in roughly sixty million dollars to sketch it county growers every year this industry provides a lot of jobs in the area what is the impact to the economy the labor force due to all of these right our season's going to be shorter and so it's going to affect the the labor force these losses to local potato crops may hit other businesses too we talked to the owner of a restaurant in Mount Vernon he says he may need to get his potatoes elsewhere for now until the next crop is harvested I'm the best in the world you know we can source from other areas qualities justice minister is what comes on the schedule agricultural expert I talked to with the WCC it's normal for farmers to harvest all of their crops every year but losses on this size are rare a county come on is some tours will be flying high ABC's Dave Shriver explained Yvonne must California based SpaceX plans to launch up to four tourists into a super high orbit and this could take place by the end of next year the private company in space adventures thank are working on the flight ticket prices have not been disclosed but are expected to be in the millions Tracy ventures this put tourists into orbit with trips to the international space station with the aid of the Russian space program this triple skipped the space station in orbit two to three times higher or about five hundred to seven hundred fifty miles above earth David Freiberg B. C. news at twenty and fifty past the hour on komo news will propel insurance money update another big sell off on Wall Street on a day U. S. health officials indicated the corona virus will likely become a global pandemic the major indexes all tumbled at least two and three quarter percent the Dow industrials have dropped more than nineteen hundred points now over the last two sessions after the close toll brothers reported quarterly earnings and revenue that we're site analyst estimates the news has told shares sharply lower in after hours trading as expected Amazon today opened its first full size cashierless grocery store in Seattle of course the Amazon go grocery store on Capitol Hill with about ten thousand four hundred square feet uses an array of cameras shelf sensors and software to allow shoppers using a smartphone app to pick up items as varied as organic produce and wine and walk out without having to stop and pay or scan merchandise that's your money now I'm Jim Tesco colonus secretary of state Mike Pompeii is defending the U. S. response to the corona virus outbreak insisting that America is leading the world's response to the public health crisis we've got fifty three cases in the U. S. now including thirty six passengers who were on the diamond princess cruise ship off Japan Pompeii says covert nineteen cases in the U. S. are being isolated and that the state department has issued proven travel restrictions Pompeii slamming around for not being candid about the outbreak there the Iranian regime may have suppressed vital details about the outbreak in that country around's official corona virus death toll is fifteen not fifty as others have claimed meantime the journal a Massachusetts biotech company says it's developed the first cove it nineteen vaccine and has sent it to the CDC for human testing health updates Saralee Kessler NBC news radio a local man who had a heart attack while he was working out got the chance to thank those who helped save his life people noticed something was wrong with Thomas loop that's when a teacher at the gym jumped in to perform CPR firefighters got loose heart beating again before rushing him to Harborview in critical condition captain Kevin Flanagan says there are two big things you can do learn CPR and download a smartphone app called Paul's point we also have people arriving to us that had been notified by this application on their cell phones alerts you to anytime there is as CPR or cardiac events that's within a certain range of distance from you Luke was surprised by the ordeal and says he exercises regularly doesn't drink or smoke and considers himself very healthy in opioid maker wants people to know where they can file lawsuits against the bankrupt company ABC's Ryan burrow reports to form of the maker of oxycontin is launching nearly twenty four million dollar ad campaign telling people where they can file claims against the company as it seeks to resolve nearly three thousand lawsuits over its role in the opioid crisis had started online this week with more coming in newspapers television magazines radio billboards movie theaters and other locations in the weeks to come Purdue pharma filed for bankruptcy in the fall settlement could top ten billion dollars Ryan burl ABC news traffic.

York ABC Alex stone Harvey Weinstein California Los Angeles rape
A California City is Giving 'No Strings Attached' Cash to Residents

Investor's Edge

01:25 min | 2 years ago

A California City is Giving 'No Strings Attached' Cash to Residents

"Residents of Stockton, California have been through a lot from widespread foreclosures to the city going bankrupt. Starting on Friday a bunch of Stockton residents will be getting a monthly payment of five hundred dollars. This is known as the universal basic income married up larissa's senior fellow with the national taxpayer's union. She explains more about this program in Stockton on Fox News. A very targeted narrow program. It's not really a UB program at all. What it does it affect four percent of the population in Stockton. It goes this five hundred dollars coming out only goes to people below a certain income, which is actually the opposite of UPI programming. UPI program says everyone regardless of income, regardless. Exactly get the pay out there thinking being that this gets rid of the disincentives for people who are getting aid to not find work now in Finland and in Canada. They've tried these programs, and they have found the opposite to be true. And they found that by paying people not to work you don't create any incentives to watch people to the workforce anymore. As far as if these programs worked up ler says, it's amazing to me proponents WBAI program. They say that this is a way to get rid of inequality and to help people who can't work, but you look at the examples of places that have tried this that have really robust social safety net. And they even say that this does nothing to try and correct. Those inequalities and everywhere Finland and Canada as I mentioned before that I've tried this program have cancelled that because they have shown to be ineffective

Stockton UPI Finland Larissa Senior Fellow California UB Canada Fox News Five Hundred Dollars Four Percent
"larissa" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"larissa" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Pity barbara bush has died at her home in texas at the age of ninety two family spokesman jim mcgrath confirming her death more than once president george walker bush told a young audience my advice is listen to your mother bush fortythree may have listened to his mom but he also made what came to be a familiar joke at her expense i did with my family my mother wasn't cooking mr bush described his mother as strong and stern not surprising since she was the center of the family when her husband the first president bush was busy moving up the political ladder now to say that same fellow that i used to drive around in little league car pools and i used to yell at two please pick up is wrong to see him as president truly amazing barbara bush had six children one daughter robin died young of leukemia leading mrs bush to say that made her love every living human more there's no doubt that her other kids including the one who grew up to live in the white house loved barbara bush very much one of the sweetest words in a row cabbie larissa is mom steve kafe and cbs news again former first lady barbara bush has died at the age of ninety two at her home in houston in your mouth honoring fallen police officer the sea of blue hundreds of police officers from around the country march in procession to the church for the week of officer sean gannon killed last week in the line of duty people lining the route to the church as the hearse carrying gammons coffin pass by the police department down here is amazing they do a great job i mean it's it's a tough world now so it's just it's hard we feel like we've lost a family member you know i support the police officers and firefighters and niro supporting era too much better tonight blue lights will illuminate bridge in boston and the burns bridge over lakeland segment in worcester in honor of officer gannon his funeral is tomorrow in yarmouth the passenger killed in an emergency landing in philadelphia today has been identified as jennifer reardon a bank executive and mother of two from new mexico southwest airlines jet plane blew an engine and got hit by shrapnel that smashed a window having to make.

sean gannon mexico jennifer reardon gammons mr bush george walker bush executive philadelphia worcester burns bridge boston barbara bush officer houston cbs steve kafe white house mrs bush robin president
"larissa" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"larissa" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"A probe has been launched to the michigan state university after a former campus doctor was sentenced up to one hundred seventy five years in prison for sexually abusing patients correspondent jim because ours reports michigan's attorney general has also appointed a special council they said that this investigation will be independent thorough transparent and thronged and although they did not specifically say that this was a criminal investigation what was said is that they will look to see what the facts are and where the facts take them at least ninety five people have been killed in afghanistan's capital following a suicide carbombing correspondent nick payton walsh ace was in the securest todd really of kabul moving european commission other diplomatic missions as well and that enormous hospital to go through one checkpoint than the police took the mon than they detonated the bomb the taliban has claimed responsibility for the attack which also left one hundred fifty eight wounded i'm anne cates this is science today in the last few decades one of the most rapidly growing areas in research is the quest to understand how the human brain works and the severe consequences when the brain goes awry the biggest challenge according to neuro biologist jack feldman of ucla is at the brain is probably the most complex object and the universe i realize that other people have said that put this probably true through eighty billion neurons the role connected to each other so by the time to go through the combat it toils the numbers just could get to be totally out of hand we need to be able to understand things one way of doing this to try and tackle the simple problems first to provide a foundation for the more complex problems feldman and his colleagues are working on just that by pinpointing the brain sign reflects their findings will help any under standing of the neural control of breathing which has broader implications for lung function we would like to understand what the mechanisms are to be able to fight therapies for thing like sids in sleep apnea and red syndrome and so on and so forth for science today i'm larissa branin with zillow you not just.

michigan state university jim michigan afghanistan todd taliban anne cates jack feldman ucla larissa branin zillow attorney nick payton kabul one hundred seventy five years
"larissa" Discussed on The Forward with Lance Armstrong

The Forward with Lance Armstrong

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"larissa" Discussed on The Forward with Lance Armstrong

"Wanna tours one us yeah yeah okay at one or two l a r i s s a c o n n o r s tuko but you you you blogger journal every week we i used to write a lot more but i think the most the nicest thing people ever say is that they read my blog because when i started writing someone said a lot of people have a lot to say about very little and then i was like wow this has got to be interesting if people are going to read it and then people tell me it's inspiring how cool is that will you dude dude it i did i mean and this is the i'm going to get to in a second put but getting up early ryan does school doing all that man i'm not used to be worse as after we got four o'clock in the morning this is heaven waking up at five are you kidding and my bike commute commuters the best by commute it's like all black without of course is the best oh will you come to orange county and you do it you'll see it's the best bike him you i'm in this kenyan is beautiful the sun is coming up and then i'm on his bike up i never have to cross the road nostop whites it's a perfect hour it's all downhill so i don't get sweaty it's never cold in orange county it's the pastor we just gives more aspen trees listen to music known on the way to school i don't know why i'm still asleep i'm in writing more with music and who i always thought i would i always thought that was not a good idea you're not like overstimulated when just hearing was of you're on the road listening for cars and it's it's.

orange county ryan two l