22 Burst results for "Lapointe"

"lapointe" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

Main Engine Cut Off

07:28 min | 1 d ago

"lapointe" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

"Rosa kinda came. About as a you know. Funded by these. Spa are small. business programs. Do about technology with less support from the air force. Research lab early on nasa About the new. No there's always this desired these new high-performing saray design so You know we spent a lot of time with these kind of smaller programs. Developing the technology In a taken that big step of getting used into the into the market over these these asked ten years or so We're fortunate enough to to get funding from air. Force research lab nasa. Sm see to do this. Experiment demonstration mission on isis. Back in two thousand seventeen and that was the first chance we had to really showcases technology on orbit For the general public. We've been doing a lot of work up to that. Point with various customers with commercial and government developing rosa for different Applications and right around that time. We did that. Demonstration mission Working with boeing and nasa there was definite desire to era a needle safe the increase of power on s or. They realized that the current raise up there right now or or degrading a little bit faster than they had Spaded so You know boeing and after they saw me to do add more additional power eighth abilities to extend the life of existing systems up there but also enable any sort of future missions and along the light of of space station so right around that time twenty seventeen. We began developing this. This program with boeing and it was a little under the radar or for a while Just with everything going on with s and I think there was a out of a desire to keep it. Low key until we got further along in the in the design and development process And then yeah. Yeah we We proceed wing the first two wings and deliver them and iriarte. Today we have The first up on orbit and early working on wings three and four. That are gonna be delivered later this year and then five or six shortly all after that. I'm curious about the The the interaction there about the isis program and your demonstration mission. Right you did this on. I assess the first time. Did you have an idea at the time that this would be a good upgrade for the i assess the long list of missions that rose is going to be used on. I think that was pretty lengthy at the time as well that that you had your eyes on. Certain missions is on there but I guess what i'm getting at is is what is the the the fit for of the actual technical aspects of rosa. Did that feel like a good match from day one. Yeah you know for For us rosa. I think it would be it. It kinda was perfect technology. If you were gonna add more power to. I assess it's very The way deploys and and how it can package it in the launch vehicles Us seemed like a perfect that so When nelson boeing's restarted expressing interest About using it you know it was kinda around all that same timeframe so definitely that flight experiment was a big at a push and they you know they definitely saw the benefits of using of rosa. And and what it can do for representing station. So yeah it was all kind of great On nation things that all happened around that time frame and and We were fortunate enough that nasa was looking for a solution and no rosa was really a a perfect fit for what they needed. So the stowage part that you mentioned there that the ability for this to be packaged a lot smaller from understanding than competing designs and things like that that that seems like a pretty big motivation because of constraints that nasr's dealing with with unpressurised cargo zazi. Basically if you fit in a dragon shrunk. You're good to go. Otherwise i don't even know what you would. You'd have to like make a new space to get to is s with something much more sizable so and it certainly looked like you were maxing out the trunk. Area of dragon design constraint. Early on that you knew that was the package that you had to fit into. Yeah no that was That was definitely one of the key. Designed drivers was being able to In the dragon. Yeah you're absolutely right without. The space are the space shuttle allowed or a lot larger payloads and things to lie and so with that no longer an option It's definitely a space is definitely a strength that we have work around so we maxed out as much volume as we could In the dragon truck were down to the last quarter of an inch or so of what we were allowed to. So we we really packed in as much as we could To to meet the power requirement that boeing and nasa are looking or and Yeah luckily with the rose design. We have A lot of different options in wha- what we can do with the design the iras wings that were flying an i assess. That's our folded rosa design. So we do have other applications Like the flight experiment is one example. Where that that array Old we didn't have that need to fit it in a smaller envelope but Yeah we have different options for packaging. And and the the arrays gonna be flying for the Lunar gateway are walsh element. Those are all going to be a folded rosa design if it on their vehicle so yeah if if we customers are looking for big power that's a good way to package a lot In a small area now the cells themselves that are that are on these I think some references to your site that it it was a boeing that actually makes the cells themselves on the solar race and you are more focused on the deployment system is at the kind of breakdown of the system. Yes so us here at red wire. We don't actually produce a source itself so we we basically Cure the cells from a handful suppliers. So for iras. A we were using cells from Uppity spectra lab who is a city area by And they're they're one of two or three kind of key suppliers of of source for space And they have a a cell. That package is really nice. With what What we wanted to include on rosa but The head of really nice thing about the rosa technologies we we can really incorporate any cell technology. That's out there.

ten years Today first chance first time first four one example rosa five two one three later this year six of an inch twenty seventeen nasa day one two thousand seventeen Uppity spectra lab
"lapointe" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

Main Engine Cut Off

05:56 min | 1 d ago

"lapointe" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

"Hello and wealth manager off. I'm anthony colangelo today. We're gonna talk. About the newest upgrade to the i assess the rollout solar arrays that are in the process of being deployed. He's going to be six different wings deployed on the i The first one is deployed. Now the second one is kinda halfway there given some scheduling that. We will talk about in this. Show the rollout solar ray upgrades the that took some of us. By surprise early in the year it was kind of under the radar for a while and then nasa posted a press release. That said we're flying six new solar rays to the space station this year and they're really really cool pieces of technology. They are as they as the name implies they roll out. So they're all rolled up when they get launched than they get Put in place. And they deploy under some really interesting mechanisms. That require no motors or anything like that. No moving parts just unfurling with its own support structure. So i wanted to talk to a couple. Different people from red wire renoirs accompanied that holds a couple of other companies that you may or may not have heard of maiden space deployable space systems among others those two just pertinent to the conversation today. I we're gonna be talking to matt lapointe. Who is the technical director for the rollout. Solar ray program formerly at deployable space systems. I can still at deployable seat space systems as part of red wire. And then we're gonna talk to andrew rush. You may remember his name because he was on the podcast almost two years ago when he was at the time. The ceo of maiden space maiden space became part of red wire and andrew. Rush moved to be ceo of red wire the parent company. So he's going back on the show to talk about some of the future looking aspects to the rollout solar ray program the There's a lot of missions that are gonna be using this in the near future. And i want to talk a little bit about general strategy because they are the experts with deployable or in space assembly systems in space today. So i wanna talk about you. Know everything from the technical background of the rollout solar ray program through the what does this mean for red wire overall and i think the too perfect guests to do that. So that's what we're doing here today but before we get into talking to matt i wanna say thank you to all of you out there. Who made this episode of main engine. Cutoff possible there are six hundred fifty. Eight supporters of main engine cutoff every single month and that includes forty one executive producers. Thank you brandon matthew. Simon laura melissa. Chris patten matt. George ryan donnelly chris. Warren bob russell maurice jol yon grant david eunice rob. Tim dodd the everyday astronaut. Frank join the lars agile. Space tommy match the astra gators at. Sei chris aegis. Trade lol. Fred and seven anonymous executors. Thank you for making this show possible. If you want to help support the show head over to main engine cutoff dot com slash support and join the crew. There you can get an entire other podcast in your feet. Every week called meco headlines where i talk about. All of this story is going on in space. It's great way to stay up with news and support the podcast but now that we thank all of you Let's get into our conversation with matt. Thank you so much for joining me here on main engine cutoff. It's a pleasure to have you in the. I'm sure a very exciting week. As everything is we're we're still mid deployment of the solar rays at are up on station. So how's your week. Been going with all this happening now. Thanks for having me yet yeah. It's a really exciting time here. Yeah we have one of two Down so we're looking forward to friday a wing number two deployment Yeah definitely a lot of buzz and excitement. We can't wait for that. That second wing to be deployed in a surplus power. It was an interesting time. Because i s evs tend to go relatively without any issues and then they're always like oh. We're ahead of schedule. We're doing like nine. Other tests the e v. they had some issues. I think this. I was travelling during the second. Uva was there also some things that were getting worked during the second. Yeah unfortunately shane suit at a couple issues on both will as they also had a little bit trouble with a thermal cover that goes over the hatch so Yeah definitely set us back a little bit on the first day And unfortunately we they ended up having to at at early before they could get through the full installation So yeah you know things happen. It's it's never easy with human spaceflight. It's there's always challenges in and come up in tomorrow and shane. They did an amazing job on these days. Overcame these challenges to make Make that deployment happen so We couldn't be more happy and you know we're hoping thirty. Va everything goes according to plan and no more sued issues of for exactly so. I wanted to talk a little bit about the historical context for the work. That's happening this year because i. I don't think i was unique in this. I was surprised in january when nasa put up this press release that they were upgrading. the solar rays on station. I don't think many people knew about it. Because i sent a lot of surprise from many people in the industry as well that i was talking to about that at the time And i know you had a demo mission back in twenty seventeen of the the smaller scale rollout solar ray that assume lead into the upgrades that are going on station this year. So could you give us some context on on the program overall to this point and how it got to this level of of like now we're going to upgrade six of the eight wings on station. How did that all come about. Yeah yeah definitely so so rosa as a product line we've we've been developing For a little over a decade now we were deployable space systems. Our were are the.

anthony colangelo january andrew rush Frank George ryan donnelly Rush matt lapointe Tim Simon laura melissa Eight supporters today friday Fred this year Warren bob russell both first one thirty two years ago two
Interview With Shane Balkowitsch

Photography Radio

06:02 min | 4 months ago

Interview With Shane Balkowitsch

"Well hello everyone and welcome to another podcast from frames magazine my name is scott olsen and today we are going old school and we are going deep into a really really wonderful type of photography. That's not practice very much anymore and really frankly when you see it. It's going to knock your socks off. We're talking with shane belkevich. Shane happens to live just a couple hours. West of me out here on the great plains of north america up north dakota chain that afternoon. How's everything out in the middle part of the state. good scott. thanks for having me on. We've got a little snow last night. Which was a very welcomed. Got a little snow over here. It's cold it's january is imagine about winner on the american that should be asked should be. You're absolutely right shane. You are just absolutely mesmerizing with the work. You're doing you do wet plate colin on photography. You do when one of the earliest styles of photography and admit you know. When i first heard about it i thought why in the world would anyone want to go through that amount of work for an image that i can do in my mirrorless. Dsl are very quickly. And then i realized how wrong. I was can't do that image and i certainly can't come up with a product that you've come up with so first question for people that that are familiar with the process. What is wet plate photography. What is the whole call it on process. Yeah so a wet plate clothing. Photography's invented by frederick scott archer in. He started working on about eighteen. Forty eight we believe in eighteen fifty one. He came out with a journal article in a scientific journal and presented it to the world. So what we're doing. I'm sure many of your listeners. Know about daguerreotype process which was invented by the declare. The frenchman About ten years. Before what plaguing frederick scott archer wanted to improve on that and This is what he came up with and the final product. And what your comment about why. You can't capture wet played in a modern a digital camera. Is that this is completely analog and the final images the images that i make. I an amber typist. That means i make my photographs on glass specifically for me black glass and these images are made out a pure silver on glass. And what's about silver silver does not degrade so these images that i have Have made over the last eight years of made a three eight hundred of them all by ten most most eight by ten black last amber types of they'll be here thousand years from now broken which which is not something you can save for princeton pigments in paintings and other things like that so the these are very archival images and i. it's just a very very romantic process. i was never photographer before. A two thousand twelve took my first exposure on october. Fourth never owned a camera. And i just find myself chasing this this historic process. It is really really interesting and we need to tell people that there is a movie out. There is called belkevich b. a. l. k. o. w. i t. s. c. h. on video. It's on amazon. Prime it is a documentary about you and your work and folks. You need to go there. You need to watch this film if you are in the any kind of photography. You need to do this but shane one of the things. That really intrigued me. Watching the film is that most of us that are in the photography files were making digital files. Or you know. We're coming up even if we're still dealing with old thirty five millimeter film or that kind of stuff Medium format film. You know we come up with a negative but then you know actual print is a temporary thing. You much more like a sculptor are making an object's this glass plate and it's not revisable you can't go back and tweak the highlights you can't go back and ask grain if you want. What is the appeal of making that object versus a kind of idea. We have to understand most web play. Cloudy and artists There was one here in bismarck. North dakota orlando scott gough. When he he was known for capturing the first ever photograph of sitting. Bull here bismarck. In the in this process that i practice and i i happen to capture ernie lapointe the great grandson. The city hundred thirty five years later in the same town in the same process but goth would have made a negative like you had said he would make a glass of so instead of putting his images onto black glass which you cannot contact with. He would have used clear glass. Clear glass as you insinuated. You can make multiple copies and you can enter. The final product in that scenario is a print. Because you want to be able to sell you know apprentice shayna print scott where wants to print you can make as many prints of these want is your business and it. Did you know good to have a one off plate because you and you know when you're talking about eighteen fifty one is no way of duplicate and they didn't have scanners and we couldn't do anything like that so you know. I think there's something very special about the the fact that these images are one offs and they can never be duplicated in they can never be replicated. When i make one of these images. I've for instance. I've dropped an image once and tried to go five minutes later. Ten minutes later tried to make this image with the same sitter the same camera. The same lenses saint chemistry. And i can never get back to that so if you look at this romantically. I'm not actually taking snapshots people actually making ten second movies. I'm still life movies. Because my exposures in my natural studio that i built here in bismarck. It's called nostalgic glassware plate studio the first one in in the country bill of the ground up and over a hundred years. I'm making ten second exposure. So there's heartbeats and there's blood flowing through the person there's a couple. Maybe a blinker to and what. I really love about this is. Maybe there's a thought so. I'm capturing thought on that piece of glass pure silver. That'll be here on.

Frederick Scott Archer Shane Belkevich Scott Olsen Shane North Dakota Colin North America Scott Gough Ernie Lapointe Scott Shayna Print Scott Bismarck Amazon Orlando
Can Airport COVID-19 Testing Encourage More People To Fly?

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:57 min | 8 months ago

Can Airport COVID-19 Testing Encourage More People To Fly?

"So if you're itching to travel the airlines for their part are going to say go ahead and do it many airlines are requiring masks there disinfecting cabins they're touting their hospital great air filtration systems. They're even starting to Cova tests at the airport. Here's NPR's David Schaper. Imagine. A Hawaiian vacation with the lush islands, sparkling beaches. It's the kind of trip people planned for way in advance and then cove. It got in the way we had a trip from last spring that Battie added his wife and four kids postponed their dream vacation back in. March. When Hawaii began requiring every traveler to self quarantine for fourteen days upon arrival that essentially shutdown tourism after all who would wanna fly all the way to Hawaii just to be trapped in their hotel room for two weeks. But the bad he had a family finally landed Honolulu's airport last week after it opened to those who test negative for the corona virus, we got a rapid test. It took about thirty minutes you know. The NASAL SWAB tests. Everybody's clear. Ever excited in airlines are excited to to get paying customers back on their plane. So they're now offering passengers preflight cove in nineteen testing for some destinations united was the first to announce on the spot preflight testing at San Francisco's airport for Hawaii bound travelers for results fifteen minutes it cost you two, hundred, fifty dollars. There are also cheaper forty eight hour in home or clinic testing options and other airlines are following suit now even some. Airports are getting into the COVID testing game. We do the test right here in the main terminal Tampa. International Airport CEO. Joel Lapointe says his airport is offering travellers to any destination two kinds of tests. The rapid test which will give you results in fifteen minutes cost fifty seven dollars, and then the more accurate our test costs a hundred and twenty five dollars and you get your results within forty eight hours a few other airports now offer testing. To, Henry heartfelt heads the atmosphere research group travel industry research firm what the airlines and airports are trying to do is remove every possible obstacle. People have when they start to think about taking a trip but some public health experts our concern because not all of the tests are reliable and what that means is that the likelihood that they will actually identify a positive case in an a symtomatic individual is fairly low Mercedes. Cardin is an epidemiologist at. Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine. You could get a negative test but in fact a day or two later, your viral levels could surge and then you're really quite infectious and so I fear that it provides a false sense of security to do the on the spot testing the less the business travel association's joining others in calling for more widespread airport cove in nineteen testing in an attempt to jump-start industry decimated by the pandemic

Hawaii International Airport David Schaper Cardin NPR Battie Honolulu Joel Lapointe Feinberg School Of Medicine Northwestern University San Francisco CEO Tampa Henry
"lapointe" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

06:10 min | 1 year ago

"lapointe" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

"So this is the part of the episode where we have a few questions from our Hulu subscribers who have watched your segment on your attention please now streaming on Hulu and come up with their own questions. I'm really nervous. Should I be this? Do not be nervous at all? It's just questions from people who are like we like you. WanNa know what you think's solid so our first question is from Tony from Toronto. I Tony How do you use or plan on using your differences to make an impact on E. Sports and East sports leadership love it? Thanks Tony I think there's it by fold answer here. I is very functional into my organization when I walked into. Eg It was twelve men working with a bunch of players under them in a tiny little room and a suburban industrial facility in Washington. And now we are seventy strong men women. Lgbtq plus family people who have kids like. We've just a big diverse group of really strong high performers across two facilities and Seattle and La with even more players beneath us in more titles. And that isn't done just by throwing money at something that is done by setting a vision that people can align and feel comfortable with to not just work for but also perpetuate in that vision is really what. I what I tell my staff. The goal for me is to hear people say I want to work or compete at evil geniuses and the nuance there is. It's not sports. It's not gaming. It's they want to work at this organization because it has the reputation the prestige and the infrastructure to support all different types of people and to be excellent and so then functionally that it's tied into me rolling out. I know I talked earlier about like. Hr Department a Finance Department. Learning in an organizational development initiatives. These are things that maybe sound commonplace in some industries but are very nudity sports a little bit of tying back into our brand identity you know living evil as we say is being comfortable being questioned for what we do and why we do it but we show through results and this is really showing that bringing select parts of what a Lotta gamers will corporate culture or best practices to make a space in workplace environment successful. Bring that in house doing things. Ethically doing things Well documented and scalable. That's what's going to help. Bg Be another top Tier Team for another twenty years. And hopefully we'll set the stage for the rest of the space where. Oh E. G. OFFERS ME XYZ EERIE G supports XYZ. That's where people are gonNA WANNA flock to not just as employees or players but his fans our next question from Dylan from California. Which sport is your favorite one So Love Rocket League title for as a player If I'm to pick amongst all of my my children as I guess I should say Counterstrike is pretty cool. Only because it's completely boggles my mind. It's very difficult first person shooter. Things are very fast paced. And what's interesting about? Counterstrike is survived many many years and what was exciting for me. We re entered counterstrike not too long ago as a title which was one of Evil Genius. I ever games. They played over twelve years ago so to bring that back and bring back such a strong team of really goofy guy is the counterstrike culture's pretty cool. It's bit more street. It's more fun Has Been It's been a cool Group to be with and our last question will be from Linda in Texas. How do you deal with stress? Call it the Iron Church and that is the gym. I think it's it's a hard trap for like professionals in any work environment. You know okay stressful. It's grab drinks. Let's go to happy hour was go. Grab dinner That's fun I found. That's not conducive to my best mental health state my physical health state so I have carved out physical activity as well as social time to really make sure. I'm always breaking my game to the table because stress is hard one issue. I as a new sports team owner One thing I I. Struggle with still is when the team loses I internalize all of those losses which is bad because a a lot of teams that do great and don't agree that I'm send Making sure you know I carve out time to to separate from the work. Identity is work as me in. I am work to our small successes and failures just tried to buffer those a bit more emotionally of been difficult so meant so much feeling so bad and it's terrible one of our titles we compete in. It's it's live and I'll go to the matches and I'm in the front and I know I'm on broadcast live the cameras and I have no fo- poker face whatsoever like I. Our players will make a mistake. I know they made a mistake. My face this showing the made a mistake in the night no one broadcast. Kohl's pistole shit her team doing so I e to counterbalance out of it better. What is it like seeing yourself on those broadcasts? It's it's funny because people will say. Oh you you're so good you must love it. It's not my Intrinsic Comfort Zone Base. Because he had no poker like. I'm over here like dropping F bombs and like getting mad at my poor GM who sits next. Why are they doing this? So it's been a learning experience learning curve for sure. Yeah I can't imagine you're like flipping tape technical fouls sports there are. I luckily have not committed any but you know their players aren't so seized like obscene gestures or say certain things Li by being a bold team. We have gotten into a more than one a little snafus here in the past. But it's okay no foul.

Counterstrike Hulu Tony I Hr Department a Finance Depart Toronto Wan GM Seattle Washington Iron Church Li Dylan Texas La E. G. Kohl Linda California
"lapointe" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"lapointe" Discussed on Your Attention Please - A Hulu Podcast

"A lot of bumps and when I came in, it was. was at a relatively low period for the org struggling both in what they want to be where they want to go and how to get there, and it's been amazing just to see in the past year all the new expansion we've been able to get into. How has that process been? I think it's always really interesting to watch when someone comes in as a new director or CD CO or Or leadership, especially with a relatively like storied organization, like evil genius has quite a reputation in that space, and it seems like you came in and started kicking down doors. What does that process been like for you? I definitely didn't take the path of least resistance looking back, I. Don't know if I would have changed that, but it's been. It's tough because you hit the nail on the head. An organization that has such history and legacy has people in constituents set up strong feelings about what the ORG is, and how it should be run, and how it should present itself, but we had to change what the org had been doing didn't work on a lot of different levels brand, financial reputational, and for us to get not just table. Stakes of what other teams are doing or other organizations are doing we have I want to exceed table stakes, and so a lot of. Of that is taking risks, and it's a delicate balance of listening making sure I don't charge and bulldoze the best elements of that legacy culture or the East sports fan base that really feel strongly for a variety of reasons, but also push.

Travel to the Mississippi Gulf Coast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

10:10 min | 1 year ago

Travel to the Mississippi Gulf Coast

"Let's talk about Mississippi's Gulf coast. I I like to welcome the show Charles. McColl from McCall Travel Dot Com and Charles's come to talk to us about coastal Mississippi Charles. Welcome mm to the show. Hi Chris how are you today. I'm doing well and we're talking about the state of Mississippi. What is your connection with coastal Mississippi? As a travel writer. I have visited the coastal Mississippi a few times over the past two years and after going there three or four times. I decided that I loved that area and other parts of the US Gulf coast. So much that I developed a new brand called. US Golf coast which covers everything from key. West South Padre but we are talking only about coastal Mississippi debut today so as a travel writer I covered it several times. Excellent and why should someone go to coastal Mississippi. We'll we'll talk about many things but it is is unique. The unique destination the United States. It has the longest continuous beach in the United States. Which I think a lot of people don't know I love road road trips? I travel all over the world. Love driving and there's this sense of soul fulfillment I drive on the Mississippi Gulf coast. I where it's just different than anywhere else. You can drive for an hour and not see anything except for the sand in the water is unobstructed by condos and indulge and restaurants. And what have you so this this great peace and calm and different than anywhere else. Excellent and what kind of itinerary tenorio you're going to recommend for us. It's not a singular destination. There are many communities there. So I'm GonNa recommend some things to do in each of the communities go along the coastal Mississippi. It's all still call the Mississippi Gulf coast. So I'M GONNA use both terms interchangeably. I don't want you to drive fifty miles in one day for lunch and then go drive fifty miles back so I will concentrate on the various communities and say all right first day. You're going to be here second day. You're going to be here and so on and we can do a three four five seven ten very well. Let's get into it where you're GONNA start it. Let's start in Pascagoula. So Mississippi is between Alabama and Louisiana China so coastal Mississippi represents the entire Mississippi Gulf coast so over on the east side closest Alabama Alabama. If you're driving from mobile the first thing you're gonna hit is Pascagoula. The city is probably most famous. because it's where Jimmy Buffett was born. Okay I did not I know that. Yeah so that's going to set the expectations for what the coastal Mississippi areas. All about thank Jimmy Buffett was born there so we're already at our five o'clock somewhere attitude. Pascagoula is also a navy base. So there's a lot of military and also industry the street going on there but it's it's a seafaring community. It's laid-back relative to some of the other cities. We'll talk about. Well what are we going GonNa do in Pascagoula one of the things that happened in past the goal of that as I guess lesser known as that one of the biggest UFO abduction stories in in US history happened there. So back in the seventies the couple of people claim that they were abducted by UFO. And so they were never disproven even so. That's one of the most famous things that happened in Pascagoula. Okay but other than being abducted by aliens. What am I going to do in Pascagoula for won a narrow down here to the the oldest house in Mississippi isn't Pascagoula okay? It's called the lapointe Krebs House and museum now so I went. There are a couple of months ago and I was fascinated by Howell. They showed the construction of how house was done in the bleed was the seventeen. Twenty s house was built the How they use the for the the hair from animals as insulation in the house and things like that kind of interesting Seventeen fifty seven. Is there anything specific renovated the Krebs House. We're going to go to the Krebs House. You could probably spend a couple of hours there. It's a nice waterfront setting and you can get some history of the. The natives that lived in the area and then European settlers came in and saw a whole history of Mississippi but the main point there there's to see the the house and the oldest house in the Mississippi Delta region I think between Minnesota and the Gulf of Mexico. It's the oldest house that's still in the American frontier. I'm thinking New Orleans would be older than that but I mean the city might be but I'm not sure if there's a structure that's older than point good point. The city is older but I don't know if there are any of original houses. Okay Fair enough. But another thing that I really loved in Pascagoula. The Motto Bon Center. I believe the official is the best. Gula River Audubon Bond Center captain McCoy Relation on McColl. And there's a captain McCoy and he runs nature trips out of the Pascagoula River River Audubon Center and what I loved about. It is that I learn things. Obviously like you learn on most trips but the Pascagoula River is the longest. And I'm not going to get the the terminology right. It's the longest une damned river in the continental united in a at states. Yeah so I was fascinated by that and I was like well. What about this wherever they were like now? It was dammed at some point. So the Pascagoula River I believe is four four hundred and eighty miles. That is natural the way it's always been so it hasn't been dammed. It hasn't been obstructed by any kind of construction directions so you can see wildlife and nature the way that it was several hundred years ago. Something didn't expect expect to find in coastal Mississippi or anywhere else and you say wildlife. I'm picturing talking marshes birds alligators that sort of thing. Am I in the right right ballpark. You're right and one thing that that's dominant in this area or the Mississippi sandhill cranes which are relatively large bird. I'm sure there are in other parts that states but there is a sandhill crane refuge that none in Pascagoula but on the other side so I tend cuts through through the area so from mobile bill to New Orleans. You would drive high tech Postal Mississippi. I'm talking about everything. South of I ten okay. North of town the Pascagoula River would go up there. And that's where the sandhill crane. Refuges the birds. No birds don't recognize boundaries. They fly all over the place. So you can see that. I was on the riverboat tour. Okay the AUDUBON center is like most centers they want to promote the natural wildlife and the scenery. And that's so forth and it's a really hidden gem. I think that most people don't recognize will in because it has the name Audubon on it. I'm assuming calmly talking about birdlife predominantly. So yes okay. I don't know if everybody knows. I mean Audubon as a as a charity I think is well known but Google Audubon. You'll find what is James Audubon. Is that the a original one who did all the original drawings of birds in the early. US That's really neat. Watercolors this fascinating realistic catches does right. So I mentioned captain McCoy so you could take his crews out of the audubon center also wrench around Kayak and I did did that one time and going at your own pace around the marshes fascinating at least a dozen gainers and as close they would just scatter into the water. So I love love doing that at my own pace to excellent and John James Audubon. I got it almost John James. Okay when I said early. I didn't realize how early he was. He was born in seventeen eighty five and so he was basically drawing birds up until about the Mexican American war. You're in the US. And so as the frontiers were being filled in a he was out there with his sketch pad. MOM IN ESTA goal. There's obviously the Jimmy Buffett stuff to the native son. A I think he this family left when he was three and then he grew up in mobile but he has come back and he recognizes Pascagoula his birthplace so there is a beach and a bridge and his childhood home are all named for Jimmy Buffett. The parrot heads can go and pay pilgrimage to Jimmy Buffett and go visit some of those sites and one of my favorite places the Pascagoula is called bozos grocery. It's a very old school from the nineteen fifties place where you go in you place your order and you wait inside. been there two or three times. The last time I went kayaking at the river Audubon Center. In fact I got a takeout L. Poboy from Bozo's grocery and then took it on the Kayak. But it's this old school place where you go in and you place your order and you order order off the menu. You don't make up stuff and there was some guy in front of me. That was a visitor and he wasn't a local either and so he went on these. ZAC Oh can I make this substitution. Know what's on the bed. Yeah and I was like basically your choices are you. You get what you WANNA shrimp boat boy. You want poboy poboy being sandwich. A sub someplace else or a hoagie or a hero depending on where you're from but a pavilion in this region of the world. Okay and shrimp being the best known. One that I now. They're also known for their Fried Oysters. Poboy so okay. I got a half in half half. It's amazing I had a couple dozen po boys and along the Gulf coast and I it's one of the better ones side totally recommend going to Bozo groceries to get to take out to go kayaking or he.

Mississippi Pascagoula Pascagoula River Mississippi Gulf United States Pascagoula River River Audubon Jimmy Buffett Audubon Center Gula River Audubon Bond Center Gulf Lapointe Krebs House And Museu Audubon James Audubon River Audubon Center Captain Mccoy Mississippi Delta New Orleans Krebs House John James Audubon
"lapointe" Discussed on Good Code

Good Code

11:59 min | 1 year ago

"lapointe" Discussed on Good Code

"Buckets. Governance is one John Identity Access Verification and validation data ownership insecurity or the big areas and I always put governance number one understanding the governance structure around. How technology is used is critical? It's especially critical because blockchain is basically. I'm setting up a set of rules and then I'm using technology to make sure that the only transactions are recorded into this ledger. Follow those rules so who gets to set those rules. What happens if you create a digital identity system in a community that doesn't have a secure identity system and then you've created one and then it was a company that created and the company goes bankrupt also identity system disappear governance is really important and then identity identity is foundational to everything we do as we talked about before there are billion people in the world that don't have identity so what does identity look like in a blockchain? Do I have have to have a foundational identity. Do I have to know your social security number your identification number your birthday and everything else or can you have a username. What's appropriate in your context? There's certain countries in the world. Where maybe if you had different genders on your identity card? You know there's many places now legal you can have male female or other although certain places is in the world where that's illegal and what if you're in a place that creates an immutable identity system. That has those options. And you're on the other category. And then maybe the world around you changes or your religion gene or your sexual orientation. Those are all things that you might not want everyone to know. There's lots of things and things that you might not even think about today but that ultimately for some reason isn might become an issue issue and then the verification. How do you we talked about this before? How do you verify the information that goes onto a blockchain once everybody decides that you've solved Rubik's cube puzzle? That's when the information goes on but that doesn't say hey. The information in there is necessarily valid in crypto currency context. It's much easier easier to verify because you just look back and say hey do you have cryptocurrency to give to somebody else or not. But we're talking about other kinds of information. It's much more complex. So those are all really important. And then data the ownership blockchain is incredible because it gives you the ability to actually pass control of assets from one person to another so who gets ownership of that data and then access who has access to read the system to write to the system. And even if you have the access through computer systems etc do you have the digital literacy to effectively control and have access to the system and security how you do security is critical of all this information. So you you design that framework I I want to ask you. It seems like having these these questions that you ask yourself at the beginning. What your intention is this technology? The right technology for you for what you're trying to do and then answering all of these questions about what you're GonNa do and who's going to have access to what you're GonNa do in who can control why blockchain I feel like it could apply hi to all new technologies and may be chewed. Why did you focus on blockchain is in about the fact that it's immutable is? Is that why it's so important. There was a couple questions in there on a couple of answers right so the reason is so absolutely important with blockchain is what I said before is one. It's immutable but to blockchain is all about setting up a set of rules And then validating everything against of roles and once you set up a blockchain it's can be challenging to change those rules midstream and the question in terms of why did we start with blockchain blockchain. This was work that was done by the Rockefeller Foundation. Because they were looking at the identity. Problems said that's why this works started at Georgetown with the blockchain ethical design on framework. I've actually done to work to extend it because as you said it's very extensible. Easily to other digital technologies did some work for the United Nations last year looking at the ethics of AI and more emerging technologies more generally especially in support of international development across the globe and many of the same the principals in this framework applied. So you bake the ethics into the design at the beginning. That's the intense. That's the goal. How do you make sure that then? They're applied throughout because it's it's great to have good intentions but then how do you make sure that they remain in there really deployed absolutely. Well I think one of the things that's important to mentioned. I don't think I mentioned yet. Is that. It's really important to us. A broad stakeholder engagement process and when I'm taking any interested party you have to understand hand the entire community that is going to be affected by this technology and you have to bring them in so it talked before about people are trying to create identity systems for homeless populations so so when I understanding the entire ecosystem around that problem while there's the homeless population there's also just the local community the neighbors. There's all of the service providers who might be trying to provide services to that homeless population because ultimately identity is gonNA help connect them with services. Now those could be private service providers this could be government service providers. There's far more people that are going to potentially be stakeholders in this process. You need to bring them in to this process right from the very beginning into understand you know as we ask those questions to make sure that the effect of the technology is really what you want and what you want as a community because as I said before there could be really competing interests and Mrs a one and done you. Don't just create the technology and walk away because the world changes context changes so one of the things we talk about with blockchain ethical design framework. Is it's really meant to be an iterative process. Ask One just the initial design implementation is iterative but then throughout the life cycle of technology. Go back and revisit. Those questions right. Do you need to update the technology. How do we need to update it? Designing an infant technology is really circular But it's harder to revisit with blockchain as you said it is earlier so that's why it's important to have it it is it is but that's why governance is so critical because ultimately blockchain is going to verify the transactions according to the rules you've set but there's also the entire governance structure structure around that technology. How're you if you're not talking about crypto currencies? You know talking about something else. That's much maybe more complicated to verify than how are you verifying verifying that process. Go back to the diamond example. Anytime you have a physical thing and you're translating it to digital record. There is an issue issue that you have with how you verify that. That's not unique to blockchain. That's anytime you have a digital thing you want to create digital record. That's why are if I'd Egypt's have been created etc but how do you recreate that immutable link between a physical thing and that digital record with people. That's why they're looking at okay. What are the finger your fingerprints iris scans etc with diamonds? I think they look at something. Like forty different characteristics of the demand to make sure it's the right one but so that is a non trivial problem of how you create that length. Well that's part of the governance structure so you have have to make sure that your community who's engaged in saying. Hey what do we want out of. This technology isn't just engaged at the beginning. But they're engaged in a governance structure in the right way throughout in so who is using your tool at the moment to you know and have feedback from them and how widely distributed so we launched it last year. And we've been trying to have it become much more widely distributed and I don't have feedback per se on kind of quantities projects. I do have many people. Tell me that they're using it. They're starting to build it in a lot of these technologies are very immature early stages which is exactly when we want to be thinking about these questions we have been working on getting the word out about the framework and talking about. How do we? We've been talking with different entities about. How do you start to take this and translate this into something that is more widely widely used and so the goal is to help build the standards for blockchain or maybe the regulations? Well Yeah I think all of that in terms of how do you bring. The important questions is that we brought out in the framework to build those into whatever ultimate certification standards are and whatever regulation. Is I just WanNa ask you. Because what's your dystopia. What's your worst nightmare? Marijuana comes to block chain those things that you think these framework can can avoid so. I think some of the worst things are that the way blockchain technology is designed is is that it exacerbates and codifies some of the unhealthy power differentials that we have across society so I think the nightmare scenario with blockchain nine is that entities that already have a lot of power at the expense of others in whatever sector of society used blockchain to just further consolidate that power are as opposed to. There's a really powerful tool with blockchain that you can start to give people control back over their data for instance an example. That's often often cited. Is that for why identity a digital identity system with with what they call zero knowledge proof so I don't necessarily have to know your social security number if there's a system that just tells me you have a social security number so if you're a young woman in your twenty one you go to a bar. What's your identity that you give him generally your license? Which has your address address your birthday? All this other information that that individual doesn't actually need to know they just need to know that you're over twenty one so if instead you walk up with a blockchain based identity system that shows some some proof that he then trusts that says. Hey this person's over twenty one without even telling what age exactly you are now controlling your information in away. That's much healthier. That exposes you to less risk over all as an individual the utopian scenario for this technology is that we find we the ease as a society to start to give power over people's data over people's kind of digital identities so that they can actually decide who gets gets the pieces of that information and who gets to use it and for what ends what's fascinating and what you just said is that I think we're we're starting to have that understanding when it comes to a is that can exacerbate the existing discriminations and and Oppressions of certain categories of people. But I don't think people have come mm to terms with it being also the case with blockchain which is still very much in the hype cycle. That's very interesting. I just want to end by asking. You always end by asking my My guests if I could give you a magic wand and you could change one thing either in the way that technology is being rolled out the technologies being designed or the technology is being consumed. What would that be really would be? Engagement of diverse populations in the development of technology people in early on that have different perspectives. That will always create better technology and the other. Is there just one thing that listeners could do to help or to protect themselves may be or what is the one thing that individuals citizens could do think really individual citizens can demand that there be standards created around technology. One of the things is that these technologies are moving very fast. But there really isn't professionalization around the deployment of new emerging digital technologies. That will be very very important. Because ultimately at the end of the day it's often regulation and standards that provide the guardrails for the most vulnerable parts of our population. I will care lapointe. Thank you so much for for your time. This was really a great conversation. Thank you that was good code collaboration with Cornell hex digital life initiative this podcast is produced reduced hosted and edited by his truly chorus Tripoli's or mix engineer. He saw her neck. Is Our music composer. Thanks for listening and if you liked it tell a a friend leave us. Five stars on eighteens spread the word on twitter facebook and wherever you are online and say hi at contact at good could podcast dot com. There won't be an episode next week for the New Year's celebration. Take some time with your friends. Your family your loved oft ones we will but we'll be back on January seven for the rest of season two in our first episode for the New Year is full. I hope twenty twenty will be a good one season..

blockchain Rockefeller Foundation United Nations twitter Georgetown Egypt lapointe Marijuana Rubik twenty twenty Cornell engineer facebook Tripoli
"lapointe" Discussed on Good Code

Good Code

11:59 min | 1 year ago

"lapointe" Discussed on Good Code

"I sat down down with her in September in Washington DC. She's the program director for the French American Foundation Cyber Security Program and we met at the program's flagship conference before working on blockchain. The point worked on autonomous systems in the military so I began by asking her what brought her from one technology to the other. Well really it was technology and ethics having worked on a ton of systems in the military for a long time. Obviously ethics is really important. And so my background's runs in engineering. And I come at this as an engineer. But I really look at technology and ethics in a way that when you make small choices they might seem unimportant and small choices at that time but those can have resounding impacts on people's lives especially when that technology is replicated multiple. Fold all over the world so oh technology and ethics is very important to me so that something I started working on with a ton of systems. And that's what brought me to Georgetown to actually work on a project around blockchain an ethics which which is what we ultimately turned into the blockchain ethical design framework. Yeah and we're going to talk about that in a minute but before I WanNa ask you when when people think of blockchain would would immediately comes to mind Bitcoin Perhaps for the more educated a wider way of crypto currencies. That is not your focus. Your focus has been on the block chain uses for social impact. Can you just explain what blockchain ease really and how it goes far beyond Bitcoin and crypto currencies. Absolutely the answer. This is something I. I speak at conferences around blockchain and ethics in the framework. We've put out. It often is at the end. I don't know why ethics at the end of the conference but I'll always ask the audience and say look who can actually explain blockchain to somebody else and that amazes me because even after people have sat through four or eight hours of blockchain related content content. I don't think I've ever had more than fifteen percent of a room. Actually raised their hand. And as you said I don't actually deal with cryptocurrency when people come. Ask me about various cryptocurrencies. And what they should invest in. I I have no idea. I'm really focused on blockchain for other applications and especially in the social impact space so it is helpful to think about crypto currencies. When you're trying to explain blockchain if you think about the traditional financial system you have a bank account at a bank? You'll put money in take money out. Transfer money to somebody else so at the end of the day the bank is keeping a record of all those transactions. So if you write down your checkbook if you still have a checkbook what all those transactions are you hand calculate everything. Nobody actually really cares. What's in your handwritten checkbook because it is the bank? That's keeping track of all transactions sorted. Thank you intrepid with it. It's basically a ledger of transactions and it's a digital editor so the Bank has a digital ledger of transactions well in a crypto currency example. So what if let's say you sold me a plant and I wanted to send you some money. Well we could do that via crypto currency. But there's no bank in the center. There's no central authority that verifies that money is coming from me going to you. So how does that happen. What happens is you're using basically cryptography? You have lots of different computers. That are out there as part of the network at work that are racing to solve a problem. kind of like a Rubik's cube right and so they're racing to verify these transactions so they take a bunch of transactions actions that are out there like my transaction to you. That's out there. They put them together into a digital block and then they're trying to solve a mathematical puzzle. That goes along with that digital block and whoever whoever solves the puzzle first they win the race and their block of transactions block goes onto the blockchain which is a chain of these blocks of information. Mation well so. They're spending their computer power to do this. So why are they incentivized to do it. Well for CRYPTO currency. Then they'll actually earn tokens. They'll earn crypto currency currency. If they win that race they may get twelve or twelve and a half bitcoin. So they're incentivized but that's how you're actually verifying this information. There's people verifying verifying that those transactions are valid. And they're putting in these blocks information on a chain well because they're using cryptography. That record becomes a digital ledger. Uh of transactions just like the bank had but now it's verified by all these different monitors around the world and that record can't be changed because a copy of that entire record lives on all these different computer so if you change one thing everybody would notice that you try to change them. You can't change it. So what you end. Up With is a Digital Record Digital Ledger of transactions that is collectively immutable. This is a really powerful idea. A digital record of transactions. That can't be changed but it doesn't have to be money. It can be other transactions it it can be data in there a record of transactions and so what are some of those uses of blockchain that. Don't come to mind immediately that you have seen In that already exist or are being developed maybe for social good but not necessarily I I read in one of your papers. You had a really interesting example diamond tracking blockchain to enable consumers but also industry professionals to distinguish between blood diamonds. We call them unknown blood diamonds conflict diamonds. What are some of these examples? That are not not cryptocurrencies. That use that ledger that digital peer to Peer Ledger. Yes so there's a lot of different interesting example so you mentioned one. That's very interesting in terms of this diamond registry street and there are different types of ledgers. So You can create a ledger where anybody can participate in. The process of mining and pudding transactions onto the ledger so so a cryptocurrency is like that anybody can participate. We sometimes call that permission less. You don't need permission to participate. Also anybody can read the entire transaction. You can go online the entire bitcoin transaction history. So That's a publicly viewable ledger. So that would be kind of a permission less and public ledger. But you can also create blockchain technology that you you have to have permission so a permission system and you can create blockchain technology where you have to be given access. So it's a private can only be viewed privately privately and you can have different combinations of those so the diamond one is interesting because the whole idea's to say okay. We're going to track the providence of diamonds. So you're tracking diamonds as they go from hand to hand will only the people in the supply chain can actually right to it. So it's a permission ledger. But the idea is that it's publicly available so people can track that Providence. It's now it brings up one of the big issues about blockchain. Though sometimes people say blockchain is the truth technology. It's not really technology. There is consensus that the information going in is valid. That doesn't necessarily mean all of the information is valid because there's a human system wrapped around that technology and there's a couple away at that might fail. Well one. How verify the information going into the system? The blockchain itself is going to track the transaction of that diamond but it is not by itself going to verify fi that no slave labor or no conflict was used to actually mind that diamond and what if the first sellers is lying about the provenance. It's of that diamond also could happen right exactly. So that's the problem. So how do you verify the information going in. And this leads to another huge example of an application of blockchain and that's identity so identity systems people create are looking to create identity systems. There's over a billion people in the world that don't have any kind of formal identity. What does the first thing somebody asks you for when you try tried to access any formal system be financial medical any kind of transportation trying to get on a plan term building? Sometimes yes exactly you need identity. So that's really important. So there's so many people in the world that don't have identity so people are trying to create identity on a blockchain right in their ways of creating immutable identities. He's so you have to be able to verify that a person matches an identity but once you do that you can link to their biometrics. You can link it to Iris. Scans or fingerprints etcetera there era people in the world who have very valid reasons for not wanting their identity to follow them for changing their de think about victims of stocky or abuse. There are refugees. He's for political reasons. That fear facination. They're very valid. Reasons for people change Sunday so once you start to put somebody's characteristics into an immutable mutable system. There are real challenges and that's why we created the blockchain ethical design framework. Because we wanted people to think about these things from very beginning. When you're designing implementing technology angie you make choices? That don't seem important at the time but they can have resounding impacts on people's lives and anybody who has designed manager project around design and technology knows it is much much easier to think about these things at the very beginning than to try to build them in later because it gets more and more expensive to the point of infeasible impossible with the technology. We spent six months talking. People saying what could possibly go wrong. You're putting people's information in. I mean there are people creating identity systems for for homeless populations because it's really hard for them to keep physical Downey card. Sometimes we talk to people across the country difference Touche's we talked people internationally and there were hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of things that people raise questions concerns issues and so we sat down with and said okay. How do we take all of these things that could possibly go wrong and put them into some kind of tool that people can use when they're designing this technology that they think about these things things from the very beginning and that's how this framework was created? So does it look like. Is it like a series of questions. That technology designers must ask themselves when they're building building in new technology when they plan to use blockchain. What is this framework that you designed at Georgetown? It's about questions right. You hit the nail on the head. It is all about questions people ask me well. What's ethical when it comes to blockchain and say look I can't always tell you what's ethical and what's not ethical but I can give you questions that you should be asking in your context early on in the process so what it looks like is is? There's kind of a series of steps at the beginning to think about first of all. Think about your problem problem. You're trying to solve a lot of people. Say Hey I have a blockchain what can I do with it right but we say hey look start with whatever opportunity. You're trying to take advantage or problem. You're trying to solve and understand that and understand the context of it. I often talk talk about this. As an ecosystem design methodology understand the ecosystem around your technology. Who are the people involved all the different stakeholders or the organizations? What are the dynamics between them? Often you'll have different players in a system that very different incentives that are often conflicting. So you need to understand that. What's the existing technology what's the entire status quo? Whether it's the financial I think we've seen with some of the social media examples that how technology is financed has a huge impact on what happens in. What's the legal and regulatory framework and understanding your ethical intentionally? There's a lot of different ways to be ethical. I can say Gobi Ethical. Okay I pay my bills. Therefore I'm ethical. It's important to understand what your approaches and then combined with understanding that ecosystem around your problem you can then figure out. What is your design philosophy for how you're going going to build this technology? I always say when you're a program manager product designer. You have to have a northstar because you're gonNA make lots of decisions and they'll take a lot of different directions but if you always have hundred star and say hey this is what I am optimizing my technology for. Hopefully you'll get there and then you have to decide is blockchain the right technology for me and if it is then we have a whole series as of questions in different areas that you should be asking an iterative way throughout your design and implementation process to make sure to avoid unintended the consequences absolutely because the ideas that technology is often designed because people want to do good in the world with it. Bad things happen and really. There's two directions that happens one. Is You design and technology. You just. Don't think of something or you. Maybe couldn't anticipate something and there's unintended consequences and to people intentionally try to manipulate technology for for their own advantage. Both of those things are important so by asking different questions early on in the process. You can start to think about that. You can't predict everything but the better questions you ask at the beginning the better the technology is going to be and what we really found when we sat down with hundreds of different issues and questions that those questions. You should be asking really fall into six.

Georgetown Providence Washington DC French American Foundation Gobi Ethical engineer program director editor program manager northstar Downey Touche
"lapointe" Discussed on ON BOYS Podcast

ON BOYS Podcast

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"lapointe" Discussed on ON BOYS Podcast

"It really helpful analogy because if you have avidan oriented you're not going to change that plant you tend the environment you create. The field you fertilize is that what farmers due to help raise their crops. Engineers their crops in. They're really that is our role as parents. Teachers adult hits helping. Children grow absolutely and mine might now partner in life He's a child development specialist. It's valley works with children with autism. Awesome and the one thing that he says and I love it so much that he never saw a plant grow better or faster having somebody pull on the top of it. Aw that's a powerful you. They say it one more time because I really want people to get this into your head. This is an image that you can think about as you continue on your driver as you're putting your kids to bed tonight. He's never seen a plant grow better or faster by having somebody pull on the top the bit rather our job as parents or other big people whether you be a teacher whether you be an anti uncle grandma. GRANDPA a caregiver. Our Job Bob is big. People is to create the conditions around the plants that are conducive to crowd. I feel like we could keep talking to you all day An absorbing all of this knowledge. There's part of me that just wants to sit down and have coffee with you and say okay. Vanessa here's what's really going on but you don't have of all day and we don't have all day. I am definitely going to encourage people to pick up a copy of your book because this wisdom is in there her and tell her listeners where they can find you online and I do believe you're going on book tour as well and doing some talks. Yeah and so Dr Vanessa. lapointe joint with an E. ON THE END DOT COM D. R.. Vanessa lapointe Dot com is where you can find me an enter my website. You can access all my social media channels in everything announce where I do talk often about these kinds of things and I have a list of Bobbins that will be on the website and then outs for the book. It's available available everywhere. That books are sold. Its audible. It's on Amazon. And wherever you usually get your books and you are right in the middle of all your media media so our listeners encouraged to stay tuned. What's happening in your city and if you're doing a book signing book reading come on out and support? Dr Turbine Nessa. In this amazing work. I really feel like you've expanded this fear of out of just the practical strategies which are important but what we have to grow ourselves and as we grow ourselves we are growing humanity and we are growing this planet in the forward we're direction the direction towards love and connection that we need to be in it is my heartfelt belief that if even just one generation apparent accepted the invitation the journey that it's parenthood in the manner that we've spoken about it today that we actually would change the world. I think we are changing the world. You Bet they thank you so much for being with US thank thank you thanks for joining us. We Are Jennifer L. W. Fink and Janet Alison and. We are here to support you in parenting and teaching tomorrow's MED..

Vanessa lapointe Jennifer L. W. Fink Bob Dr Vanessa. lapointe Dr Turbine Nessa partner Amazon Janet Alison
"lapointe" Discussed on ON BOYS Podcast

ON BOYS Podcast

12:10 min | 1 year ago

"lapointe" Discussed on ON BOYS Podcast

"I do actually encourage our listeners to listen again because this is deep work work and it can't just go in one ear. It's got to go and both and you've gotta sit with it and process these questions and work with them. It doesn't the change overnight now am really every single one of us will be doing this work every single day of our lives and so we don't if it's what we're here to do whether we want to lean into the sharp bits of that or shy shy away from them. It's what we're here to do. So we can choose to grow or we can choose to sit in the status quo and to recognize that. You know there's some uh-huh days that were more able to lean in and there's some days it's like no you know I just gotTa take a break today and I'm just going to drink my coffee and let the world go by and but that's okay too. Yeah and also to really be gracious with ourselves in all of that because we are humans men's we are wired to react and Emo- an experience all of that and to not make ourselves wrong for having all of those big reactions is an emotions and I've literally. I've had days where I've worked statements like you know Mike. It should not by big big statements on fifty sixty times a day because because I'm back deep in process that overwhelmed by what it is that's happening around me and then I literally have other days where I'm like. I hate you Byron Katie. I'm not asking asking those questions today. Just GonNa be grumpy and yelling shouting mummy and come. What may there you go and then? Let's let's talk about that for a moment because I think one of the risks of having these kinds of conversations and talking about doing this deep work is it does bring up this guilt feeling for a lot of parents that program will my God. I have ruined my child already. So you know. Let's talk talk about that. Maybe you start parenting. You don't know any of this and you react like your parents did. And what would you say to parents who are like like I have screwed up already. You know what I would say. Her fact that is perfectly imperfect imperfect. Because there's an invitation in that thought in and of itself I have screwed up. Oh my all of the growth. That's buried underneath that thought. Aw like there's gold to be mined in them there hills right so I would say perfect and it really is my belief that nothing happens randomly family. Everything has played out exactly the way that was meant to play out in your life and in your child's life why I don't know that's above my pay the grades and I really hang my hat on the idea that everything happens the way that it happens because it's supposed to happen Bat Bat Way and so maybe you have young adult children now or maybe you are going into the stage in life of becoming a grandparents and in your viewing this uh-huh swell of emotion about all of this all over again because you're seeing it play out. Maybe another generation all of its perfect and so lean into those sharp to because they're there to offer you another pass for Growth and development in and one of the most gorgeous things that modern day science has offered us in terms of brain imaging How we understand the brain to respond to external environment is that it is never too late eight you can be ninety seven years old and we can rewire the parts of your brain that would have been most impacted by the way that you were parented? Granted it's never ever too late and so lean into that too because there's real hope in that understanding what I find interesting. Moving thinking about our children now is that we have as humans. Come up with all these different ways to kind of put our children in categories in an the effort to understand them more deeply The temperaments and there's Myers Briggs. There's like all the things but but you have described children as dandelions or or gets us more about that. So this comes out of the work of Tom Voice and his colleagues and I met tomboys when I was a doctoral student and he was a visiting professor at the university that I was attending and so I heard about this and I wasn't a mother yet so I haven't really made sense of it and then I watch forward in time and I became a mother and my first son was was what we call a dandelions yet where she just kind of like. Everything's fine like if you've ever tried to grab a Dandy Line you plant them in a crack in the the man in the sidewalk and forget to water them and not only do they grow but they thrived right and so Nathan was born. He's my boy his nap. Fifteen wearing men sites. Let's fifteen chiefs at. He was born and he kind of liked being alive. He liked people like sleeping eating you. You like going to school just like it was just fine and you didn't know that you got handed like the perfect first child. Oh 'cause you thought you were a great parent look at me. I'm such a good mom. Because I'm a child psychologist like worse I'm like nailing it Hashtag and and then my second son came along three and a half years later. He's in Arquette. And if you've ever tried to govern arcade you now that you need to. They need like just the great amount of water and the rate amount of lights and just the right amount of humidity and the right temperature and the rate base and the router. They die like they're not able to survive survive and yes if you can find just that combination not only will they survive. But they will thrive and they will be spectacular and so- Maxwell axe was born. He like arrives in the world screaming and does not stop. I do all of the things that you think that you're supposed to do with the baby who cries all the day long and also will be night long and one of the things that I'm doing is singing nonstop and I am. I do not have like the voice of an angel that is true but it's not like really horribly offensive. When he was six weeks old? I realized it's the found of my singing invoice. That is making my baby. Cry Again. My journey of figuring being this gorgeous orchid boy out who You know sometimes we talk about boys being born more vulnerable than girls and And other other times we really land on that we socialize. Our boys stinking their last vulnerable when they had big squishy Open hearts and there they they really can be very sensitive to their world physically but also emotionally. So that's my or could boy and And I'm a child psychologist ecologists. I have the kid who growled at other adults. Tried to say hello to him. I'm sorry I'm laughing even makes me feel so much better so so good. I The kid who could not would not separate from me to go to preschool. It took like two and a half months to get him gradually transitions into that classroom. I have my way was the first kidding kindergarten to Barf all over the classrooms second day of school because he was so freaked out about being there it became a biohazard tone. He literally he started throwing up in one corner of the classroom saw the garbage can in the other corner and tried to make their well. He spewed vomit all over every And in his time has gone on it has been sort of a series. He's of bumps in the road. Some of them quite significant in terms of diagnoses and other things were My second wormed way and I've had to figure it out and I often say like it's a good thing. He came second because I have no that Oughta signed from doing it. I have to grow myself up and I'm sure you still are because you just said that your oldest son is fifteen. I'm doing my math right. The younger ones probably about twelve. Now that's right so everything so you figure it out for how to parent. Elementary school aged kids. I mean it's sort of helpful but now you're dealing with tweens and teens and that's a whole nother challenge. It's a whole nother challenge. And of course his his Daniel's brother straight as at school makes friends really easily excels else has athletics. Things and his brother has had to kind of struggled to find his way. And as I observe all of that and come alongside side My younger son in those things. I'm aware at how very unique this path is and how very different. I must be the a mother to that second born boy compared to his older brother there is no one size fits all and alongside championing. Its growth I also have to a lot of self reflection. Am I approaching this from a space of fear and do I need to toggle. My Fear Love Continuum. Can you in right now. Am I reacting to something that happened with a friend at school at two intensely at for him like you know every cell in my body wants to college the principal Intel so and so how it's going to go into and then I have to stop and think okay what three L.. And what is this called that trump. And what really is my role in terms of either stepping in for my boy war stepping back and allowing him to get a Scott Ah fund the soul that he's developing and Nixon of his life in finding slowing that's such a great reminder. I love your term scuff on the soul while because we do resist that we don't want our children to suffer because because again exactly what you're saying in calls that up in us and it is a wicked uncomfortable. We don't GonNa go there. Having our kids see us do this kind of work this deeper level of parenting wanting whether they are conscious of it or not is so important to change these family patterns to change the the generations that they're getting it by Osmosis right now and sometimes they're getting it by. Hey we're having these real conversations and you know my my girl's know that I went to therapy when they were kids and and now they go to therapy as young thirty year olds and I'm so grateful for that also also want to do that. Personal growth and that inner work and they know that that's an essential part of being human and and I think our children grow in the fields that we create around us. And so you you know when you communicate you can communicate it very openly. My voice also know that. I've sat out my own support to find my way through the hiccups of life. And in addition to that without me saying or speaking speaking anything they are breathing it in the air that they live in. They grow in the fields. That I'm creating around Lee the environments. Let's that I'm creating around me. And so they'll know it even if.

Byron Katie Emo Mike chiefs Myers Briggs Tom Voice Arquette Osmosis Nathan Maxwell Lee visiting professor Intel Daniel Nixon principal ninety seven years thirty year six weeks
"lapointe" Discussed on ON BOYS Podcast

ON BOYS Podcast

07:01 min | 1 year ago

"lapointe" Discussed on ON BOYS Podcast

"The child's that we gave life to we they actually are catapulted back in time in an emotional space to the events of our own childhood. So when your child is acting out and you're a getting in trouble from daycare provider actually re experiencing. You're freaked out two or three year old south else. WHO got in trouble for whatever it was who wasn't good enough who didn't perform who didn't belong CFPB? She had just awakened in you all of these programs and it's those programs that create your worldview or your lens through which you are now viewing circumstance with your with your son. I listened to him Eckert. Totally speak a couple of years ago here in Vancouver Canada where it rains nine months of the year and he was on stage and he said listen. You live in Vancouver. It rains here nine months of the year. So you can wake up every morning and look out the window and be like it's raining again it's still audible for you can wake up every good morning and you can look out the window and say to yourself. Oh Look Watch Chris falling from the sky. Oh look my son. Bed had another child at daycare today. A look my son is the hitter. My son's the runner my son's but whatever price on all of the above and all of its neutral. None of it has needing until we give it meaning and the trick is we give it meaning in from our own programming and it's instantaneous. It's not like we have to think about it. It just happens in just happens you. You aren't even even aware that you were deep down the rabbit hole of your own programming ask you now. You react to the daycare provider. You tell them they can't tell you how apparent or you Kowtow. I'm so sorry I'll make sure it. Never you know whatever you're reacting from these deeply embedded and places and spaces within your soul. So how do we do differently. Step one is to know that it's not real and then step two if the start to make sense of the idea that that can be something different and so I often use a tool called work which is Offered forward by a woman named firing. TV and you can access all of it. Three online on her website By the way I get no downstream prophets and she has you sort of offer forward a statement and then you question the statement and so my son should not bite and then she would say for you to ask yourself is that true is Kenya no absolutely one hundred percent percent for sure that my two year old son should not be biting. And when you really think that through you can't know for sure that your two year old son should not be biting first of all. I'm going to tell you. As somebody who specializes in the field of child development that two year olds bite because it's their way of making sense of the world and they have as yet to grow brains that allow them to regulate from the inside and so some children will regulate through biting and explore their environment through biting. And aren't they perfectly brilliantly normal your two year old son or even three year old son should bite and so you cannot now for sure that it. It shouldn't be happening and yet when you believe. The thought might sunshine not biked. Does it bring you peace or does it bring you crazy when he is. He is biting crazy. It brings you crazy. So what if you made your peace with. I'll check it. He really should be biting partly because he's normal and this is what kids have got agents stage two and second and here's the gift net because it's tricked you out. He shouldn't happy doing that. Because now you get another opportunity. He should be biting hitting running jumping all of the things because now you got got another opportunity to figure out what program do I have running underneath all of this. And then I like that. An additional question into the process and and so Byron Katie would say what kinds of feelings come up for you when you believe. The thought that he should not bait and yet he is biting and so we would list rather feelings. I feel ashamed. I feel embarrassed. I feel not good enough. I feel on the outside. I don't belong whatever it is and then my Question which was given to be my knee by my own at teacher or mentor is just like when so. When can you travel back in time to the first six years of life is usually when we wanna focus that question when outs have you felt that cocktail of emotions and feelings and it doesn't even matter what situation you land on? You'll come up with some kind of an event in your first six years years. You'll remember a time when you got you know in trouble at kindergarten or you'll remember a time when you did something naughty at home and put on the time monster or whatever it was you'll remember a time and so you start to connect the dots and on the outside. They might think okay. Nothing's changed like tomorrow in the daycare. Teacher her calls. I'm still GONNA be freaked out by this. But it's somebody who traveled to the bottom of the whale and find founder way back up I will tell hi you the more that you flex that muscle of questioning your thoughts all day long the easier it becomes and the more you will make sense of that. It's it's like that five chapter book. Chapters are very short. I walked down the street I fell in the whole. I didn't know how to get out. I walk the street. I fell in the hole. But I've been here before. I know that I'll find my way out. I walked down the street. I knew there was a whole. I've found it anyway. Yeah that's where I'm at with parenting right there. I accepted responsibility for it and I found my way out. I walked down the street I saw the I walked around the whole and the final chapter in life as I walked down a different street. Let's pause there there. That is that is worth worth taking a moment to digest in process that we're going to take a little pause for our listeners and will tell you how you can access. This great new book on.

Vancouver CFPB Eckert Canada Byron Katie Kenya Chris founder two year nine months three year six years one hundred percent
'Toy Story 4' is a Masterpiece. Is It in Pixar's Top 5?

The Big Picture

10:49 min | 2 years ago

'Toy Story 4' is a Masterpiece. Is It in Pixar's Top 5?

"You. I'm Shawn fantasy editor in chief of the ringer. And this is the big Pixar podcast. They conversation show about Toy Story, four and all sorts of childish things. I'm joined today by apparent at the ringer rob heart villa. Hello rub. Hello. How's it going? It's going very well. And I appreciate you being here. You know, some of my frequent co host on the show among them, amended Dobbins, and Chris Ryan are, just straight up assholes about animated movies, and I noticed that I need to have people on to talk about important animated films. And I think even before you were a parent, you would have been a thoughtful and sophisticated guest for this episode, but you are a father and so you are happenings moves to Pixar in, in deep way in recent years. Is that fair to say that's very fair to say very complicated relationship with these movies at this point? But yes, yes, so we'll talk about that a bit on this show. I think we'll start the show though by talking about the new Pixar movie, which is, of course, Toy Story four, I think, when Pixar I started about twenty or so years ago, I never would have guessed that. That there would have been a fourth installment of any of these movies, in fact when they started. They seemed like a new version of a kind of storytelling that didn't necessitate sequels if you look on the ring dot com right now you can read a really interesting column by miles Surrey about the state of Pixar and their decision to make a series of sequels over the last ten years, and what that means for their, their brand, and what it means for their business and what it means for their creativity. And in some ways, I think it's been really threatened over the last few years, you know, we were just talking before we started recording about the infamous cars, three, which I would say is not one of the more legendary. In the Pixar verse. But Toy Story four, I thought was quite wonderful. And I thought it hearkens back to what makes a lot of these films. Great and also push them forward a little bit, rob. How did you receive toys story for what did you make in the movie, I saw last night with my sons who are eight and five and sort of Iraq is sort of preview screening. And I my kids laughed more laughed, louder just more obnoxiously than at any movie. I think that I've ever taken them to know. So I by by that measure, I mean it was a huge success. And I thought it was wonderful, and I thought it push things forward, but also sort of hold back on that sort of classic Pixar idea that like the kids are delighted, and the parents are total emotional wrecks. You know what I'm saying? Like I it's sort of an impressive mass magic trick that these movies can do. And I think especially of inside out, you know, which was, my, I think I've written about this on the side a couple times now. But like my son walk. Out of inside out. He was five at the time and he thought anger was funny, and I was just crying mess, you know, because I just watched I just watch goofball island, which is like the visual manifestation of like a joyful kid becoming a sullen teenager, like depicted, on, like a giant theater screen, and it was just the most crushing experience like the way those movies these movies are designed to work on those two levels, and they sort of drive, the parents to the toy store, but also to therapy, like, I, I feel like this one was sort of uncomplicated, Katie just funny and delightful and I had it seriousness and had like themes that parents, especially it would pick up on. But like it wasn't working that dichotomy where it was sort of, like designed to upset me personally, you know what I'm saying? Like I feel like they can play with that a little bit. But they don't have to hammer at it all the time in every movie that they put out, you know, I could just enjoy my kids, enjoying this one, a lot more than I feel like the last. Several Pixar movies. Yeah. I agree with that. I do think though, there is this entire school of almost academic sought around Pixar movies. And if you want to, if you want to experience Toy Story four as an exegesis on creationism and identity and a cartesian analysis of society, you probably could do that. I absolutely. Yeah. And I think that is that, that whole divide is fascinating to me the way that you've underlying basically the pure kid enjoyment of something, and the way that adults are entertained, and even moved by some of their films. I feel like can you give me a little bit of a sense of as a parent? What it's like to see a lot of movies like this, not just Pixar movies, but animated movies or what's on TV or what streaming for your kids and what the balance is between this is secretly for parents. And this is actually just dumb entertainment for kids, so that they don't like break things in the kitchen. Yeah. I mean, I feel like I've seen every type of movie along that spectrum, you know, and I haven't hated any. Movie that I think I've taken my kids to even like down to, like rock dog or whatever, you know, like I it's the LEGO movies are trying to be adult and trying to be knowing and it feels like they are specifically pitched for the adults in a way that, like a lot of the jokes are going right over the kids heads, like I don't dislike those movies, but I think that the LEGO movies are a little too cute about that. You know, I've seen plenty of things like, you know, the emoji movie or the trolls movie or whatever. Which are, you know, have theoretically adult jokes, but aren't trying to work that duality certainly the way that Pixar movies. Are you think about four key who like the new protagonist are like the new cool character here in Toy Story, four four key spends the movie like having an identity crisis like ease? He's a new toy but he thinks he's trash. And like he wants to be trash like he's literally, a spark with pipe cleaner arms, and he spends the whole first thirty minutes of the movie is going trash trash. And like I think that's really profound. And my son just really loves the way that four key keep saying, trash trash, like he did it. My son did it all the way home whole drive home like. And it's that's a cool. Little thing, that's you know, the different levels, and you can appreciate it on without it having to be this comedy versus tragedy divide. You know, it's sort of typifies, you know, again, like inside out, or even like the last toys story movie, Toy Story, three ends, of course, with, like, the scene, where they're all heading down into the incinerator, and they all sort of somberly, join hands and they're sort of resigned to the fact that they're all gonna die like all these little toys, and it's you know, I'm sort of a crying rack, and like my sons are sort of mildly disturbed, but they figure everything is going to be okay. And it is, but, like there's a moment of like pure pesos on that level in this movie, and I was, frankly, kind of relieves like the idea that I have to walk into every Pixar movie like braced dad, this huge sort of existential breakdown, you know, as my kids, just enjoy themselves like at felt like we pulled back on that. A little bit. And I was grateful for that. I agree with you. It's it did feel bit like an episodic adventure, which wasn't a bad Yang. I think sometimes you can get a movie like that, where the stakes have been lowered from the previous film, and you're like, well nigh. You're just wasting my time. But inevitably when it's a movie about anthropomorphized toys, somehow, it's nice to just have something that is a little bit more fun. I mean you mentioned Toy Story three which, you know, sort of ends with that transition from Andy to Bonnie, and then inevitably Bonnie becomes the, the young child, who is the owner of all these toys. And so were reintroduced to a world that features some of Bonnie's toys, and then the toys from the classical Toy Story story, and then four he comes along on the first day school. I, I did feel in that sort of first day of school moment that I was getting some of those inside out vibes that you're talking about where it's sort of, like they have managed to metastasized the most vulnerable feeling that you can have in your life. That that's scary trust. They of school where like I don't know anybody and everybody hates me. And I'm afraid and I miss everything. Is comfortable around me and they zero in on it, and they show it to you through the eyes of a little kid. And you immediately feel a recognition. That is a storytelling power. That is often overstated about Pixar allow me to overstate at wants more like it's amazing how they manage to locate and isolate those feelings and show them to you on screen, and make you relate to them like I am consistently blown away by that. There's another one at the end, when there's the kid lost at the fair, you know, she's just sort of there's a little girl, and she's crammed between, you know, to food carts or whatever, and she's crying and like, yeah, it's the exact same feeling and I yeah, there's a conversation also I think it's between Woody and four key. And like I think what he says, like, you know, these kids like you watch them grow up and become a person. And then they leave, you know, they'll do things you'll never see like the whole point of these movies is that the toys realized that one day, they'll be abandoned. You know, one day, they'll fall out a favor and one day, the kids will run off without them and won't need them anymore. That's, that's not even subtexts. Like that's just that's exa-. Exactly how parents feel watching these movies, you know, I think that's always there. And it is really striking. You know, I mean, this is possibly the best movie I've ever seen with the numeral four in it. You know what I'm saying? As you as you said, like I understand sort of the dismay, or at least a concern that Pixar has become by and large, like a sequel factory, you know, but I I I didn't dislike incredible to at all. But like I felt like certainly this was a better sequel than any of the other sequels that we've had this year. Obviously, you've been talking about how terrible and how sort of lifeless, they are like this is just a one eighty from that. Yeah. They staved it off. It's, it's a pretty impressive single-handed job in a in a friend summer from hell for this movie to come along and, and gay ever. So briefly, I think I think pause things one thing, that's notable too, is, you know, we're talking about the human emotion that they're able to imbue into these films and into these characters in the movies directed by Josh Cooley, who is. Essentially a first time Pixar director, though. He's worked for the company for a while and the screenplay has two people credited, but the story has two four six eight people credited and it's a complicated list of people. I'm going to read it to you really quickly story by John Lasseter Rashida Jones will McCormack Josh Cooley. Valerie LaPointe, Martin Hines, Stephanie, fulsome, and Andrew Stanton. Now, the last two people are the official authors of the screenplay famously when this movie came together, Rashida Jones and will McCormack her writing partner were brought on board to write it, and they eventually left the project because they felt like they were not as open minded about new voices, particularly a woman of color talking about the way to tell these stories for Pixar Pixar, very famously has had some fraught history with, with John Lasseter, one of its co founders chief imagine ear for a number of years due to sexual misconduct allegations. And the company has I, I would say affectively weathered the. Storm, whatever that can mean an has moved on from Lassiter, who I believe is most recently appointed to a position on inside of sky dance, and they're animated division of paramount, but it's so strange to have an event like that happening

Pixar Editor In Chief Surrey Dobbins Iraq John Lasseter Rashida Jones Katie Josh Cooley John Lasseter Chris Ryan Lassiter Affectively Andrew Stanton Bonnie Rashida Jones Director Valerie Lapointe Official Partner Andy
"lapointe" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"lapointe" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"Like LaPointe lumber family owned since nineteen forty seven now serving central Maine from Augusta and Gardner. Lapointe lumber where we still live. By the words of Norman, senior quality and service are what get it done. Know you guys in Massachusetts may have vocal hot kiss. But we in New Jersey. Spartacus and perverted. Oh, that's bad. That's good. I'd never heard him called perverted across. But I'd say that that really works. Bob Menendez accused of of having sex with underage prostitutes in the Dominican Republic paid for by his dear friend was now a convicted felon convicted of stealing tens of millions of dollars in Medicare fraud. Oh, man. This election has been tough on me. I used to be on top of the world. But now people look at my political appearances locked I look at your movie appearances box office poison. I didn't come here to be made sport of Mr President. You haven't seen? Migrate screen gems. A civil action and the gentleman from Boston. Look up who blank hold the ball or not blank called the ball. That is the question. L? I've answered I've answered the question in my head. I haven't done it yet. But I'm I'm I'm gonna blank the Massachusetts governor's race. That's that's how what I think of called of all the Republican incumbent. You.

LaPointe lumber Massachusetts Lapointe Bob Menendez Dominican Republic Norman Augusta Gardner New Jersey Mr President Maine Boston fraud
Oklahoma, Russia and Britain discussed on All News, Traffic and Weather

All News, Traffic and Weather

02:09 min | 3 years ago

Oklahoma, Russia and Britain discussed on All News, Traffic and Weather

"Spirit airlines investigating a smell that caused an oklahoma bound flight from san diego to divert to arizona the flight left san diego around seven am sunday and then landed in phoenix a couple of hours later passengers reportedly described an odor that came through the plane and then mysteriously was gone seventeen passengers asked to be evaluated by phoenix fire in a sixty two year old man was taken to the hospital as a precaution this is the second time in a week a frontier flight on the san diego to tulsa route has been diverted because of an odor inside the cabin that's jason camp adonia reporting wbz news time five forty he's been gone for seventy four years but army sergeant william all but who is killing act killed in action in germany in world war two is the furthest thing from forgotten you can imagine this memorial day is grandson is remembering the grandfather he never met at the dutch cemetery where he's buried wbz's karyn regal spoke with his grandson mark lapointe who's remembering his grandfather in a very big way sergeant william alba fought in the european theater he was killed in action seventy four years ago in germany those letters were almost never known to his daughter because all of its widow's new husband for betas wife to remember her i love but audits widow had a secret in the attic of their home and aims were in a cigar box tied together in a in a blue ribbon grandson is a singer and songwriter mark lapointe and he put his grandfather's words to music and at memorial day ceremonies in the netherlands he's performing his somewhere in germany with a live orchestra backing him he's remembered you know he's not forgotten karyn regal wbz newsradio ten thirty and an israeli official says russian billionaire roman abramovich has received israeli citizenship after his british visa was not renewed chelsea football club owner arrived in israel today israel granting automatic citizenship to anyone of jewish jewish descent now britain's said this month it would review longterm visas of rich russians after the march poisonings of a former russian spy and his daughter in the english city of salisbury the uk has accused russia now of exposing them to a.

Oklahoma Russia Britain Chelsea Karyn Regal Germany Jason Camp Tulsa Phoenix Arizona San Diego UK Salisbury Israel Roman Abramovich Official William Alba Mark Lapointe Dutch Cemetery
"lapointe" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"lapointe" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The lapointe fires on the glove save made by jeff glass he'll wisely hold onto the clock faceoff will stay in the hawks zone of a circle the his right hawksley of one of the nothing mandate count shut the flame so far the contests mogo eleven there's been some real good opportunities that both heads at the ice it say like the play get caught in one end of the eyes the fact that forced type of period and then it gets down at the other end of the ice and it stays there for a while both teams i don't think we'll be real happy with the way they played the role in today's put on certain shift to be real happy with how he competed in the opposite at the allott coaches analyzing video after this one you'd think both both coaches from both team and nobody cares accept the results of this it it could be an ugly game and so far it's kind of an ugly period but i i would say the call for these teams have worked extremely hard to disperse period as what i was at center ice further badgers takes a loose puck and foot sit back and bihac zone along the left port key he went to the overdosed early along the right side boards declare now at center ice lost they handle further penalty boxes but caves if they're to scoop it back away and then back when took it away from pay into the hawks zone back much of a left wing sides it could chuck he'll spend it on my than at around that the far side and a shot from hamik from the rightwing boards kick say may fight west brody with a punt carrying behind the haug at a round of the right circle sets on what cuts shots saved by a butterfly position fraud then pearl which took the want a struck for the right reporter by hammock third widewide glass and glasses definitely caught a.

jeff glass hawks brody haug fraud reporter lapointe chuck
"lapointe" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"lapointe" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"The low to mid thirties the weekend will be mild with highs going into the mid 40s and both days a blend of sun and clouds i'm wr meteorologist taylor lapointe this is news radio six turn on iheartradio if crowds are obvious covered them blinded by a blanket a little knives false killer as lulled the madness of this world into was lumber wake up and eyes upon new staring straight down and keenly through seeing all that you are and everything that you can never be yes and i is upon new and i ready to blink so face her with arms wide open and mind leaving your future has arrived are you ready to go allow leakers both government saying the number is call the niger boys six seven three thirty seven hundred that's triple eight six seven three thirty seven hundred.

taylor lapointe niger
"lapointe" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"lapointe" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"Fifty jesse if we could see ends will come once he gets the end though there limit these i think when we think that that will not immediately of course those vehicles' you'll bill nye will thin is that bongo me done a good job to a group of young people you get into a bomb when things at the end of the up have you think when we think about him he can't allow that the ends enough vehicle joe lapointe will get you up in the canadian they'll be upbeat premier kindle me think of joyner the lead garrett you're a surprise at bottom malvo from you again when you told me that you did this this mobile add lynn were his five in out the only thing burgers to see dad winberg whoa and found now you may do no historic wrong you have be lay guzman darmono some one back when we have no meaning fired at junior ever now that playing good the the standing thing to shoot.

jesse joe lapointe joyner garrett guzman bill nye lynn
"lapointe" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"lapointe" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Fifty jesse if we could see ends will come once he gets the end though there limit these i think when we think that that will not immediately of course those vehicles' you'll bill nye will thin is that bongo me done a good job to a group of young people you get into a bomb when things at the end of the up have you think when we think about him he can't allow that the ends enough vehicle joe lapointe will get you up in the canadian they'll be upbeat premier kindle me think of joyner the lead garrett you're a surprise at bottom malvo from you again when you told me that you did this this mobile add lynn were his five in out the only thing burgers to see dad winberg whoa and found now you may do no historic wrong you have be lay guzman darmono some one back when we have no meaning fired at junior ever now that playing good the the standing thing to shoot.

jesse joe lapointe joyner garrett guzman bill nye lynn
"lapointe" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"lapointe" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"Radio my jack heath near new hampshire today on behalf of david washing our team spirit iheart radio we thank you our listeners in sponsors very much a part of the show is specially thank the men and women who served to keep us free and their families who are not with their loved ones during the holidays from the viking propane whether desk weather on news radio six dead break between systems today for christmas eve will have sunshine and passing clouds temperatures in the low to mid thirties but overnight tonight clouds will fillon and eventually snow by early on christmas day a true white christmas will mostly cloudy skies and snow showers especially heavy in the morning temperatures in the mid20s tuesday we clear out with sauna temperatures also cold and unloaded mid20s i'm wsb meteorologist haley lapointe strength courage joy you give these precious gifts and many more when you donate to ronald mcdonald house charities this holiday season you can give families with children the gift of togetherness and help them stay close to each other and the karen resources they need when they need it the most for a sick child sometimes the best medicine of all is having family nearby for more hugs kisses and i love youths donate today at our estimates the dot org slash donate the morning they've been waiting for is almost here but don't worry if your christmas tree could still use a little more love walmart's got your back with a great collection of lastminute gifts the kids will be thrilled to find favorites like barbie tree house in kuble home many under.

jack heath new hampshire christmas walmart david christmas eve wsb haley lapointe ronald mcdonald kuble
"lapointe" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"lapointe" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"Be right back this report is brought to you by compassion international from the viking profane weather desk weather on news radio six dead yucky wintry mix through the day today with freezing rain and plane rain temperatures right around freezing tonight this system polls away the temperatures will fall down into the 20s with clearing skies on sunday some sunshine temperatures in the low to mid thirty's then overnight christmas even to christmas day we have another storm system moving in that will likely bring us some snow temperatures in the 20s on christmas day i'm wsb meteorologist hailing lapointe the future is bleak for child poverty knows who knew dreams no hope rebuking changeover will you become a compassion child sponsor just a little more than a dollar a day brings hope find out how at compassion com board slush radio people are afraid of dentist because of the old connotation than it always hurts when you go to the mrs dr primary care for her of her effort dentistry in manchester sharing his thoughts about gaining a patient's trust to gain trust the new dentist you have to actually believe what this person is telling has to make sense to you in your own head so if you tell people the truth and you can show it to them on a big tv screen their x rays and the photographs you've taken in you clearly explain everything to them and you can see it in a face when they understand it then it's not difficult to talk about trust is the most important thing and if you don't take the time to answer the questions they're not going to trust your but once you gain their trust for them to actually accept and go onto the next step isn't part that i think that's part of what we do and how i tried to establish my practice nostalgia.

christmas lapointe manchester wsb
"lapointe" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"lapointe" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"That was that was a lowpoint for sure i'm glad you did that the tapes if you're curious i think i still it i think it was guns n' roses user allusion one into in town temple of the dog despite that lapointe when i quit the job the next year i did leave my my old boss a parting gift the sandwich of a decade i was a teenager i didn't like the way john the guy who ran the store unlike like the way he accused me of stealing step even know i did steal stuff like he was right to look judging late me eat but despite that i still thought he was an asshole so my last day at work this is bad i got a paper plate i drew a picture of his face on it you know wrote his name actually wrote fuck you john and then and then i literally took a shit on it like literally just shit it and then i hit that plate of shit of my own shit in his office where knew he would smell it but in a place up high kinda behinds was up where i didn't think he'd find it and i have no idea if he did find it i was a dirty filthy savage when i was in high school 1994 i switched from kind of being a bad boy to be someone who could he twoshoes kickoff senior you're kind of got electricity buck student body student body president after running a horrific smearcampaign against my opponents iran against randy wilson a ryan shaw two totally these and kids totally these in kids rhyme my class rand of the year blow me they did not deserve to have their names slandered by but i thought i did the theme of my student body president campaign was he shouldn't vote for randy because randy was fat and all he cared about was hot lunch and you shouldn't vote for i know it's not funny but i just think about it at.

lapointe president randy wilson ryan shaw john iran