22 Burst results for "Language Center"

"language center" Discussed on Spark My Muse

Spark My Muse

09:59 min | 2 years ago

"language center" Discussed on Spark My Muse

"And get all the resources that you need or somebody in your family family or your friendships. Somebody you know needs to heal from trauma. Even if it's not you please pass this along. I'm hoping in this can reach as many people people as possible. This book has already been completely invaluable to me because it made me understand my body and my emotions and how they work in a whole new way. Emotions don't have language and this is why it's so hard if we have been traumatized and someone says hey tell me how you feel and and you are like lots of things. I don't know it's because emotions are not part of the language center of our brains in fact when we're traumatized say an accident or somebody has abused us. The broker center of the brain and the language center of the brain is on the other side and it goes off line so to heal. We have to reintegrate discharged the emotion from the one side. Those feelings is that our bodily That that are the sympathetic feelings. That charge us up to make us feel Maybe a stomach ache headache. make us feel shaky and nervous as were remembering the trauma. We're not just remembering it. If it's trauma we are actually reliving it because trauma trauma doesn't have chronological time. We just remember it as if it's happening right now. That's how we know we're not healing from it if you ever describing trauma that's happened to you and it takes you right back there. You feel the emotions again. That means it hasn't been healed when we acknowledge our feelings with words words and say I'm scared or anxious and Liz mentions that underneath all those things. I'm angry. Anxious sad is always the root is always fear. You're because that's what gets migdal cranked up that fight or flight or freeze part of our brain that has kept human beings things from going extinct. We not to run from a wild animal or to escape if we have to. That center of the brain is so important to our connects essential. Survival it can also wreak havoc with us and it doesn't want to let go of the negative memories so we have to integrate them with the language language center to to get a full healing to happen for us. I will go through the step process that Liz mentions about on how to de trigger ourselves but I highly recommend that you preorder her book which will be out in February two thousand and twenty. You'll for life because it is full of incredible insights very very practical steps in tools that you can have to be freed up in your life again to be released from that toxic harmful energy keeping your body with the negative emotions that got stored there from trauma and trauma in child is different than trauma in an adult for a child. Just being left behind for a few minutes in a parking lot even no your parents were actually a few feet away and you didn't see them for a child that's existential trauma. Because they didn't know better where anybody was and they I thought maybe they would be left to die. So when you're a kid too soon too fast or too much can be extremely traumatizing in the sense of those triggers new sense the same sorts of things again. When you smell the same smells when things look similar you might get triggered again and have no idea idea no actual recollection of the memory or some sort of flashback but from your childhood mine that was wounded at that time the made an enormous impact? Because he didn't have the experience you have now as an adult so list mentions also that when you are reintegrating yourself dealing with the trauma. Oh you come towards yourself as an adult with the experience you have an. It's an adult and you go back to that wounded part of yourself. That got stuck there in that that spot of trauma. Maybe someone was violent with you. You had no power. You're just a little kid. Someone screaming at you. And you're freaked out. You Go back to that child in that Memory Marie and you comfort that inner wounded child. Because something's got stuck there. Some emotion got stuck at that age for you. And you go back and you comfort that child as the adult you now because that child still needs to be rescued still needs to be comforted and acknowledged and they're stuck stuck there in perpetuity without chronology. If it felt unsafe for you and your childhood you never really felt safe in your body authorities and it's really about how we feel that brings about healing. I we have to feel safe in our body and one more triggered. We suddenly don't feel safe in our body. We feel like something's threatened so undealt with fear and anger turns into depression and hopelessness sometimes suicidal thoughts and dejection and despair. So when you have those those feelings of ongoing anger sadness fear depression. That's undocked undocked with trauma that is sourced ultimately in fear may have happened awfully longtime ago. You might not even have any real memory. Maria Trauma happens in the Right Hemisphere but memories that we actually can remember happened on the left. The right side of the brain has no time time. No sense of timing is always present and no sense of language talking. It out can't work to integrate trauma until your body feels safe and until you you feel safe in your body when you approach the part of yourself. That's wounded approach it in a tender way like you would approach an actual child who's suffering with compassion and tenderness be that loving parents or that sweet person to that child at that child never had on pages to forty four list. Mentions it isn't the details of the actual event that are super important to you. Go over and to hash out. It is just the fear that's released that happened. During the event that's important and it's also important important to Rian power yourself during the process which can lead to victory and overcoming because sometimes in the process of remembering we spent ourselves into victimhood. This is how I was treated. This is how I am treated and the victimization becomes a permanent sort of status in our mind because we keep reliving the trauma but not moving past it on page one fifteen. Dr Molenaar goes into how to de trigger. I love this part because I've already used it. It works great and I know I'll have to keep using it because I have lots and lots of UN resolve trauma. I don't feel safe in my body at times. I haven't been been able to feel safe in my body. There were lots of traumatic things and that's true for many of us that's not. I'm not unusual. I think lots of thus have just been powerless as children or stuff has happened. Maybe someone got sick. Maybe those a car accident may be someone died and there was no way to control all that and that fear came up in your little body and there was no way to really deal with it so the first thing to do due to de trigger is maybe the hardest thing if you're not used to it is that you just have to realize wait a minute. I was okay but now I don't feel okay. My Body doesn't feel right. I feel jacked up. I feel I feel angry. I feel triggered. You just realize it is just the noticing. WHOA I've been triggered? WHOA now? There's no blaming involved like who triggered me. Just feel what you feel. Don't be blaming. Just think okay. My my body is responding reacting to something maybe a little more than it should be. Maybe some stranger on twitter said something like thank you know but who cares what they said for some reason. It's really gotten you upset. That's okay you're triggered. Eggert just say I feel triggered. I notice I'm triggered so that brings it into your conscious. Mind out of your unconscious. Mind where that sensory memory is. It's a bodily sensory memory. It doesn't have words. It doesn't have conscious thought it's it's down deep below language so all you can sense is just what your body's telling you you'll feel anxious you'll feel fight flight or freeze so notice when your body is triggered. It shouldn't be too hard to get on twitter for about five minutes and you'll get triggered. So maybe they'll be a sudden anxiety. disassociation Gatien anger. You might feel the need to escape like I'm out of here. Maybe a physical pain a headache. He might feel just really tired. All of a sudden and a pain somewhere might emerge in the neck the shoulders something like that stomach is where some people keep their paying guest stomach ache or they have indigestion and and trouble with gastro intestinal track so at that point. When you when you sense that that's number one then go to number to say how you feel speak it out loud and feel the feeling conscious way so if you feel frightened worried scared angry?.

language center Maria Trauma Liz twitter pain depression Marie Dr Molenaar Eggert
"language center" Discussed on Influencer Networking Secrets Podcast

Influencer Networking Secrets Podcast

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"language center" Discussed on Influencer Networking Secrets Podcast

"This is not dangerous. Aid final flight so breathing from valley actually calms you down and at just a slow breaths and particularly if somebody's really telling you what they think of you and saying you know what that's the trouble. You're just another typical salesman. When you know you're doing this. You've got plenty of time to breath one of that that nothing of it you so number one breath from your belly slow yourself down number two and this is probably the most effective thing to do and that is to name your feelings to yourself <hes> <hes>. That's the key so you're gonna say gee. I get frightened when you tell me this for hung. I'm f- i'm feeling embarrassed or ashamed. That's alleged by and large not helpful but naming them to yourself becomes very helpful and that as well as activating the language center into and you brian because you're looking for the woods to name your feelings but it does some saying <hes> about your energy up to now when you do have these feelings. You probably want to accuse the other person of you. Make me feel <hes> embarrassed ashamed <hes>. I'm frightened said whatever but actually nobody makes me feel anything this. These are my feelings. Yes my feeling. I have in response to what you've you've just said for sure you're you're out of the trigger of but as my feeling so owning your own feelings and naming them to yourself is a very powerful thing that it's almost acknowledging the magdala and acknowledging that process. That's inside of you now you do this. Also of what you need to know about that is that feelings are neither good moped so in my course that i teach i i usually get to at this point where we've explored what's the meaning of feelings and how they work and actually is now a bad feelings and no good feelings these feelings we like him bird like but they're not good or bad from a moral point of view so you can have any feeling you're like what is good or bad that we can judge who can be judged. Edged is your actions feelings of different from actions <hes> yup yup. This is important to get that fist so when you name you'll feelings if i say <hes> i'm feeling hateful towards your. I hate you if i say that to myself. There's nothing wrong with it yeah if i act and hate you from going to punch in the nose. <hes> punching in the nose is not very good. That's that's lure against that but there's he's not a little there. This is how feeling yes yeah. I was just thinking. I'm thinking of all the <hes>. I'm so sorry to admit this but i've i've run out of the capacity for b._s. Ing with people. I'm thinking of all the phone conversations i had with the people who gave me these excuses and i would just sit there on the other end of the line. I wasn't saying anything but i was rolling my eyes. You know and just i i if i could have in the moment said you know right now. I'm feeling scornful. I'm feeling proud. I'm feeling rejected. I'm feeling you know just like you described if i could if i could have said that to myself yeah as opposed to just feeling it and then taking taking on more and more layers of it as time went on i might well have been able to to rescue myself from the because because after a while this compounds and you start to feel pretty defeated most of the time -solutely and the other bet that you feel is any empathy for them um yes and and so you hear their excuses as biz but actually if you are able to say because the the knicks pat admit listen put that little moment if you if you are able to say i am feeling that you wouldn't have rolled your eyes because you rolling your eyes..

Edged salesman knicks language center brian
"language center" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"language center" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Talking about how to learn a foreign language most effectively, and it is often compared to learning how to ride a bike. But it doesn't quite pan out that way because often, you know, like, you say, you don't use it. You lose it. And the reality is that language fluency has a lot to do with really practicing and using the language and a listener tweets any console for us westerners, learning, Asian and tonal language. They seem so daunting, some recurring. Well, these are among the most difficult languages for an English speaker to learn I think one of the key things as was saying was to get into a social context where you see and experience the language in it is being addressed to you as welcoming you as a as a member to this community and seeing how it is the language is being used around you and with you that is I think the really key thing. And then once you have a sense of how the language is is being used in a social context, then to focus on the details of the tones and distinctions that are being made the problem with some of these apps as they start off with the tones without any kind of context. And so you're you're making auditory discrimination distinctions, but it's not clear what for. For again recurrent as rector the Berkeley language center. Professor French at UC, Berkeley. And let's go to your calls, and let's begin Aaron with you. You're on the air. Good morning. Yes. Can you hear me? I can't go ahead. All right. Thanks so much. I love this program. I studied Spanish here at UC Berkeley, I majored in comparative literature minored in Spanish, literature studied abroad, Stanford here. Classes with Spaniard slip with standards. It was one of the most important.

Berkeley language center UC Berkeley Aaron Berkeley Stanford Professor
"language center" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

13:14 min | 2 years ago

"language center" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To teach you foreign language in record time. But do they deliver what they promise? Well, in this hour, we're gonna get tips from experts on how best to pick up a foreign language something very American need. And we'll also hear how foreign language fluency can affect our worldview and bring us closer to our own heritage. Joining us here in studio, recurring. He's director of the Berkeley language center. Professor of French UC. Berkeley, welcome glad to be here. Michael have you? We also have online with us via Rica, Marion, she's professor of communication sciences and disorders Northwestern University. Welcome to the program. Good to have you with us. Thank you. Here. And we also help them marry con his science writer and author of four words for a friend. Why using more than one language matters? Now more than ever welcomed African. Hi, hi to you. And let me begin with you. If I may way, this is go right to the heart of this. Why learn another language, particularly when we hear all about how English as global language. We have all this translation technology. One language it. Suffice many say, yeah, if you want to do is over capital make make a reservation and in a hotel, that's fine. But having a language inside your head is very very different it enables you to understand the will from other people's perspectives. It also I think very importantly it gives you understanding of your own full processes because once you start to get into another language. What you start it started cells to become polish of you, you begin to be away the languages don't map onto each other neatly. That one would that woods. Exact I looks in each other in different languages Russian is not English and some fiendish coat. Once you start to realize that you realize of the woods always possible. And you start to reflect on the way that you think can communicate you understand yourself better as well as understanding the special. So that oh my script Cirque by your so title, while using more than one language matters. Now more than ever why? Now more than ever because of the way the world's going. I started writing this this on this book several years ago because I just have this awful feeling of doom from wherever one looked it seemed as though people are becoming more suspicious of if each other less open to each other will if each other most spacious and struck me. If you can make languages work together within one within one person within one family within one high within one community. Well, maybe that's quite a good way to to start counteracting this rising tide of suspicion, and anger and fear. American is science writers book is called four words for friend. Why using more than one language matters? Now more than ever and let me bring a recomend into this conversation. She's professor communication sciences and disorders northwestern. And do a lot of study about the brain and learning languages, and there really is brain enhancement, especially for what we call the executive function in the brain. Let's talk about that. I mean, just in terms of learning language. Sure. So just like any type of experience what it's music, whether it's another language, I'll brain highly plastic so using another language can change function and sometimes structure of the brain as well, one of the most striking outcomes of being bilingual multi-lingual is a delayed onset of dementia and Alzheimer's old individuals. So if you speak another language, you will be diagnosed with dementia Alzheimer's likely four to six years later than if you're Mona lingual in part because you functionally compensate for the structural changes in your brain, your experience of juggling, multiple languages simultaneously all the time thrall life improve executive function, or at least translates to this ability to mitigate some of that cognitive decline. The socio. Had with dementia late in life. Well, it's always been an assumption that you learn language better faster earlier in life, but that's not necessarily the case. There is some other there some evidence. There's some evidence that learning another language early in life is easier. However, one can learn another language at any age. So whereas we used to think that there is this critical period critical period. Hypothesis was that before puberty one was much better learning another language as it turns out. We can learn a language at any point the difference would be having an exit. Usually if you do learn language later in life after your system has already been set to your native language, you're more likely to have an accent throughout life. But as far as you'll cavalry size and being able to communicate effectively in another language that can be acquired any age. And with us is recurrent directs the Berkeley language center. Professor French UC Berkeley sinking Rick before we went on the air about how Samuel Beckett road waiting for Godot in French tonight. Good. Joe, although that was not as native language, they do, of course, was English. Many great writers wrote in languages at weren't their own sometimes Joseph Conrad, Vladimir Nabokov, sometimes when can get a sense of more control by using a language that is not your native language now. Yeah, I think it opens up a lot of doors to creativity ways of thinking as Merrick was talking about that are quite different from the ways of thinking that you have in your native language. There's a lot of baggage that goes along with your native language when you have gone through the process of learning another language and partaking in another culture leads you to new ways of thinking. And I think that that computers to the creative process as well. Full. The old way learning language was memorization, go in the language lab. Inhere these. Tapes over and over again, people still use tapes. But we've got all these new things out. There was a stone do Elanga l- babble and memorize and so forth, and they advertise if you know, the make you fluent somehow very quickly. Let's get you thoughts about. Yeah. Well, I was interested in your setup that you mentioned pick up a language, and I think that that goes along with the pitch of the apps. I think you know, basically, these are great things for people to have and to work with. And to provide a limited exposure to the language, but if you're going to really learn the language in terms of being linguistically, culturally, proficient, they're most likely not going to get you there. And if they were able to develop a long-term path for these programs, it would take an awfully long time. Well, maybe we should talk about fluency when some think about fluency, they think about speech, but other thing about writing and reading and actually within a language there changes going on all the time medically, and you know, are barely keep up with them, and are many languages within a language people talk about the scientific language, and they talk about the language cooking, and so forth within different languages. So what are we what are you? I think when you think of fluency what does that include? Well, I think in terms of rather than fluency proficiency. And the fact of the matter is none of us is proficient in all demeans of our language, and that's, you know, won't be go to college and graduate school. We get educated in new fields, and we pick up new ways of using language, and it's an ongoing process. I still consider myself a learner of English as well as other languages that. I speak. So I don't see it as a process that ends at puberty or adolescence, but is really a lifelong adventure. Well, there's an old joke that says if you speak or fluent in three languages, your trilingual to your bilingual one year in American, and somehow that seems to have a good deal of impact. Particularly in fact, let me get you on this American the modern language association. Put out a study that said that there are six hundred fifty one foreign language programs right here. Across the country in colleges that have been shut down French being at the head of the pack. Your with a hundred twenty nine Spanish being next with one eighteen and there are some other alarming statistics that I just wanna get your response to and we'll get all of you professors to respond to this because there's a kind of language deficiency here in the United States. You got twenty percent of students. According to the pew study that was done on this from kindergarten to twelve studying foreign language. That's compared to ninety two percent in Europe. I mean, these are really vast gaps. We're talking about coming from you Merican. Well, I'm sitting here in England. And we have exactly the same likes to pass it to use the would. Languages. What guy outta fashioned like nobody's business in Russia. Schools does seem to be a number of problems here. One of the main ones is an I don't know whether this this is marriage, Alina states. But certainly if if we compare English speaking students, which ones in European countries. A survey recently recorded that. The English students were released keen on studying the languages, and there there are many different reasons for that some of them complicated, and political, and we will get into those English meaning not only here. But across the pond where you are. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. The English students really didn't like studying French germinal will Spanish, oh, whatever. And that that levels of dislike what a lot higher than those that pays in other European countries strikes me that one of the main reasons for this says is that full people in students in who makes me speak, other languages, French to whatever English to them is is something that has really positive associations, like a loss of them in Hof souls, the that of the they love the most of the movies that they that. They they enjoyed the most. Of a rule in English. So English is something that has really arouses warm feelings in them. It's something they want to draw close to whereas native English speakers, another language is something that have best they feel they too. And we find out sometimes recurring that people actually learn the language foreign language by watching a lot of movies or a lot of television people. Tell me people told me immigrants have told me listening program, they picked up a lot of ways of speaking English. No, that's true. And one of the things that we've had great success with at Berkeley language center. A project developed by my colleague, Mark is a film clip database that allows you to zero in on particular things that you would like to learn you can search for vocabulary grammar structures speech functions and so forth and have direct access to film clips that will demonstrate the use of those structures. Vocabulary cultural notions in feature films. But I think that more broadly texts in general, whether it's literature. Theater? Songs? These are all all the things that are happening on the internet globally. These are all great sources of language learning. Very camerin. Isn't the best way just interpersonal and learning to use the language face to face with people who are fluent and. The goal. Hopefully is always to be able to use that language actively with someone. But of course, that the absence system line now that TV programs any other way that is available to one is a good place to start. There is not a lot of research on the relative efficiency and success of the different apps at this point. This is still a very new area full learning another language, but they seem to to work for some people. Some better others are the better and other ways of starting on this journey can be what one should choose whatever since to work best for them. But eventually you do want to engage with someone and interact with someone maybe it's a coffee date with a person who speaks that language. Maybe it's traveling to that country. Maybe it's dating someone who fixed language there are multiple ways to to use language to eventually tame the fluency that you discussed earlier, what do you make out of one point two?.

language center Berkeley language center Professor Berkeley Alzheimer executive French UC Northwestern University professor of communication sci Michael Marion director professor communication scienc Europe writer Samuel Beckett Russia England Merrick
"language center" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:58 min | 2 years ago

"language center" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And naturally sing and played over and over. And we'll go to another caller. And that's you Don, you're on the air. Hello. Yes. Hi wife, and I moved to Germany shortly after we were married lived there for six years, and we trae your that that experience and a friend of mine who moved there to live with his girlfriend. I told him avoid English just speak German. No matter how poorly and the other comment is that some people say that having another language having two languages like having to soul. Now, my experience in speaking other languages, they teach you in language to don't translate just speak. So I want to ask your experts there about this question. If you're thinking about some subject that just politics, and you've got to different people. You're speaking to one is German and one is English. When you go to say, something you select the language to say it in. And then you just say likewise, you switch the other language. What is the nature of this pre language? Nation before you select a language to say, it's important question. Very American go to you again on this. That's a really good question and linguist studies the selective mechanism on you before before your producer language extensively. In fact, what's interesting is that the same person can actually think differently and reach different conclusions when using a different language, so you could speak to a bilingual multi-lingual, and that's in part because the language use activates this entire network of memories and experiences, and is linked to discreet rail thinks that you have experienced in that language, and it's quite often the case that you experience across languages vary in some significant way. So it's not unlikely for one to make a different decision to think of themselves and of others differently to express emotion differently across the two languages. So that that will really influence what you say not only in how you said. But sometimes the answer itself there's actually research on things like moral decision making. Ethical decisions financial decisions aware using. For example. A second language makes one melodic UIL and provides an answer that's melodic less emotionally Laden. But you don't need to look at research. You can look at your own experiences. If you speak another language, and let's say you own the romantic relationship with someone what you in familial situation. And you do often fill a different intensity today. Motion that you express all the someone expresses to you. If it is expressed in the same language again. Very Marin is professor communication sciences and disorders at Northwestern University. Roseau talking the hour with recurrent who's here with us a CEO who directs Berkeley language center, and as professor of French at UC, Berkeley and American science writer, and the author of forwards for friend, why using more than one language matters. Now more than ever, and this is a fundraising period for security public radio. For more information about how to support cake, you go to kick you D dot org on Michael Krasny. Funds for the production of forum this morning or provided by the members of cake QB public radio and the germanacos foundation and the generosity foundation. And by generous gift from yawn Shrem and Maria Manetti Shrem, founders of the Manetti Shrem museum of art at UC Davis, which preserves the legacy of renown artists such as Wayne Tibo for future innovators by dedicating a third of its space to arts education. Hi, good morning. This is Audrey Ana from San Francisco as an integral from. Columbia. It's great to just hear you is everything morning and my father used to everything morning. So that's why I got into the routine of it also part of my morning routine with my coffee, you keep me company. You keep me informed. You guys deserve every single bit of money that I needed to give I look forward to continuing listening to you guys for years to come. All right. Thank you so much. Thank you. Thank you for the warm words and the support and thanks to your dad for listening and setting you on the right path all those years ago, I'm Cynthia Marcucci here with Gregg Sherwood and Dave Freeman. And we are so grateful to people like Adriana who step up to support us. And now we are asking you to join them. Please go to your phone and give us a call at one eight hundred nine three seven eight five zero or point your browser to go type in dot org slash donate. Just type that into your favorite browser. And it will take you right to an easy pledge form that you can fill out. And either way if you make your move in the next few minutes, it's going to be worth twice as much to us worth about five hundred dollars dollar for Dollar Challenge. Grant, thanks to Ellen Moran of the signals society. The signals society is a group of members who make significant annual contributions to and our challenge. Grant rule applies. If we don't make the challenge before the break is over we have to offer to return all of the five hundred dollars. If you can join us a monthly sustaining member the entire first year of your membership will count towards our challenge right now. One eight hundred nine three seven eight eight five zero is the phone number and Cynthia mentioned, you can donate online. It's Keiichi weei dot org slash donate. And you may want to use either one of those to get on board and help us earn this extra money in the form of the challenge. And of course, even when we have a challenge, we also have thank you gets to share with you. And if you can come in at that fifty cent. -oday level. Fifteen dollars a month. We have three really choices for you to consider one is the Washington Post. That's a digital subscription to the Washington Post for an entire year. If you enjoy for them on a regular basis, you will certainly enjoy the Washington Post..

Washington Post Cynthia Marcucci Maria Manetti Shrem Berkeley language center Manetti Shrem museum of art Germany Don Michael Krasny Columbia Ellen Moran germanacos foundation producer Audrey Ana Northwestern University San Francisco UC Davis Adriana Marin CEO professor
"language center" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"language center" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is forum. I'm Michael Krasny. We're talking about how to learn a foreign language most effectively, and it is often compared to learning how to ride a bike. But it doesn't quite pan out that way because often, you know, like say, you don't use it. You lose it. And the reality is that language fluency has a lot to do with really practicing and using the language and a listener tweets any console for us westerners, learning, Asian and tonal language. They seem so daunting. Some thoughts recurrent, well, these are among the most difficult languages for an English speaker to learn I think one of the key things as was saying was to get into a social context where you see and experience the language in is being addressed to you as welcoming you as a as a member to this community and seeing how it is that language is being used around you and with you that is. I think the really key thing. And then once you have a sense of how the language is is being used in a social context, then to focus on the details of the tones and distinctions that are being made the problem with some of these apps as they start off with the tones without any kind of context. And so you're you're making auditory discrimination distinctions, but it's not clear what for again recurrent as rector the Berkeley language center. Professor French at UC, Berkeley. And let's go to your calls, and let's begin Aaron with you here on the air. Good morning. Extra. Yes. Can you hear me? I can't go ahead. All right. Thanks so much. Love this program. I studied Spanish air at UC Berkeley, I majored in comparative literature minored in Spanish literature, Stanford here. Kalamata? Two classes with standard with standards. It was one of the most important decision in my life. I really appreciate your talking about this. And I share your. I sort of lament as well. Fewer students are setting for a quick comment. And a question my comment is I don't think it was mentioned. But one thing I've found to be really valuable, and I know the standards I did it with found to be really valuable with what we called an intercom or an exchange where you just meet every week over Conti, and you sort of slopped languages you talk in English. And then you talk and standards to get the practice. I'm living with standards. Department was significantly more official but into combo was really helpful. Everything and you can do that in the United States as well arranged was trying to learn English. And you you practice both jam your language. My question is less about the value of reading in another language. I learned to read Spanish, well, I really learned to converse in it. Well, and I love reading Spanish, and I learned a lot of the glamour that I had never learned English. I learned Spanish started saying out applied in English. But also really love studying poetry Spanish sort of the different ways that standard works in poetry away. That English is not my. My question is about what's the value of reading? I know it doesn't always translate into being able to speak. It terms of forming some of the. That that you were discussing and whether to that. Learning conversion in the light with. Yeah. Thank you for that question. I was just saying fair to recurrent how I learned French for a PHD. Learn how to read it, and I still can't really speak. It would love to be able to speak it. Let's talk about that connection via Rica Marion, I mean between reading and learning in terms of speech. For sure words words can have a magic to them. And you can you can no notice that magic often when you learn to read, and you can see the connections between different languages, and you can see how languages may share route Omay share structure with another language, they know or with an older language. Reading another link reading learning..

Aaron Berkeley language center UC Berkeley Michael Krasny Berkeley Kalamata United States Stanford Conti Professor official
The case for and against Joe Biden's 2020 chances

Bob Brinker

05:27 min | 2 years ago

The case for and against Joe Biden's 2020 chances

"But you main message of the ad I agree with all of that. You probably agree with all that. That's why say Biden is running in the moderate lane. Even though his historic record is not particularly moderate his running in that lane. Perfect example. So Joe Biden when he talks about America as an idea and all the great things we've done in the past the stock footage that he uses is stock footage of marines landing on the beaches during Normandy or Guadalcanal, and then he juxtaposed that with MLK and civil rights marchers. Now, there's a thing that all the other democratic candidates have done in their video that Joe Biden did not do in this video all the other democratic candidates then flash to some sort of gay pride parade or something. Right. Then they flash to the rainbow flag on the wall of the White House or something Joe Biden. Specifically does not do that. That's choice. I promise you somebody in his campaign said to him Joe. We don't want that in their why because you used to oppose gay marriage. We don't want that in their why because you're trying to appeal to blue collar voters in Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Michigan not to upper east side, liberals in New York and Washington DC MOS Angeles. I promise you that something that happened. So Joe Biden is running that campaign. Now, how is that campaign going to play with the with the progressive wing of the Democratic Party Biden is hoping that the progressive savage each other that there are ten people in that lane. He's the only person in the moderate lane. And he walks the nomination. That's not a terrible strategy. It really is not. But all guns are now going to train themselves on Joe Biden, Joe Biden is everything that the that the radical base of the Democratic Party despises, not just as likes despises. So for example, the Justice Democrats came out, and they put out a tweet saying they're not going to endorse Joe Biden, they said, quote, Joe Biden is out of touch with the center of energy in that. Critic party today now notice that language center of energy? And I think that's correct the sensor of energy is not with Joe Biden, and his sort of moderate view of America as eight fundamentally great place that we have not always lived up to that's a conservative view, most people and left do not believe in this. So they say Democrats future Medicare for all green new deal free college rejecting corporate money ending ending mass incarceration deportation. Right. That is what they say. The future is Joe Biden voted in favor of the Iraq war. He voted for bankruptcy reform act. He voted for mass incarceration. In fact, he helped author at nine hundred ninety four he voted against school desegregation and against marriage equality, according to them. Now, he didn't actually vote against school desegregation. He voted against forced busing. That's not the same thing as desegragation forced integration. And desegregation are not the same thing legally speaking, but when he says that they voted against marriage. That's true. He voted in favor of additional marriage. He voted in favor of of the I believe in the nineteen nineties that offensive. Marriage act. So in any case, the Joe Biden, Joe Biden record will be up for debate here among Democrats now, here's the thing in a if we just went straight to the general election, you'd have to favor Joe Biden, he'd be the odds on favourite against Donald Trump in a primary. However, Joe Biden occupies the space that Donald Trump occupied. So in a primary space, Joe Biden, basically is Trump Trump in the general is this larger than life figure who is the incumbent and the referendum is going to be on him. That's at least the democratic theory in the democrat primaries, Biden is the larger than life figure and all of the focus is going to be on him. And the problem for Joe Biden is that he has never withstood focus. Well, Joe Biden has always failed to withstand the scars of battle. This is why he failed in one thousand nine hundred eight and had to drop out of replay drizzle scandal. So Bernie Sanders is going to be the first person to go after Joe Biden, obviously. And Bernie's allies are preparing the fight. According to the hill Sanders has been more of a liberal liberal policy. Visionary championing policies that were initially regarded by colleges fringe ideas, these concepts related embraced by leading members of the democratic caucus such as raising the minimum wage to fifteen bucks an hour and providing free college education. Former colleagues described Biden Sanders is polar opposites in terms of personalities and interacting with fellow senators Biden Seventy-six is gregarious and sociable. He was always eager to work a room strike up a friendly conversation or reassure a colleague who's feeling down a retail politician to his core Biden always wanted to know what was on his fellow senators, mind Sanders by contrast was focused on policy often. So wrapped up in his thoughts. He seemed oblivious to his colleagues he was seen consumed by Embiid plans to fight wealth inequality and push the national debates left, but uninterested in the personal lives of fellow senators who do you think the base is going to resonate to? If you hate Trump like despise from from Peter who do you think are gonna go for? Joe Biden a guy who's amiable, but not necessarily as hard edged or Bernie Sanders who's going to yell and scream and ransom rave about Donald Trump or Kamala Harris, who's a prosecutor Democrats have a lot of choices in these primaries. I'm not sure that Joe Biden stands up to scrutiny. That's a very conservative campaign launch video and Franklin sort of astonished that's the direction that he went especially because he's now going to have to defend his record Senator Dianne Feinstein has already come out and said that Biden would have handled the Clarence Thomas Anita hill hearings differently. If you could do it all over again, he's going to spend the first month of his campaign apologizing for his entire record. That's what you'll Biden is going to do is that a solid launch strategy. Basically, the only reason he's famous is the reason he's going to be apologizing. I don't see this as working well for for Biden. I think he's gonna launch he'll be strong at launch. And then it's all downhill

Joe Biden Donald Trump Bernie Sanders Democratic Party America White House Senator Dianne Feinstein Guadalcanal Language Center Iraq Embiid Clarence Thomas Anita Hill Mos Angeles Franklin Pennsylvania Michigan Washington
"language center" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

06:40 min | 2 years ago

"language center" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Life. There's nothing you can't achieve if you work at it. Should we believe and above all else facts, which is stake in this election? traffic right now. We can't He's found forget side of the what ten happened of walnut in Charlottesville. grove bus disabled Even in the more carpool important. lane delays We have here to remember coming who away from city we terrorists are. are just now. Trying to get This that is out America. of your way six oh five south between Beverly in Whittier. Entire Well, this is roadwork now. Here's have had the thing the about that ad. lanes couple There's not lanes a still word taken in that away ad and that's backing just up reading toward it. valley There's not a warden and also in six that ad oh five aside north. from his Telegraph characterization of this is was the greatest an earlier crisis. accident We've ever left. phased Traffic in Charlottesville backed up to south as American street all in the this northbound kind of stuff five and MARTINI Trump is fundamental and all that be carefully. stuff is wrong. Snotty But what at he Arbor main for an message accident, of the right ad. shoulder. And I that's agree busy with leaving all karma of that. data You next probably report. agree Three fifty. with all I'm Rhonda that. Kramer, That's why AM seven Biden hundred. is running in the moderate lane. Even though his historic record is not particularly moderate his running in that lane. Right. That last perfect example. So Joe Biden when he talks about America as an idea and all the great things we've done in the past the stock footage that he uses is stock footage of marines landing on the beaches during Normandy or Guadalcanal, and then he juxtaposed that with MLK and civil rights marchers. Now, there's a thing that all the other democratic candidates have done in their video. The Joe Biden did not do in this video all the other democratic candidates then flash to some sort of gay pride parade or something. Right. Then they flash to the rainbow flag on the wall of the White House. Or something Joe Biden, specifically does not do that. That's choice. I promise you somebody in his campaign said to him Joe. We don't want that in their why because you used to oppose gay marriage. We don't want that in their why because you are trying to appeal to blue collar voters in Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Michigan not to upper east side liberals in New York and Washington DC in Los Angeles. I promise you that something that happened. So Joe Biden is running that campaign. Now, how is that campaign going to play with the with the progressive wing of the Democratic Party Biden is hoping that the progressive savage each other that their ten people in that lane. He's the only person in the moderate lane and he walks denomination. That's not a terrible strategy. It really is not. But all guns are now going to train themselves on Joe Biden, Joe Biden is everything that the that the radical base of the Democratic Party despises, not just dislikes despises. So for example, the Justice Democrats came out today, and they put out a tweet saying they're not going to endorse Joe Biden, they said, quote, Joe Biden is. Out of touch with the sensor of energy in the Democratic Party today. Now, notice that language center of energy. And I think that's correct. The center of energy is not with Joe Biden, and his sort of moderate view of America as a fundamentally great place that we have not always lived up to that's conservative you most people in left do not believe in this. So they say Democrats huger Medicare for all green new deal free college rejecting corporate money, ending ending mass incarceration and deportation. Right. That is what they say. The future is Joe Biden voted in favor of the Iraq war. He voted for bankruptcy reform act. He voted for mass incarceration. In fact, he helped author it in one thousand nine hundred four he voted against school desegregation and against marriage equality, according to them. Now, he didn't actually vote against school desegregation. He voted against forced busing. That's not the same thing as desegregation forced integration. And desegregation are not the same thing legally speaking, but when he says that they were voted against marriage. That's true. He voted in favor of traditional marriage. He voted in favor of of the. I believe in the one thousand nine hundred defensive Marriage Act. So in any case, the the Joe Biden job, I record will be up for debate here among Democrats. Now, here's the thing in a if we just went straight to the general election, you'd have to favor Joe Biden, he'd be the odds on favorite against Donald Trump in a primary. However, Joe Biden occupies the space that Donald Trump occupied. So in a primary space, Joe Biden, basically is Trump Trump in the general is this larger than life figure who is the incumbent and the referendum is going to be on him. That's at least the democratic theory in the democrat primaries, Biden is the larger than life figure and all of the focus is going to be on him. And the problem for Joe Biden is that he has never withstood focus. Well, Joe Biden has always failed to withstand the scars of battle. This is why he failed in one thousand nine hundred eight and had to drop out over a plagiarism scandal. So Bernie Sanders is going to be the first person to go after Joe Biden, obviously. And Bernie's allies are preparing the fight. Right. According to the hill. Sanders has been more of a liberal a liberal policy visionary championing policies that were initially regarded by colleagues fringe ideas, these concepts related embraced by leading members of the democratic caucus such as raising the minimum wage to fifteen bucks an hour and providing free college education, former colleagues, describe Biden Sanders is polar opposites in terms of personalities and interacting with fellow senators Biden Seventy-six is gregarious and sociable. He was always eager to work a room strike up a friendly conversation or reassure a colleague who's feeling down a retail politician to his core Biden always wanted to know what was on his fellow senators, mind Sanders by contrast is focused on policy often. So wrapped up in his thoughts. He seemed oblivious to his colleagues he was seen as consumed by bishops plans to fight wealth inequality and push the national debates left, but uninterested in the personal lives of fellow senators who do you think the base is going to resonate to? If you hate Trump like despise from your Trump hater, who do you think you're going to go for Joe Biden, a guy who's head of amiable, but not necessarily as hard edge or Bernie Sanders who's going to yell and scream and. Ransom rave about Donald Trump or combo Harris. Who's a prosecutor Democrats have a lot of choices in these primaries. I'm not sure that Joe Biden stands up to scrutiny. That's a very conservative campaign launch video and Franklin sort of astonished that's the direction that he went especially because he's now going to have to defend his record Senator Dianne Feinstein has already come out and said that Biden would have handled the Clarence Thomas Anita hill hearings differently. If you could do it all over again, he's going to spend the first month of his campaign apologizing for his entire record. That's what you'll Biden is going to do is that a solid launch strategy. Basically, the only reason he's famous is the reason he's going to be apologizing. I don't see this as working well for for Biden. I think he's gonna launch he'll be strong it launch. And then it's all downhill. Gain. Just a second. We're gonna get to more on Joe Biden, how the Democrats are reacting where things stand right now. But first, let's talk about that timeshare that you bought I know you're in Hawaii for vacation. And they said, you know, what you can get a great deal on a luau. If you go to this time share presentation, you thought I am strong willed. I will not buy a timeshare, and then you bought yourself a timeshare you did so because basically you were roped into it. And now you have a weekend for an average cost of twenty grand with an interest rate of up to seventeen point nine percent. Plus one thousand dollar a year maintenance fee, and then when you're tired of it, you're stuck you can find hundreds of these things listed for a buck right now. With no buyers friends, this is nonsense..

Joe Biden Donald Trump Bernie Sanders MARTINI Trump America. Democratic Party Charlottesville Charlottesville. grove Kramer Trump White House Whittier language center Beverly Iraq Hawaii prosecutor Senator Dianne Feinstein
"language center" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

09:34 min | 2 years ago

"language center" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"That you've provided for us. It's it's wonderful to have you read this. You've been serving under the air force special special operations command. And then you. Got your degree. At the Korean class at the defense language institute. Foreign language center in Monterey ruining the Korean console channels award for excellence. And you did something that is highly unusual. You were deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan as well as several countries in Africa. And tell us what you did when you were in Africa with a tablet, please. Absolutely. So one thing that not a lot of people might really realize about deployments is that once you're done doing the actual work that you're needed that you're needed for sometimes you actually have have downtime, and there's not a whole lot of options when you're in, especially know, countries like in in the horn of Africa, where I was where your your internet and TV options are actually pretty limited. So one thing that I started doing to pass the time was grown up reading a lot of fantasy CS Lewis JR Tolkien's stuff like that. So I thought to myself, you know, maybe a good use of my time would be if I were to start writing a fantasy novel much like, you know, so Mike heroes who actually both of those authors that I mentioned just now also were fought in World War One. So you know, what I'm doing is that necessarily new it's just part of a new generation of writing while deployed. So you wrote you wrote a book. On a tablet. While I did while being deploy how long did it take you to write the book and tell us about the book and where it is today? And and. Absolutely. So it's called gift of the shaper. And it's actually my first Microsoft attempt at at at at a book, and it took me I'd say just about two years to to write the whole thing. Then that's coming up with the completed manuscript going through editing making small changes to the plot. But ninety five percent of the book was just like you mentioned written on my on my tablet on the touch screen. No last night, even, you know, a detachable keyboard or something because that was just the the tool that I had at my disposal when I was deployed and after a while I just got used to using the touchscreen so much that I it didn't even occur to me to use. My, you know, my my laptop or something to start writing. But yeah. So it's called gift to the shaper. And it's it's a an epic fantasy. So, you know, you're thinking like game of thrones that kind of stuff, and it's about a young man who finds himself dragged into a war between two sides. Now one side wants to free their God, who's called the breaker of the dawn and another side wants to keep him imprisoned. And they're led by their God is called the shaper of ages, which I actually derived the name of the book from a gift of the shaper, which was basically the shaper, you know, giving giving her power to some of her followers. So that kind of how I I came up with the name and the book is getting rave reviews. So good for you. Now. Thank you. I appreciate that. Tell me tell me a little bit about what's life? Like now that the book is done and. You're back here in the states. Yeah. So I actually it turns out that writing is something that I really enjoy a very passionate about it. It took me thirty odd years to figure that out. But once I did I actually found that it was something that I was you know, good at. But it was something that I really enjoyed doing. So when I got home, I decided, you know, what I I have this first book that I've written and like you said it it's gotten good reviews from people they actually really enjoy the book. And I thought, you know, maybe this is something I'd like to continue doing. So I actually found myself writing a sequel, which I actually have had recently finished. So you know, it's just the first draft. It's not going to be done for quite some time. But it is something that I I definitely enjoy doing especially after you know, finding that gift to the shaper was sort of something that, you know. Found myself so easily writing so, yeah, I basically just been doing some more writing since I've been home. So were you not you didn't do any writing writing was not something that you wanted to do or thought about doing you kinda just picked it up? All you were in Africa. Absolutely. I kept you know, like, some someone listeners who were who grew up in the ninety s might be familiar with live journal, which was basically an online sort of blog format where you could, you know, write your thoughts and me as an angsty twenty something year old was doing that a whole lot. But that was the closest thing that I ever really had to any sort of writing, I taken English courses in college. But I had never attempted so much as a long poem before actually writing and finishing get to the shaper. But it was something that sort of came naturally to me just because I like I'd mentioned I I grew up reading so many books. I was an absolutely perations reader and story structure and narrative and character points of view or all something that was very familiar to me as as a huge fan of the genre. So writing honestly came very easily to me, I think I took to it a lot more quickly than some. Who who you know? Maybe had never grown up writing a reading or anything like that. Yeah. So you found writing in this dangerous warzone therapeutic. Yes. Definitely. It was it's an escape. And and I think that's why. Yeah. You know, some some people think it's it's kind of funny that, you know, a war vet comes out and writes a fantasy novel. But I think that was part of because I wanted to distance myself so much from you know, what I was seeing every single day going out and supporting these special operations missions. I come back, and I I'd get I take myself into a different world. What about your your colleagues in your tell soldiers men and women that you serving what do they think it was strange you would wander off and do this writing or they had no clue? Some of them new and all of them supported me, which was absolutely amazing and one guy in particular was very very supportive. He was one of the guys who I was deployed with in in a west African country called new share his name was named Dave. And he was the guy who would he loved reading military fiction military, nonfiction anything like that. But that was his preferred genre. He didn't really venture outside the bounds of that. And I'd actually given him an early draft of the manuscript of gift to the shaper. And I said, you know, I'm looking for people to sorta give tweaks and suggestions to this would you mind taking a look at it. And Dave turned around and said, you know, this isn't I don't read stuff at outside of of military stuff like this. So I'll probably not be interested in it. But I'll give it a give it a shot as your friend. Well, the next day he came back. And he sat me down for about forty five minutes because he had blown through the entire novel in just less than a day. He was like first of all where can I get more fantasy like this and second of all I loved it. So that was I think the the biggest piece of support that I got from one of my fellow service servicemen. Yeah. I think it's so fascinating that that you were able to just take yourself out of that situation and devote yourself to writing. Now, you're trying to find a way to do it fulltime. I definitely am. Yeah. So I found out in November that well actually in consecutive weeks. I found out I that I was a finalist for or give to the shape or was a finalist for the twenty eighteen Bessbrook awards. And then I found out on the nineteenth November nineteenth that it was actually it had won the Beverly Hills book awards in the category of fantasy. For me that was that was a great Siobhan. You know, it's one thing to get five star reviews its other to it's another thing to win awards. Yeah. Well, well, well, being deployed a great story..

Africa Dave defense language institute Monterey language center Microsoft Beverly Hills Lewis JR Tolkien Iraq Mike Siobhan Afghanistan ninety five percent forty five minutes two years
"language center" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

09:35 min | 2 years ago

"language center" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"I if I'm in the car, my radio's on W shooting in New Zealand the opportunity to write a guest column on their site. And the two women took it as an opportunity to double down attacking Chelsea Clinton. Even further lean Dwight and rose Asaf custody the President Clinton on Friday evening on her. Her way into the memorial service accused her of inciting the mosque shooter because Clinton had sided against Ilhan, Omar in her anti semitic language center, blaming Chelsea for having been an influence her in the mosque shooting now here again. Something that has become standard operating procedure a horrific shooting like this happens and the left, including the media immediately seeks to blame their political enemies for it rather than the perp. Or did then link the perp to their political enemies. And it's it's it's silly. And it's getting tiresome, but they work overtime to pull this off. And they never stopped doing it. A good analogy the left lives on the battlefield life to the left. Is the battlefield to us. It's not we don't want to be on the battlefield every day. That's not how we look at life. But they do life is the battlefield life is a daily battle in an ongoing war and every skirmish. Must be one. And since they cannot win. With prevailing ideas. They cannot win with superior ideas. They have to go out and destroy the credibility. And the humanity of their opponents. And that is precisely what happens, and it's that that many on our side have no idea how to combat or how to how to respond to how to battle it. And it's it's made if even made more frustrating by the fact that look at the Covington kids so this kid shows up he's got to make America great head on. We know what happened because of this a total mischaracterization an attempt to destroy this kid and his school and his his friends that were all there in a story that was originally reported as wrong as incorrectly as it could be. But what's the impact of that? The impact of that. Is that everybody else puts their make America great caps away. Because they don't want the hassle. How many of you have purchased a book by a well known conservative writer, and you get on an airplane. And you don't want to you don't want people. See you're reading your frayed of what'll happen. So you buy the book, but you don't bring it out in public and read it because you are afraid of being assaulted attacked insulted or what have you? So you take the path of least resistance and hide the fact that you support a particular conservative, author you put away your make America great again hat. This does two things it it. It creates the impression that there aren't any people that support Trump or that there aren't very many people are a conservative, and then it gives the left the idea that they can totally steamrolled any opposition into silence and invisibility. And then they get shocked on election day when the people who are afraid to tell pollsters what they think afraid to wear make America great again hat afraid to display a book written by a prominent conservative, author they show up and vote and the left loses. And they can't figure it out because they get the idea there steamrollering everybody. There's also a third aspect of this. Many of the people hiding their make America, great again hats, and many of the people who are not pulling out the book by famous conservative on an airplane in many many cases, those are the same people complaining about how the Republicans never fightback. And if you confront them on that, well, we're not supposed to fight back there. Whether we elect Republicans to fight back on our behalf. Right. Understand that. But anyway, this is an indication of of how intimidatingly successful the left is has been and is in stifling any public opposition to them. And they do it by categorizing people at this white nationalist thing. This is just a replay of the same technique. They used in the aftermath of the Indiana religious freedom restoration act, and any other public event in that case, it was gay marriage and gay this and gave that and trans this and Transnet in this case, it's Islamaphobia, but it's it's the same technique. It's the same formula that is replayed event after event after event and after each of these events people that had nothing to do with it. People that weren't even in New Zealand into being categorized as white nationalists. And by the way, that doesn't even mean what it means white nationalist means white supremacist. White nationalist is code word for modern day KKK. And what it really means when they start throwing around the term, white, nationalist. I'll tell you what it really means what they're really saying is. That white people. Are trying to get rid of all opposition. They founded this country, and they're going to try to hold onto this country. But they're the ones that have ruined this country white people so all of this white privilege white nationalism. And then you notice the allegations and accusations made if you don't condemn this thing that happened in New Zealand properly, if you don't say exactly what you're supposed to say the way they demand you say it, then all of a sudden, you become a member of this white nationalist group, which means white supremacy, which means KKK, which means you hate minorities, which means you are rotten to the core way. That's what they're trying. That's the impression of trying to create of everybody. Who does not say and does not think exactly as they do. And this has been highly successful as an intimidating thing. And that's why people hide their make America. Great again, hats or their books or whatever that would identify them as conservatives because they don't nobody gets on an airplane to be in a war. Nobody gets on an airplane to be in a battle the left. Does the left goes everywhere. Life is the battle life is the battlefield. And it isn't with it is with Trump. Trump happily joins him on the field of battle and happily. Reply responds to him every day day in and day out. And as such you know, that Donald Trump is the most popular Republican president in any of our lifetimes memories. Donald Trump's approval numbers in the Republican party are over ninety percent. There isn't a Republican who has come close to this. More and more people are now in polling Davis suggesting that Muller's investigation is a witch hunt. And it's over wrought that it's that numbers over fifty percent. Now, that's just out by the way. And the reason Donald Trump gets these popularity numbers is precisely because he does not take even an idol sentence. Of accusation false accusation or allegation and let it go. He responds to every one of them with his tweets. Or however, he does. So and you see how it drives them crazy. They are used to people laying down there used to people cowering in fear in the corners. They're used to people taking their maga- hats off. They're used to people hiding their books. They're used to people whispering. Hey, I really support Trump. I can't say. Those public. I just can't okay understand. But when thinking about this Hillary Clinton business, I mean, this is big here is the chosen. Prodigy of the Clintons. I mean is the future of the Clinton dynasty? And the Washington Post the New York Times, none of the drive by media are defending her in this instance, where she is being accused of having culpability and responsibility for the New Zealand mosque shooting. Only Donald Trump junior comes to her defense. Don't forget folks, if you can say it's about her on, Omar. Tweet where she blamed Omar for antisemitism. But they know that her husband is Jewish. And he's got a couple of kids who may be raised. Do not take that out of the equation. That's the same thing with Jared. And and I gotta take a brief timeout. We'll be back in continue.

Donald Trump America New Zealand Chelsea Clinton Omar Trump president Hillary Clinton New Zealand mosque language center Indiana Covington Dwight writer Republican party Washington Post Jared Asaf
"language center" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

10:11 min | 2 years ago

"language center" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"As you know, the sheep. What exactly that she'd do? I didn't print the story out of what she did. I've got all the reaction stuff. I guess she went to a a memorial meeting for the New Zealand shooting and her presence. There was considered insulting. Because she had previously tweeted her opposition, the Ilhan, Omar and hurt anti semitic tweets. And so when Hillary when when Chelsea shows up, the leftist mob went nuts now the thing that you have to remember here. Is that Chelsea married a Jewish man and has a couple of kids? Now, this doesn't get reported at any of this. But do not doubt for a moment. The people involved here know this. So in a move that. I am certain has stunned the Clintons BuzzFeed has given anti Israel activists who harassed Chelsea a guest column. Buzzfeed news, gave the two anti Israel activists who confronted Chelsea Clinton at a New York City memorial for victims of the shooting in New Zealand the opportunity to write a guest column on their site. And the two women took it as an opportunity to double down attacking Chelsea Clinton. Even further. Lean Dwight and rose Asaf our custard the pregnant Clinton on Friday evening on her way into the Morial service accused of inciting the mosque shooter because Clinton had sided against Ilhan, Omar in her anti semitic language center, blaming Chelsea for having been an influence her in the mosque shooting. Now here again, something that has become standard operating procedure a horrific shooting like this happens in the left, including the media immediately seeks to blame their political enemies for it rather than the perp or did then link the perp to their political enemies. And it's just it's it's silly. And it's getting tiresome, but they work overtime to pull this off. And they never stopped doing it. A good analogy the left lives on the battlefield life to the left. Is the battlefield to us. It's not we don't want to be on the battlefield everyday. That's not how we look at life. But they do life is the battlefield life is a daily battle in an on going war and every skirmish. Must be one. And since they cannot win. With prevailing ideas. They cannot win with superior ideas. They have to go out and destroy the credibility. And the humanity of their opponents. And that is precisely what happens in. It's that that many on our side have no idea how to combat or how to how to respond to how to battle it. And it's it's made. It's even made more frustrating by the fact that look at Covington kids so this kid shows up he's got to make America great head on. We know what happened because of this a total mischaracterization and attempt to destroy this kid and his school and his his friends that were all there in a story that was originally reported as wrong as incorrectly as it could be. But what's the impact of that? The impact of that. Is that everybody else puts their make America great caps away. Because they don't want the hassle. How many of you have purchased a book by a well known conservative writer, and you get on an airplane. And you don't want to you don't want people. See you're reading your frayed of what'll happen. So you're by the book, but you don't bring it out in public and read it because you are afraid of being assaulted attack insulted or what have you? So you take the path of least resistance and hide the fact that you support a particular conservative author or you put away your make America great again hat. This does two things it it. It creates the impression that there aren't any people that support Trump or that there aren't very many people are a conservative, and then it gives the left the idea that they can totally steamroll any opposition into silence and invisibility. And then they get shocked on election day when the people who are afraid to tell pollsters what they think afraid to wear a make-america-great-again hat afraid to display a book written by a prominent conservative, author they show up and vote and the left loses and they can't figure it out because they get the idea there steamrollering everybody. There's also a third aspect of this. Many of the people hiding their make America, great again hats, and many of the people who are not pulling out the book by famous conservative on an airplane in many many cases, those are the same people complaining about how the Republicans never fight back. And if you confront them on that, well, we're not supposed to fight back there. Whether we elect to Republicans to fight back on our behalf right understand that. But anyway, this is an indication of of how intimidatingly successful the left is has been and is in stifling any public opposition to them. And they do it by categorizing people. This this white nationalist thing. This is just a replay of the same technique. They used in the aftermath of the Indiana religious freedom restoration act, and any other public event in that case, it was gay marriage and gay this and gave that and translates and Transnet in this case, it's Islamaphobia, but it's it's the same technique. It's the same formula that is replayed event after event after event and after each of these events people that had nothing to do with. It people that weren't even in New Zealand end up being categorized as white nationalists. And by the way, that doesn't even mean what it means white nationalist means white supremacist. White nationalist is code word for modern day KKK. And what it really means when they start throwing around the term, white, nationalist. I'll tell you what it really means what they're really saying is. That white people are trying to get rid of all opposition. They founded this country, and they're going to try to hold on to this country. But they're the ones that have ruined this country white people so all of this white privilege white nationalism. And then you notice the allegations and accusations made if you don't condemn this thing that happened in New Zealand properly, if you don't say exactly what you're supposed to say the way they demand you say it, then all of a sudden, you become a member of this white nationalist group, which means white supremacy, which means KKK, which means you hate minorities, which means you are rotten to the core way. That's what they're trying. That's the impression of trying to create of everybody. Who does not say and does not think exactly as they do. And this has been highly successful as an intimidating thing. And that's why people hide their make America. Great again, hats or their books or whatever that would identify them as conservatives because they don't nobody gets on an airplane to be in a war. Nobody gets on an airplane to be in a battle the left. Does the left goes everywhere. Life is the battle life is the battlefield. And it isn't with it is with Trump. Trump happily joins him on the field of battle and happily. Reply responds to him every day day in and day out. And as such you know, that Donald Trump is the most repopulate Republican president in any of our lifetimes and memories. Donald Trump's approval numbers in the Republican party are over ninety percent. There isn't a Republican who has come close to this. More and more people are now in polling Davis suggesting that Muller's investigation is a witch hunt that it's overwrought that that numbers over fifty percent. Now, that's just out by the way. And the reason Donald Trump gets these popularity numbers is precisely because he does not take even an idol sentence of accusation false accusation or allegation and let it go. He responds to every one of them with his tweets. Or however, he does. So and you see how it drives them crazy. They are used to people laying down there used to people cowering in fear in the corners. They're used to people taking their maga- hats off. They're used to people hiding their books. They're used to people whispering. I really support Trump. I can't say doesn't take public kiss Cam. Okay. Understand. But when thinking about this Hillary Clinton business, I mean, this is big here is the chosen. Prodigy of the Clintons. I mean, the future of the Clinton dynasty. And the Washington Post the New York Times, none of the drive by media are defending her in this instance, where she is being accused of having culpability and responsibility for the New Zealand mosque shooting. Only. Donald Trump junior comes to her defense. Don't forget folks, you can say it's about her you on Omar tweet where she blamed Omar for antisemitism. But they know that her husband is Jewish. And she's got a couple of kids who may be raised Jewish. Do not take that out of the equation. That's the same thing with Jared and and vodka. I gotta take a brief timeout. We'll be back.

Donald Trump Chelsea Clinton New Zealand America Omar Hillary Clinton Trump Ilhan Israel Clinton Clintons New Zealand mosque Indiana Covington New York City memorial Washington Post writer Jared language center
"language center" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

10:49 min | 2 years ago

"language center" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"As you know, the she. What exactly that she do? I didn't print the story out of what she did. I've got all the reaction stuff. I guess she went to a memorial meeting for the New Zealand shooting and her presence. There was considered insulting. Because she had previously tweeted her opposition to Ilhan, Omar and hurt anti semitic tweets. And so when Hillary or when when Chelsea shows up, the leftist mob went nuts now the thing that you have to remember here. Is that Chelsea married a Jewish man and has a couple of kids? Now, this doesn't get reported any of this. But do not doubt for a moment. The people involved here know this. So in a move that. I am certain has stunned the Clintons BuzzFeed has given anti Israel activists who harassed Chelsea a guest column. Buzzfeed news, gave the two anti Israel activists who confronted Chelsea Clinton at a New York City memorial for victims of the shooting in New Zealand the opportunity to write a guest column on their site. And the two women took it as an opportunity to double down attacking Chelsea Clinton. Even further. Lean Dwight and rose Asaf our custody the pregnant Clinton on Friday evening on her way into the memorial service accused her of inciting the mosque shooter because Clinton had sided against Ilhan, Omar in her anti semitic language center, blaming Chelsea for having been an influence her in the mosque shooting. Now here again, something that has become standard operating procedure a horrific shooting like this happens and the left, including the media immediately seeks to blame their political enemies for it rather than the perp or two then link the perp to their political enemies. And it's it's it's silly. And it's getting tiresome, but they work overtime to pull this off. And they never stopped doing it. A good analogy the left lives on the battlefield life to the left. Is the battlefield to us. It's not we don't want to be on the battlefield everyday. That's not how we look at life. But they do life is the battlefield life is a daily battle in an on going war and every skirmish. Must be one. And since they cannot win. With prevailing ideas. They cannot win with superior ideas. They have to go out and destroy the credibility. And the humanity of their opponents. And that is precisely what happens, and it's that that many on our side have no idea how to combat or how to how to respond to how to battle it. And it's it's made. It's even made more frustrating by the fact that look the Covington kids so this kid shows up. He's got to make America great head on. We know what happened because of this a total mischaracterization an attempt to destroy this kid and his school and his his friends that were all there in a story that was originally reported as wrong as incorrectly as it could be. But what's the impact of that? The impact of that. Is that everybody else puts their make America great caps away. Because they don't want the hassle. How many of you have purchased a book by a well known conservative writer, and you get on an airplane. And you don't want to you don't want people see reading your afraid of what'll happen. So you by the book, but you don't bring it out in public and read it because you are afraid of being assaulted attacked insulted or what have you? So you take the path of least resistance and hide the fact that you support a particular conservative author or you put away your make America great again hat. This does two things it it. It creates the impression that there aren't any people that support Trump or that there aren't very many people are a conservative, and then it gives the left the idea that they can totally steamroll any opposition into silence and invisibility. And then they get shocked on election day when the people who are afraid to tell pollsters what they think afraid to wear a make-america-great-again hat afraid to display a book written by a prominent conservative, author they show up and vote and the left loses and they can't figure it out because they get the idea there steamrollering everybody. There's also a third aspect of this. Many of the people hiding or make America, great again hats, and many of the people who are not pulling out the book by a famous conservative on an airplane in many many cases, those are the same people complaining about how the Republicans never fight back. And if you confront them on that, well, we're not supposed to fight back there. Whether we are lucky Republicans and fight back on our behalf. Right. Understand that. But anyway, this is an indication of of how intimidatingly successful the left is has been and is in stifling any public opposition to them. And they do it by categorizing people. This this white nationalist thing. This is just a replay of the same technique. They used in the aftermath of the Indiana religious freedom restoration act, and any other public event in that case, it was gay marriage and gay this and gave that and trans this and Transnet in this case, it's Islamaphobia, but it's it's the same technique. It's the same formula that is replayed event after event after event and after each of these events people that had nothing to do with it. People that weren't even in New Zealand in that being categorized as white nationalists. And by the way, that doesn't even mean what it means white nationalist means white supremacist. White nationalist is code word for modern day KKK. And what it really means when they start throwing around the term, white, nationalist. I'll tell you what it really means what they're really saying is. That white people. Are trying to get rid of all opposition. They founded this country, and they're going to try to hold onto this country. But they're the ones that have ruined this country white people so all of this white privilege white nationalism. And then you notice the allegations and accusations made if you don't condemn this thing that happened in New Zealand properly, if you don't say exactly what you're supposed to say the way they demand you say it, then all of a sudden, you become a member this white nationalist group, which means white supremacy, which means KKK, which means you hate minorities, which means you are rotten to the core way. That's what they're trying. That's the impression of trying to create of everybody. Who does not say and does not think exactly as they do. And this has been highly successful as an intimidating thing. And that's why people hide their make America. Great again, hats or their books or whatever that would identify them as conservatives because they don't nobody gets on an airplane to be a war. Nobody gets on an airplane to be in a battle the left. Does the left goes everywhere. Life is the battle life is the battlefield. And it isn't with it is with Trump. Trump happily joins him on the field of battle and happily. Reply responds to him every day day in and day out. And as such do, you know that Donald Trump is the most repopulate Republican president in any of our lifetimes and memories. Donald Trump's approval numbers in the Republican party are over ninety percent. There isn't a Republican who has come close to this. More and more people are now in polling Davis suggesting that Muller's investigation is a witch hunt and its overwrought that that numbers over fifty percent. Now, that's just out by the way. And the reason Donald Trump gets these popularity numbers is precisely because he does not take even an idol sentence. Of accusation false accusation or allegation and let it go. He responds to every one of them with his tweets. Or however, he does. So and you see how it drives them crazy. They are used to people laying down there used to people cowering in fear in the corners. They're used to people taking their maga- hats off. They're used to people hiding their books. They're used to people whispering. I really support Trump. And I can't say doesn't take those public can't understand. But when thinking about this Hillary Clinton business, I mean, this is big here is the chosen. Prodigy of the Clintons. I mean, the future of the Clinton dynasty. And the Washington Post the New York Times, none of the drive by media are defending her in this instance, where she is being accused of having culpability and responsibility for the New Zealand Mosk shooting. Only. Donald Trump junior comes to her defense. Don't forget folks, you can say it's about her you on Omar. Tweet where she blamed Omar for antisemitism. But they know that her husband is Jewish. And that she's got a couple of kids who may be raised Jewish. Do not take that out of the equation. That's the same thing with Jared. And and if I gotta take a brief timeout, we'll be back in continue right.

Donald Trump Chelsea Clinton New Zealand America Omar Hillary Clinton Trump Ilhan Israel Clinton Clintons New York City memorial Covington Indiana New Zealand Mosk Washington Post writer Jared language center
"language center" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

11:00 min | 2 years ago

"language center" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Welcome back. Great to have you. Rush Limbaugh, cutting edge societal evolution. One more thing here on this Hillary Clinton business as you know, the she. What exactly that she do? I didn't print the story out of what she did. I've got all the reaction stuff. I guess she went to a a memorial meeting for the New Zealand shooting and her presence. There was considered insulting. Because she had previously tweeted her opposition, the Ilhan, Omar and hurt anti semitic tweets. And so when Hillary or when when Chelsea shows up, the leftist mob went nuts now the thing that you have to remember here. Is that Chelsea married a Jewish man and has a couple of kids? Now, this doesn't get reported any of this. But do not doubt for a moment. The people involved here know this. So in a move that. I am certain has stunned the Clintons BuzzFeed has given anti Israel activists who harassed Chelsea a guest column. Buzzfeed news, gave the two anti Israel activists who confronted Chelsea Clinton at a New York City memorial for victims of the shooting in New Zealand the opportunity to write a guest column on their site. And the two women took it as an opportunity to double down attacking Chelsea Clinton. Even further. Lean Dwight and rose Asaf our custody the pregnant Clinton on Friday evening on her way into the memorial service accused her of inciting the mosque shooter because Clinton had sided against Ilhan, Omar in her anti semitic language center, blaming Chelsea for having been an influence her in the mosque shooting. Now here again, something that has become standard operating procedure a horrific shooting like this happens and the left, including the media immediately seeks to blame their political enemies for it rather than the perp or did then link the perp to their political enemies. And it's it's it's silly. And it's getting tiresome, but they work overtime to pull this off. And they never stopped doing it. A good analogy the left lives on the battlefield life to the left. Is the battlefield to us. It's not we don't want to be on the battlefield everyday. That's not how we look at life. But they do life is the battlefield life is a daily battle in an on going war and every skirmish. Must be one. And since they cannot win. With prevailing ideas. They cannot win with superior ideas. They have to go out and destroy the credibility. And the humanity of their opponents. And that is precisely what happens, and it's that that many on our side have no idea how to combat or how to how to respond to how to battle it. And it's it's made. Even made more frustrating by the fact that look Covington kids so this kid shows up. He's got to make America great head on. We know what happened because of this a total mischaracterization an attempt to destroy this kid and his school and his his friends that were all there in a story that was originally reported as wrong as incorrectly as it could be. But what's the impact of that? The impact of that. Is that everybody else puts their make America great caps away. Because they don't want the hassle. How many of you have purchased a book by a well known conservative writer, and you get on an airplane. And you don't want to pee. You don't want people? See you're reading it. You're afraid of what'll happen. So you're by the book, but you don't bring it out in public and read it because you are afraid of being assaulted attacked insulted or what have you? So you take the path of least resistance and hide the fact that you support a particular conservative, author are you put away your make America great again hat. This does two things it it. It creates the impression that there aren't any people that support Trump or that there aren't very many people are a conservative, and then it gives the left the idea that they can totally steamrolled any opposition into silence and invisibility. And then they get shocked on election day when the people who are afraid to tell pollsters what they think afraid to wear make America great again hat afraid to display a book written by a prominent conservative, author they show up and vote and the left loses. And they can't figure it out because they get the idea there steamrollering everybody. There's also a third aspect of this. Many of the people hiding their make America, great again hats, and many of the people who are not pulling out the book by famous conservative on an airplane in many many cases, those are the same people complaining about how the Republicans never fight back. And if you confront them on that, well, we're not supposed to fight back. We elect Republicans to fight back on our behalf. Right. Understand that. But anyway, this is an indication of of how intimidatingly successful the left is has been and is in stifling any public opposition to them. And they do it by categorizing people is this white nationalist thing. This is just a replay of the same technique. They used in the aftermath of the Indiana religious freedom restoration act and any other public events in that case, it was gay marriage and gay this enga- that and trans this and Transnet. In this case, it's Islamophobia. But it's it's the same technique. It's the same formula that is replayed event after event after event and after each of these events people that had nothing to do with it. People that wanted to even in New Zealand ended up being categorized as white nationalists. And by the way, that doesn't even mean what it means white nationalist means white supremacist. White nationalist is code word for modern day KKK. And what it really means when they start throwing around the term, white, nationalist. I'll tell you what it really means what they're really saying is. That white people. Are trying to get rid of all position they founded this country, and they're going to try to hold onto this country. But they're the ones that have ruined this country white people so all of this white privilege white nationalism. And then you notice the allegations and accusations made if you don't condemn this thing that happened in New Zealand properly, if you don't say exactly what you're supposed to say the way they demand you say, then all of a sudden, you become a member of this white nationalist group, which means white supremacy, which means KKK, which means you hate minorities, which means you are rotten to the core way. That's what they're trying. That's the impression. They're trying to create of everybody. Who does not say and does not think exactly as they do. And this has been highly successful as an intimidating thing. And that's why people hide their make America. Great again, hats or their books or whatever that would identify them as conservatives because they don't nobody gets on an airplane to be a war. Nobody gets on an airplane to be in a battle the left. Does the left goes everywhere. Life is the battle life is the battlefield. And it isn't with it is with Trump. Trump happily joins him on the field of battle unhappily reply response to him every day day in and day out. And as such do, you know that Donald Trump is the most Ripon Republican president in any of our lifetimes and memories. Donald Trump's approval numbers in the Republican party are over ninety percent. There isn't a Republican who has come close to this. More and more people are now in polling Davis suggesting that Muller's investigation is a witch hunt that it's overwrought that that number numbers over fifty percent. Now, that's just out by the way. And the reason Donald Trump gets these popularity numbers precisely because he does not take even an idol sentence. Of accusation false accusation or allegation and let it go. He responds to every one of them with his tweets. Or however, he does. So and you see how it drives them crazy. They are used to people laying down there used to people cowering in fear in the corners. They're used to people taking their maga- hats off. They're used to people hiding their books. They're used to people whispering. I really support Trump. I can't say. Public. I just can't understand. But when thinking about this Hillary Clinton business, I mean, this big here is the chosen. Prodigy of the Clintons. I mean is the future of the Clinton dynasty? And the Washington Post the New York Times, none of the drive by media are defending her in this instance, where she is being accused of having culpability and responsibility for the New Zealand Mosk shooting. Only. Donald Trump junior comes to her defense. Don't forget folks, you can say it's about her on Omar. Tweet where she blamed Omar for antisemitism. But they know that her husband is Jewish. And that she's got a couple of kids who may be raised Jewish. Do not take that out of the equation. That's the same thing with Jared. And and if I gotta take a brief timeout, we'll be back in continue.

Donald Trump Chelsea Clinton New Zealand America Hillary Clinton Omar Rush Limbaugh Trump Ilhan Israel Clintons New York City memorial Indiana Covington New Zealand Mosk Washington Post writer Jared language center
"language center" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

10:53 min | 2 years ago

"language center" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Here on this Hillary Clinton business as you know, the she. What exactly that she do? I didn't print the story out of what she did. I've got all the reaction stuff. I guess she went to a memorial meeting for the New Zealand shooting. And her presence. There was considered insulting. Because she had previously tweeted her opposition, the Ilhan, Omar and her anti semitic tweets. And so when Hillary when when Chelsea shows up, the leftist mob went nuts now, the thing that you have to remember here is the Chelsea married, a Jewish man and has a couple of kids. Now, this doesn't get reported any of this. But do not doubt for a moment. The people involved here know this. So in a move that. I am certain has stunned the Clintons BuzzFeed has given anti Israel activists who harassed Chelsea guest column. Buzzfeed news, gave the two anti Israel activists who confronted Chelsea Clinton at a New York City memorial for victims of the shooting in New Zealand the opportunity to write a guest column on their site. And the two women took it as an opportunity to double down attacking Chelsea Clinton. Even further. Lean Dwight and rose Asaf custody the pregnant Clinton on Friday evening on her way into the Morial service accused her of inciting the mosque shooter because Clinton had sided against Ilhan, Omar in her anti semitic language center, blaming Chelsea for having been an influence her in the mosque shooting. Now here again. Something that has become standard operating procedure a horrific shooting like this happens and the left, including the media immediately seeks to blame their political enemies for it rather than the perp. Or did then link the perp to their political enemies. And it's it's it's it's silly. And it's getting tiresome, but they work overtime to pull this off. And they never stopped doing it. A good analogy the left lives on the battlefield life to the left. Is the battlefield to us. It's not we don't want to be on the battlefield every day. That's not how we look at life. But they do life is the battlefield life is a daily battle in an ongoing war and every skirmish. Must be one. And since they cannot win. With prevailing ideas. They cannot win with superior ideas. They have to go out and destroy the credibility. And the humanity of their opponents. And that is precisely what happens, and it's that that many on our side have no idea how to combat or how to how to respond to how to battle it. And it's it's made. It's even made more frustrating by the fact that look at the Covington kids so this kid shows up. He's gotta make America great head on. We know what happened because of this a total mischaracterization an attempt to destroy this kid and his school and his his friends that were all there in a story that was originally reported as wrong as incorrectly as it could be. But what's the impact of that? The impact of that. Is that everybody else puts their make America great caps away. Because they don't want the hassle. How many of you have purchased a book by a well known conservative writer, and you get on an airplane. And you don't want to pee. You don't want people see reading you're afraid of what'll happen. So you're by the book, but you don't bring it out in public and read it because you are afraid of being assaulted attacked insulted, or what headed so you take the path of least resistance and hide the fact that you support a particular conservative author or you put away your make America, great again had this does two things a it. It it creates the impression that there aren't any people that support Trump or that there aren't very many people are conservative, and then it gives the left the idea that they can totally steamroll any opposition into silence and invisibility. And then they get shocked on election day when the people who are afraid to tell pollsters what they think afraid to wear a make-america-great-again hat afraid to display a book written by a prominent conservative, author they show up and vote and the left loses and they can't figure it out because they get the idea there steamrollering everybody. There's also a third aspect of this. Many of the people hiding their make America, great again hats, and many of the people who are not pulling out the book by famous conservative on an airplane in many many cases, those are the same people complaining about how the Republicans never fight back. And if you confront them on that, well, we're not supposed to fight back. We elect Republicans to fight back on our behalf. Right. Understand that. But anyway, this is an indication of how intimidatingly successful the left is has been and is in stifling any public opposition to them. And they do it by categorizing people. There's this white nationalist thing. This is just a replay of the same technique. They used in the aftermath of the Indiana religious freedom restoration act and any other public event in that case, it was gay marriage and gay this and gave that and translates and Transnet. In this case, it's Islamophobia. But it's it's the same technique. It's the same formula that is replayed event after event after event and after each of these events people that had nothing to do with it. People that weren't even in New Zealand up being categorized as white nationalists. And by the way, that doesn't even mean what it means white nationalist means white supremacist. White nationalist is code word for modern day KKK. And what it really means when they start throwing around the term, white, nationalist. I'll tell you what it really means what they're really saying is. That white people. Are trying to get rid of all opposition. They founded this country, and they're going to try to hold on to this country. But they're the ones that have ruined this country white people so all of this white privilege white nationalism. And then you notice the allegations and accusations made if you don't condemn this thing that happened in New Zealand properly, if you don't say exactly what you're supposed to say the way they demand you saved. And all of a sudden become a member of this white nationalist group, which means white supremacy, which means KKK, which means you hate minorities, which means you are rotten to the core. That's what they're trying. That's the impression they're trying to create of everybody. Who does not say and does not think exactly as they do. And this has been highly successful as an intimidating thing. And that's why people hide their make America. Great again, hats or their books or whatever that would identify them as conservatives because they don't nobody gets on an airplane to be in a war. Nobody gets an airplane to be in a battle the left. Does the left goes everywhere. Life is the battle life is the battlefield. And it isn't with it is with Trump. Trump happily joins him on the field of battle and happily. Reply response to him every day day in and day out. And as such do, you know that Donald Trump is the most popular Republican president in any of our lifetimes and memories. Donald Trump's approval numbers in the Republican party are over ninety percent. There isn't a Republican who has come close to this. More and more people are now in polling Davis suggesting that Muller's investigation is a witch hunt that it's overwrought that that number numbers over fifty percent. Now, that's just out by the way. And the reason Donald Trump gets these popularity numbers is precisely because he does not take even an idol sentence. Of accusation false accusation or allegation and let it go. He responds to every one of them with his tweets. Or however, he does. So and you see how it drives them crazy. They are used to people laying down there used to people cowering in fear in the corners. They're used to people taking their maga- hats off. They're used to people hiding their books. They're used to people whispering. I really support Trump. I can't say. Those public. I can't understand. But when thinking about this Hillary Clinton visit I mean, this is big here is the chosen. Prodigy of the Clintons. I mean, the future of the Clinton dynasty. And the Washington Post the New York Times, none of the drive by media are defending her in this instance, where she is being accused of having culpability and responsibility for the New Zealand mosque shooting. Only. Donald Trump junior comes to her defense. Don't forget folks, you can say it's about her you on Omar. Tweet where she blamed Omar for antisemitism. But they know that her husband is Jewish. And she's got a couple of kids who maybe raised Jewish do not take that out of the equation. That's the same thing with Jared. And and if I gotta take a brief timeout, we'll be back and continue right.

Donald Trump Chelsea Clinton New Zealand Hillary Clinton America Omar Trump Ilhan Israel Clinton Clintons New Zealand mosque Covington Indiana New York City memorial Washington Post writer Jared language center
News in Brief 21 February 2019

UN News

03:20 min | 3 years ago

News in Brief 21 February 2019

"This is the news and brief from the United Nations. The use of a snake by Indonesian police during the interrogation of indigenous Papuan boy amounts to torture. You at appointed rights experts said on Thursday, an online video released earlier this month shows the handcuffed youngster arrested for allegedly stealing a mobile phone screaming in fear as officers pushed the snake's head towards his face. The case is just the latest in a widespread pattern of violence alleged arbitrary arrests and methods amounting to torture by the Indonesian police and military in Papa the rights experts insisted representatives of the Indonesian police have publicly acknowledged the instant and apologized for it. But the UN experts appealed for prompt and impartial investigations to be carried out. I think that such tactics are often used against indigenous Papuans and human rights defenders the development comes amid an ongoing military operation in Papua. Which became part of Indonesia in nineteen sixty nine and has seen an increasingly vocal pro independence movement. U N secretary General Antonio guitarist has called for the international process of decolonization to be brought to a successful conclusion as he addressed the special committee on the subject at union headquarters in New York on Thursday, mister Gutierrez reminded his audience that decolonization is one of the most significant chapters in the US history. Propelling the growth of the organization today's total of one hundred and ninety three countries. But he added there is still work to be done as seventeen. Territories around the world are waiting to attain itself. Government the U N G specifically mentioned the case of New Caledonia which 2018 held a referendum on independence from France. Who's corporation in the process? He said was commendable. Countries around the world have been celebrating international mother language day on February the twenty first, but for Ben goalies, it has a particular significance. The day was officially recognized by the general assembly in two thousand eight following lobbying by Bangladesh, but the origins stretch back to nineteen fifty two when Bangaladeshi was still a part of Pakistan Bengali students protested, a government older imposing or do as the sole national language and the widespread unrest that followed led to the Bengali language been granted official status for years later. Speaking to pulling a grip from your news. I'm Bassett Masud been moment. Pummit Representative of Bangladesh to the UN explained what his country is doing to ensure linguistic diversity worldwide in Bala dish. We have set up an international mother language center to research languages, which are vanishing and also out to protect them, promote them, preserve them. We should all strive to. Protect whatever you have from the past and languages is the most significant manifestation of any such culture identities on the basis of language than we have songs and lullabies and other cultural forms, and you can hear the full interview with embassador moment on our website, news dot U, N dot org. Kodo leadin U N news.

Mister Gutierrez UN Bangladesh Language Center United Nations Indonesia Papua Papa U N Bassett Masud Bangaladeshi Embassador United States Secretary BEN New Caledonia General Antonio Bala Dish
Mother Language Day celebrates multilingualism and cultural diversity

UN News

05:28 min | 3 years ago

Mother Language Day celebrates multilingualism and cultural diversity

"This is Conan Lennon from U N news Thursday, the twenty first of February is international mother language day a day, set aside to promote linguistic, and cultural diversity and multilingualism. It's estimated that every two weeks language goes extinct, but why trying to protect these languages. What is the real significance of this day? Only in a grid from your news. Pose these questions to the permanent Representative of Bangladesh to the UN ambassador. Masud been Mormon international mother language days been internationally to proclaimed in ninety nine hundred ninety nine through UNESCO resolution and Bangladesh was the main force behind it because it was in one thousand nine hundred two where being is students. They sacrificed their lives in order to protect and save their mother tongue which is bam. La at the time. And ever since this is part of our Bengali nationalism to promote and commemorate this day or the protection of not only our own language, but all those struggles elsewhere in the world, our people in small communities are also fighting every day to protect and promote their mother tongue. So that led us to take the initiative at the UNESCO. So that these days globally recognized. And so that we not only commemorate the what also celebrate the multi-lingualism all over the world, which will in turn promote more tolerance and kind of develop a sense of a culture of peace, and harmony where diversity does not mean harmful for the global citizen, but diversity is also. A powerful set of instrument, and and how languages can be part of that. It's estimated that a language disappears. Every two weeks, and some people say that it's a it's a natural process that simply some of these smaller languages, go extinct, the speakers, simply start speaking. You know, the more prominent languages and that this is all natural. So why why should we interfere with this natural process of having these smaller languages extinct? That's very interesting question. I mean, we have to protect our heritage in our culture, or or, you know, existence, for example, there are small island states in the world today. And if the sea level rise some of them will face existential problem, so why do we have to protect their land? Because, you know, many of those countries have small populations of a few thousands perhaps. So they can be relocated in other countries. But no, the international community and inhabitants of of those island countries. You know, this is something the cherish that, you know, the identify themselves with similarly languages are. Also means of identifying yourself and for children, you know, the link to their past to the ancestors with the language to therefore, it is very important to protect these vanish. Shing languages and in Bangladesh. We have set up an international mother language center to research, the research on on languages, which which are vanishing and also how to protect them promote them, preserve them and in our own country. We have mine minority ethnic communities, and our education system has recently come up with a new promotional scheme. So that these ethnic children, they can learn their first lessons in their own language. Also side by side with our official language, which is been golly. And also English is also being taught in schools. So that you know, we should all strive to protect whatever we have, you know, from the past and languages is the most significant manifest. Nation of any such cultural identities and with on the basis of language than we have songs and lullabies and other cultural forms. There you an ombudsman office is asking for proverbs and people's mother tongue. Do you have a favorite proverb in your mother tongue that you could share and then give their interpretation in English? One that is called the shoulder male of Holly. Which means if you wait and have be patient than will get the result. So not to be you know, to jumpy or to try to achieve everything in one day, but you have to show patience and what for your goal, and then you will get objective. So I think it's a good thing.

Unesco Bangladesh Language Center Representative Of Bangladesh Conan Lennon BAM UN Shing Official Two Weeks One Day
"language center" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

09:48 min | 3 years ago

"language center" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"That you've provided for us. It's it's wonderful to have you read. This you've been serving under the air force special special operations command. And then you. Got your degree at the Korean class at the defense language institute. Foreign language center in Monterey burning the Korean console channels award for excellence. And you did something that is highly unusual. You were deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan as well as several countries in Africa. And tell us what you did when you were in Africa with a tablet, please. Absolutely. So one thing that not a lot of people might really realize about deployments is that once you're done doing the actual work that you're needed that you're needed for sometimes you actually have have downtime, and there's not a whole lot of options when you're in especially, you know, countries like in in the horn of Africa where I was where your your internet and TV auctions are actually pretty limited. So one thing that I started doing to to pass the time was grown up reading a lot of fantasy CS Lewis. Jared token stuff like that. So I thought to myself, you know, maybe a good use of my time would be if I were to start writing a fantasy novel much like, you know, some Mike heroes who who actually both of those authors that I mentioned just now also were fought in World War One. So you know, what I'm doing is that necessarily new it's just part of a newer generation of writing while deployed. So you wrote you wrote a book. On a tablet. I did. Being deploy how long did it take you to write the book and tell us about the book and where it is today? And and. Absolutely. So it's called gift of the shaper. And it's actually my first Microsoft attempt at at at at a book, and it took me I'd say just about two years to to write the whole thing. And that's coming up with the completed manuscript going through editing making small changes to the plot. But ninety five percents of the book was just like you mentioned written on my on my tablet on the touchscreen. No last night. Even, you know, a detachable keyboard or something because that was just the the tool that I had at my disposal when I was deployed and after a while I just got used to using the touchscreen so much that I it didn't even occur to me to use. My, you know, my my laptop or something to to start writing. But yeah. So it's called gift to the shaper, and it's an epic fantasy. So thinking like game of thrones that kind of stuff, and it's about a young man who finds himself dragged into a war between two sides. Now one side wants to free their God, who's called the breaker of the dawn and another side wants to keep him imprisoned. And they're led by their goddess called the shaper of ages, which I actually derived the name of the book from a gift of the shaper, which was basically the shaper. You know, giving giving her power to some for followers. So that's kind of how I I came up with the name and the book is getting rave reviews. So good for you. Now. Thank you. I appreciate that. Tell me a little bit about what's life? Like now that the book is done and. You're back here in the states. Yeah. So I actually it turns out that writing is something that I I really enjoy a very passionate about it. It took me thirty odd years to figure that out. But once I did I actually found that it was something that I was good at. But it was something that I really enjoyed doing. So when I got home, I decided, you know, what I I have this first book that I've written and like you said it gotten good reviews from people they actually really enjoy the book. And I thought, you know, maybe this is something I'd like to continue doing. So I actually found myself writing a sequel, which I actually have had recently finished. So you know, it's just the first draft. It's not going to be Ducati done for quite some time. But it is something that I definitely enjoy doing especially after you know, finding that get to the shaper was sort of something that, you know. I found myself so easily writing so, yeah, I basically just been doing some more writing since I've been home. So were you not you didn't do any writing writing was not something that you wanted to do or thought about doing you kinda just picked it up while you were in Africa. Absolutely. I kept you know, like, some someone listeners who were who grew up in the ninety s might be familiar with live journal, which was basically an online sort of blog format where you could write your thoughts and me as an angsty twenty something year old was with doing that a whole lot. But that was the closest thing that I ever really had to any sort of writing. I taking English courses in college. But I had never attempted so much as a long poem before actually writing and finish and get to the shaper. But it was something that sort of came naturally to me just because I like I'd mentioned I grew up reading so many books. I was an absolutely perations reader and story structure, a narrative and character points of view are all something that was very familiar to me as as a huge fan of the genre. So the writing honestly came very easily to me, I think I took to it a lot more quickly than someone who, you know. Maybe had never grown up writing or reading or anything like that. Yeah. So you found writing in this dangerous warzone therapeutic. Yes. Definitely. It was it's an escape. And and I think that's why. Yeah. You know, some some people think it's it's kind of funny that you know, war vet comes out and right the fantasy novel. But I think that was part of because I wanted to distance myself so much from you know, what I was seeing every single day going out and supporting these special operations missions. I come back, and I gave I'd get I take myself into a different world. What about your your colleagues in your fellow soldiers men and women that you were serving they think it was strange you would wander off and do this writing or they had no clue. Some of them new and all of them supported me, which was absolutely amazing and one guy in particular was very very supportive. He was one of the guys who I was deployed with in in a west African country called new share his name was named gave. And he was a guy who would he loved reading military fiction military, nonfiction anything like that. But that was his preferred genre. He didn't really venture outside the bounds of that. And I'd actually given him an early draft of the manuscript of gift to the shaper. And I said, you know, I'm looking for people to sorta give tweaks and suggestions to this would you mind taking a look at it. And Dave turned around and said, you know, this isn't I don't read stuff at outside of military stuff like this. So I'll probably not be interested in it. But I'll give it a give it a shot as your friend. I well the next day he came back. And he sat me down for about forty five minutes because he had blown through the entire novel in just less than a day. He was like first of all where can I get more fantasy like this and second of all I loved it. So that was I think the biggest piece of support that I got from one of my fellow service servicemen. Yeah. I think it's so fascinating that that you were able to just take yourself out of that situation and devote yourself to writing. And now you're trying to find a way to do it fulltime. I definitely am. Yeah. So I found out in November that well actually in consecutive weeks. I found out I that I was a finalist for or gift to the shape or was a finalist for the twenty best book awards, and then I found out on the nineteenth November nineteenth. But it was actually it had won the Beverly Hills book awards in the category of fantasy. For me that was that was a great Siobhan. Oh. You know, it's one thing to get five star reviews, its other. It's another thing to win awards. Yeah. Well, well, well, being deployed a great story. What's the best website? How can people find out more about you your story and gift to the shaper? So my website is D L dash Jennings dot com, and it is available on Amazon, kindle,.

Africa defense language institute Monterey language center Microsoft Beverly Hills Ducati Iraq Jared Mike Siobhan Afghanistan Dave Amazon kindle forty five minutes two years
"language center" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

09:29 min | 3 years ago

"language center" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Active that the United States Air Force. And and thank you so much for your service and the work that you've provided for us. It's it's wonderful to have you with us. You've been serving under the air force special special operations command and then new. Got your degree. At the Korean class at the defense language institute. Foreign language center in Monterey. Earning the Korean consul-generals award for excellence. And you did something that is highly unusual. You were deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan as well as several countries in Africa. And tell us what you did when you were in Africa with tablet, please. Absolutely. So one thing that not a lot of people might really realize about deployments is that once you're done doing the actual work that you're needed that you're needed for sometimes you actually have have downtime, and there's not a whole lot of options when you're in especially, you know, countries like in in the horn of Africa, where I was where your your internet and TV options are actually pretty limited. So one thing that I started doing to to pass the time was grown up reading a lot of fantasy CS Lewis Jared Tolkien stuff like that. So I thought to myself, you know, maybe a good use of my time would be if I were to start writing a fantasy novel much like, you know, some my heroes who actually both of those off authors that I mentioned just now also were fought in World War One. So you know, what I'm doing isn't necessarily new. It's just part of a new generation of writing while deployed. So you wrote you wrote a book. On a tablet. While I did while being deploy how long did it take you to write the book and tell us about the book, and where it is today and. Absolutely. So it's called gift of the shaper. And it's actually my first Mike first attempt at at at at a book. And it took me I'd say just about two years to to write the whole thing then that coming up with the completed manuscript going through editing making small changes to the plot. But ninety five percent of the book was just like you mentioned written on my on my tablet on the touch screen. No last night, even, you know, a detachable keyboard or something because that was just the the tool that I had at my disposal when I was deployed and after a while I just got used to using the touchscreen so much that I it didn't even occur to me to use. My. You know, my my laptop or something to to start writing. But yeah. So it's called gift to the shaper. And it's it's a an epic fantasy. So, you know, you're thinking like game of thrones that kind of stuff, and it's about a young man who finds himself dragged into a war between two sides. A now one side wants to free their God who's called the breaker of the dawn and another side wants to keep him imprisoned. And they're led by their goddess called the shaper of ages, which I actually derived the name of the book from a gift of the shaper, which was basically the shaper, you know, giving giving her power to some of her followers. So that's kinda how I came up with the name and the book is getting rave reviews. So good for you. Now. Thank you. I appreciate that. Tell me a little bit about what's life? Like now that the book is done and. You're back here in the states. Yeah. So I actually it turns out that writing is something that I I really enjoy. I'm very passionate about it. It took me thirty odd years to figure that out. But once I did I actually found that it was something that I was good at. But it was something that I really enjoyed doing. So when I got home, I decided, you know, what I I have this first book that I've written and like you said it gotten good reviews from people they actually really enjoy the book.

Africa John Ross Dave defense language institute Monterey language center Iraq Lewis Jared Tolkien Beverly Hills Mike Afghanistan ninety five percent forty five minutes two years
The 14-Year Active Duty Veteran Turned Epic Fantasy Writer

The Frankie Boyer Show

04:47 min | 3 years ago

The 14-Year Active Duty Veteran Turned Epic Fantasy Writer

"Active that the United States Air Force. And and thank you so much for your service and the work that you've provided for us. It's it's wonderful to have you with us. You've been serving under the air force special special operations command and then new. Got your degree. At the Korean class at the defense language institute. Foreign language center in Monterey. Earning the Korean consul-generals award for excellence. And you did something that is highly unusual. You were deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan as well as several countries in Africa. And tell us what you did when you were in Africa with tablet, please. Absolutely. So one thing that not a lot of people might really realize about deployments is that once you're done doing the actual work that you're needed that you're needed for sometimes you actually have have downtime, and there's not a whole lot of options when you're in especially, you know, countries like in in the horn of Africa, where I was where your your internet and TV options are actually pretty limited. So one thing that I started doing to to pass the time was grown up reading a lot of fantasy CS Lewis Jared Tolkien stuff like that. So I thought to myself, you know, maybe a good use of my time would be if I were to start writing a fantasy novel much like, you know, some my heroes who actually both of those off authors that I mentioned just now also were fought in World War One. So you know, what I'm doing isn't necessarily new. It's just part of a new generation of writing while deployed. So you wrote you wrote a book. On a tablet. While I did while being deploy how long did it take you to write the book and tell us about the book, and where it is today and. Absolutely. So it's called gift of the shaper. And it's actually my first Mike first attempt at at at at a book. And it took me I'd say just about two years to to write the whole thing then that coming up with the completed manuscript going through editing making small changes to the plot. But ninety five percent of the book was just like you mentioned written on my on my tablet on the touch screen. No last night, even, you know, a detachable keyboard or something because that was just the the tool that I had at my disposal when I was deployed and after a while I just got used to using the touchscreen so much that I it didn't even occur to me to use. My. You know, my my laptop or something to to start writing. But yeah. So it's called gift to the shaper. And it's it's a an epic fantasy. So, you know, you're thinking like game of thrones that kind of stuff, and it's about a young man who finds himself dragged into a war between two sides. A now one side wants to free their God who's called the breaker of the dawn and another side wants to keep him imprisoned. And they're led by their goddess called the shaper of ages, which I actually derived the name of the book from a gift of the shaper, which was basically the shaper, you know, giving giving her power to some of her followers. So that's kinda how I came up with the name and the book is getting rave reviews. So good for you. Now. Thank you. I appreciate that. Tell me a little bit about what's life? Like now that the book is done and. You're back here in the states. Yeah. So I actually it turns out that writing is something that I I really enjoy. I'm very passionate about it. It took me thirty odd years to figure that out. But once I did I actually found that it was something that I was good at. But it was something that I really enjoyed doing. So when I got home, I decided, you know, what I I have this first book that I've written and like you said it gotten good reviews from people they actually really enjoy the book.

Africa United States Air Force Defense Language Institute Lewis Jared Tolkien Monterey Language Center Iraq Mike Afghanistan Ninety Five Percent Two Years
"language center" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

03:51 min | 3 years ago

"language center" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Like Putin to teaching and so I've been teaching vets medics in the first few years for the lost ways. Now eleven years, which is likely terrifying now has a big box with him, and he's brought some of his clean tell in will reveal what they all in this box. And it's a big box. We've seen a little glimpse of them that they keep he's going to reveal what they Al h when the program for those of you at home, we've got a little guest who quiz running throughout the show. We'll clues across the hour. But his your first one who or what makes this sound? And it is more clues coming up later on. Now, let's kick off with some questions. And I this one is for you. Jacob is come from, Dave. He's on Twitter and Dave says to primates have their own language. So do primates have their language, and if so how do they communicate? So that's a really big question. And it's really at another of what I'm interested in. It's been quite low time thinking about languages of every complicated thing it's something that we just do very naturally and learned to do with time. And the word refers to this sort of complex system of multiple parts of grammar and words that we combined together to form sentences ideas. And so and language, of course, doesn't only come in. This little spoken form that we using now it's also written and sign language. And braille and so on his various forms of language, and of course, there are languages as well. So the word is is a complicated idea. Simple as the question de primates have languages, yes. Because humans primates. And we use language, and for many thousands of years other homonym relatives that are relatives of humans would have also been very likely to have been using language. So now details and Denisa ver the hobbits from Indonesia, and so on and even for quite a long time before that it's quite likely that other species like, homo erectus, were using fairly complicated language, sort of at least quite similar to what we what we use. Now, I've seen the brain costs the so-called Endo costs of of some of the skulls of some of the aforementioned early human ancestors that you mentioned and specifically they have a bulge in the parts of the brain on the left hand side, where modern humans have a bulge, which is language center and Pelley anthropologists use this argument that probably language was involving because the brain seems to show the same sort of specialization. Yeah. There are lots of sort of quite crude markers of what might represent language in these hominids for which we've only got a few bones. I suspect the brain's quite a bit more complicated than just yet. On the outside of the brain. You have a little bulge dogs have that as well. Don't they? If you could a dog's brain, it's also slightly metrics. And we think that's why dogs quite good interpreting human language, possibly, the it is tempting human language, probably argue more to do with the tone of it. So when somebody walks in and says, you know I've spoken to him. And he knew he did wrong. It was probably the tone of voice used the words us so probably be a little bit cautious about saying the lump on the brain means that they know what they're talking about. But the dog in the Guinness Book records was called Rica Ringo and it had a three hundred word vocabulary. It was it was a Kelly died now, unfortunately, but it had this extraordinary ability. You might remember they did the study where you could show at one of its toys, which it knew the name for and you could put a whole bunch of these toys that didn't you the name for in a next door room? And then one new toy that it did not know the name for never seen before. And you can say to go and get the X from next door and the exit new it didn't know that would retrieve the toy the nine four. So it clearly did understand how to engage with an unprocessed language. Yes. You no. I think. Certain ways in which they can make those associations. It's a certain amount of conditioning. But yes, Jason I've just wondering if it's a collie that has the three hundred vocabulary. How many of those words are synonyms for food..

language center Dave Putin Rica Ringo Indonesia Twitter Jacob Jason Kelly Pelley eleven years
"language center" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

03:47 min | 3 years ago

"language center" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"To revise them in the course of a few days repeatedly using the so-called space repetition. You can use apps which are based on the system such as Anki or memorize or you can ride lists of worse in a notable us in the gold, goalies method, which is also very popular with many polyglot s-. If you're not sure which methods are effective and what he's available out there. Just check out polyglot YouTube channels and websites and get inspiration from them. If it works for them. It will most probably work for you too. The third principle to follow east decreed assistant in your learning. We're all very busy. And no one really has time to learn a language today. But are we can create the time if we just plan a bit ahead. Can you wake up fifteen minutes earlier than you normally do that would be the perfect time to revise some vocabulary? Can you listen to a podcast on your way to work while driving? That would be great to get some listening experience. There are so many things we can do without even planning that extra time such as listening to podcasts on our way to work or doing household chores. The important thing is to create a plan in the learning. I will practice speaking every Tuesday and Thursday with a friend for twenty minutes. I will listen to YouTube video while having breakfast, if you create a system in your learning, you don't need to find that extra time because it will become a part of your everyday life. And finally, if you want to learn the language fluently, you did also a bit of patience is not possible to lend language within two months, but it's definitely possible to make a visible improvement in two months, if you learn in small chunks every day in a way to enjoy. And there is nothing that motivates us more than our own success. I vividly remember the moment when I understood the first joke in German when watching friends I will so happy and motivated, and I just kept on watching that day, two more episodes. And as I kept watching I had more and more of those moments of understanding this little victories and step by step. I go to a level where I could use the language freely and fluently to express anything. This is a wonderful feeling. I can't get enough of that feeling ADT. That's why Leno language every two years. So this is the whole polyglot secret find affective methods, which you can use system medically over the period of some time in a way, which. You enjoy. And this is how polyglot Sloan languages within months. Not. Here's. Now, some of you may be thinking that's all very nice to enjoy language leading. But isn't the real secret that you, paulie, gloss are just super talented and most of us aren't while? There's one thing I haven't told you about Benny and Lucas Benny had eleven years of Irish Gaelic and five years of German at school, couldn't speak them at all when graduating up to date twenty one he thought he didn't have the language, gene. And he could not speak another language, then he started to look for his way of learning languages, which was speaking to native speakers and getting feedback from them and today Benny can easily have a conversation in ten languages. Lucas tried to learn English at school for ten years was one of the worst students in class. He's friends even made fun of him gave him a Russian textbook as a joke because they thought he would never learn the language or any language, and then look us started to experiment with methods looking for his own way. To learn. For example, by having Skype conversations with strangers and after just ten years, Lucas is able to speak eleven languages fluently. Does that sound like a miracle? Well, I see such miracles every single day as the language center. I help.

Lucas Benny YouTube language center Skype Leno paulie two months ten years fifteen minutes twenty minutes eleven years five years two years
Going to school in Switzerland: for kids and adults

Swiss and Chips

15:30 min | 3 years ago

Going to school in Switzerland: for kids and adults

"Jay, and I am still on street and we've got an amazing show for you jam packed with lots of things and a special surprise at the end actually. But we're doing a bit of a focus on school today and I'll tell you, why do you want to know why? Yes. I was your idea. So. You? No, we would have to rethink. So basically I went back to school in Saturday. Oh, yeah. I know that. Now getting school is probably a little bit of an overstatement, but basically an eight weeks time, I'll be taking my see one toke German exam. Oh, that's exciting. You probably the only person I know he would say that to that you have done on the other exams already in German hunt you? Yes. That's true. What what made you might? Why do you do that? I mean it or question. I also asked myself down five to nine on Saturday morning. Basically I'm doing an exam preparation course for the next eight weeks. And then I'll take the c one exam sort of towards the end of October. Why am I doing it? Yeah, I don't know because I didn't actually need it, but basically I've been studying German for months months and years and years. And I came to the end of my see one course which is meager at club. Shoot. I should say of schools are available of course, and then I thought, you know what? I'm gonna take that exam. Great. I think it's a great idea. I mean, then you have also goal in mind. Yeah, because things really got switched up a gear. We could say. The sort of St. one course I was doing. It was quite fun. You get to talk people in the group. He kind of chat about current topics and things, but this exam preparation courses. Kind of like the language equivalent of German boot camp, basic loca. Okay. At the beginning she said everybody introduce yourself and if you've got any questions asked them now because you won't have another chance. Sounds fun avenue question and I went to. It seems now. Well, anyway, so you posted in our Facebook group, Switzerland for English speakers? Exactly. Yeah. You posted there that you are going to the course you one and if anyone has any experience with it, but it ended up that. Some one or two people had a question about the be one. Be one exam. I so yes, exactly. So there was Rica again. Yeah, our favorite, our biggest fan, we can say that. Group and the Facebook groups are. Thank you very much so mice. When we see a comment from anyone or post. Recast. I would love to know how the b one was basically, as you may already know in the you took the token thumbs, maybe gutter a slightly different, but I think that they run along the same principles this parts reading, writing, listening and speaking basically, and what happens is on exam day you sort of they run them at various different places like language centers, kind of all over the country and Switzerland anyway, also, and other countries as well. And you go to sort of the center where you've paid your money registered to do the exam. You meet a bunch of strangers. Normally, I guess in a suiting someone you've done a course with and then you just go into in my case, it was quite move them. They give it so proud. And then you just kind of practicing the things that you've probably already done in your course should be familiar if you haven't done. Of course, of course, I'd say, look it up online before and you're just kind of filling in your answers on answer sheet. Everything is timed and then through. Out, you have kind of small breaks in between the separate pots Bundy sort of interesting part, which is quite surprising to me, and I'm glad that I know now before I d my seat one was the speaking of the test. And for this they pay you up with someone else. He's taking the exam. Oh, I see. And you have to go into the rim together and they kind of lay a sort of card of information face down the table, and you have a few minutes to read it and kind of prepare your aunts. And then basically, I think for the b one, you talk about what's on your car today. Have a person. Okay. And then that person has to ask you questions about your sort of present and there is a exterminator in the room? Yes. Most importantly, does person in the corner watching. Okay. It's just very weird because you have to have this kind of fake conversation with someone you diagnose and you're a little bit kind of stress than say, some maybe Steve two things to even drew and look help holiday. I mean, how do they judge? How do they judge. I don't know the exact details, but I think the b one level anyway, they just want you to be able to talk about a topic that you don't know about in advance. Okay. I think that's the kind of important thing to bear in mind

Switzerland England Newson Premark Shula UK Boston Penn Facebook Horan Newson Joe Turncoat Ben O'hare Elaine Half Moon Quidditch Honus Tennis Ikin Assisi Horton Andrea HUN