18 Burst results for "Langston Hughes"

"langston hughes" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

Everyday Zen Podcast

03:58 min | Last month

"langston hughes" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

"The collected poems of Langston Hughes. So I'm sure all of you know. Excuse me. Hughes was A. AFRICAN AMERICAN POET! at the very beginning of the twentieth century. Who was part of the Harlem Renaissance Harlem was the place to be probably in the world at the time. That likes to Hughes was a young man. It was really fabulously exciting. All kinds of things going on literature music art of all kinds. I'm going to read you a few poems of Hughes He wrote a bunch of poems that would reappear every now and then. Madam. Madam and that's Madam was some kind of Harlem Lady I. Don't know whether she. He means her to be a madam. You know running prostitutes or whether she's just a a a lady living in town. Anyway Madam and the newsboy. Newsboy Knox I the defender that was A. Local African American paper? newsboy knocks by the defender. These colored papers is a solid sender. I read all about the murdering news and who killed who with a lovesick blues. Then I read the lynchings and such. COME TO THE CONCLUSION! White folks ain't much. Then I turn over and read the scandal and the gossip column. Initials for handle. Than the pictures. Marvel looks well. But if JOE was my husband. I'd also looks well. It's just a matter of who is who. If I was Marva I'd be in the papers to. Wouldn't you? Madam in her might have been. I had two husbands. I COULDA had three. But my might have been. was too good for me. When you grow up the hard way, sometimes, you don't know what's too good to be true. Just might be so. He worked all the time spent his money on me. First Time in my life. I had anything free. I said. Do you love me or am I mistaken? You're always giving. And never taken. He said. Madam. I swear all I want, is you? Right there and then. I knowed we was through. I told him Jackson. You better leave. You got someone else up your sleeve. When you think you've got bread, it's always a stone. Nobody loves nobody. For yourself alone. He said. In Me, you've got no trust. I said I don't want. My Heart? To bust. Batum in the insurance man. Insurance man. I heard him knock. But he couldn't get in because my door was locked. We could go Tuesday. He came back again this time. I thought I'll let him in. Insurance, man said. It's paying time. Madam You are six weeks behind. I said Mr just let it slumber. I'll pay in. When I hit the number. Insurance man said. Suppose you're die. Who would bury you? I said why. I.

Langston Hughes Harlem Marva Marvel JOE Jackson Batum
"langston hughes" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

02:35 min | 2 months ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"Your community be a laser and focus on real positive change that's how this moment becomes a different moment in the history books that's how George Floyd's death does not become just another name and a long list of people who should have never died in the first place George Floyd must not have died in vain Mr Floyd's killing must be a moment in which this nation actually learned and grown and progressed to make this place a better place and we can do it if we are smart together Langston Hughes told us the ultimate goal make America the land that fulfills her promise of greatness for all Americans that's what this is about we can do that we have shown what we can do use this moment use this empowerment news this mobilization and use it for good use it for good so that when we look back we say yes the story was all too familiar in some ways what happened to Mr Floyd was all too familiar but the outcome was different and the outcome was historic and it was actually a moment of positive change that has to be our goal all of us from the angry young protesters on the street frustrated and your drives lashing out two government officials on both sides of the line to the police officers ninety nine point nine percent of them who are good hard working people who are trying to help their community it's a common goal we just have to be smart enough to get there questions follow a lot of Y. pidi xcelerated into a crowd of protesters there's videos and media officials pulling down the massive restraining them and.

George Floyd Langston Hughes America
"langston hughes" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:52 min | 5 months ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Have no wish to be an area hospital where he later died Ms our H. two and a five year old female our system solidly since that this is this is ridicules black cool kids will die certainly the which will live long as always eating blood and gold letting kids die Langston Hughes right this is an outrageous act of violence and in our study this Indianapolis the few words can be said to truly help people of Indianapolis who have lost people to gun charge for the blade of a knife yet words are demanding the level of gun violence is unacceptable words to tell everyone else it will be alright even as the violence in the streets mounts and breaks records for men and women of the IBM PC are responsible for the safety of the citizens more from this city you are about to hear how the violence affects you it might take my life in my hands walking out of the stadium you are about to hear the attempts an explanation and what some of the leaders believe might be solution we already know from the neighborhood that's why we have asked continuously where's the outrage what seems to be a lack of outcry or rage rage I think the most effective way of addressing that is from we're about to hear the story that's just like for six to the story of violent crime in Indianapolis no it's not just one zip code you're affected by the crime in Indy no matter where you live in the metro or in Indiana green was called in Greenville and Avon they should be asking themselves why do I care about this here's the answer it's coming to a neighborhood near you.

Langston Hughes Indianapolis Greenville Avon Indiana
"langston hughes" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:18 min | 5 months ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"This is for the kids who don't black kids will die certainly the which will live long as always eating blood and goals letting kids stuff Langston Hughes right this is an outrageous acts of violence and and are starting the address is Indianapolis few words can be said to truly help the people of Indianapolis who have lost people to gun charge or the blade of a knife yet words are to maintain the level of gun violence is unacceptable words to tell everyone else it will be alright even as the violence in the streets mounts and breaks records for many women of the I. anti are responsible for the safety of the citizens more from the city you are about to hear how the violence affects you it might take my life in my hands walking out of the stadium you are about to hear the attempts at explanation and what some of the leaders believe might be solution we already know from the neighborhood that's why we have asked tenuously where's the outrage what seems to be a lack of outcry or rage rage but I think the most effective way of addressing that is funny we're about to hear the story that's just like four six two the story of violent crime in Indianapolis no it's not just one zip code acted by the crime in Indy no matter where you live in.

Langston Hughes Indianapolis
The Harlem Globetrotters

The Past and the Curious

09:20 min | 5 months ago

The Harlem Globetrotters

"The Savoie ballroom was a jewel of jazz age. Chicago theatre opened in the nineteen twenties just before people in the United States were hit by the Great Depression which left many Americans poor and hungry throughout the difficult time. The Savoie was a place to find joy on the south side of Chicago. The building was regularly filled with residents from the largely African American neighborhood. Who gathered to dance to some of the biggest stars of the day count basie Duke Ellington Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong? Were just a few of the people who banged out. Tunes as people jibed across the giant DANCEFLOOR. Dancefloor was so big that it actually doubled as a basketball court for the Savoy. Big Five in the late. Nineteen twenty s the five-man team hosted games to fill the slow nights in the ballroom. A young man in cab. Calloway would sometimes seeing during halftime but back then basketball wasn't very popular people cared about contests like horse racing and boxing baseball. Not The five on five game that depended on getting a ball through a hoop. It was a long way from the sport. We know much slower and much lower scoring than today. This team from Chicago would eventually work to change that. But they're Savoie audience could never have guessed how at some point. There was a dispute among the players of the Savoie five and they broke up. Three of them led by Tommy. Brooklyn's start a new team and rename themselves. The globetrotters it was an era of barnstorming. And when not at the Savoy they set out from Chicago to tour the Mid West region of America there were no organized leagues of teams and players in the Nineteen Twenties and thirties. Instead semi professional teams would travel from town to town and earn money playing teams from whatever town they were in sometimes. Businesses might have a team of employees so a barnstorming team like the globetrotters might play against some guys who had spent the whole day assembling cars canning vegetables or even driving taxi caps. Other Times barnstorming might play a team made up of members of a religious group. The House of David. Those guys never shaved so they played basketball with beards down to their bellies. Making James Harden's beard look like a five o'clock shadow soon. A young Jewish immigrant named Abe Sapper. Steam entered the picture with the globetrotters. Abe was a terrible basketball player but his other skills were valuable. He knew a lot of people who did bookings and many of these towns and more importantly he had a car these five teammates and their manager. Abe would pile into his model t like sardines attend camp and hit those cold slick winter roads. It was the nineteen twenties and they understood that random people in random midwest towns might be surprised to find that all five members of the team coming to play their local guys were African Americans. There were very few professional sports comprised of African Americans at this point so they decided to alter their name to help people know what to expect at the time. The most notable and best all black basketball team was known as the Harlem rent which was short for the Harlem Renaissance in the Nineteen Twenties and early thirties. The New York neighborhood of Harlem was an epicenter of black culture and it was a time referred to as the Harlem Renaissance. People knew about these incredible artists and musicians. Who lived there along with the writers like Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston so the globetrotters who were very much from Chicago? Ask themselves how do we make ourselves sound dignified worldly and clearly a team of African Americans the Harlem Globetrotters? Will it matter that? We're not from Harlem that we've never tried it around the globe new super nope cool. Let's pile into a small unheeded car and go beat some people in basketball and they did just that it was remarkable. How good they are. They beat nearly every team from Wisconsin. Illinois Iowa anywhere else they went then they pile back into the car and head on down the road to the next game throughout the nineteen thirties. The team built up quite a reputation. They might have been the best basketball team in the world. No one agrees on how the famous tricks came into the game. A popular explanation is that they'd slip into the fun and flashy dribbles and drives after they safely put plenty of points on the board against their opponent. This did several things one it entertain the audience. Once the actual threat of competition was gone. No one wants to watch a blowout so a fun. Show of tricks kept the locals entertained but also no one wants to watch their local fellas get trounced a group from the city coming in and wiping the home team can really anger a local audience and the Harlem globetrotters new. This trick plays would thrill any crowd and win them over. The focus slowly became not about the final score but about how much fun it was to watch these incredible athletes and their astonishing an often humorous approach to the game. I we win. And then we cloud Abe Saperstein once said now most people agree that the real clowning didn't start until a man named goose. Tatum joined the team. Goose was an incredible athlete. Who could put the basket ball through the hoop with ease? But he also had a keen eye for comedy he found inspiration and funny movies and carefully watched the acts of clowns and other entertainers his favorite gags would show up on the basketball court. Sometimes goose would tiptoe over and pretend to spy on the opposing team's huddle all while making sure the audience in on the joke other times he'd hand the refs at trick ball after a timeout upon dribbling the ball. The referee grow angry because the ball never bounced back up. It just plopped devoid of air on the ground. Sometimes goose would disappear from the court altogether while the game continued only to be found in the audience eating popcorn. He even had a bit where he would pretend to be knocked unconscious on the court. The refs in his teammates would try everything to wake him up. But no amount of shaking or poking prodding would open his eyes. It was only the smell of his own Stinky Shoe. That would get him back up on his feet again. Much to the disgust delight of the audience in Nineteen forty-eight Abe Sapper Stein was with a friend who just so happened to own a basketball team called the Minnesota Lakers. The Lakers were the best team in the brand new professional basketball league which would soon become known as the NBA. The League did not allow black players on any of their teams regardless of League affiliation and regardless of the color of the player skin each man believed his team was the best in the world. They'd never meet in a league as it was so the natural solution was to stage an exhibition game between the Lakers and the globetrotters. It didn't seem so to the men at the time but game between an all white. Nba team and an all. Black semi pro team would prove monumental. Eighteen thousand people came out to watch which was easily twice. As many people as most professional basketball games would attract the time. And despite the fact that the Lakers star center who stood six speed and ten inches tall was seven inches taller than anyone else. On the court. The globetrotters one on a last second shot. It was a powerful moment. The next season those Lakers would go on to win the National Championship. But when they played the Harlem globetrotters a second time for a second exhibition between the two teams. The globetrotters came out on top yet again. The following year the NBA ended segregation and three of those same Laker Whooping Harlem globetrotters Chuck Cooper Nat Clifton and hang designee. Became three of the I four African Americans to join the League and play professional basketball. This was nineteen fifty three years. After Jackie Robinson had broken the color barrier in baseball the globetrotters still continue their entertaining shows today. Keeping the spirit of barnstorming alive. They get a lot of credit for how they support communities and bring joy to so many and educate kids about health. But it's easy to forget about how important they were in integrating professional basketball. They now tour and play with just one team often known as the Washington generals according to most sources the globetrotters have beaten the generals over sixteen thousand times. How many times have they lost though? That question is harder to answer. But it's just a few. The most recent globetrotter loss was way back in one thousand nine hundred seventy one when both teams lost track of the score when clock expired. The generals were ahead. That was not supposed to happen. And people expected the GLOBETROTTERS TO WIN. And it's usually agreed that they will today. It's all about the show the fun and the love of basketball not the competition. This is what made that loss. So shocking reports from nine hundred. Seventy one SE. The stands were filled with silent shocked faces and even a few crying children. Luckily it's been smiles for all since then

Basketball Harlem Globetrotters Harlem Chicago Nineteen Twenties Minnesota Lakers Savoie Savoie Ballroom NBA Harlem Renaissance Chicago Theatre Abe Sapper Abe Saperstein ABE Ella Fitzgerald United States Baseball Abe Sapper Stein James Harden
"langston hughes" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

07:02 min | 6 months ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"Here's the thing saving money with. GEICO is almost better than playing pickup basketball. Because there's always that guy who joins your game. He never passes the rock. He constantly bricks threes. And who completely hack you. And then put his hands up and say no foul no foul with GEICO. It's easy to switch switch and save on car insurance no need to fake. An ankle sprain. Because you're absolutely exhausted. So switching save with GYCO. It's almost better than sports. Hi I'm Bobby Brown. Welcome to my podcast beyond the beauty. A new show from IHEART radio. I'm going to be sitting down with different from people each week that I think we can all learn from IHEART. Radio is number one for podcast but don't take our word for it. Listen to the on the beauty on the iheartradio APP APP apple podcasts. Or ever you get your podcast because we all have something to learn about the real meaning of beauty in this day in history class is a production of iheartradio. Everyone I'm eve and welcome back to this day in history class. A podcast asked where we unwrap a piece of history. Candy every day today is February first. Twenty twenty the day was February first. Nineteen ninety-two writer and activist Langston. Dan Hughes was born in Joplin Missouri. Hughes was an important figure in the Harlem Renaissance and he is considered a pioneer of modern black literature. Aw though it's long been believed that he was born in Nineteen. Oh two recent archival discoveries do suggest that he may have been born a year. Earlier Hughes Lineage was full of prominent and politically active people. His maternal grandmother's first husband Luis leary died in John. Brown's raid at harpers ferry grandfather. Charles Henry Langston was an abolitionist and one of the first black people to attend Oberlin College. His great uncle. The John Mercer Langston was the first Black Congressman from Virginia. The first president of Virginia State University and the First Dean of the law school at Harvard University versity and his grandmother frequently told him stories about their family history. His parents were James. Hughes and carry Langston Hughes was young. His father left the family and moved to Mexico and his parents divorced. His mother moved to different cities for work. As a result. Hugh's grandmother grandmother raised him in Lawrence Kansas though he lived with and visit his mother in some cities like Kansas City in Colorado Springs. Eventually he settled with his mother and stepfather and Lincoln Illinois. Then Cleveland Ohio by this time Hughes had already begun writing poetry. He went to High School School in Cleveland and there began delving into leftist literature in ideology took interest in the souls of black folk by W E B Two boys and studied the work of Paul. Laurence Dunbar Carl Sandberg Friedrich Nietzsche and other writers and he started publishing his poems Hughes wrote one of his most famous poems. The Negro speaks of rivers when he was a teenager on train to Mexico once he graduated high school. He spent a year in Mexico with his father father but he had a strained relationship with his father who considered black people inferior even though he was black and he urged Hughes to pursue a career. That was more practical than writing. But Hughes immersed himself more in his writing he moved to New York City attended Columbia. University took odd jobs. Jobs then dropped out of college. He traveled to Africa and Europe as a crewman and he lived in Paris for a while where he continued to write poems and fiction and learned more about Blues Jazz artists when he returned to the US he moved to Washington DC and took trips to Harlem where he met literary figures. It's like county colon and Jean toomer in nineteen twenty six alfred. A Knopf published his first book of poetry the weary blues in addition to poetry Hughes wrote novels short stories and plays in which he portrayed black American life in the nineteen twenties through nineteen sixties. His works include the simple tales which began as a regular column in the Chicago defender. A book of short stories called the ways of white folks and apply Cotton Lotto that ran on Broadway for more than a year. H- used it reading tours and he traveled throughout the Soviet Union and Asia. Riding a lot of fluffed his poetry he wrote prolifically and many people around the world supported his work but many others disliked his portrayals of everyday working class nice black people believing it was a disturbance to the race to display the less desirable aspects of black life and other critics thought. That Hughes didn't take a strong strong enough political stance in his work regardless Hughes became successful enough to live off of his writing and public lectures Hughes wrote up until his death in nineteen sixty seven. His ashes are beneath a floor. Medallion at the Sean Burke Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem. I'm Eve Steph coat and hopefully you know a little more about history today than you did yesterday. If you haven't gotten your fill of history yet you can find us on twitter facebook and instagram at Ti D. H.. Fee podcast. You can also email us at this day at Heart Media Dot Com. Thank you again for listening and we'll see you tomorrow for more podcasts. From iheartradio vis the iheartradio radio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Hi I'm Bobby Brown. Welcome to my podcast beyond the beauty. A new show. Oh from iheartradio. I'M GONNA be sitting down with different people each week that I think we can all learn from IHEART. Radio is number one for podcast but don't take our the word for it. Listen to the on the beauty on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. or Get your podcast because we all have something to learn about the Real uh-huh meaning of beauty the richest most powerful place on earth of fiction. PODCAST TUMAN BAY on an epic scale. How does everything power everything we have to get away from? This place is our destiny now on the podcast network Luke. Maye old episodes of Tumor Bay Seasons One and two now for free on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts..

Langston Hughes Bobby Brown GEICO Mexico Harlem Charles Henry Langston John Mercer Langston iheartradio basketball IHEART Laurence Dunbar Carl Sandberg Jean toomer apple Cleveland Harlem Renaissance Oberlin College Luis leary Joplin Soviet Union twitter
"langston hughes" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:34 min | 7 months ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on KQED Radio

"For Martin Luther king junior ascended to there was a nineteen year old poet living here in Harlem name Lexden Hughes and he wrote about climbing the stair case filled with splinters in tax decades before doctor king dare to dream like some Hughes wrote about a dream deferred king was inspired by Langston Hughes but the strategic came up the public distance from Langston Hughes the accused communist sympathizer a label that could have a negative impact on the larger movement privately these men admired one another Langston dedicated songs and poetry to doctor king Dr king reside at length since poetry in public they took a private jet to Nigeria together in nineteen sixty and in nineteen sixty six lex and wrote a poem called demonstration upset that poem to music by Beethoven abroad for you all here today you'll want to hear it yeah this is Kyle Walker did you ever walk into a bar holds with the water turned up full blast did you ever walk towards police gun that might be your last did you ever stand in the face of snarling doll and not move as the dogs K. did you ever feel tear gas bar Hey good night your Tong when the waters of rainbow hues your those guns are no longer aimed at you on when the cops get the gel your a doll when the police dog wag their tail your doll when the tear gas canisters of dry your Tong when you all star in the sky gong the out of your you have the key to all George all.

Langston Hughes Nigeria lex Beethoven Kyle Walker K. George Martin Luther Harlem Dr king
"langston hughes" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on KQED Radio

"She set poems by Langston Hughes to her own music since then she's been working hard. She's produced several new human beings as well. As new albums the latest album, the capitalist blues is out now and Layla McCullough is with us from the south by southwest festival. Leyla. Thanks so much for talking with us nice to speak with you again. Thanks for making the time. How has the festival been for you, so far it's very interesting because I've heard about this festival for a long time. And and it's my first time actually being here. So I'm realizing why it has the reputation that it has it's kind of overwhelming. And it's like, wow, how do you break through? All of this noise. You know? But here I am. Well, speaking of breaking through all this noise. And one of the things about your music has always followed its own path. I mean, you've always kind of said what you wanted to say in the way that you wanted to say it, and you have kind of organized your life in such a way that you could do that. And I was reading an interview about this latest album. We're you said how have my previous records not been considered protests albums? Point taken which I feel like you're making a statement with the title capitalist blues, are you? Yeah. I think so I think that it's appropriate. It's been interesting even just being here at south by south west and witnessing the inequality that is so prevalent in our society just walking around the streets here, promoting my music. And yet the words that I'm singing still feel like they ring so true, especially in this sort of context where everyone is literally trying to get ahead and trying to move their careers forward. Trying to move their life forward in some way. And and then we're right next to this huge homeless population. I've been seeing like people nodding out on heroin on the street corners and thinking how did we all end up here at the same time in this moment. It just makes me feel like more sure of my songs. Does it feel a little disorienting in a way? Yeah. It's disorienting because I'm like, I don't want to believe that there is rampant inequality with and that it's difficult to see our way through this as a society. I don't want to believe that we're all so callous in some way, and that we're all just so self interested. I'm not absolving myself of that, you know, when I say that I feel that way about myself sometimes, and I'm like, this is so confusing. Because I'm using to be here. I have I have an incredible amount of freedom in privilege in certain ways. And yet. You know, I'm a black woman in the folk music world jazz world, just seeing all of the layers of my identity sort of juxtaposed.

Langston Hughes Layla McCullough heroin
"langston hughes" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"For good. You talked about being inoculated where did for you as a child? Hope and faith come in. How did they reinforce? How did you develop that because I don't need to tell you, you know, this one hundred times better than I'll ever know it inoculation doesn't strike everyone in that circumstance hope often fades away and a sense of either grinding permanence or hopelessness can encroach how did that not happen for your family or for you? Langston hughes. The words in one of his poems. A raisin in the sun. The famous Sidney Poitier movie what happens to a dream deferred dry up like a raisin in the sun or fester like a sore and run does it sugar over like a syrupy. Sweet does it sag beneath a heavy load or does it explode. So there are options when you're going through those kinds of challenging situations. So what happens to that defer dream because that is basically what you're going through. You're born with dream. You're you're born with aspirin, exactly. And so in the inner city, it is often deferred. And so in Hughes says in his porn, there are all kinds of a tragic things that can happen as well as positive things. I think because I was blessed to almost live in the church we will walking distance from the church. So every time the door open, my siblings, and I were there with my mom, and then matriculated at a church school from grade one all the way through high school, and even through college and seminary. And so that was marvelous inoculation because you were provided with what I would call supernatural insights into why you were going through what you were going through. And how you could extricate yourself from. There's a wonderful bible verse that I once got a nickel for Hebrews four twelve says the word of God is quick and powerful sharper than any two. Sword. Piercing the dividing asunder a bone and marrow and is a designer of the thoughts and the intensive of the human heart. So it is basically saying that there is something supernatural in scripture. That can bring about a metamorphosis, so that you are not so much searching the scriptures as the scriptures are searching you hence Jesus says in Matthew four four you do not live by Irish do alone. But by every word that comes from the mouth of God. I'm sure it strikes my audience, Dr Barry is it strikes me that there is a deep devotion and.

Langston hughes Sidney Poitier Dr Barry aspirin Jesus Matthew
"langston hughes" Discussed on Eating For Free

Eating For Free

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on Eating For Free

"Where it had it's like first beginnings i'd actually goes all the way back to like the thirties and forties no doubt like langston hughes wrote a poem about the ballroom culture shockingly like it has been around for you can tell it's too it's too traditional in the way it works for it to be so new like in just the eighties but yes so it follows these women all trans characters enga characters on the show are played by actual trans and gay people in real q just give a little shot for that like we have to fix trans women like six transplant all with names in speaking does not how trans women on a major on a major show with a major production look behind at all like i have i can't even think of show where i've seen that many characters diversity you know i will say and i kind of touched on this in my review for adolescent but ryan murphy has been around now for almost twenty years if you think about it like his first show was in nineteen ninety nine and it was for show doom but it was called popular it wasn't a two season show on the wb and it's probably at sounds his greatest failure he would say the show i think that has kind of field his rise to superstardom in the show runner world because he still thinks that was like the greatest show of all time and everything is done after his to prove that point but ryan murphy has been around for twenty years now and his career has kind of spanned various eras in culture in the greater media actually insane congressional majorities like he really has like each show i think of is a very specific part in pop culture like glee as we know was like huge wjr deal american horse or my god you've been bigger even bigger and then like even the new normal for a little bit was like at the zeitgeist american crime story is like.

langston hughes ryan murphy greater media twenty years
"langston hughes" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Live you know if you do things the right way the naturally the rewards come to trinidad chrome okay now you have a tour you planning tour is when you get hit to the states or they didn't play go ahead there was an exhibition forcing the i ten school of exhibition merlo moments that's what i say run by langston hughes who is a very talented hip hop party and in combination no they were very caught by the same thing all right okay yeah here's was renaissance poet he was the topic fema famous of the harlem renaissance poet from the thirty forty yes lifezette news that's three lendings nine from that and let's really is the new just after the incidents but that's okay and what is he doing with the the in charge of your tour or he this was he's conception monuments and he's welcomed wine company on moines as well sites combining final and hip hop now that we had yeah and it really is because he's obviously crossing barriers and taking it different social aries now the loss was on june ten in charleston south carolina i wasn't there but my work was and we kunti kuti plight there my work was really well received so the place that we're looking at as gonna be lanta looking publicly nine the next tool three months and we're hoping to get mitre hip hop performance as well tied into that at the moment of comedy reveal that signed sealed delivered but we would definitely be having exhibition in atlanta.

langston hughes fema moines atlanta trinidad charleston south carolina three months
"langston hughes" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"It's very weird she's got short curly here rectangular glasses she's not a doctor but she's wearing a lab coat she's not a nurse but she's got a prescription pad beside rana is a big cardboard sign that says the poet is in and if you are open to it she's ready to find a poem just for you take them in land in your chair here and just see as you get a bit settled what do you need a home for today need more time in the day or more days in the week you say a bit more about that ronald bloom is what mount sinai calls their poet in residence every so often she sets up a booth in the hospital inviting visitors patients nurses doctors to approach her for a poem i walk in and i say to myself they're sick people here wake up now they're vulnerable people here wake up see the whole thing kind of works like a doctor's appointment you take a seat across from rana g asks how you're feeling what's on your mind what you need right now and she either writes a poem or prescribes one for you from a big stack of paper her medicine chest we'll see if it fits and if it doesn't keep going this one's called still here by langston hughes i've been scared and battered my folks the wind done scattered snow has frizz me son has baked me looks like between them they done try to make me.

ronald bloom mount sinai langston hughes rana g
"langston hughes" Discussed on Touré Show

Touré Show

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on Touré Show

"A murderer or a army military dude like how you supposed to be like well there's this car today jamal lion gay billionaire popstar don stand it still i think that you know it's all about paying dues and i don't always have to audition for instance there was a cameo that reggie huddling asked me to do in marshall as langston hughes that was just that was just him asking me to do with their other movies that are coming up that you know i either created for myself or or were created with me and mind so it's it's it's kind of luck at a draw it's just but but i'm certainly in my mind i'm certainly not above auditioning i still auditioned for alien covenant let's talk about that how did you how did you get that i audition like everybody else i don't think they knew who i was really yeah i don't i mean they knew like once i got onset they knew who i was but i don't think that really scott my sitting at home watching empire being like ooh i love kooky city i'm curious because really scott is one of the great directors modern hollywood what is being directed fucked up with that egypt's and movie you really of the gate two bucks when when you are being directed by really scout what is that like what are his notes like when he comes over like okay that was great but he's so funny he's so funny and he so he's so funny and serious at the same time it's so exciting to watch him work because he's literally like a little kid and a candy store and he's so respectful you know what i'm saying of of people's time and people's talent it's so interesting because we worked on french hours like french lunch hours where we would work through our lunch and he because his whole thing is we work six thirty in the morning to six thirty in the evening every single day and his whole thing is people should be able to have dinner with their families and like whoa i've never ever been on a set like that in my life.

langston hughes scott hollywood egypt reggie marshall
"langston hughes" Discussed on WHCP Community Radio 101.5 FM

WHCP Community Radio 101.5 FM

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on WHCP Community Radio 101.5 FM

"If you really listen to the words and kind of put the rather laidback musical vibe on the back burner you realize just how biting that social commentary is is this song nina simone kohl wrote with langston hughes backlash blues sound the record she put out 19th sixty seven the first album of her career that really didn't seem to put too much emphasis on what kind of a musician she was you know jazz blues folk to start the set the title track to the record odeta put out nineteen 64 it's a mighty world that's number thirty eight on the turning the tables list nina simone sings the blues came in at number twenty eight and our countdown to number one continues next with anita franco it was 1998 and she was determined to put out an album the captured the energy of her live show does and she did it's called little plastic castle oh in a guy fish shown in as saying which is now greg kofi shown in an risk on a day which is every day dubbed the man his thing which is very magazine at a story enough of them red alert liz saco fish have no memory against their lives some notch lime mine emma little plastic castle israel suppress i said to him and it's not fair to say if they're handing but they don't seem much mm the.

simone kohl langston hughes nina simone anita franco greg kofi
"langston hughes" Discussed on WHCP Community Radio 101.5 FM

WHCP Community Radio 101.5 FM

05:08 min | 2 years ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on WHCP Community Radio 101.5 FM

"And in may one yellow bearing in brown ms novak lead leaving mandalay ooh no move the bag neither man nope would he had been god that bloom will move back flash boom he youth wade and free if you really listen to the words and kind of put the rather laidback musical vibe on the back burner you realize just how biting that social commentary is is a song nina simone kohl wrote with langston hughes backlash blues it's on the record she put out 19th sixty seven the first album of her career that really didn't seem to put too much emphasis on what kind of a musician she was you know jazz blues folk to start the set the titled track to the record odeta put out nineteen 64 it's a mighty world that's number thirty eight on the turning the tables list nina simone sings the blues came in at number twenty eight and our countdown to number one continues next with anita franco it was 1998 and she was determined to put out an album that captured the energy of her life show does and she did it's called little plastic castle in a guy shown in azad azeri which is raikov michel in iris on a day which is every day the man is thing which is down by magazine read a story enough of red alert they say gold fish have no memory against their lives so much like mine and the little plastic castle israel suppress iso two and it's hard to say if they're handing but they don't seem much the fold in from his city the your say i rigging judge on the list as you down of the feeling that day and then the day you leave either he clinton the thing as they've done near the two girls in there in the view this loan in your life here it is to give the gift getting go of these days showed us come made in in his bono bocom competition lear busy getting the then ruling and and even though my image dragon income minutes two gunmen decisions lightly it is a sign of my dragging mind.

mandalay wade simone kohl langston hughes nina simone anita franco lear ms novak clinton
"langston hughes" Discussed on Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

"World ordering power is to break from a kind of ideological sir have monolith a means not even just a consensus it's kind of a hill it's it's it's it's the it's it's the really it's the equivalent of kind of what we used to condemn as in of soviet ideology right it's a it's a kind of it's a kind of axiomatic there that i mean i consider it it's they're like flatter authors yeah i mean it's sort of like what do you mean the us wasn't the most beneficent savior in the world that that stopped a all of us were living under the the nazi yoke right exactly and and and also i mean it's it's such an incendiary topic to raise in this country when you go to almost any public event whether it's a a graduation at a at a high school her a middle school a sporting event someone is going to invoke the heroic nature of the world war to record of the united states it happens at it happens republicans democrats across the board everywhere it's like our societies drip and it and as i read your book i was her thinking it's such a great pushed back to this notion that being born in american means you are born into the greatest nation that's ever lived the country that saves the world i mean it really is like a nonstarter if you disagree with that in the mainstream of american discourse absolutely and it's one of the reasons why you know in in in this book and in some of my previous work i really go back to the black radical tradition and thinking about world war two in particular and i and i use this quote somewhere from from langston hughes where he talks about you know we we we hate hitler as much as anybody but we also want to defeat what he calls are native fascisms you know and and for african americans you know that notion that world war two was would require a double victory a victory against fascism abroad and also against racism at home you know became a very sort of a sort of a sharp critique right it was.

united states republicans langston hughes hitler
"langston hughes" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on Here & Now

"A jazz orchestra in a string quartet sit ready to play as a man steps up to the microphone carl stokes mayor of cleveland starts to read a poem by another noted cleveland her langston hughes i to sing america i am the darker brother they sent me the eden in the kitchen when company comes but i lay behind the control room glass was famed new york jazz producer bob thelia of the next to him was noted composer and arranger oliver nelson's they collaborated on a series of recordings like this each one featured prominent american cultural voices commenting on current issues over a jazz soundtrack take this hammer a geared to the cab you tell him our god tell him i'm god music historian lauren schoenberg says the albums were released on deals personal labone in and they definitely word headed for the top of the pop charts mob was at that time you had people were making enough money from the commercial stuff that felt that they could go out and record things that they loved the may not have been a huge pay day at the end the stokes recording was released under the title the mayor and the people on one side of the record he can be heard reciting a mixture of gospel lyrics and verse from poets like links than hughes ingil scott hereon picture man of nearly thirty who seems twice his own clothes torn endured the other side consisted of an impromptu question and answer session from an invited audience arranged by feel we'll see it's very easy saying the now just men and now we are we going to be able to tool you am i going to be lancia questions are you can say these question.

cleveland oliver nelson carl stokes new york producer bob thelia lauren schoenberg lancia
"langston hughes" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"langston hughes" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Price off on everything on a terrific catalogue at mypillowcom it is disagreement day keeps than some tweets that i want to get to as well andrew you're on the medved show perry microprojects yaoman are no i got i got very kind of pure things that right the first of arming barker president being a ray i don't know what the proper award for oregon part of a mostly white crowd in alabama quite that aggregrate violent racial history i heard bombing finger that nature and calling mercury black football players after if it's not right what is that and widen thank you guys were taken anything that don't have a reason could revert only yeah i think they don't have a reason to be taking in the i think they don't have our and this is something dr king understood you know martin luther king used the amount eric and flag and reveres the american flag and praised the founding fathers yes including the slaveowners and took the position that the great black poet langston hughes wrote about in the 1930s led america be america again calling america to its highest ideals but you don't do that by disrespecting the american nation and its symbols and in terms of what do you call president trump for calling people less obeys you call improved unpresidential inappropriate stupid all those things but the ideas it's not just black players who were taking knees and there are white players and there were white owners who are doing it too and do i think that the president spoke well on this no i don't think he spoke well at all but the idea that that he is a racist because he called somebody s o bs look uh there are racist terms that are used and there are people who use those terms on the left and on the right and there i think when you're talking balance the racism charge that suchate eight poisonous charge right now and there are real racists among us we saw some of them in charlottesville uh and do i think that the president was foolish not to denounce some of those racists more forcefully i do that i think he has a problem on this issue i do but to say that the president is a racist is this a wildly overstating some of this foolishness.

president alabama martin luther king america andrew medved barker oregon football langston hughes charlottesville