31 Burst results for "Langer"

"langer" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

03:02 min | Last month

"langer" Discussed on From Scratch

"Dr folkman compared research to driving at night. Can you describe that analogy. Yes that's that's very good doctor. Fogelman said You know trying to solve the problem of angiogenesis or some of the other things would be kind of like driving at night. You can only. You can't see past where the headlights go. But you can do the whole trip that way so in other words. You don't know the answer when you're starting but you could make steps and those steps would eventually get you there. What are some images that come to your mind when you think of your research you know one. Is this driving at night. What about like crystallization. You know how they have a formation of a crystal and it becomes like this whole network of crystals. But that's my own candy that's significant. I mean that that's an example. Certainly one thing that actually we were involved in in fact we started a company on that too was a company called transform where one of the challenges actually when you make pharmaceuticals is having a good shelf life. Because you don't wanna use a drug if if if the drug after you make it as unstable after a month nobody's gonna use it. You can ship it all over the world you need and a lot of times. You won't use a drug for a year or two so getting the drug in the right crystal form. That's in the right stability. That actually is a big deal. If you don't get it in the crystal form it may not be stable and then it won't be useful to anybody but if it isn't a crystal form it can be very stable. You exercise daily. How long have you been exercising. And why is it so important to you while i've probably been exercising probably for a lot. Probably the last thirty two years thirty. Three years is important. While my dad died of a heart attack when he was sixty one was twenty eight at the i mean it so i just wanna live as long as i can for my kids and my wife and my family and what kind of baxter. What do you do for exercise. Well i Use a recumbent bike. elliptical machine treadmill And waits for how long probably two to three hours. A day said two to three hours. That seems above average. I think it's probably quite a bit above average certainly for somebody my age but i I'm able to work while i do it and My wife and kids actually exercise a lot. You know we have this gym at home. So sometimes we're all doing it together or at least a few of us and so But i it is certainly above average. You mentioned your wife You met your wife at mit. She's a neuroscientist had did you meet. We met on the track. I was running actually outside and so she. I knew her though a little bit because one of the people in our lab was roommates with her. So i knew her a little bit but then we saw on the track when we started talking. And so that's how that happened but thank you very much for joining us. It's my pleasure. I enjoyed it very much. My guest has been the chemical engineer. Dr robert langer. I'm jessica harris. this is from scratch..

Fogelman robert langer Three years jessica harris a year three hours sixty folkman one thing twenty eight two one one of the people last thirty two years thirty after a month
"langer" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

06:23 min | Last month

"langer" Discussed on From Scratch

"But it's a long road to getting approval for for anything you mentioned that These have not been approved yet and a firm like polaris has been very patient. It's patient capital Understanding that they might not see proceeds for decades thus right i mean Though they've done very well. As far as i know from what i guess. People in business called an eye are standpoint. I mean i think people in the investment business understand that when you're doing medical work you don't do it on on on sales at the time you do it on the promise of the company and that's turned out to work. I mean an early company that i was an adviser do for many years was was genetech in that came out and stock market and did fantastic and they had no products a lot of promise but ultimately they did get products and those products were were blockbusters. Let's talk about the entrepreneurial nature of what you've done your pioneer in science You though you are also a pioneer in tech transfer in a way in commercializing a lot of this research. What are some of the hurdles that you've faced entrepreneurially. Even outside of you know the development of your lab in the early days in the nineteen eighties. Yeah well i think. I think the challenges that you run into when you try to do entre things i mean. One is always raising money but to with again. Some of your colleagues won't think highly of it. You know they you know. Dr folkman actually said at a very well once. He actually got one of the earliest industrial grant. So you got about twenty three million dollars for monsanto for cancer research in the nineteen seventies and he was at a dinner. Somebody asked him What are the advantages and disadvantages of getting that kind of money and he swell. Let me do the disadvantages. I he said there's a gene that a lot of people have That's not expressed directly. It's expressed indirectly and he said that genius called jealousy. And if you're a young faculty member that's not such a good thing because people can control your your future you know and then a third thing is anytime you try to create any entity. You're dealing with all kinds of people. I mean with different personalities. I mean that's good because they're going but somehow they have to come together to create this company and you have to have good business people and good scientists and good clinical people and sometimes there might be conflicts. And so you have to try to help on those things. You've you've helped launch close to two thirty companies. It's not like you're being. Jeff bezos and you launched one company called amazon here you have sprinkled dozens of companies around in in your atmosphere. So how do you think about Starting a company. You just say well. Here's a great idea. And hey you. Ceo with this specific background. You go run with it. And i'll advise you're like a godfather to these companies more than in the trenches every day. I think that that's probably fair. I mean to me. My major mission still is being professor and teaching and doing research at mit in training students. But i also want when we create something for it to get out to the public and and my students and post. Docs some of them. Some of them will go into academic positions Some of them wanna take their inventions and make a company out of it. And so i you know so if we're fortunate enough to a have made an important discovery and be have somebody who wants to run with it. You know i. I want to help them do that. Incidentally some of the applications for your research have been in fields other than medicine. One example is in the waste industry. Can you describe that well actually one of the things that one of our post docs avi don't created with something was a palmer. But that would help in. What's called flocculation. And what's what and what that means is like you have a swimming pool and you have waste or junkin. Swimming pool could be leaves or could be. You know dirt anything. A flocculation is something that makes those things come together so rather than it be over your entire pool over your entire surface that comes together and it's very easy to then remove And so there's something that Company licensed called super flock. That that's was ver- you know very very widely used what are some other tangible technologies. That have come out of your lab that we might know af- well we've created Fat substitutes that people have used of foods That's an example like for example hood no-fat Sour cream or yogurts does use those use these products. I may near a whole bunch of things like that there's a company we've started Called living proof Which is in the hair care industry. And also jennifer aniston is involved in that as well as an investor. Yes and and social so there. There's products that the company in my students and post docs and everybody we've And people the company that created that can prevent frizzy hair that can Give more body and of course all a medical wants some of the companies that we've been involved in. I mean they've created products that Can help people schizophrenia. Help people with alcoholism how people with diabetes. What's an example of an application of your discovery to a treatment of alcoholism so the very first company that I got involved. Starting was company ends attack and what we did was make little discount from our early discoveries that we could make microbes fears that could release molecules of a size. We merged that company with our downstairs neighbor And basically that company has Created a micro sphere that can deliver a drug for a month. It's been shown to greatly reduce Alcoholism so microbes. Fear being a polymer that releases a chemical that inhibits the desire to drink alcohol. That's exactly right. Yeah it's a. it's a little microbes. Fear that you can inject through a small needle once a month and And and and dentist just what you said. You can also use that same microscope to reduce people's reliance on cocaine or narcotics as well. We talked a lot about polymers. And a controlled drug delivery To things like tumors. You've also spent a good portion of your career.

Jeff bezos amazon jennifer aniston nineteen eighties nineteen seventies folkman genetech Ceo once a month first One example two thirty companies about twenty three million dol one company third thing schizophrenia a month dozens of companies one things
Minnesota Officer Shoots Black Driver

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

00:22 sec | 2 months ago

Minnesota Officer Shoots Black Driver

"After police shot and killed a black driver while trying to arrest him unannounced standing warrant. This comes as the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derrick Show Van's murder trial is ongoing. Minnesota State Patrol Colonel Matt Langer. What you will see is a greater law enforcement presence, a greater National Guard presence. The deadly shooting drew a crowd of protesters last night. In the meantime, Sheldon's try Elinor's Week three.

Derrick Show Van Minnesota State Patrol Colonel Matt Langer Minneapolis National Guard Sheldon Elinor
Senate rejects GOP motion challenging Trump impeachment trial

Hugh Hewitt

00:27 sec | 4 months ago

Senate rejects GOP motion challenging Trump impeachment trial

"Of the upcoming impeachment trial. Democrats would need 17 Republicans to cross party lines on Lee, five, joined Democrats in voting to defeat Senator Paul's motion declaring the impeachment to be unconstitutional. Several GOP senators already voicing their belief that it's unconstitutional to impeach a former president. Others, like Senator Ted Cruz, characterizing the charges Lacking merit, motivated by political revenge and a waste of the Senate's time Bob Langer reporting Janet

Senator Paul Senator Ted Cruz LEE GOP Bob Langer Senate Janet
It's a Wonderful Life With Gigi

Recovery Happy Hour

06:36 min | 5 months ago

It's a Wonderful Life With Gigi

"All right. Today's interview is released. Special gee-gee langer has been sober for thirty. Four years used a twelve step program but what is so wonderful about. Her story is all of the other resources that she's used to do. Even deeper healing. We talk about energy work. Inner child healing topping Rural linguistic reprogramming. Meditation cranial sacred healing and outta jillian really incredible books to read all of which are linked in the show notes. This is proof that healing goes on forever and that your recovery won't look the same forever. Either she is the author of the book fifty ways to worry less now and is retired in florida with her husband. It was an absolute joy to get to know her. Here's digi langer hygiene. How are you. I am great. I'm so glad to be here. And yeah i'm so excited to be having recovery. Happy hour with you today. Thank you for taking the time to to share your story of recovery. I'm going to start this interview. The same way i start every interview and that is what is your name and your sobriety date and would you have described yourself as a high or low functioning drinker when you were drinking langer smy name and my sobriety date is february. Eleventh nineteen eighty six. And i was still a high functioning. I except in the area of romance in the area romance. I was extremely low functioning. I mean are we ever high functioning their love and logic those two things. Just don't mix well well. Why don't we just say that to other people. It looked like i was high functioning dairy cow. Mary go. I think i'll i think all of the above is super relatable before we get into your story. Tell me real quick just about what you're doing right now where you live. How old you are what you do for a living family hobbies anything like that. I'm retired. And i'm a little over seventy and i live in southwest florida. I grew up outside of chicago area and then travelled all over in my rambunctious years twenties and thirties. And most of my time. I've lived in michigan for the last several years just this summer. My husband and i moved down to florida. We have a little condo here. We have our kitty with us. And i don't have any children. Because i couldn't stay married long enough and snow grandchildren. So yeah life is good. I don't know what else you asked me. I think that hobbies. What do you like to do for fun right now. In south florida. Play a little golf You know. I have a blog and a lot of service work and a a nonprofit. I'm on that helps. Connect women in sobriety and i do a newsletter and i'm working on another a workbook for how to worry less and my husband and i play we. We just have a good time yeah. I'm very grateful that is fantastic. We'll let's get into your story and in five ten minutes or less. Tell us how long you drink. Tell us how long it was a problem and why you decided to stop you know. It really wasn't a problem for a long time in high school. I got drunk really drunk once and got deathly ill and had a blackout and everybody said how fun. I was a couple of times in college. I got drunk and did not stupid things. And and then i got married and started a teaching career and and he didn't really drink so i drank very little toward the end of that that it. It's kind of a long story about that marriage. But anyway i was very desperate at the end and i discovered marijuana so in my you know. Twenty three or so. I discovered that marijuana killed the emotional pain that i was going through. I really preferred marijuana. I could drink about six. Or seven beers. You know and i got through grad school by getting high and at night to ease the stress and it was really when i was around thirty four years. Old let's see. I had already been divorced twice. I was finishing my doctorate. I had gotten through that with the aid of drugs and alcohol just to calm anxiety and And i lived with two other guys long term. And so i met this guy who was different from all the other guys and i thought. Oh this is. The john and i moved to michigan and we got married very fast and within nine months of marrying him. I went to a bar picked up a stranger and he had marijuana and i started having this affair. You know with this guy. And and i went out to bars a couple of more times when my husband was traveling. My third house but my new you know went home with strangers. Finally i went running to a psychologist. I said what is wrong. With this problem. I have a brand new phd from stanford. And i have this private cd life and my professional life is looking better and better in my private life was worse and worse and he said well you're in the early stages of alcoholism you know. He got my family history and He said just try for a month or two. Try having one or two drinks but stopping and see what happens. Well sure enough. I tried to do his experiment. And sometimes i have two drinks and stop just like a normal drinker. Other times i would have the two drinks and then it was third drink and fourth rank and pick up the stranger and do crazy things that no one could get me to leave and eventually it. I could see the pattern very clearly. That if i had even one drink i could not trust myself to do really dangerous things for myself and other people

Gee Langer Florida Jillian Michigan South Florida Mary Chicago Golf John Stanford
It's a Wonderful Life With Gigi

Recovery Happy Hour

05:46 min | 5 months ago

It's a Wonderful Life With Gigi

"All right. Today's interview is released. Special gee-gee langer has been sober for thirty. Four years used a twelve step program but what is so wonderful about. Her story is all of the other resources that she's used to do. Even deeper healing. We talk about energy work. Inner child healing topping Rural linguistic reprogramming. Meditation cranial sacred healing and outta jillian really incredible books to read all of which are linked in the show notes. This is proof that healing goes on forever and that your recovery won't look the same forever. Either she is the author of the book fifty ways to worry less now and is retired in florida with her husband. It was an absolute joy to get to know her. Here's digi langer hygiene. How are you. I am great. I'm so glad to be here. And yeah i'm so excited to be having recovery. Happy hour with you today. Thank you for taking the time to to share your story of recovery. I'm going to start this interview. The same way i start every interview and that is what is your name and your sobriety date and would you have described yourself as a high or low functioning drinker when you were drinking langer smy name and my sobriety date is february. Eleventh nineteen eighty six. And i was still a high functioning. I except in the area of romance in the area romance. I was extremely low functioning. I mean are we ever high functioning their love and logic those two things. Just don't mix well well. Why don't we just say that to other people. It looked like i was high functioning dairy cow. Mary go. I think i'll i think all of the above is super relatable before we get into your story. Tell me real quick just about what you're doing right now where you live. How old you are what you do for a living family hobbies anything like that. I'm retired. And i'm a little over seventy and i live in southwest florida. I grew up outside of chicago area and then travelled all over in my rambunctious years twenties and thirties. And most of my time. I've lived in michigan for the last several years just this summer. My husband and i moved down to florida. We have a little condo here. We have our kitty with us. And i don't have any children. Because i couldn't stay married long enough and snow grandchildren. So yeah life is good. I don't know what else you asked me. I think that hobbies. What do you like to do for fun right now. In south florida. Play a little golf You know. I have a blog and a lot of service work and a a nonprofit. I'm on that helps. Connect women in sobriety and i do a newsletter and i'm working on another a workbook for how to worry less and my husband and i play we. We just have a good time yeah. I'm very grateful that is fantastic. We'll let's get into your story and in five ten minutes or less. Tell us how long you drink. Tell us how long it was a problem and why you decided to stop you know. It really wasn't a problem for a long time in high school. I got drunk really drunk once and got deathly ill and had a blackout and everybody said how fun. I was a couple of times in college. I got drunk and did not stupid things. And and then i got married and started a teaching career and and he didn't really drink so i drank very little toward the end of that that it. It's kind of a long story about that marriage. But anyway i was very desperate at the end and i discovered marijuana so in my you know. Twenty three or so. I discovered that marijuana killed the emotional pain that i was going through. I really preferred marijuana. I could drink about six. Or seven beers. You know and i got through grad school by getting high and at night to ease the stress and it was really when i was around thirty four years. Old let's see. I had already been divorced twice. I was finishing my doctorate. I had gotten through that with the aid of drugs and alcohol just to calm anxiety and And i lived with two other guys long term. And so i met this guy who was different from all the other guys and i thought. Oh this is. The john and i moved to michigan and we got married very fast and within nine months of marrying him. I went to a bar picked up a stranger and he had marijuana and i started having this affair. You know with this guy. And and i went out to bars a couple of more times when my husband was traveling. My third house but my new you know went home with strangers. Finally i went running to a psychologist. I said what is wrong. With this problem. I have a brand new phd from stanford. And i have this private cd life and my professional life is looking better and better in my private life was worse and worse

Gee Langer Florida Jillian Michigan South Florida Mary Chicago Golf John Stanford
It's A Wonderful Life With Gigi

Recovery Happy Hour

05:00 min | 5 months ago

It's A Wonderful Life With Gigi

"Hygiene. How are you. I am great. I'm so glad to be here. And yeah i'm so excited to be having recovery. Happy hour with you today. Thank you for taking the time to to share your story of recovery. I'm going to start this interview. The same way i start every interview and that is what is your name and your sobriety date and would you have described yourself as a high or low functioning drinker when you were drinking langer smy name and my sobriety date is february. Eleventh nineteen eighty six. And i was still a high functioning. I except in the area of romance in the area romance. I was extremely low functioning. I mean are we ever high functioning their love and logic those two things. Just don't mix well well. Why don't we just say that to other people. It looked like i was high functioning dairy cow. Mary go. I think i'll i think all of the above is super relatable before we get into your story. Tell me real quick just about what you're doing right now where you live. How old you are what you do for a living family hobbies anything like that. I'm retired. And i'm a little over seventy and i live in southwest florida. I grew up outside of chicago area and then travelled all over in my rambunctious years twenties and thirties. And most of my time. I've lived in michigan for the last several years just this summer. My husband and i moved down to florida. We have a little condo here. We have our kitty with us. And i don't have any children. Because i couldn't stay married long enough and snow grandchildren. So yeah life is good. I don't know what else you asked me. I think that hobbies. What do you like to do for fun right now. In south florida. Play a little golf You know. I have a blog and a lot of service work and a a nonprofit. I'm on that helps. Connect women in sobriety and i do a newsletter and i'm working on another a workbook for how to worry less and my husband and i play we. We just have a good time yeah. I'm very grateful that is fantastic. We'll let's get into your story and in five ten minutes or less. Tell us how long you drink. Tell us how long it was a problem and why you decided to stop you know. It really wasn't a problem for a long time in high school. I got drunk really drunk once and got deathly ill and had a blackout and everybody said how fun. I was a couple of times in college. I got drunk and did not stupid things. And and then i got married and started a teaching career and and he didn't really drink so i drank very little toward the end of that that it. It's kind of a long story about that marriage. But anyway i was very desperate at the end and i discovered marijuana so in my you know. Twenty three or so. I discovered that marijuana killed the emotional pain that i was going through. I really preferred marijuana. I could drink about six. Or seven beers. You know and i got through grad school by getting high and at night to ease the stress and it was really when i was around thirty four years. Old let's see. I had already been divorced twice. I was finishing my doctorate. I had gotten through that with the aid of drugs and alcohol just to calm anxiety and And i lived with two other guys long term. And so i met this guy who was different from all the other guys and i thought. Oh this is. The john and i moved to michigan and we got married very fast and within nine months of marrying him. I went to a bar picked up a stranger and he had marijuana and i started having this affair. You know with this guy. And and i went out to bars a couple of more times when my husband was traveling. My third house but my new you know went home with strangers. Finally i went running to a psychologist. I said what is wrong. With this problem. I have a brand new phd from stanford. And i have this private cd life and my professional life is looking better and better in my private life was worse and

Florida Michigan South Florida Mary Chicago Golf John Stanford
It's A Wonderful Life With Gigi

Recovery Happy Hour

04:43 min | 5 months ago

It's A Wonderful Life With Gigi

"Hygiene. How are you. I am great. I'm so glad to be here. And yeah i'm so excited to be having recovery. Happy hour with you today. Thank you for taking the time to to share your story of recovery. I'm going to start this interview. The same way i start every interview and that is what is your name and your sobriety date and would you have described yourself as a high or low functioning drinker when you were drinking langer smy name and my sobriety date is february. Eleventh nineteen eighty six. And i was still a high functioning. I except in the area of romance in the area romance. I was extremely low functioning. I mean are we ever high functioning their love and logic those two things. Just don't mix well well. Why don't we just say that to other people. It looked like i was high functioning dairy cow. Mary go. I think i'll i think all of the above is super relatable before we get into your story. Tell me real quick just about what you're doing right now where you live. How old you are what you do for a living family hobbies anything like that. I'm retired. And i'm a little over seventy and i live in southwest florida. I grew up outside of chicago area and then travelled all over in my rambunctious years twenties and thirties. And most of my time. I've lived in michigan for the last several years just this summer. My husband and i moved down to florida. We have a little condo here. We have our kitty with us. And i don't have any children. Because i couldn't stay married long enough and snow grandchildren. So yeah life is good. I don't know what else you asked me. I think that hobbies. What do you like to do for fun right now. In south florida. Play a little golf You know. I have a blog and a lot of service work and a a nonprofit. I'm on that helps. Connect women in sobriety and i do a newsletter and i'm working on another a workbook for how to worry less and my husband and i play we. We just have a good time yeah. I'm very grateful that is fantastic. We'll let's get into your story and in five ten minutes or less. Tell us how long you drink. Tell us how long it was a problem and why you decided to stop you know. It really wasn't a problem for a long time in high school. I got drunk really drunk once and got deathly ill and had a blackout and everybody said how fun. I was a couple of times in college. I got drunk and did not stupid things. And and then i got married and started a teaching career and and he didn't really drink so i drank very little toward the end of that that it. It's kind of a long story about that marriage. But anyway i was very desperate at the end and i discovered marijuana so in my you know. Twenty three or so. I discovered that marijuana killed the emotional pain that i was going through. I really preferred marijuana. I could drink about six. Or seven beers. You know and i got through grad school by getting high and at night to ease the stress and it was really when i was around thirty four years. Old let's see. I had already been divorced twice. I was finishing my doctorate. I had gotten through that with the aid of drugs and alcohol just to calm anxiety and And i lived with two other guys long term. And so i met this guy who was different from all the other guys and i thought. Oh this is. The john and i moved to michigan and we got married very fast and within nine months of marrying him. I went to a bar picked up a stranger and he had marijuana and i started having this affair. You know with this guy. And and i went out to bars a couple of more times when my husband was traveling. My third house but my new you know went home with strangers.

Florida Michigan Mary South Florida Chicago Golf John
Biden’s lead over Trump stays steady

Dave Ramsey

00:35 sec | 8 months ago

Biden’s lead over Trump stays steady

"With less than three weeks until the presidential election. Gary Langer, a survey researcher who directs polling here at ABC News. Says Joe Biden is showing some record setting numbers. Biden is up by 59 to 36% of 23 Point margin among women. That's the most support for AH for any presidential candidate among women in exit polls dating to 1976 that includes a big lead for for Biden among suburban women among suburban white women Bite has a vast more than 40 point lead among moderates. If it holds that would be a record by far.

Joe Biden Gary Langer Abc News Researcher
Solving the Murders of Katherine and Sheila Lyon

True Crime Brewery

04:08 min | 11 months ago

Solving the Murders of Katherine and Sheila Lyon

"Not like we're just talking about it for any kind of thrill. We're talking about it because we need to know what's going on in our society that's making this happen really drew. Okay, so we'll start John. Lyon, met his future wife. Xavier. University in Cincinnati. They were both students there. His wife Mary was from Erlanger Kentucky John was the Chicago. Boy. They married in Air Langer and had their first child a boy they named. Jay. Then after graduation John got a job at a radio station in Ohio, that's where Sheila was born. then. He worked at a radio station Illinois and Catherine more and they're. Following that John worked in both TV and radio in Peoria. He was on a daytime children's program where he played the guitar and Banjo. And in that same time period, nary was in a folk band. And then she gave birth to their youngest child Joe. Some pretty cool people I. Think they sound very interesting. He does. And she s in a folk band I. think that's really cool and it was the seventies. So they were kind of hit by guests. Yeah, probably. John's hard work eventually paid off. You got hired at W. M. A., l.. which at the time, the seventies was the most popular radio station in Washington, D.. C.. And John, was a pretty talented radio personality. So working at this station's worked as a fill in disc jockey, he read the news and he performed in a band, the multitask. Yeah John and Mary were both Pretty Witty People very well-spoken. So March Twenty, ninth nineteen, seventy, five was unseasonably warm in the suburbs of Washington. DC. Catherine. And Sheila Lyon. Ages ten and twelve were on spring break from school. John had worked the night shift the night before and drove home at six. Am that morning and went to bed. She learned Catherine. went to the Wheaton Mall. They had two dollars between them and they plan to get two slices of pizza. And Mary was happy to see them go together. She led the older one, didn't always want to spend time with their little sister, but recently, the two would become close played together like friends. But John Woke up that afternoon to an empty house. Mary had gone bowling and the boys were off playing with friends in the neighborhood. Mary came home with their younger boy. Joe Soon, after John Woke up, then he went back to bed for nap before dinner and Mary went and Rick. Some leaves in their backyard. When the sun began to go down, Mary really began to worry about her daughters. They were usually really good about being home for dinner and Sheila would call if they were at a neighbor's house playing. But Sheila had called and there had been no sign of the girls. But this is nineteen, seventy five. Your mind is not going to go to objection at this point. Nobody really thought like that. No, not then now. So they went ahead and had dinner with the two boys waiting for the girls to show up assuming they would. and. When there was still no word after they finish dinner Mary began calling around to all of their friends. No one had seen them though. So the family drove around looking for the girls and as time passed and they looked for their daughters in the Dr, the alarms really began to go off in their heads that something was wrong. So that's when they decided to call the police. But most runaways. The lions sisters, and they were nearly always found within twenty four hours. So when these girls were still missing overnight, the police began to realize that this was a case that was different. And the idea of follow play was becoming a real possibility at that point. The John and Mary told the police that this was just totally out of character for their girls both were honor roll students, and they both followed rules Catherine who went by Kate. Was the outgoing. Very Athletic,

John Mary Sheila Lyon Catherine Washington Joe Soon Cincinnati Xavier Air Langer Peoria JAY Chicago Erlanger Kentucky Ohio Wheaton Mall DC W. M. A. Illinois Kate Rick
Turning Proteins into Device Coatings that Provide Therapeutic Benefits

The Bio Report

05:57 min | 1 year ago

Turning Proteins into Device Coatings that Provide Therapeutic Benefits

"Lou Alvarez a West Point graduate who earned a PhD in bioengineering from Mit served twenty years in the military including time as an intelligence officer in Iraq, he saw injured soldiers, who doctors were able to save only to later have their limbs amputated because of the inability for injuries to heal properly, the experience led him to develop a means of turning recombinant proteins into a form that allows them to be used as coatings that act like paint can be applied to implants to promote growth and other benefits. We spoke to Alvarez founder of their adaptive about his journey from the battlefield, the lab how his company's platform technology works and the range of applications to which it may be applied. Lou thanks for joining us. It's great to be here. We're GONNA talk about Regenerative Medicine Third DA- positive and your efforts to improve the ability of bones to heal. I'd like to start with your own journey and how you became involved in the field of regenerative medicine. A West Point graduate. Masters in Chemical Engineering in a PhD in biological engineering from MIT. You've also got twenty years of active military service and earned both a combat action badge and a Bronze Star medal. How did you come to West Point? When did your interest in science begin? Were A. it's an interesting trajectory. One would necessarily recommend to others perceive career in science, but It's been quite a right unless but the. Interest really started the early school. In I always knew I wanted to devote my life to science, but about round the time that I was graduating high school light. I got an niche to prove myself physically maybe militarily, so I I decided to go to West Point. Actually provided a very good foundation for my Further studies later on in science had the bigger and and kind of engineering focus, West Point, being engineering school originally, and still is, so. It provided a good backdrop for me to continue my studies after. After finishing a West Point. Military service included time in Iraq. How much of your time was an active military zone? Right so after finishing west point. Miami actually was lucky enough to receive a hertz, Foundation Fellowship, this foundation that that pays for regular school in the in the sciences. And that allowed me to remain on active duty, but to pursue graduate school, and then after that. Two years than I was reassigned to units were traditionally tactical. Army units, and that included time both US industry said in Iraq so I a deployed with the First Cavalry Division to Iraq as an intelligence officer and. That tour was a little over a year, but that period of time between the masters in the was about a five year period of time. What was your experience in Iraq? So. It was actually in Iraq that that I think this idea crystallized in my mind. You know what it is that I. WanNa do in science. A lot of people come in. To a scientific field and maybe have a question about what direction to take so many options, but. What I saw there and what I almost nearly experienced myself several times. You know these injuries that lead to lifelong. Disability. Several if he was serving with head injuries. For example to the limbs lower limbs. I'M GONNA. Get back to the states. Medical scientists able to save their lives, but some of them suffered amputation, and the now have lifelong disability, and all that was due to the fact that there really wasn't anything out there to regenerate tissues, so that that ideas what motivated when I got back from Iraq to to go back to mit again under the leadership to the the focus on this idea, precise tissue regeneration. How much contact had you had with with people who who became amputee? Well after I got back, I did have a lot more interactions with folks in the region near the Walter Reed. Military Medical Hospital. Just others that had served with who who had suffered injuries so. It was a period of time in two, thousand, five, six, seven, eight. Where you know, there were really a surgeon so more and more people that had served with people that they knew. Were suffering injury. So you know it's a close knit community end up. Seeing many of them again. You returned to mit to earn a PhD in biological engineering. What was the work you did there? How did it connect? Sure so when I went back, the army gives you three years basically to do a PhD so I knew I had to hit the ground running. And and have a plan for what to do and MIT's department of biological engineering was very. Welcoming and said you don't pick the professor that you want to work with also a worked with Linda, Griffith, who is really Tinier in the field of regenerative? Medicine Tissue Engineering. Actually! She was a post doc in the Bob Langer's lap. Developed the ear on the back of the mass back in the ninety S. So you know real rich tradition of tissue engineering there it was on her group that I was able to focus on this idea for good delivery of proteins to induce the body to regenerate tissue.

Iraq West Point MIT Lou Alvarez Tissue Engineering Regenerative Medicine Third Officer Army Military Medical Hospital Founder Linda Foundation Fellowship Miami Walter Reed Bob Langer Professor
Turning Proteins into Device Coatings that Provide Therapeutic Benefits

The Bio Report

06:16 min | 1 year ago

Turning Proteins into Device Coatings that Provide Therapeutic Benefits

"Lou thanks for joining us. It's great to be here. We're GONNA talk about Regenerative Medicine Third DA- positive and your efforts to improve the ability of bones to heal. I'd like to start with your own journey and how you became involved in the field of regenerative medicine. A West Point graduate. Masters in Chemical Engineering in a PhD in biological engineering from MIT. You've also got twenty years of active military service and earned both a combat action badge and a Bronze Star medal. How did you come to West Point? When did your interest in science begin? Were A. it's an interesting trajectory. One would necessarily recommend to others perceive career in science, but It's been quite a right unless but the. Interest really started the early school. In I always knew I wanted to devote my life to science, but about round the time that I was graduating high school light. I got an niche to prove myself physically maybe militarily, so I I decided to go to West Point. Actually provided a very good foundation for my Further studies later on in science had the bigger and and kind of engineering focus, West Point, being engineering school originally, and still is, so. It provided a good backdrop for me to continue my studies after. After finishing a West Point. Military service included time in Iraq. How much of your time was an active military zone? Right so after finishing west point. Miami actually was lucky enough to receive a hertz, Foundation Fellowship, this foundation that that pays for regular school in the in the sciences. And that allowed me to remain on active duty, but to pursue graduate school, and then after that. Two years than I was reassigned to units were traditionally tactical. Army units, and that included time both US industry said in Iraq so I a deployed with the First Cavalry Division to Iraq as an intelligence officer and. That tour was a little over a year, but that period of time between the masters in the was about a five year period of time. What was your experience in Iraq? So. It was actually in Iraq that that I think this idea crystallized in my mind. You know what it is that I. WanNa do in science. A lot of people come in. To a scientific field and maybe have a question about what direction to take so many options, but. What I saw there and what I almost nearly experienced myself several times. You know these injuries that lead to lifelong. Disability. Several if he was serving with head injuries. For example to the limbs lower limbs. I'M GONNA. Get back to the states. Medical scientists able to save their lives, but some of them suffered amputation, and the now have lifelong disability, and all that was due to the fact that there really wasn't anything out there to regenerate tissues, so that that ideas what motivated when I got back from Iraq to to go back to mit again under the leadership to the the focus on this idea, precise tissue regeneration. How much contact had you had with with people who who became amputee? Well after I got back, I did have a lot more interactions with folks in the region near the Walter Reed. Military Medical Hospital. Just others that had served with who who had suffered injuries so. It was a period of time in two, thousand, five, six, seven, eight. Where you know, there were really a surgeon so more and more people that had served with people that they knew. Were suffering injury. So you know it's a close knit community end up. Seeing many of them again. You returned to mit to earn a PhD in biological engineering. What was the work you did there? How did it connect? Sure so when I went back, the army gives you three years basically to do a PhD so I knew I had to hit the ground running. And and have a plan for what to do and MIT's department of biological engineering was very. Welcoming and said you don't pick the professor that you want to work with also a worked with Linda, Griffith, who is really Tinier in the field of regenerative? Medicine Tissue Engineering. Actually! She was a post doc in the Bob Langer's lap. Developed the ear on the back of the mass back in the ninety S. So you know real rich tradition of tissue engineering there it was on her group that I was able to focus on this idea for good delivery of proteins to induce the body to regenerate tissue. was well understood why these? Soldiers. Who would come home would. have their lives save, but then end up losing limbs. That's a great question. It's something that maybe doesn't get a lot of attention so if you injure limb. Normally. That injury affects bone. Can AFFEC-, nerves and vessels, if any one of those tissues doesn't heal properly. Then you end up with a limb? That isn't usable. Actually becomes a burden to you and the medical guidance is that what's recommended? Amputation, which is a? This is amazing to me that you would. Basically discard limp because one of the wires is not the NACCHIO correct Civis, so to me I wanted to. Address a problem on a very detailed level this Aitken we regenerate? Let's say bone so now. You can save a bit if if the problem is that the bonus inhale. So. It's a piece wise approach to try to salvage alums. What are bone void fillers? And how are they used

Iraq West Point MIT Regenerative Medicine Third Army Tissue Engineering LOU Military Medical Hospital Bob Langer Aitken Foundation Fellowship Walter Reed Miami United States First Cavalry Division Officer
"langer" Discussed on Daily Sales Tips

Daily Sales Tips

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"langer" Discussed on Daily Sales Tips

"Today's tip comes from Allan Langer. Allen's the author of the seven secrets to selling more by selling less that he wrote as an antidote to the numerous pitch trainings and teachings that have existed for decades, but simply didn't produce the results he knew could be achieved here. He is hey everyone allan. Langer here from the seven Secrets Center for sales and marketing and. And here is my sales tip for you. I call it becoming the expert and what I mean by this is perception. Is Reality Okay? You have to be perceived as the expert in your field, whether you are not so with today's attention span I just looked at some statistics and the average attention span today for the average human being is seven seconds especially online, so if there's someone out there who has a problem and they? They are looking for someone to solve that problem with product or a service. They are going to look to see if you are an expert and you have seven seconds from your standpoint to show them that you are where they need to have the perception that you are the expert. Let me give you an example of what I mean. Let's say I. I mean the market for Lampshades, and I, met a networking function and there's. There's well. There's two lampshade guys in the room so I meet <hes> both of them I take both of their business cards, and then I'm gone from the networking function and a few days later I think Oh, boy, I need to order lampshades. I pick up both business cards and I look at one, and says Joe Smith Lampshade consultant, and then I look at the other business card, and it says Steve Smith Senior lampshade consultant. Well now I. Don't really remember either person, but I'm going to call the senior lampshade consultant. Why because right there I am perceiving Steve as more of an expert than Joe simply because of his title. Okay, so you need to take a step back and look through the eyes of your customer to how you're perceived. Website on your company's website. What your title is! How are you perceive in your Lincoln Profile? Are you perceived as an expert in your field as an expert in your product or your service, or are you perceived as just another sales rep the perception right now. You have that seven seconds to have. Someone believed that you are the expert. Because once you do that, you'll have a much easier time getting in front of that customer. You'll have a much easier time selling that customer, because really you need to believe you're the expert as well, but the perception has to be there, and that has to be from the customer's standpoint. Okay, so that's my tip. Become the expert, the customer has to perceive you as the expert. And if they do, you'll have a much better time closing the sale

Allan Langer consultant Allen Joe Smith Steve Smith Scott Ingram seven Secrets Center
Becoming the Expert - Allan Langer

Daily Sales Tips

02:43 min | 1 year ago

Becoming the Expert - Allan Langer

"Today's tip comes from Allan Langer. Allen's the author of the seven secrets to selling more by selling less that he wrote as an antidote to the numerous pitch trainings and teachings that have existed for decades, but simply didn't produce the results he knew could be achieved here. He is hey everyone allan. Langer here from the seven Secrets Center for sales and marketing and. And here is my sales tip for you. I call it becoming the expert and what I mean by this is perception. Is Reality Okay? You have to be perceived as the expert in your field, whether you are not so with today's attention span I just looked at some statistics and the average attention span today for the average human being is seven seconds especially online, so if there's someone out there who has a problem and they? They are looking for someone to solve that problem with product or a service. They are going to look to see if you are an expert and you have seven seconds from your standpoint to show them that you are where they need to have the perception that you are the expert. Let me give you an example of what I mean. Let's say I. I mean the market for Lampshades, and I, met a networking function and there's. There's well. There's two lampshade guys in the room so I meet both of them I take both of their business cards, and then I'm gone from the networking function and a few days later I think Oh, boy, I need to order lampshades. I pick up both business cards and I look at one, and says Joe Smith Lampshade consultant, and then I look at the other business card, and it says Steve Smith Senior lampshade consultant. Well now I. Don't really remember either person, but I'm going to call the senior lampshade consultant. Why because right there I am perceiving Steve as more of an expert than Joe simply because of his title. Okay, so you need to take a step back and look through the eyes of your customer to how you're perceived. Website on your company's website. What your title is! How are you perceive in your Lincoln Profile? Are you perceived as an expert in your field as an expert in your product or your service, or are you perceived as just another sales rep the perception right now. You have that seven seconds to have. Someone believed that you are the expert. Because once you do that, you'll have a much easier time getting in front of that customer. You'll have a much easier time selling that customer, because really you need to believe you're the expert as well, but the perception has to be there, and that has to be from the customer's standpoint. Okay, so that's my tip. Become the expert, the customer has to perceive you as the expert. And if they do, you'll have a much better time closing the

Allan Langer Consultant Joe Smith Steve Smith Seven Secrets Center Allen
Gilead’s remdesivir is a rare example of foresight in this pandemic

Bloomberg Politics, Policy and Power

05:35 min | 1 year ago

Gilead’s remdesivir is a rare example of foresight in this pandemic

"Up let's go inside the magazine the cover story it's all about how Kelly adds wind does appear is an example of foresight in this pandemic we caught up with magazine editor Joe Webber and the writer of the piece Robert Langer from the beginning of this series character really clear that there weren't that many drugs that could do that and like lab data against corona viruses to go right into trials plane to human trials and this is one of a kind of handful found some from very early on you know if there's going to was going to early drugs qualifiers this is likely to be excised paying attention only on those talking to Billy you know early on trying to get interviews with some of their executives which was very hard to but what one thing we were able to get you know before this completely closed off or if you get a to talk to for you know into a one of A. R. the plants for the filling the file got in California this is why does everything was shutting down in mid March in U. appointment last days we could have done it we gotta talk over there a couple of great pictures and make videos suggesting that really helped make the story and then I just kept talking to them and you know get more detail at the earliest years of compounding then yeah finally is able to get me to deal with one of the top you know manufacture accurately tell me all the the seven different chemicals went into this and they get a twenty five different steps and you can compare the two making a very yeah yes the very specific or local of type of gratitude bakery if you don't if you don't already huge amount of your specially flower advance you have to wait for the new crop wheat to grow up to be a big delay that's right January all the specialty ingredients in the right order the flyers in China and Europe Wayans dance I was like the biggest smartest thing that they did yeah it's that's really such a key detail what to bring into Weber the editor of Bloomberg business week he joins us from Brooklyn and jolt you put this on the cover it makes a huge amount of sense because it's such a good read give us the contact from your perspective because you're looking across all of these stories not just as it relates to the crown of ours but across the world of business you know I think the story's significance is is huge and it's also the way that I I think is the best part of it but this is almost like the most hopeful news the only hopeful news basically to date in this coronavirus saga you either with like it it feels like it one bit of bad news after not act and it's almost like this cacophony of incompetence sometimes and so what I think Bob will be able to do in this Gilead story was actually shows like here's a good example of like one of the only ones really of a company that had incredible foresight and preparedness and you know how do you not actually ordered the raw materials that they needed to actually make this creep back in January even before it was you know before we knew how bad this was going to be having not done that back then we would not have the treatment that we certainly you know I like to be sure this is not a cure it's a treatment it takes corona virus from being fifteen gate operation down to maybe like eleven Coolidge down to like a linen suit you know if it's a modest improvement over nothing but at least it's something and you don't bother are you sort of you know reported around if you know if it's actually even more incredible than that because this is a drug that actually you know it's been around for like eleven years now and it never could find a purpose even right what what's the backstory you know the first thing that is you know looking for hepatitis C. drugs that was hard to administer the a better one for pills with conditional for that and then you know they tried it for a bola and they spend years on that you know because the first attempt to prolong a ball out quicker than the outbreak faded before they could get into even falls lake Catherine reasonable outbreak and then it didn't work that well so they are but in the end so they're trying to figure out what to do next and when the moment came along and they didn't have the thing that he definitely was I did not in January they didn't assume the best case scenario they didn't play has to wait a few weeks we'll see if this goes away because they're gay in case this is a pandemic worker or a whole bunch of stuff right now and it's just very different from what a lot of other folks did I have to say what's really cool in the story and if if people don't totally understand how significant this is it you're right Mr how Anthony Fauci has pointed out that he is like in the trial of ambassador to the first big trial of AZ T. the first drug for HIV right and so then you understand because that too was something we just couldn't figure out a treatment and so you understand Bob how room disappear is really a first very important step well yeah absolutely I mean the way to think of this is as a first step or first thing over again as the sea of going to self censor any a lot more drugs they're working on better drugs and better ways to administrative right now to confusion and we're definitely gonna need vaccines this doesn't solve the problem this is you know and as you said the first up from the second you know hospitalized patients in this reporter Robert Langer and of course Joe Webber the editor of Bloomberg business week and Carol what I really liked about this story from the pretty arresting cover image all the way through the pieces we talk so much about sort of botched response in on preparedness this was a case where a company anticipated some of this a lot still to be seen about whether this will be the drug that we need but I a company in the

Joe Webber Writer Kelly Editor
"langer" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

12:05 min | 1 year ago

"langer" Discussed on From Scratch

"But it's a long road to getting approval for for anything you mentioned that These have not been approved yet and a firm like Polaris has been very patient. It's patient capital Understanding that they might not see proceeds for decades thus right I mean Though they've done very well as far as I know from what I guess people in Business called an I R STANDPOINT. I mean I think people in the investment business understand that when you're doing medical work you don't do it on on on sales at the time you do it on the promise of the company and that's turned out to work. I mean an early company that I was an adviser do for many many years was was genetech in that came out and stock market and did fantastic and they had no products a lot of promise but ultimately they did get products and those products. Were were blockbusters. Let's talk about the entrepreneurial nature of what you've done your pioneer in science You though you are also a pioneer in tech transfer in a way in commercializing a lot of this research. What are some of the hurdles that you've faced entrepreneurially? Even outside of you know the development of your lab in the early days in the nineteen eighties. You know. Well I think I think the challenges that you run into when you try to Pharaoh things I mean. One is always raising money but to this again. Some of your colleagues won't think highly of it. You know they you know. Dr Folkman actually said at a very well once. He actually got one of the earliest industrial grant. So you got about twenty three million dollars for Monsanto for cancer research in the nineteen seventies and he was at a dinner. Somebody asked him What are the advantages and disadvantages of getting that kind of money and he said well? Let me do the disadvantages. I he said. There's a gene that a lot of people have That's not expressed directly. It's expressed indirectly and he said that genius called Jealousy. And if you're a young faculty member that's not such a good thing because people can control your your future you know and then a third thing is anytime you try to create any entity. You're dealing with all kinds of people. I mean with different personalities. I mean that's good because they're gonNA but somehow they have to come together to create this company and you have to have good business people and good scientists and good Clinical people and sometimes there might be conflicts. And so you have to try to help on those things. You've you've helped launch close to two thirty companies. It's not like you're being Jeff Bezos and you launched one company called Amazon here you have sprinkled dozens of companies around in in your atmosphere. So how do you think about Starting a company. You just say well. Here's a great idea. And Hey you. Ceo With this specific background. You go run with it. And I'll advise you're like a godfather to these companies more than in the trenches every day. I think that that's probably fair. I mean to me my major mission still is being professor and teaching and doing research at MIT in training students. But I also want when we create something for it to get out to the public and and my students and post. Docs some of them. Some of them will go into academic positions Some of them WANNA take their inventions and make a company out of it. And so I you know so if we're fortunate enough to a have made an important discovery and be have somebody who wants to run with it you know. I want to help them do that. Incidentally some of the applications for your research have been in fields other than medicine. One example is in the waste industry. Can you describe that well actually one of the things that one of our post doc Shaw Vidalia created with something was a palmer? But that would help in. What's called flocculation? And what's what and what that means is like you have a swimming pool and you have waste or Junkin. Swimming Pool could be leaves or could be. You know dirt anything. A flocculation is something that makes those things come together so rather than it be over your entire pool over your entire surface. It comes together and it's very easy to then remove And so there's something that Company licensed called Super Flock. That that's was ver- you know very very widely used what are some other tangible technologies? That have come out of your lab that we might know AF- well we've created Fat Substitutes that people have used of foods That's an example like for example Hood no-fat Sour cream or yogurts does use those use these products. I may near a whole bunch of things like that There's a company we've started Called living proof Which is in the hair care industry? And also Jennifer. Aniston is involved in that as well as an investor. Yes and and social so there. There's products that the company in my students and Post. Docs and everybody we've And people the company that created that can prevent frizzy hair that can Give her more body. And of course all a medical wants some of the companies that we've been involved in. I mean they've created products that Can HELP PEOPLE WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA? Help people with alcoholism how people with diabetes. What's an example of an application of your discovery to a treatment of alcoholism so the very first company that I got involved. Starting was accompanied ends attack and what we did was make little discount from our early discoveries that we could make microbes fears that could release molecules of a of any size. We merged that company with our downstairs. Neighbor alchemists and basically that company has Created a micro sphere that can deliver a drug for a month. It's been shown to greatly reduce Alcoholism so microbes. Fear being a polymer that releases a chemical that inhibits the desire to drink alcohol. That's exactly right. Yeah it's A. It's a little microbes. Fear that you can inject through a small needle once a month and And and and dentist just what you said. You can also use that same microscope to reduce people's reliance on cocaine or narcotics as well. We talked a lot about polymers. And a controlled drug delivery To things like tumors. You've also spent a good portion of your career on tissue engineering tissue regeneration. Can you describe what that is briefly? Sure well lots of times. People have serious medical problems where they don't have their gone bad or they're burned or all kinds of problems where they don't have a tissue or organ or has been seriously damaged so around. Nineteen eighty-three a friend of mine. J. Conti he's had a pediatric surgery at mass general. The came to talk to me about this at that time. He was head of the liver transplant. Program at Children's Hospital and we started talking about ways that we might be able to use plastics and sells mammalian cells to to craft new tissues and organs and That would eventually lead to new strategies for creating artificial skin for burn victims New ways of of creating while livers or you know Intestines orcas a lot of them are at the research stage. We're also looking at ways of making spy. New Spinal cords for people that are paralyzed vocal. Cords for people have difficulty speaking or singing so all kinds of things like that. So what is the tissue of while the strategy that we use is you have Palmer's plastic scaffold and then you put the cells and over time the cells make what's called their own extra cellular Matrix so all the same proteins hopefully and sugars and other things that are in the human body To begin with the cells recreate and over time that plastic scaffold dissolves. It's a desirable scaffold that we've designed so in essence rather than ladies girdles or other things. What you're having is with the body normally would have which are the what are called these extra cellular matrix proteins and polysaccharide so the plastic delivers sort of a platter for this artificial tissue. Which flirts with or franchises with the real tissue in the body and they cohere and intermingle and then become their own organism. Pretty well And issues his own challenges. But that's sort of the general strategy that we've developed and Jessica Harris. You're listening to from scratch my guest. Dr Robert Langer founder and chief researcher of the language labs at Mit Dr Langer holds over eight hundred. Issued or pending patents. Two hundred and fifty companies have licensed or sublicense. The discoveries originated in his lapse. Dr Langer is a magician. I'd like to turn to your personal life Tell me about this magic while I've always been fascinated by magic so from time to time. I try to learn how to do tricks. I mean I remember taking even a magic class and I would always love going to magic shops and seeing people do do tricks and I used to do a shows when my kids were little that I remember one time even doing a show at mit for four hundred people. That was a while ago. I I'm probably pretty rusty now. Is there an area of magic that you prefer? Do you like the cards or the body disappearance or what. Yeah well actually I like. I like the cards. People have often broken up magic into two kinds of magic stage magic and close up magic stage. Magic is like the body disappearing and things like that. But I've I've always liked the sort of close up magic with cards or coins but particularly cars have always thought those those are fascinating in a way magic and chemistry or science seem on the face of it very similar. You have something that you know on the surface is is wow generating and your job and your hobby is to understand how to create that. Wow you your job is to understand the reasons for that outcome. Then some things could even you know appear like magic like we just published a paper a week or two ago and science where some of my post docs found like this This plastic or polymer. That can you put it on your hand and starts jumping all over the place and it can even lift things that's almost magical and and a lot of what we've ended up doing in the lab is is understanding better phenomena that Is is extremely complicated. How long have you been interested in magic? Oh I've been many many years since I was a little boy. You grew up in Albany. New York what did your parents do. Well my dad ran Small liquor store and my mom was a homemaker and Jeremy my sister. What was your home? Life like was it was great. I mean you know we lived on a small street in Albany You know I had a lot of friends. Remember playing baseball and football and things like that and I went to the local public school twenty-seven it was. It was nice. You're an inventor. Essentially at what point did you think you know? I'd like to be an inventor or some type of Creator or engineer In your childhood were those seeds apparent to you that early. They weren't apparent to me that early but one of the things that I had That I got US gifts There's a company called Gilbert when I was a little boy and they have made all kinds of great things that kids like to play with. I mean they had this erector set and they had a whole bunch of different ones of various Complexity you know where you could build structures like a merry go round and other where there was like a parachute. Jump another where you could launch rockets. And then they also had a microscope set and they had a chemistry set and so I really enjoyed that kind of stuff when I was a little boy. I Even like with the chemistry set. I remember mixing different chemicals together and watching. The Solutions Changed Color. Which is magic.

Alcoholism Dr Robert Langer palmer Albany Dr Folkman Polaris Jeff Bezos MIT mit Monsanto Amazon Jessica Harris faculty member Ceo cocaine Shaw Vidalia Swimming Aniston Children's Hospital
"langer" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

14:00 min | 1 year ago

"langer" Discussed on From Scratch

"How did the energy crisis indirectly lead you to the field of scientific discovery? Sure was this gas shortage. You know all over the country and there's the guests orders in Boston was really bad. So they're all kinds of jobs in the petrochemical oil industry for chemical engineers. They are hiring like crazy. Pretty much. My colleagues my friends. That's what they did. They got jobs in the oil industry and so I thought that's what I should do too so I went to A lot of interviews and I actually got about twenty job offers from different Oil companies actually four from Exxon alone. But I remember one of them in particular one of the engineers said to me if you could just increase the yield of this one chemical by like point one percent said that'd be wonderful. It'd be worth billions of dollars and I remember flying home to Boston that night thinking to myself. I just don't WanNa do that. Just seemed to me. You know that I could do things that I could do with my life that I thought maybe could help. People would be more important at least to me so So I started looking for other other ideas about what I could do. Now you send some ideas for a chemistry curriculum to various education institutions. How were they received one of the things I did when I was a graduate student at? Mit is. I helped. Start a school for poor kids and a high school and I got involved in creating new chemistry curricula and so I remember writing letters Answering different adds to different colleges To be an assistant professor that would be developing new chemistry curriculum but none of them wrote me back so the next thing I thought about since I wasn't doing so well finding good jobs finding any jobs where I could do chemistry education. I thought about medicine so I wrote a Lotta to route lot of hospitals medical schools. And they they didn't write me back either but one day One of the people in the lab ours at said to me said Bob. There's a surgeon in Boston. Named Judah Folkman and he said sometimes he hires unusual people. He thought very highly Dr Folkman. I won't say what he about me but I wrote to Dr Folkman and he was kind enough to offer me a job and it was your research with Dr Faulk men that had a seminal impact on What you're doing today to some degree. What was it specifically that you were working on? So Dr Folkman had a theory that if you could stop blood vessels from growing in the body that that might be a new way to stop cancer someday. A new way to treat cancer someday but it was a theory. Actually a lot of people didn't agree with that theory. And and what he asked me to do is to see. If I could isolate what would become the first Inhibitor of of angiogenesis. The first inhibitor of blood vessel growth. So that was how. That's how I got started. If you could stop the growth of blood vessels you could stop the growth of tumors developing further. Is that correct? The thinking was is that An is that tumors without blood vessels will not go beyond a very tiny size of about one millimeter cute but if the tumors permeated by blood vessels then that solves the nutrition problem from them for them and they can get much bigger and then of course they can also metastasized or spread through those same blood vessels and set up shop in other parts of the body. You used an eye of a rabbit to help with your research. What is special about the eye of a rabbit? Yeah well it's it's big So it's easy to visualize so what we thought about was if we could have a plastic. Aslo RELEASED POLYMER. That could take anything. That was in Cartilage that's what we were studying and a not cause harm to the eye and be deliver those molecules for a couple of months or more that that might be a way to study how blood vessels would grow or not grow. You mentioned polymers. These are plastics. Essentially the polymers. We use would be plastics. Polymers could also be rubber and so forth Palmer's basically along chain substance we're talking about manufactured tissues polymers. What was the landscape of biomaterials? When you were pioneering this field in the nineteen seventies. Yeah well it's interesting most biomaterials That people used in the body were are largely driven by medical doctors clinicians. And what they do is they would often go to their house and find an object. It would kind of resemble the organ or tissue. They wanted to fix so just to give a few examples it the material and the artificial heart that was ladies girdle material. Because it had a good you know good buoyancy your flex life and the material and a breast implant That was actually one of them was actually a mattress stuffing because it was the right. Squishy NECE The material in a what's called a vascular graft and artificial blood vessel that was a surgeon going to a close store and finding something they could so well with. And so almost. All of the biomaterials in the seventies had origins like that. They were sort of what I'd call off the shelf materials and that may solve some problems but it also created problems because they weren't optimally designed for the body presentable. If you take the artificial heart the ladies girdle material you put it in the body. And sometimes the blood hits the surface of that and it forms a clot and that clock. Go to the patient's brain and they'd get a stroke in they die and obviously there's been problems with different breast implant materials and other things as well. I'm Jessica Harris. You're listening to from scratch. My guest is the chemical engineer. Dr Robert Langer. Who is the chief researcher and founder of the Langar labs at Mit? He's considered a pioneer in the fields of tissue engineering and drug delivery in the nineteen eighties. You founded the LANGUOR lab at MIT. What was the purpose for this lab? My goals were to do things that I thought might someday help improve people's lives by doing things at the interface of chemical engineering and medicine. How was it received when you went to the administration at Mit? And said you know? I'd like to form this lab just to facilitate this research that I'm doing well certainly the my early years. Doing the research number of my senior colleagues didn't think it was very important or didn't think it was very good and they suggested that I probably should start looking for new jobs. Why wasn't because the field was so nascent there were a lot of I was that I think that that people people's idea of what's important probably has a lot to do with what they're doing themselves and you know and and and they had different areas in this department. But this didn't fit into any of those and the I think the thinking was if I didn't fit into something that that pre existed I probably wouldn't get promoted. I probably wouldn't get tenure since your research wasn't well received at MIT. Did you ever think of maybe moving to an environment? That was more friendly to the type of work. You're doing well I actually think. Mit was as friendly as any place. You know my first nine grants were turned down an nobody an MIT were on the sections at turned them down in fact mit was was. You know I still think is a great place to be if you go against the prevailing scientific wisdom anywhere in the world. You're going to run into problems. So how did you break through that conventional bias? Why don't know if I really ever did. I just kept doing the work that I thought was important and I started you know publishing it and and I think pharmaceutical companies started to notice it and they said that they were nice enough to say that the work they thought was very important. What were some examples of early breakthroughs that helped to lend credibility to what you were doing? So so we published this paper in nineteen seventy six in nature showing that you could deliver molecules of almost any size so that that was probably the breakthrough Or that was maybe the first breakthrough but people thought trying to get these molecules. Big Molecules through a plastic was kind of like you are walking through a brick wall even though the plastic was porous. Bob People didn't know that then and we didn't know that then either so the challenge would be the following. You could either have something that would be non-porous that you couldn't get through it all or anything. That was poorest. Would be kind of like Swiss cheese so you could get through it but then you get through it almost instantaneously and what we were saying was that we have these tiny little particles and yet the drugs would come out for over one hundred days so the problem would be. How could that happen? And not just defied what? I like to say conventional wisdom. We talk about your your research. I gaining an academic acceptance. What was the first example of the commercialization of one of your findings? Well there were a couple but I think one of the early ones was We designed polymers. That could Dissolve in a certain special way. And we what we call surface erosion kind of like how far. Soap dissolves and. What was done in this particular case as it delivers an anti cancer drug? It sorta told her all done locally so the cancer drug doesn't go throughout the whole body. It just is given locally. To the to the tumor and then there was a company originally Nova Pharmaceuticals and later Guilford pharmaceuticals that licensed it and developed it and ultimately it led to a product. That still used today actually intriguing. Brain cancer called Glee. Delaware for this is one of the earliest examples of the commercialization of one of your discoveries since then Roughly two hundred and fifty companies have license or sub-licensed. Your your discoveries were you surprised by this torrent of commercial applications for for what you were doing. It's hard to say whether I surprised or not. I wanted people to use it. You know when you're in academia and you're a professor. I mean you're training students which I love to do. And you're making discoveries and findings which is also what I like to do but I also WanNa see what we do get used. I just don't want it to be a scientific paper that just you know people read about. I wanted to see what we did. Have an impact on people's lives. That's why got involved in patenting processes them. That's why you know I. I wanted to see our things. Get licensed to companies and ultimately licensed create companies ourselves. Because if we didn't do that you know I find if you're not your own champion. It's very hard to find others. Who are going to be often. There's controversy around Tech transfer universities or academics using their discoveries for commercial ends because it leads to potential conflicts of interest. What was that landscape? Like free you think. Mit You know along with Stanford is probably one of the is the top to technology transfer places and in the world and I think their goal is really the same as mine is not actually to make money. It's not too it's really. How can we you know? Maximize the chances of products being developed. Mit which was founded in eighteen. Sixty one One of its mission was to provide and support industrialization of America so not had more of a commercial slant to it then perhaps academic institutions. I think that's right I think. Mit wants to see products created. They want to see things get out to the public incidently once say at a technology or an innovation is discovered and is profitable. It's split in three ways. Third of the profit goes to the Department. A third goes to the university and a third goes to the inventor. As far as I know that that's the policy that Mit us. And I think a lot of universities. Follow something close to that. We're talking about the profitability of some of these discoveries and you turn to the private sector for the funding of some of these companies. Polaris is a venture capital company in Boston. That has invested over two hundred million dollars in your company's roughly twenty companies How did that relationship start? There was a company we that was starting with A woman named Sherry Oberg and she was Wanted to have a company that would create a new imaging agents and we'd published a paper actually and science that lend itself to doing that. She was a dartmouth graduate on the business school. She knew a guy named Terry McGuire and she introduced me to him and was probably early nineties and she also asked if he was interested in investing in a company which he did. So we've had a great relationship in like you said they've probably done close to twenty companies That we've been involved in. What our imaging agents you said that she developed so in this case. Let's say you were doing an ultrasound And for certain things you can use ultrasound and get a pretty good picture but for example if you wanted to see whether you had a heart defector certain other kinds of vascular abnormality and you try to use ultrasound. Contrast isn't good enough so if you could create an ultrasound contrast station that was good enough. Then you could see things by ultrasound imaging that you wouldn't really be able to see otherwise and you could certainly see it with much much greater detail. So for instance. If you're pregnant and you go to get an ultrasound. Are Some of these. Imaging agents used in seeing the baby and the Placenta. So in the case of of looking at a baby. You don't need to do that because I think the contrast good enough. But if you wanted to look at if you want it to look at something much smaller. Let's say you want to look at at at I'll make this up the babies Toe or something like that and you wanted to zoom in on. It might be very hard to see with the regular picture. The contrast agent might be useful for doing that by the way. I think there are still hardly any ultrasound. Agents approved The ultrasound contrast agents approved. I expect there will be by this or others..

Mit Boston cancer Bob People Judah Folkman Exxon graduate student Dr Robert Langer Dr Folkman Jessica Harris Brain cancer Delaware assistant professor Dr Faulk
"langer" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"langer" Discussed on From Scratch

"Discoveries for commercial ends because it leads to potential conflicts of interest. What was that landscape like for you i think m._i._t. You know along with stanford is probably one of the is the top to technology transfer places and in the world and i think their goal is really the same as mine is not actually to make money. It's not too. It's really how can we you. You know maximize. The chances of products being developed m._i._t. Which was founded in eighteen sixty one <hes> one of its mission was to provide and support industrialization relation of america so m._i._t. Had more of a commercial slant to it then perhaps other academic institutions. I think that's right. I think m._i._t. Wants to see products created. They want to see things. Get out to the public. Incidently once say at a technology or an innovation is discovered and is profitable bowl. It's split in three ways. Third of the profit goes to the department. A third goes to the university and a third goes to the inventor. As far as i know that that's the policy that m._i._t. Us and i think a lot of universities follow something close to that. We're talking about the profitability of some of these discoveries and you you turn to the private sector for the funding of some of these companies. Polaris is a venture capital company in boston. That has invested over two hundred million dollars in your company is roughly twenty companies. <hes> how did that relationship start. There was a company we that was starting with <hes> a woman named sherry berg and she was <hes> wanted to have a company that would create the new imaging agents and we'd published a paper actually and science that lend itself after doing that. She was a dartmouth graduate on the business school. She knew a guy named terry mcguire and she introduced me to him and was probably early nineties and she also asked if he was interested in investing in a company which he did so. We've had a great relationship in like. You said they've probably done close to twenty companies <hes> <hes> that we've been involved in what our imaging agents. You said that she developed so in this case. Let's say you were doing an ultrasound. <hes> and for certain things you can use assaulter sound and you know get a pretty good picture but for example if you wanted to see whether you had a heart defector certain other kinds of vascular abnormality and you try to use ultrasound for sound the contrast isn't good enough so if you could create an ultrasound contrast station that was good enough then you could see things by ultrasound imaging that you wouldn't really be able to see otherwise or a and you could certainly see it with much much greater detail so for instance if you're pregnant and you go to get an ultrasound are some of these imaging agents used in seeing seeing the baby in the placenta so in the case of of looking at a baby. You don't need to do that because i think the contrast good enough but if you wanted to look at if you want it to look at something much smaller let's say you want to look at at at i'll make this up the babies <hes> toe or something like that and you wanted to zoom in on it might be very hard to see with the regular picture. The contrast agent might be useful for doing that by the way i think there are still hardly any ultrasound agents agency approved. The ultrasound contrast agents approved. I expect there will be by this or others but it's a long road to getting approval for for anything you mentioned that <hes> these have not been approved yet and a firm like polaris has been very patient. It's patient capital <hes> understanding that they might not see proceeds for decades. That's right. I mean <hes> though they've done very well. As far as i know from what i guess people in business called an i r standpoint i mean i think people in the investment business understand that when you're doing medical work you don't do it on on on sales at the time you do it on the promise of the company and that's turned out to work. I mean an early company that i was an adviser adviser do for many many years was was genetech in that came out and stock market and did fantastic and they had no products a lot of promise but ultimately they did get products and those products were were blockbusters..

terry mcguire sherry berg Polaris stanford america boston two hundred million dollars
"langer" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"langer" Discussed on From Scratch

"He thought very highly a doctor folkman won't say what he thought about me but i wrote to dr folkman and he was kind enough to offer me a job and it was your research with dr faulk men that had had a seminal impact on what you're doing today to some degree. What was it specifically that you were working on. So dr folkman had a theory that if you could stop blood vessels from growing in the body that that might be a new way to stop cancer someday a new way to treat cancer someday but it was a theory and actually a lot of people people didn't agree with that theory and and what he asked me to do is to see if i could isolate what would become the first <hes> inhibitor of of angiogenesis the first inhibitor of blood vessel growth so that was how that's how i got started. If you could stop the growth of blood vessels you could stop the growth of tumors developing further. Is that correct yeah. As the thinking was is that <hes> an is that tumors without blood vessels will not go beyond a very tiny the size of about one millimeter cube but if the tumors permeated by blood vessels then that solves the nutrition problem from them for them and they can get much bigger and then of course they can also metastasized or spread through those same blood vessels and set up shop in other parts of the body. You used an eye of a rabbit to help with your research. What a special about the eye of a rabbit yeah well. It's it's big <hes> so it's easy to visualize so what we thought about was if we could have a plastic a slow release polymer that could take anything that was in <hes> cartilage. That's what we were studying and a not cause harm to the eye and be deliver liver those molecules for a couple of months or more that that might be a way to study how blood vessels would grow or not grow you mentioned polymers. These are plastics essentially the polymers ulmer's. We use would be plastics. Polymers could also be rubber and so forth palmer's basically along chain substance. We're talking about manufactured tissues polymers. What was the landscape of biomaterials when you were pioneering. This field in the nineteen seventies yeah well. It's interesting most biomaterials <hes> that <hes> people used in the body who are largely driven by medical doctors clinicians and what they do is they would often go to their house and find an object it would kind of resemble the organ or tissue they wanted to fix so just to give a few examples it the material and the artificial heart that was ladies girdle material because it had a good you know good buoyancy your flex life and the material and a breast implant <hes> that was actually one of them was actually a mattress stuffing because it was the right squishy nece <hes> the the material in a what's called the vascular graft and artificial blood vessel that was a surgeon going to a close store and finding something they could so well with and so almost all of the biomaterials <music> materials in the seventies had origins like that they were sort of what i'd call off the shelf materials and that may solve some problems but it also created problems because they weren't optimally designed for the body example. If you take the artificial heart the ladies girdle material you put it in the body and sometimes the blood hits the surface of that and it forms a clot and that clock go to the patient's brain and they'd get a stroke in they die and obviously there's been problems with different breast implant materials and other things as well. I'm jessica harris. You're listening to from scratch. My guest is the chemical engineer dr robert langer who is the chief researcher and founder of the langar labs at m._i._t. He is considered a pioneer in the field of tissue engineering and drug delivery in the nineteen eighties. You founded the languor lab at m._i._t. What what was the purpose for this lab. My goals were to do things that i thought might someday help. Improve people's lives by doing things at the interface of chemical engineering and medicine. How was it received when you went to the administration at m._i._t..

dr folkman cancer dr faulk dr robert langer jessica harris palmer researcher founder
Steve Stricker And Bernard Langer discussed on Purity Products

Purity Products

00:14 sec | 2 years ago

Steve Stricker And Bernard Langer discussed on Purity Products

"In the champion's tour today Steve Stricker birdied the final hole for a two under seventy and he held on to the lead after three rounds at the regions tradition with Bernard Langer among three players who are two

Steve Stricker Bernard Langer
U.S. man charged in 'enemy of the people' threats to Boston Globe

WBZ Morning News

00:43 sec | 3 years ago

U.S. man charged in 'enemy of the people' threats to Boston Globe

"A California man. Is accused of making threats against the Boston Globe after the. Paper spearheaded a free press project a coordinated editorial response to political attacks on the media Robert chain of Encino California was charged, with calling the, paper switchboard, threatening to kill. Its employees referring to, the globe, as the enemy of the people Alex Kingsbury deputy ideas editor for, the globe says the paper responded with business as usual The call. Came in on a normal normal day. At the office and the people. In the auditory aboard knew about these threats and word is. About them took appropriate precautions and, went through with our, workers we would do any day of the week if convicted chain could spend up to. Five years

President Trump Tesla Truman Boston Globe Gary Langer Andrew Mccutchen Robert Chain Chairman Elon Musk Boston ABC Blackrock CEO White Sox Adam Kaufman Stephanie Ramos DOW Washington Post
"langer" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"langer" Discussed on From Scratch

"Breast implant materials and other things as well i'm jessica harris you're listening to from scratch my guest is the chemical engineer dr robert langer who's the chief researcher and founder of the langar labs at mit he's considered a pioneer in the fields of tissue engineering and drug delivery in the nineteen eighties you founded the languor lab at mit what was the purpose for this lab my goals were do things that i thought might someday help improve people's lives by doing things at the interface of chemical engineering and medicine how was it received when you went to the administration at mit and said you know i'd like to form this lab just to facilitate this research that i'm doing well certainly my early years doing the research you know number of my senior colleagues and think it was very important or didn't think it was very good and they suggested that i probably should start looking for new jobs why was it because your field was so nascent there were a lot of i was that i think that that people people's idea of what's important probably has a lot to do with what they're doing themselves and you know an and they had different areas in this department but disdain fit into any of those and i think the thinking was a didn't fit into something that that pre existed i probably wouldn't get promoted i probably wouldn't get tenure since your research wasn't well received at mit.

dr robert langer researcher founder jessica harris
"langer" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"langer" Discussed on From Scratch

"I'm jessica harris this is from scratch my guest is dr robert langer founder of the langar labs at mit one of the world's largest biomedical engineering labs with ten million dollars in annual grants and a hundred researchers he's pioneered the fields of tissue engineering and drug delivery which has led to the development of over thirty companies he is a father of three children and magician welcome thank you very much your influence on the bio materials field is vast and i'd like to start with the early days of your professional life because in a way it helped to inform what you are doing today after graduating from cornell you were a graduate student at mit and this was during the nineteen seventies during the energy crisis how did the energy crisis indirectly lead you to the field of scientific discovery sure the sketch shortage you know all over the entry the gas orders in boston was really bad so they're all kinds of jobs in the petrochemical industry for chemical engineers they are hiring like crazy pretty much my colleagues my friends that's what they did they got jobs in the industry and so i thought that's what i should do too so i went to a lot of interviews and i actually got about twenty job offers from different oil companies actually four from exxon alone but i member one of them in particular one of the engineers said to me if you could just increase the yield of this one chemical by like point one percent he said that'd be wonderful be worth billions of dollars and i remember flying home to boston that night thinking to myself i just don't want to do that just seemed to me you know that i could do things that i could do with my life that i thought maybe could help people and would be more important at least to me so so i started looking for other other ideas about what i could do now you send.

jessica harris cornell graduate student boston exxon dr robert langer founder ten million dollars one percent
"langer" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"langer" Discussed on From Scratch

"I'm jessica harris this is from scratch my guest as dr robert langer founder of the langer labs at mit one of the world's largest by medical engineering labs with ten million dollars in annual grants and a hundred researchers dr langer has helped to launch close to thirty companies and he holds over eight hundred issued or pending patents two hundred fifty companies have license or sublicence his labs discoveries were talking about the profitability of some of these discoveries and you turn to the private sector for the funding of some of these companies polaris is a venture capital company and boston that has invested over two hundred million dollars in your company's roughly twenty companies how did that relationship start doors company we do starting with a woman named sherry oeberg and she was uh wanted to have a company that would create two new imaging agents in we'd published a paper actually and science that landed itself to doing that she was a darmouth graduate on the business school she knew a guy named terry maguire and she introduced me to him in was probably early 90s and and she also asked if he was interested in investing in the company which he did so we've had a great relationship by men link you said they've probably done costa twenty companies that we've been involved him what what are imaging agents he said that i'll give out yeah so in this case let's say you were doing ultrasound uh and for certain things you can use ultrasound and you know get a pretty good picture but for example if he wanted to see whether you at a heart defactor certain other kinds of vascular abnormality and you tried to use ultrasound contrast isn't good enough so if you could create an ultrasound contrast agent that was good enough then you could see things.

jessica harris founder langer labs boston sherry oeberg terry maguire dr robert langer dr langer polaris two hundred million dollars ten million dollars
"langer" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"langer" Discussed on From Scratch

"The the i'm jessica harris this is from scratch my guest as dr robert langer founder of the langer lasse at mit one of the world's largest biomedical engineering labs with ten million dollars in annual grants and a hundred researchers he's pioneered the fields of tissue engineering and drug delivery which has led to the development of over thirty companies he is a father of three children and a magician welcome you very much your influence on the biomaterials field is vast and i'd like to start with the early days of your professional life because in a way it helped to inform what you are doing today after graduating from cornell you were a graduate student at mit and this was during the 1970s during the energy crisis how did the energy crisis indirectly lead you to the field of scientific discovery sure lewis's scottish shortage in all over the country there's shortage and boston was really bad so door all kinds of jobs in the petrochemical oil industry for a chemical engineer as they are hiring like crazy pretty much show my colleagues my friends that's what they did they got jobs in the oil industry and so i thought that's what i should do to so i went to a lot of interviews and i actually i got about twenty job offers from different oil companies actually four from exxon alone but i remember one of them in particular one of the engineer said to me in of you could just increase the yield of this one chemical by like point one percent he said that would be wonderful be worth billions of dollars i remember flying home to boston at night thinking.

jessica harris founder cornell graduate student exxon dr robert langer lewis boston ten million dollars one percent
"langer" Discussed on Overthinking It Podcast

Overthinking It Podcast

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"langer" Discussed on Overthinking It Podcast

"Langer out fact that were even getting this level of conversation shows how much the political aspect of the neutrals these really a weak point compared to the original trilogy and dare i say even the prequels night kid i say i just cannot go back to it although toolbox opd cope who grew it's great to see or i just i just have a question why is it why does it matter if we tax trade routes another general logs is screaming fired surfers is at stake forever the losers at auxerre fire a tip hitting receiving any will whom you're boss had been forwarding at along with people that work or to get that being eur yup in there it's all good but they killed snow without explaining in any of the movies what he was trying to do other than just a bad goal rate look what the the two rubel galaxy you know speech said it i don't remember boy it's a shame because they i really like what they kind of did with them because in the enforce awaken snow was very much just like pal patine part to to to the extent that people i i know a lot of people speculated that he was actually palpa teen somehow like resurrected from the dead uh and so at one thing that this movie did and then threw away immediately killing them off was by actually giving him like a slightly different character than the emperor because uh he was like hedonist he has like this gold robe in this fancy red room that there's like a complete contrast from the emperor's like stark industrial throne room his space he's space christian gray.

Langer auxerre
"langer" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

04:17 min | 3 years ago

"langer" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"Langer with your holiday that pursuant darnell oh no oh man gene me live leaving ended one one deatrich wise the fact that day not being heard nothing and not i'm eating this often war bill condon yes one he behind the scenes great britain if you don't know the radio redgrave one only art the didn't play whom we emme yes one kourtney kardashian jimmy way william word thirty we will award in the fifth game when he then he gave me nominated nominated with a little bit in often emme the new key we knew who would never gear you know gained national written premium platinum without him the media will give me a winner eighty five now being at all luke maye germany proved me i don't all ninety four or give me we need him on that they will but we played them in you're your meeting meeting here she yes the week you weird we've been working the game the free are you know hey you're the hagan nominated oh wow we will not be the new the new committed we know pretty neither nor yet off you will oh we are so let me give me one are you the teasing you are a woman way you won't want any he we need regan oh gene yes and take your time we want all the details the two were they late the with me karimov felony he and i wanted the cognitive merck block amid all of you wall ongoing effort in the creation of the early in the of prediction to your they don't want me to me.

Langer bill condon britain luke maye germany hagan regan karimov
"langer" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

04:17 min | 3 years ago

"langer" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Langer with your holiday that pursuant darnell oh no oh man gene me live leaving ended one one deatrich wise the fact that day not being heard nothing and not i'm eating this often war bill condon yes one he behind the scenes great britain if you don't know the radio redgrave one only art the didn't play whom we emme yes one kourtney kardashian jimmy way william word thirty we will award in the fifth game when he then he gave me nominated nominated with a little bit in often emme the new key we knew who would never gear you know gained national written premium platinum without him the media will give me a winner eighty five now being at all luke maye germany proved me i don't all ninety four or give me we need him on that they will but we played them in you're your meeting meeting here she yes the week you weird we've been working the game the free are you know hey you're the hagan nominated oh wow we will not be the new the new committed we know pretty neither nor yet off you will oh we are so let me give me one are you the teasing you are a woman way you won't want any he we need regan oh gene yes and take your time we want all the details the two were they late the with me karimov felony he and i wanted the cognitive merck block amid all of you wall ongoing effort in the creation of the early in the of prediction to your they don't want me to me.

Langer bill condon britain luke maye germany hagan regan karimov
"langer" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"langer" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Psychology in psychiatry was so focused on pathology the ear also focusing on taking charge yeah now i make only going on there are what you want it to be in a positive sense yet know that the work um yes and now i understand you're asking me yeah yeah when i started doing research the field was consume with problems right and right from the start my research was about wellbeing an interesting that um it was too soft a word to talk about happiness so i talked about wellbeing so and they mindlessness that when the feel starts talking about happiness they didn't realize that i had been doing a twenty years earlier that's okay but that from the start with the with elderly people and we giving them choice to make them independent and that was eventually going to be understood as as mindfulness on that uh they live longer they were happier they were healthier and so on on i think that things are progressing in this way that surely now we have them all field of positive psychology yeah and i think that um my my last book the um uh counterclockwise book the subtitled the psychology or the power of possibility is still a little different and something that may hopefully um uh shape some part of the future where when stead of describing what is even if we are describing it in a more positive way that we create what we wanted to be and so you know and i have this book that uh i wanna remind me to tell you about the langer mindfulness institute and its on that website that this book will be at it's a book of one liners that are paired with paintings of um of mine and um.

langer mindfulness institute twenty years
"langer" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"langer" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Langer talk about the la usd your big lawsuit and l a u esteem for the cost one hundred fifty million dollars because these low performing schools the parents of these low performing schools and the aclu sued ellie usd because they were fixing the bad schools and they one hundred fifty million dollars and i didn't see the story anywhere but will cover it i know we're covering it and i know that abc covered it as well but i didn't see it anywhere else now this oh rages where a single councillor may serve as many as 9 hundred troubled students how the hell do you do that i mean in and let's say you work you know students are our teachers are working what an eight hour day maybe ten our data tennis closer y'all k r let's say a you're working at 10 hour day that means that means each student gets you gotta do ninety students in an hour if you talk to every student every day you got do 90 of them in an hour so he gets you get out of a twenty seconds per student and their troubled students these are just regular kids who need help from the guidance counselor that is outrageous i mean why would you put your if you can afford it why would you put your kid in in that atmosphere you know you're setting that kid up for failure and nine hundred that's the population of many highschool period yet now you're exactly right yeah you're right so let's ninety kids per hour if you'd vote divide that by sixty it's it's um led one point three in its lesson

aclu ellie usd abc langer one hundred fifty million doll twenty seconds eight hour 10 hour
"langer" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

01:52 min | 4 years ago

"langer" Discussed on What It Takes

"So so there i was i was getting my grants turned down people didn't believe in my research it appeared like a wasn't even gonna get to be an associate professor but fortunately a what happened over the next few years is different to people in that in academics in and pharmaceutical company started using a lot of our principles and things slowly began to turn around that was decades ago langer's place in the annals medicine in biotech history are secure not just for these polymer drug delivery systems we've been talking about but also for more recent advances that he and his researchers have made in nanotechnology and tissue regeneration things that are still in development or in clinical trials but they're already bringing about some of the next revolutions in medicine when robert langer sat down for interviews with the academy of achievement in two thousand twelve and two thousand sixteen he shared his excitement for the research but he also talked more generally about his life as an engineer and his thoughts about his career including all the knows no your idea doesn't make sense no it's not done that way no you can't have that job no you can't have that money for research wanted the impact of knows a couple things i mean for me early janos was scourging ominous very discouraging for me to hear that i didn't realize the scientists were like down of people were like that i would think that i would have thought now i hope that i you know encourage people rather than discourage people i mean i think you can say no and still say a boy that might be a tough problem but you know if you really work out you know maybe you'll solve it rather the know it'll never happened uh but no can be very discouraging but i think if you really believe.

associate professor delivery systems robert langer engineer janos pharmaceutical company