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19 Burst results for "Lamm"

"lamm" Discussed on WWL

WWL

02:21 min | 3 weeks ago

"lamm" Discussed on WWL

"From Robert Lamm of Chicago everything is gonna work out fine it's a positive song about the pandemic it's a positive song about the protests and everything that we're going through it's a it's a it's a good song we're gonna talk to Robert Lamm at about three fifteen on the show Friday afternoon I'm screwed enjoy this as we go to break and we'll be back on if you will see the to this now another traffic update on the Big Eight seventy W. W. well and W. W. L. on FM and one oh five three some of them to be able to be medical traffic center Josh what else on the west bank a traveling westbound at the expressway from the connection through right now Harvey no problems there after some earlier protest action had the JPSO close those roads everything is back to normal from the west bank at the downtown slow off the top of the connection to get up to the Superdome work clears up and then out to mentoring Kenner westbound I. ten moving well all the way out to the body carry spillway bridge and no problems they're headed to the lost out towards the east no slowdowns on I. ten over the high rise and that stays clear traveling to Slidell because we bridge northbound find south found little bit of roadwork in the right lane at the beginning of the bridge mile marker twenty three traffic brought to you by DuckDuckGo privacy probably did call W. B. L. five oh four to six info meet Chuck now meet trucks personal information hello made up of things like account log ins bank info and check social security number whenever chop shops banks and browses online his info travels all over the world bowls you ni how brief yet exposing it to cyber threats well that's no good so how is chock able.

Robert Lamm Chicago W. W. L. Josh Slidell Chuck Harvey Kenner W. B.
Dallas Cowboys Select Oklahoma Wide Receiver CeeDee Lamb 17th Overall In The 2020 NFL Draft

The Dave Ramsey Show

00:27 sec | 2 months ago

Dallas Cowboys Select Oklahoma Wide Receiver CeeDee Lamb 17th Overall In The 2020 NFL Draft

"The cowboys going offense with their first pick of the NFL draft tonight just moments ago Dallas selected Oklahoma wide receiver CeeDee lamb with the seventeenth pick in the first round even before the draft ESPN analyst Mel Kiper said Amari Cooper Michael Gallup and Lamm would instantly become one of the NFL's top wide receiver trios many draft watchers did not expect the land to still be available by the time the cowboys made their

Cowboys NFL Dallas Mel Kiper Michael Gallup Lamm Oklahoma Ceedee Espn Analyst Amari Cooper
"lamm" Discussed on UX Podcast

UX Podcast

12:49 min | 3 months ago

"lamm" Discussed on UX Podcast

"It's a different way to access a problem all system. So did you ever get that experience where someone says? Hey but hey. I thought you were supposed to teach me to draw but now you're exposing how bad I am at planning. I usually I usually try not to expose anybody and point the finger and say look now you see how bad you are at Xyz that but some people sometimes find it surprising how helpful it is and that they think. Oh Yeah it's most they get attracted through the through the visuals and they're like yeah. Oh Wow now I see this problem in a different light and I couldn't see it like that before. That's really great when people discover that were podcast of course so this is an audio a medium but yes. I'd love for us to try and get you to teach us some some. Give some good tips on how we can draw sketch some some better through the medium of of sound okay. Well one important thing to not forget whatever you do but especially when you sketch is key breathing a lot of people especially when they find sketching very hard they hold their breath and they get really stiff and really nervous so take it easy. I'm also I have just in terms of the former clarity. You know some things that you can do for your sketches if in doubt slowdown Make your mark slower because we often refer to get to sketching as a very fast technique but sketching is not fast because we move our hand incredibly incredibly foster cross the paper sketching fast because we are economical with our strokes we draw we simplify things. I when we sketch icons we simplify the icons two basic shapes so that we don't need to make that many stroke so we are faster and then also when we get more More experienced we try to simplify systems and concepts to just the core of what we need to explain. And therefore we don't have to draw that many elements because we are reducing the complexity or the level of complexity that we show in something that we want to explain by reducing it to the core ideas So you can always benefit from slowing your hands down. Because then you'll strokes will get clearer. Your handwriting will get clear. You don't have to write and draw things again. Usually our ideas our overtake the speed of our hand and then things get messy. Also one thing. Why sketches get messy and unreadable is The the biggest enemy of good form is pressure. Usually time pressure. You can also when you when you speak for example and you don't have much time you start speaking really quickly and then it becomes difficult to understand what you're saying all or when the stakes are high. When you're standing on a stage other people are watching an ours. Come in and just pressure is the natural enemy of good form in any discipline. So what you need to do. Is you practice the form and practically strokes and the clear shapes that you're drawing so when you are under pressure either by your own ideas streaming in by having important stakeholders in a meeting by being under time pressure that you have the good form in your hand because you practiced it so much that you can deal with the stress without impacting. Your good form like you do with public speaking like you do with athletics or Don's performances or whatever so that is one tip it's practice. Wow that was like a ted talk. I definitely have to rent a brief. I recognize the breathing thing. I do remember sometimes especially if you're doing a long straight line for example a new kind of you realize halfway through now. I haven't I haven't taken a stall of this line but I really wanted to be straight. Well one thing one tip for straight lines if you if you have one key lines one tip is especially when you work on a just on a piece of paper. Usually we have more control over our hand movement when we actually pull towards our sense of gravity so when we start away from US and pull towards our belly button so if you need to make a very long straight line Then it's better to draw towards yourself then pushing away or drawing sideways. That can be a tip when you draw on a piece of paper because you can always rotate the piece of paper so that the stroke will point towards you. Perfect practical tip. Yeah thank you so much. This has been so enlightening and so wonderful. Thanks for joining us. It's.

US Don athletics ted
"lamm" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

09:20 min | 7 months ago

"lamm" Discussed on KTOK

"Is Robert Lamm and I'm Joe McCormick and today we've got a very special episode three all out there we are doing a partnership with National Geographic yeah so they've got a new show coming out called one strange rock and it is produced by Darren Aronofsky it's all about the science of planet earth in the sort of intricate interconnected processes both geological and biological the keep the earth stable as a sanctuary for life as we know it and so because of our partnership with National Geographic for this episode we got an opportunity to talk to one of the astronauts on the show doctor Jeff Hoffman who flew five space shuttle missions including a Hubble Space Telescope repair mission this is a great interview we're just delighted to share it with everybody yeah doctor Hoffman is very knowledgeable from multiple vantage points about the thing that we're gonna be focusing on today which is the radiation risk from space and how earth protects us and he's knowledgeable in a couple of different domains because he's done high energy astrophysics and now knows all about the radiation environment of our solar system in the universe at large but he also has a direct experience of what it's like to be an astronaut in space to sort of go beyond our protective barriers and that kind of perspective is kind of hard to come by because I would say one thing it's really easy to lose sight of in your day to day life when you're reading about politics or playing with your dog or making some dinner is that your body is made of molecules and in order for molecules in your body to do what they do they have to remain what they are in most of the time the internal chemistry of our bodies is pretty stable right but we have to recognize that the chemical stability of our bodies is an enormous and unique privilege provided to us by virtue of the fact that we live on planet earth yeah and this we get into a truth that we touch on a quite a bit on the show and that is that earth is just the right planet yeah for life as we know it kind of and surprising of course being creatures that involved on planet earth that planet earth is just the right plan it for us but despite realizing the kind of anthropic obviousness of that fact it is still a kind of strange and comforting feeling what wait a minute is a comforting or is it discomforting the fact that most of the universe is going to be so hostile to us so unbelievably hostile so incredibly violent that it's just impossible to even consider and I'm not even talking about the vaporizing heat of stars of the Cold airless void of deep space I'm talking about the fact that the universe is an acid bath of killer radiation including ionizing radiation which often takes the form of these high energy charged particles the blast through animal bodies damaging in changing the molecules within them as they go along and even changing the DNA of ourselves altering the blueprints for cell replication and bringing about tissue damage sterility in cancer and so that body integrity in chemical stability we so take for granted to keep living is only possible because of the planet we inhabit which shields us from being blasted by the sun nearby and by the galaxy at large yeah it's it's interesting to think about this that we we are creatures of the shallows yeah so life as we know it essentially thrives in a tide pool protected from the full onslaught of winded way from you know if you've ever been to a to to a number of beach environments you seen those areas right where we were that the waves are crashing but there have been but there's this pool this this area of calm water that is protected from all of that yeah and that's where a lot of life can thrive that otherwise would not be a be able to bear the hostilities beyond the rocks exactly and it actually reminds me of this a quote by John Steinbeck and and he's not directly talking about we're talking about here but the the comparison is is just beautiful he he wrote the knowledge that all things are one thing and one thing is all things plankton a shimmering phosphorescence on the sea and the spinning planets and an expanding universe all bound together by the elastic string of time it is advisable to look from the tide pool to the stars and then back to the tide pool again yeah earth is protected not from wind in ways but from the full blast of solar in cosmic radiation instead of rocky sea walls were protected by a robust atmosphere and most importantly the magnetic sphere yeah the interesting other side to the fact of the we've got this kind of connected consciousness that we're aware of like there is no real division between the earth and the heavens they're just different places the only real division this distance and so all the universe really is connected and does have a common origin in the Big Bang but at the same time that connectedness we use the word connected in such a happy way it's like nice to be connected to things but you could also think about that is extreme vulnerability like you are right next door to everything in the universe that would cross shin annihilate you and what we've got standing in the way of those those crushing annihilating forces beyond our power to control is essentially a big magnetic field and a thin layer of gas around the rocky surface of the planet that's right so basically we have going on here is your earth solid inner core in liquid outer core they play a crucial role in protecting life as we know it from the least deadly radiation differences in temperature and composition in the two core regions drive a powerful Dynamo in needing earth project protective electromagnetic field yeah and remember this is the one of the the the key factors we have to consider in proposed interplanetary space travel and establishing stations on other worlds the only planets in our solar system with some form of magnetic sphere in place or mercury earth Jupiter Saturn Uranus and Neptune right so then of course you've also on the surface of the earth got the atmosphere to count on because that means that there's more stuff the radiation has to get through to get to you and so the atmosphere will block some kinds of incoming radiation but the other big protector is the magnetosphere that keeps these particles directed away from the earth some of course still get through right and also the man is fear serves to protect the atmosphere as well yes because if you don't have a magnet as fear your atmosphere over time can be stripped away which is one of the things that they can probably happen to Mars long ago right so it's a protective barrier against the elements are battlements and the only humans who have walked to these battlements our astronauts such as doctor Jeff Hoffman now most astronauts never even go beyond that the shield that protects us right we know that astronauts in space are exposed to extra locals of radiation and that's one reason you want to limit your time in space you like you can go live in the I SS for ever they want to bring you back eventually because the more time you spend up there the more you're exposed to this dangerous radiation that could harm you in the long run but even up in the I SS you're still you're still benefiting from a large part of the earth's protective shield right yes it gets a lot worse if you want to go to the moon right on Mars or colonize another planet yeah because then you are going beyond or as protection so I guess we want to go now to our conversation with doctor Jeff Hoffman to talk about the radiation risks posed by the universe and what astronauts have done and can do to protect themselves but first I guess we should give you just a little bit of background on doctor Hoffman yeah so his original research interest were in high energy astrophysics specifically cosmic gamma radiation and X. ray astronomy in his doctoral work at Harvard entail balloon borne low energy gamma ray telescopes and design and and the testing of this technology from nineteen seventy two to nineteen seventy five during post doctoral work at Leicester university who worked on several X. ray astronomy rocket payloads any works in the center for space research at the Massachusetts institute of technology from nineteen seventy five to nineteen seventy eight as project scientist in charge of the orbiting H. E. A. O. one eighty four hard X. ray and gamma ray experiment which launched in August nineteen seventy seven but in in seventy eight he was selected to become an astronaut and he went on a total of five different shuttle flights so in eighty five he went up on on it and discovery nineteen ninety on Columbia ninety two on Atlantis ninety three on endeavor and then in nineteen ninety six on Columbia all told one thousand two hundred eleven hours in space twenty one point five million miles that's a lot of miles yeah frequent flyer yeah so he he he is a not only pedigreed scientist a pedigreed astronaut five shuttle flights that's impressive that's five more the vast majority of human beings all right we're gonna take a quick break and when we come back we will be heading straight into our interview with Dr Jeff Hoffman right now when you come in and switch to T. mobile you get the amazing iPhone eleven pro on us iPhone tennis traded aren't these mountains majestic joke are you even looking I'm posting these amazing pics I took with my iPhone Levin pro it has three cameras whoa those picks are amazing and you have service to T. mobile their new single goes farther than ever before then you can look.

Robert Lamm Joe McCormick one thousand two hundred eleve
"lamm" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"lamm" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Stuff to blow your mind? My name is Robert. Lamm in my name is Christian Sager today. We are going to be talking about a drug. We're GONNA be talking about M._d.. May also known as Ecstasy. Let's see but specifically we're going to be getting into kind of in this episode what the breakdown of it as how it works in chemistry how it works in biology what its effects are human body then we're GonNa do a second episode. That's is going to be mainly about experiments have been conducted for what thirty years now maybe longer on how you can use to hear all kinds of things or at least alleviate things from cancer to using it in psychotherapy and using it to help people with P._T._S._d.. You can think of it as a one to approach to looking at a particular drug and view guys and gals like this we can take the same approach with other substances in the future yeah definitely it seems like once we did the research for it seems like this is rife. This avenue is right for for more research and episodes along these lines. I'd love to do another kind of episode. That's based on the pharmacology of a designer drug or commercial kind of street drug. DOC science-based open minded exploration of what the substance is what its properties are and then how can those properties conceivably be used to our advantage and a non-recreational way now before we get started. I want to remind you all where you can find S.. In all the other things that we do a lot of people that we encounter actually think that the podcast is the only thing that stuff to blow your mind is but we actually have blog posts and articles that we write every week <hes> that are available on stuff to.

Robert Lamm Christian Sager thirty years
"lamm" Discussed on Inappropriate Earl

Inappropriate Earl

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"lamm" Discussed on Inappropriate Earl

"Raker attacked by the dogs, which was no, no, I could see you as the main doctor lowest child's, I believe she was in American actress, you know, they usually like to go for the international flair exotic enough in the beyond with you. I know you're from Decatur Alabama. I'm not sure if in the past present or future, JAMES BOND would have any reason to visit the state of Alabama situation like Lamm Nason movie. And I am overseas. My down there can overseas. I mean anything's possible. Alba is the new JAMES BOND. I mean, if you were to tell me that someday in the future, there would be a black JAMES BOND. It'd be like a you're crazy, but now because times of change and certainly actors of color are getting more prominent roles plaque James Bond's completely possible. Jay, I wanted to be the next Pretty Woman. Well, yeah. But I could see that. I mean, you know, the hillbilly. You know, country bumpkin from Alabama who you know, I could see that. I JAMES BOND. I would have trouble casting UN. But I would cast you in. Out in the universe. Like, I could see you in a superhero movie where you're like the the damsel in distress the bad guy. There aren't many bad. Female bad guys that makes any sense, which I always love like it goes back to I like different cat woman ninety but it's not like I like different. I like female bad guy. You know, I like a JAMES BOND would I think would be interesting. I mean, I don't know if he would order MARTINI. Shaken not stored probably just. Yeah. Gimme a Colt forty five in a can how. But I like like you talk about we were watching Anthony jazz. Special in you, write very similar style jokes bait and switch like I like. Robocop is a great. Kind of goes back to casting where the two main bag guys Ronny Cox and Kirkwood Smith had never played bad guys before and they both lobby lettuce read from these parts. And I think the directors and casting people you guys are like fathers from the seventy like movies and sixties where your guys and farmers. No one's gonna believe you guys. And if you look at the two main bag is from RoboCop, they are I con ick like killed it because it was so different. And I think they both even as veterans, you know, Kurt what SMID later became the dad and that seventies. So you wouldn't picture the dad from that? Seventies has a great villain. But oh, he was amazing in RoboCop and even the bad guy, Alan Rickman, and the diehard was it classically trained actor. Yes. He was Hans van Gruber. He was never a bad guy that even like we recently watched the Ted Bundy movie, which is a great example, Zac Efron who was Disney actor who's now playing a serial killer one of the most famous serial killers of all time. But it does like there's a line. And and it's true because they really said it in the Ted Bundy case, they were like, you know, serial killers aren't monsters that come out and the night, time and half Fengs and scary beards. They can be regular people. You know? And I think that that's with casting. I think. For an actor. It all comes from. What's inside of you, like what comes out of your mouth, and how your brain can portray the character versus what you look like sometimes because I think you can alter how people see.

JAMES BOND Alabama Seventies Ted Bundy Decatur Lamm Nason Hans van Gruber Ronny Cox Alan Rickman Jay Kurt Anthony jazz Alba Zac Efron Kirkwood Smith Disney
"lamm" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"lamm" Discussed on WTVN

"Station. I'm Daria Aldinger large-scale detention changes to asylum rocks as rifles just days before the midterm election. President Trump announces his immigration stance. As a migrant caravan makes its way through Mexico's Trump now warning members of the Central American immigrant caravan. They will risk their lives if they make it to the border and throw rocks that American soldiers. They wanna throw rocks at our military. Our military fights back. We're going to consider it. I tell them considered a rifle president also saying he will no longer catch and release asylum seekers and will house them in massive ten cities. Andy Field ABC news, Washington. The president rallied voters Missouri where Republican Josh Holly is challenging democratic incumbent Senator Claire mccaskill how for the first time in decades, we are where it's at with a hot country. Can you believe former vice president Joe Biden hit the campaign trail in North Dakota? The only thing strong enough to tear America, part is America's self. And we've seen this storm. You have to make you stop democratic incumbent Senator Heidi Heitkamp is locked in a tight race in that state with Republican challenger, Kevin Kramer, a federal judge has denied a request who opened his second polling site. In a western Kansas county, saying it isn't in the public's interest. Dodge city is offered one polling place for twenty years. And while the judge notes, a second location might ease lines it also he says might cause more motor concern and confusion, Tennessee is used its electric chair for the first time since two thousand seven executing sixty three year old Edmonds a Gorski for the killings of two men in the nineteen eighties. Local TV reporter Jason Lamm witnessed the execution warden app. Said, quote,.

President Trump president Senator Heidi Heitkamp vice president Senator Claire mccaskill Daria Aldinger America Joe Biden Jason Lamm Kevin Kramer Dodge city ABC Edmonds Mexico Andy Field Josh Holly North Dakota reporter Missouri Kansas county
"lamm" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"lamm" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Newsradio eight forty W H E S Louisville an iheartradio station. From ABC news. I'm Daria Albinger, large-scale detention changes to asylum rocks as rifles just days before the midterm election. President Trump announces his immigration stance as a migrant caravan makes its way through Mexico's and and Trump now warning members of the Central American immigrant caravan. They will risk their lives if they make it to the border and throw rocks and American soldiers. They wanna throw rocks at our military. Our military fights back. We're going to consider it. I tell them considered a rifle president also saying he will no longer catch and release asylum seekers and will house them in massive tent cities. Andy Field ABC news, Washington. The president rallied voters in Missouri. Where Republican Josh Holly is challenging democratic incumbent Senator Claire mccaskill how for the first time in decades, we are where it's at with a hot country. Can you believe former vice president Joe Biden hit the campaign trail in North Dakota strong enough to tear America, part is America's self? And we've seen it storm. We have to make you stop democratic incumbent Senator Heidi Heitkamp is locked in a tight race in that state with Republican challenger, Kevin Kramer, a federal judge has denied a request to opened his second polling site in a western Kansas county, saying it isn't in the public interest dodge city is offered one polling place for twenty years. And while the judge notes, the second location might ease lines it also he says might cause more voter concern and confusion, Tennessee has used its electric chair for the first time since two thousand seven executing sixty three year old Edmonds a Gorski for the killings of two men in the nineteen eighties. Local TV reporter Jason Lamm witnessed the execution. Warden at said, quote,.

President Trump president Senator Heidi Heitkamp ABC Senator Claire mccaskill vice president Louisville Daria Albinger Jason Lamm Joe Biden Josh Holly America Kevin Kramer Edmonds Andy Field reporter Missouri Mexico North Dakota
"lamm" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"lamm" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Might be the flight attendant let's not degrade this now no let's not just a joke one of thing oh yeah elephant is the weather going to be like in oakland for the white sox game at twelve thirty pm pacific time in oakland it's going to be fifty eight degrees with wins at thirteen miles an hour sixty one percent sky cover and no wind chill still fifty eight so can i read you that thing about governor lamm barbara bush was interviewed by our roy leonard in nineteen eighty four when the book that she wrote about their dog see fred story was out she was doing the rounds since she was talking about how old her dog is but the dog doesn't like talking about it's age she playfully told roy what with all of the bad publicity about age in the news those days and she said governor ran from wherever he is yeah bad about getting old yeah i looked it up and this is eighty four and this was as i recall the time you know when people are on life support and arguments over that and everything and he said governor lamm at forty eight years old he said you've got a duty to die and get out of the way let our society our kids build a reasonable life so he was talking about people who went on life support for a long time and he said ruined the economic health of the country how old was colorado governor lamm at the time he was forty eight years old oh him to say right he wasn't willing to do it now the new york times points out that the governor was given to saying outrageous things for example he recently angered nevada officials by saying that one in eight women under the age of forty five in las vegas was a prostitute he's three terms there that's the sort of loose attention to facts that we're used to now but weren't then no fill tells us the restaurant critic for the chicago tribune.

oakland roy leonard governor lamm new york times las vegas chicago tribune governor lamm barbara bush colorado nevada forty eight years fifty eight degrees sixty one percent
"lamm" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"lamm" Discussed on WCHS

"That's when things change and we see a president back off this kind of name call calling not telling the truth sending out these tweets all that voters in ohio care about the russian investigation right now i think that a lot of people do i think people what they care about is they see a president who is is is engaging in that name calling and they know people know he doesn't tell the truth about a whole lot of things and i think people overwhelmingly wonder about president trump when he calls everybody else names including people in his own party but he never ever criticizes putin so i i would guess seventy eighty percent of the people in the united states in ohio including trump voters really do wonder what what exactly it is between putin and trump that we don't know details about yet is interesting to watch lamm's campaign he didn't run against trump per se in fact would embrace some things policy wise that the president was pursuing what's your pitch to the trump voter in ohio that says you know what i don't like i may not be happy with his style but i think he's delivering well com connor williams district is right on the southwest edge pennsylvania between the from from the state line to ohio is only a few miles because it's the northern the northern northern part of of wheeling in that area in west virginia towns like stupid bill and blair and sinclair's veil and cat is woods feel across that part of ohio so i i know that district in that sense i know what kinds of people live there his raced in particularly surprise me because connor land what he talked about he talked about pensions he talked about healthcare my state alone two hundred thousand people are getting opioid treatment right now because they have the affordable care act connor lamb knows that he fought for the affordable care act.

president putin united states lamm ohio pennsylvania blair sinclair connor lamb connor williams virginia connor seventy eighty percent
"lamm" Discussed on Talk Radio WPHT 1210

Talk Radio WPHT 1210

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"lamm" Discussed on Talk Radio WPHT 1210

"Not as simple as just one thing you know people get mad at me because they've got boil down to one thing look elections are very very complicated processes i mean if you've ever worked on a campaign or run a campaign especially congressional one is a lot of moving parts here because have hundreds of thousands potentially voters coming out you're not gonna get that hi tens of thousands of voters who come out and so because of that fact you have to factor in a lot of different things it can't just turn around and say well he's more conservative of democrats so so he's fine he's gonna win what's your ground game what's your what's your ground game operation once you get up and vote operation i mean you know sometimes the fundamentals of a campaign come down to how many doors you knock on truly i mean if you've got local people on an election and they go down and they're not going door and they say hey we're with connor lamm's campaign and people say well we're democrats so they go no no but listen listen listen though he's a different kind of democrat and we can we open your mind for a second while of trump well well listen though but he's endorsed by the same union guys trump was can we talk for a second but if you don't have that kind of ground game operation you may not be able to do that seemingly by the way similar situation if the republicans campaign is just taking it for granted that it's republican district and not turning out the vote not going after republicans not robo calling not having volunteers go door to door well if that happens you're going to have a problem so so again all of these things matter and.

connor lamm
"lamm" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"lamm" Discussed on WTMA

"Of buffet the laura in two thousand ten the tea party equivalent of this fervor against the president that was obama then and now trump now what we saw is the republican party primary process filtered out the candidates who were balanced and it wound up losing at least two senate seats because of that process i'm remembering delaware and nevada going to tea party candidates who were inadequate and all terms but won their primaries is the democratic party ready to deal with that phenomenon because a what what's lined up here is that they're going to have a activist versus activists and candidates like lamm will be lost well i mean it is true that the democrats might lose some of the seats that they should pick up if they have very contested primaries and the more progressive candidate wins but it shouldn't be sort of looked over that you know the republicans when it comes to the house have a good you know sixty to seventy seats that are at least rated somewhat competitive and the democrats are looking at a total of about twenty seats that are are competitive so the republicans are are certainly playing defense and many of those seats that the democrats need to pick up to win back the majority are actually in states like california and so it's not fully the case that every thing is going to look like this pennsylvania race where we're going to be talking about economically liberal and socially conservative voters i want to turn to the national issues with lara brown and salena zito we leave pennsylvania eighteen behind and we turn to the large story of the president on trump on tariffs the president on nafta and the president in california i'm john batchelor this is the john batchelor.

president obama republican party delaware democratic party lamm california salena zito pennsylvania nafta john batchelor senate nevada lara brown
Race too close to call heading into Wednesday in Pennsylvania special election tonight — live results and updates

The Bryan Crabtree Show

02:36 min | 2 years ago

Race too close to call heading into Wednesday in Pennsylvania special election tonight — live results and updates

"What you look at the iran deal high tickets terrible i guess he was okay i wanted to eat a great kid or do something and he felt a little bit differently let's go over to kevin cirilli in canons berg pennsylvania where the administration faces a special election that is being viewed as a bellwether for trump's prospects in the midterms kevin what's the latest there the results are too close to call here the pennsylvania's eighteenth congressional election a special election mullah's democrat challenger connor lambeau into this race until every vote is counted now they're counting absentee ballots and it's unknown whether or not going to get a vote results tonight looking very unlikely we heard from the counter lamm's campaign right behind me stick around they wanted to see what was going to happen to watch this play out vick owns saying publicly that he wanted to stay in this political observers in washington or suggesting that this could be a bellwether for the midterm race this was a district that candidate donald trump carried by more than twenty percentage points so the fact that it's this close democrats very confident they're hoping that will be sort of a way terms yeah we'll be eagerly awaiting those results kevin in the meantime though let's talk about tillerson's dismissal what's the difference between tillerson and his replacement when it comes to us foreign policy and what do we expect to actually change here i apologize attorney loud in here inside of the connor election night party specifically surprise in terms of the timing of secretary tillerson's announcement but president trump and secretary tillerson for quite some time the source close to director peyot pointed out those secretary tillerson difference experiencing secretary tillerson report is brought with him a level of experience in the private sector as a former congressman on the house intelligence committee as well as someone very closely aligns with the cia with the intelligence community is bringing down perspective to the same around the world now should know that secretary tillerson ever touch criticism for not doing all diplomatic posts around the world and the democratic party is ball's in the.

Peyot Director Secretary Donald Trump Canons Berg Pennsylvania Kevin Cirilli Iran Democratic Party CIA Congressman President Trump Attorney Tillerson Washington Vick Lamm
"lamm" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"lamm" Discussed on Probably Science

"And also but then i think there was there was no set thing it was sometimes people would have like lamm all 'cause i feel like a americans eat or in some reason like many on the east upper east coast the turkey for christmas we never a turkey for yes have the british what is now what has now become the the traditional british christmas dinner is very similar to american thanksgiving dna interest turkey with rice potatoes and vegetables and trimmings and stuffing my god i love stuffing okay sorry yeah and it looks like from a quick a cursory googling that uh the other north america indigenous to north america so yeah i'm sitting the only kind of look like an american just they were is low witted round benjamin franklin one angry they add that the official the national bird right really isn't that the store that he wanted instead of the eagle franklin lung the majestic turkey i believe so if an osce sample of those freedom one really fucked me if this is not true i want to stop saying that because it's one of those things that everybody said that it does it is more like the form of the modern american in a walmart on a cart okay eyes as opposed to him eagle soaring over the play turkey does seem very much like it's gonna spend a lot of time on the slot machines have made a it's i'm glad that i didn't just repeat this like everyone else has because it is one of those slightly bullshit anything an entire article about whether this is true.

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"lamm" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"lamm" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Hello everybody mark levin here our number eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one we're going to get into these me text messages a little later too but this is a big issue that affects us all in a very significant way and we're going to have to watch more you know more than one ball at a time here for quite capable of uh walking chewing gum at the same time you the smartest audience of all audiences but i want to remind you of something why this issue is so important i've talked many times about former colorado governor dick lamm a liberal democrat in the speech he made on october eighteen two thousand third which we were lucky enough to uncover and i want to remind you of what he said fourteen and a half years ago and how pression he is and was hat tip to our friends at fair cut thirteen go i would like to share with you my land and destroy america if you think in some due to smuggle who ridge to selfsatisfied diverse enough to white bread i have has play for me you know said all gradations rise and they all fall and he said the osce of history as all free nations committed suicide so here's my plan a apart number one make it a bilingual like cultural country is free shows us.

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"lamm" Discussed on News Talk 710 KNUS

News Talk 710 KNUS

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"lamm" Discussed on News Talk 710 KNUS

"The top of the hour at eight o'clock we'll be joined by the chairman of the freedom caucus in the united states congress congressman from north carolina mark meadows looking forward to that conversation talk about immigration and fis a and so much more before we get doubt back to the fold phone lines i want to play this free it's just a couple of minutes long so everybody bear with me but do governor dick lamm nicest guy democrat obviously very very smart very forward thinking and i should have put the year on this i'll look it up while we're listening on and tell you on the other side but this was dick lamm on how to bring down a republic i would like to share with you my plan to destroy america number one at make it a bilingual by cultural country history shows us but no by legal by cultural country lives at peace with itself there's not one i believe that doesn't exist with an incredible amount of tension and conflict if not civil war my second part of my plan would be to invent something called multiculturalism this will be two parts number one i would say that all cultures are created equal it would be make no difference and make it impossible to talk about such things as culture and the second one is that i would really tried very hard and make people continue their cultural identity my third part of my plan would be to make the fastestgrowing demographic group in that country the leasteducated i would add a second under glass to the first thunder class unassimilated undereducated antagonistic and that i'd have fifty percent of the drop out of school not graduate from ice the fourth part of my plan would be to get the big foundations to fund and big business to fund these efforts with lots of money i would invest and ethnic identity and.

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"lamm" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

The Bone 102.5

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"lamm" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

"You have yeah he have tons in st louis my buddy call he will say why don't you come in with me up i am straem again let's see how would love to go ahead lam farm in st louis outside saint louis and like 15 chefs all the bad guys from various guys from st louis lumiere cooking all these different lam disease and it was going to be one or two long tables in the middle of the field but it was raining so they undergo servette in the button stood anybody have lam ribs now i've had the we made a smoke lam shoulder but most of these guys were pretty wack doubt chef so looney like lamm spam men now these little purses lambs bad now loophole isn't that counterproductive to get us expensive piece of me and make it spam we age yes it he got some bones from the far merlin boehner somphan arellano it was just you know chef tried out shefi head kind of stuff so ladder span musical is adequate from brands all they know debt no doubt of you even spam before now i said i don't know i don't know i like smith i like smack harnett i was always a one thing in the guy she said again at dishes like now if you've been in front of me like i always think i'm going to try everything but i don't go on buying gal not spams the funny thing you look at it if you look at the concept it's disgusting it's like it's like every piece of the animal that didn't get you know picking byebye nobody else so it's like you know we have dodgeball the last person to have and that's what spanners but if you cut it up a new fry spam and you put some muster's cheese on in a sandwich have you ever heard it said relic it's a delicacy in hawaii they use it all sushi area make a big against the shaping and yes life although it's got the rounded they make a big rise pay and then he began giant noory strip they love it they loved i have not obviate ya i have the i'll i'll eat as little as little sausages the tiny ones that are indiana rallied now though ivey although you kitty span because those venice losses ordnace gossaigaon will add about that adult i was like.

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"lamm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"lamm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I think wasn't sarah palin calling you orwellian because you said maybe we should emphasize health for the youth maybe more than the old gotta fall off the tree and all that richard lamm touched off let's get to that for a moment if we could to you because i mean pretty much you stand by that 75 is old enough even though he got all these people passed seventy fiber were vital in lively and two inches fine and have all their marbles into their 80s demon none of january ans yes at first of all let let's be clear what i stand behind so that we don't confuse your listeners because the title of the article sort of made me seem like you know i just wanted to have a lot of assisted suicide going on out there which is wrong so what i i said in the article is that i think we need to be realistic almost every one i assets how do you wanna live as long as possible if you want to live a high quality life almost every once has i want to live a high quality of life i said all right let's focus in on what it means to live a high quality life and let's look at the data about those kinda lives um uh we all i want to live a meaningful life we want to have meaningful work we want to have meaningful relationships we want to have a vocational interests and fund things that we do highlight bicycle right i like to hike i like the kayak i want to do those things i love to cook all of those require you know certainly being cognitively intact they also also often require being physically impact and the fact is that as we grow old are cognitive function declines all of us are short term memory are working memory declines when we get older than us senator from kentucky again exactly and you're not the all i i'm not in near seventy five yet added it's happening for me to just ask my kids so we have some cognitive it's guy and then if you look at if you look at the onset of alzheimer's you know after 75 it just goes up almost vertically it is super scary hope that by eighty five a third at least a third of the population in some estimates more i have you know l timers so.

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"lamm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"lamm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Fact i think wasn't sarah palin calling you orwellian because you said maybe we should emphasize health for the youth maybe more than the old gotta fall off the tree and all that richard lamm off let's get to that for a moment if we could to you because i mean pretty much you stand by that 75 is old enough even though he got all these people passed seventy fiber a revival in lively and two inches fine and have all their marbles into their 80s even none of january ans yes first of all let's be clear what i stand behind so that we don't confuse your listeners because the title of the article sort of made me seem like you know i just wanted to have a lot of assistedsuicide suicide going on out there which is wrong so what i said in the article is that i think we need to be realistic almost every one i asked i said so do you wanna live as long as possible if you want to live a high quality life almost everyone says i want to live a high quality of life i said all right let's focus in on what it means to live a high quality life and let's look at the data about those kinda lives uh we all wanna live a meaningful life we want to have meaningful work we want to have meaningful relationships we want to have a vocational interests and fund things that we do highlight of bicycle right i like to hike a like the kayak i want to do those things i love to cook all of those require you know certainly being cognitively intact they also also often require being physically impact and the fact is that as we grow old are cognitive function declines all of us are short term memory are working memory declines when we get older numerous senator from kentucky again exactly and you're not the all i i'm not near seventy five yet and it it's happening for me to just ask my kids so we have some cognitive this guy and then if you look at if you look at the onset of alzheimer's after 75 it just goes up almost vertically it is super scary so that by eighty five a third at least a third of.

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