35 Burst results for "Lake Superior"

"lake superior" Discussed on Climate Cast

Climate Cast

04:12 min | 2 d ago

"lake superior" Discussed on Climate Cast

"Climate cast is supported by Bank of America. Financing clean energy initiatives and advancements in renewable energy and spurring innovation in the growth of environmentally focused companies, markets, and jobs. Bank of America NA, member FDIC. Even those small changes in air temperature are going to play an outsized role on the character of Lake Superior over the coming decades. There's not much ice on Lake Superior this winter and total ice cover has been decreasing in the last few decades. More than 90% of the big Lake is ice free now as we move into February. And the historical average ice cover on superior this time of year is 23% compared with about 8% now. So what's the outlook for the rest of this winter for ice cover? And what's behind the big trend toward less winter ice on the big Lake. J Austin with the university of Minnesota Duluth tracks ice cover on Lake Superior and he's here to talk to us about it today. Hey Jay, welcome back to climate cast. Thanks for having me on Paul. So let's start with ice cover right now on Lake Superior. How much ice is there today? It's bumped up just a tiny bit in the last few days as you might imagine with this cold snapper having. I think we're at about 8%, like you mentioned. And so significantly below where we'd normally be this time of year. And you sent an interesting series of tweets a few days ago about kind of your forecast for ice cover for the rest of the season. What's your outlook for the rest of the winter and why? There are two ways of thinking about the amount of ice cover. One is the maximum amount of cover we get during the year. The other is the average over season. And it turns out that at the time that I tweeted out and that was almost a month ago at this stage, we couldn't really say much about the maximum, but we know that on average, it's very likely to be a relatively low ice shear. Simply because a lot of that is sort of baked into the system in November and December. And those were anomalously warm this year. So just how sensitive is ice cover on Lake Superior. I mean, what's the temperature difference between little ice on the Lake and a completely ice covered Lake? Ice cover on Lake Superior and on the other Great Lakes for that matter is really a strong function of the average air temperature over the course of the winter, which doesn't seem all that surprising. But the fact that it doesn't depend on whether we had a warm summer or cold summer, it doesn't depend on whether it's windy or calm. The difference between a high ice year where people are going down to the ice caves or their fishing off of Brighton beach and Duluth or maybe the shipping seasons impacted. One of those high ice shears and a low ice shear where there's essentially no open Lake ice can be due to differences in average winter air temperature on the order of four or 5°F. So just very, very small differences in air temperature can lead to large differences in the ice response of the Lake. And why does the amount of ice cover on superior matter? What are the impacts there? There are a handful, a few sort of societal ones. I just mentioned, you know, tourism and shipping and things like that. But ice also provides coastal refuge for various species of fish that are laying their eggs. It plays a large role in the amount of evaporation. We have during the winter and if you're living on the upper Peninsula, for instance, that makes a big difference to this Lake effect snowfall you might be having. So there are anything from ecological to cultural impacts of that loss of ice. When you talk to people about what you do and about Lake Superior, what's the main message you have for us to think about when it comes to ice, unlike superior? When we try to communicate climate change in the public sphere, the differences we talk about can sound really small. Where it's going to be a degree or 2° warmer Celsius by the end of the century. Here's a system where even those small changes in air temperature, especially during the winter, are going to play an outsized role on the character of Lake Superior over the coming decades. J Austin with the university of Minnesota Duluth, thanks for talking about Lake Superior ice on climate.

Lake Superior big Lake Bank of America university of Minnesota Duluth FDIC Austin Jay Brighton beach Paul Great Lakes Duluth upper Peninsula university of Minnesota
"lake superior" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

08:40 min | Last month

"lake superior" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"He was the original captain, he was certainly probably one of the most well-known captains of the Edmund Fitzgerald the guy named Peter pulsar. And he was well known for going through these locks, like this ship was designed to just barely squeeze through the lock. So it was an enormous thing to see. Coming like, you know, you could reach out and touch it basically as it was going through the locks. And then to make it even more impressive, captain pulsar would alternately play music from speakers. It took basically give everybody a show. Well, the Edmund Fitzgerald was going through the locks. Or he would use a bullhorn to shout facts about how amazing the ship was. I like this guy. Yeah, he was pretty cool. He was not the captain when the Edmund Fitzgerald went down. Instead, that captain was Ernest mcsorley. And much like the admin Fitzgerald, mcsorley was well regarded on the lakes as well. Yeah, and mcsorley was sort of known, as we'll see later as someone who would kind of go through a storm, if at all possible. It didn't seem like he was reckless or anything like that. Or would relish in putting his crew in danger, but there were, you know, there were times where certain boats would pull back and say, hey, maybe we should wait this one out. And other boats would push through. And he seemed to be the kind of captain that would generally try and push through. Yeah. So if there was a fateful day in the history of the Edmund Fitzgerald, it was Sunday, November 9th, 1975. Because that was when the fits, the Toledo express, set sail from superior Wisconsin, carrying 26,116 tons of tech and Ike pellets. And I did some math. Oh boy. Pretty sure it's right. Here we go. That's 58 and a half million pounds of musket sized pellets of iron ore or for our friends outside of the imperial system world. 26.5 million kilograms. That's a lot. And add on to that, 50,000 gallons of fuel, oil. That's a lot of weight itself. So, but it wasn't technically overloaded. It was well loaded. Yes. And it left it set sail at two 15 in the afternoon for zug island in Lake Michigan. And I was like, zug island, zug island. Detroit. But I was like, but that's not what I know it from. And then I remembered. Do you remember our episode on the hum? People can just some people here at home and it drives them crazy. Well, there's a Windsor hum and I remember they associated with zug island and I looked it up and it turns out that during the pandemic, U.S. steel company, who had a steel plant on zug island, basically shuttered their operations just for due to lack of availability of raw materials, right? And the hum vanished. That's right. So they figured it out. It was U.S. steel. One of their, one of their components of their whole setup. I like that. I need two. I thought it was definitely worth mentioning. All right, so they're headed toward that island, which is in Lake Michigan. Like you said, it was two 15 about two hours and 15 minutes later at four 30. The SS Arthur M Anderson set sail from Minnesota, headed to Gary Indiana. And they're going to two different places, but they took a similar route, which we'll talk about why here in a minute. But the sort of, again, the long and the short of this is that there was another boat, another ship nearby, kind of for this whole route in nearby, meaning under 20 miles and sometimes even as close as like 12 to 15 miles away, which is not tailgating someone, but it's pretty close as far as ship travel goes. Yeah, I mean, they could keep their lights in sight the whole time basically. And the Anderson would end up basically being like the hero of the story. So just keep that in mind. Yeah. So a couple of things about the Great Lakes themselves. Like I said, ships designed to travel the Great Lakes are probably not quite as hardy as a seagoing vessel, but they're still pretty tough because the Great Lakes has some pretty bad weather, particularly in November. And when storms start blowing across the Great Lakes in November, the sailors up there call it the witch of November. And usually November is the end of the season. They'll have their last runs of the year in November, try to get as much shipping in as they can before the weather turns. And when the weather turns, it really, really turns, especially on Lake Superior because Lake Superior is huge and long, and there's a lot of room for that wind to blow an obstructed across the Lake and really pick up some steam. Yeah, you know, we've talked about this in our hurricane episodes and tsunami episodes. Anytime you have long stretches of water that a storm is riding across is going to pick up energy from that water and moisture and wind is going to create bigger and bigger waves. I think we did one on rogue waves, which is really cool. And this large stretch of Lake Superior was, I mean, it wasn't the most well traveled area, and it seems like at least at the time Lake Superior itself, despite being massively huge, was one of the least traveled of the Great Lakes, at least as far as these shipping lines go. Yeah, I guess just because there were there was more action on the other Great Lakes maybe. Yeah, I think only about 350 shipwrecks in Lake Superior out of the and we saw different numbers. I think 6000 is what most people around 6000 shipwrecks and all the Great Lakes. I saw it as high as ten, but I think it might depend on that might be like all boats or something. I don't know. Yeah, I'm not sure either. I definitely saw both. But still, that's a pretty low ratio. And it's because it's just not quite as traveled. In addition to being huge and wide, it's also really deep. I saw somewhere that it's about 1200 feet deep at its deepest point. It's also extremely cold, where on the Lake bottom, a few hundred feet down, there's basically no aerobic life down there. It's just devoid of. It's like basically a freezer. It hovers at about 32 33° just above freezing. Or wait, 0° is just above freezing, but still it's really, really cold. 32° is. And so anybody who falls in the water is going to catch hypothermia pretty fast. It's just one of the parts of the Lake. Like it's always cold. Basically year round. You just have to know that about it. All right, so I think that's a great setup for what's going on. But these lakes look like. Sounds like I'm going to break, but we just did that. It does. So they set out the Anderson and the Fitzgerald. And they decide because of this weather coming in. I believe the most dangerous weather there at superior comes from the northwest, north by northwest. Is that right? So they decide, all right, this weather is coming. We're going to take what people that sail that area jokingly called the scenic route. Which was basically to try and stay as far away from the meat of this storm as possible. And it would take a little bit longer, but it was supposedly a safer route. If you have bad weather coming in. Yeah, but as we'll see, it would be a very fateful decision. And this was this happened to be a voyage chock full of fateful decisions. Yeah. But that scenic route, and they purposely took the scenic route because the weather was supposed to be bad. I think they left at two 30 p.m. and by 7 p.m. there was a Gale warning for the entire Lake. So that's a big storm. I think this one actually came up from Oklahoma, they said, across the plains, hit the Lake and just started messing things up. So they took this northern route to try to stay away from the weather as much as possible. But like you said, mcsorley was known as a heavy weather captain, so he was definitely the type to push ahead. He wasn't the only one to push ahead through this storm. There were plenty of others. The Arthur Andersen among others who were just making their way through the storm because they had ships they believed in. But they also passed a handful of different places where they could have stopped and waited out the storm in safety and didn't. They pressed on another handful

zug island Edmund Fitzgerald mcsorley Great Lakes Peter pulsar captain pulsar Ernest mcsorley Lake Superior Lake Michigan Arthur M Anderson Fitzgerald Gary Indiana time Lake Superior U.S. Windsor Wisconsin
"lake superior" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:01 min | 9 months ago

"lake superior" Discussed on WJR 760

"It's a special experience I can't think of anywhere else I've been in the world and I've been to a lot of places Where once you're there all you can hear is nature There's nothing artificial You might be able to hear like a generator after a couple of days on the other end of that very big island because your ears become so attuned to hearing the wind blowing through the trees and the seabirds and you're going to see moose You might even hear or see a wolf occasionally It is a special special place It truly is and really especially if you have young children that appreciate getting out in the outdoors This is the place to do it There is no cell phone connectivity Once you get on the island if you can stay at a lodge and they have cell phone access but this is a place to truly disconnect and you're absolutely right Once you get out on the trails you're probably more likely to see a moose than another person There are wolf spottings from time to time but we'll select to kind of keep their distance but it's truly a place to where you can just sit on a shoreline and peer off into Lake Superior and feel just disconnected from the rest of the world And some of us need that Sometimes some of the time we need to put our problems away and maybe not be able to check that email We need that excuse to be able to say ah you know I'm off the grid today And so this is a place you can truly do that There's a 165 miles of hiking trails to explore take some planning but it's truly a bucket list experience for I think all michiganders Absolutely As is visiting the kiwi Peninsula there are so many other things to do So many other things to see you would not believe the views from vistas like the top of that beautiful mountain experience at the end of the QAnon Peninsula very very special So you need to find out all about this before you go No before you go the.

Lake Superior QAnon Peninsula
"lake superior" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:23 min | 9 months ago

"lake superior" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Yeah the big Lake here the taste so you can't compare anyone else Johnny tau drove up to Duluth from St. Paul with his wife uncle and cousin He's made this pilgrimage north every spring for the past 15 years for half his life because he's just crazy about smell He says they taste great kind of like French fries I slip off the head and then you just yank all the guts out with it and then do a quick rinse batter and deep fry your golden But you've got to catch a lot of them to make a meal Thankfully that's easy this time of year when after dark big school swim into the warmer water close to shore to spawn Instead of catching them with a rod and real Tao and his uncle each hold one end of a 25 foot long net You go out there and one guy or person on each side pull the net and just slowly walk back slowly walk back When they get to shore they lay the net down on the beach It's full of dozens of teeming smelt All right First metal for 2022 Groups of people line the shoreline with lanterns portable heaters and empty coolers they hope to fill with fish They wear waders to stay warm in the 40° Lake Superior water Julie Yang drove up here from the twin cities with their husband she also loves eating smelt but for her it's a bigger experience It's beautiful out here at night so listening to the waves crash just catching fish in the middle of the night I don't know it's something weird about that but it's fun There's a festive atmosphere in Duluth every spring when the smelt rock even an annual parade to mark their arrival But it's nothing like it was in the 1960s and 70s People would come from all over the Midwest to fill up pickup trucks full of smell at the time That's Don schreiner a fishery specialist at the university of Minnesota He says back then the smelt ran so thick you didn't even have to get wet You could just dip a net in the water and scoop them out The population plunged in the 1980s when larger predator fish recovered in Lake Superior Today enough smelt remained a sustain this long-standing tradition but shriner says there's a new threat Michigan Wisconsin and Minnesota have all issued consumption advisories for Lake Superior smelt After some fish were found to have high levels of a family of chemicals called pfas or forever chemicals And it seems like smelt for some reason accumulate more of this chemical than.

Johnny tau Duluth Julie Yang St. Paul Lake Superior Tao Don schreiner Midwest university of Minnesota shriner Wisconsin Michigan Minnesota
"lake superior" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:46 min | 9 months ago

"lake superior" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Part carnival Dance Minnesota public radio takes us there Smelt our skinny little fish only 6 to 9 inches long but they have a big devoted following Number one fish in my book yeah the big Lake here the taste like so you can't compare it anywhere else Johnny tau drove up to Duluth from St. Paul with his wife uncle and cousin He's made this pilgrimage north every spring for the past 15 years for half his life because he's just crazy about smelt He says they taste great kind of like French fries I slip off the head and then you just yank all the guts out with it and then do a quick rinse batter and deep fry your golden But you've got to catch a lot of them to make a meal Thankfully that's easy this time of year when after dark big school swim into the warmer water close to short a spawn Instead of catching them with a rod and reel tau and his uncle each hold one end of a 25 foot long net You go out there and one guy or person on each side pull the net and just slowly walk back slowly walk back When they get to shore they lay the net down on the beach It's full of dozens of teeming smelt All right First metal for 2022 Groups of people line the shoreline with lanterns portable heaters and empty coolers they hope to fill with fish They wear waders to stay warm in the 40° Lake Superior water Julie Yang drove up here from the twin cities with her husband she also loves eating smelt but for her it's a bigger experience It's beautiful out here at night so listening to the waves crash just catching fish in the middle of the night I don't know it's something weird about that but it's fun There's a festive atmosphere in Duluth every spring when the smelt rock even an annual parade to mark their arrival But it's nothing like it was in the 1960s and 70s People would come from all over the Midwest to fill up pickup trucks full of smell at the time That's done shriner a fishery specialist at the university of Minnesota He says back then the smelt ran so thick you didn't even have to get wet You could just dip a net in the water and scoop them out The population plunged in the 1980s when larger predator fish recovered in Lake Superior Today enough smelt remained a sustain this long-standing tradition but shriner says there's a new threat Michigan Wisconsin and Minnesota have all issued consumption advisories for Lake Superior smelt After some fish were found to have high levels of a family of chemicals called pfas or forever chemicals And it seems like smelt for some reason accumulate more of this chemical than the other fish species that we've looked at so far Health officials advise smelters not to eat more than a meal a month That means no more pickup trucks full of.

Johnny tau Duluth Julie Yang Minnesota St. Paul Lake Superior university of Minnesota Midwest shriner Wisconsin Michigan
"lake superior" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:01 min | 10 months ago

"lake superior" Discussed on WJR 760

"Was not under power was an old schooner barge So it didn't have its sales up It doesn't have an engine So it's at the mercy of the Lake The Wilhelm couldn't do anything So it went down did it stay in one piece What happened was when the tow line broke it was at the mercy of Lake Superior So it drifted towards the Chris point lifesaving station And during that time they were trying to bail the ship out and it didn't They couldn't keep up with the amount of water coming in So when they knew the ship was lost they all got off the vessel and got into a lifeboat and started to roll toward shore And that was the last time anybody saw it until we did a 131 years later Wow And even though the vessel is pretty well intact it is broken up a bit Yeah I spent but just the currents and such probably did some real damage to it later So that happened about this time of the year was May 4th 1891 and then this far later You found it So now how can people learn more about it or are you going to have any displays at the museum this year Probably not for the Atlanta this year We have some other sites that we do need to go back and look at Our director of marine operations Daryl ortel was on fire last year He found a lot of spots we need to go back to and put our ROV down So we're going to have some more some more news coming up We've just got to identify these Rex and get the story wrapped up for everybody If you want to find out more about the Atlanta you can go on our website and we have a couple of stories up there including a very interesting letter from a gentleman his name was Eli wait was one of.

Chris point lifesaving station Wilhelm Lake Superior Daryl ortel Atlanta Rex Eli
"lake superior" Discussed on Optimal Living Daily

Optimal Living Daily

04:02 min | 10 months ago

"lake superior" Discussed on Optimal Living Daily

"The lasting benefits of getting comfortable with discomfort by Jay Harrington of life and whim dot com. I woke in a tent a bit disoriented, and my attention immediately fixated on my feet. Is the morning of day two of what was to be a four day, 43 mile hike through pictured rocks national lakeshore. Three friends and I had carefully planned the journey. We had enough food, clothing, tents, and supplies to get us through. We had the means to filter the Lake Superior water we'd need to stay hydrated. But as is often the case when planning for an outdoor adventure, a small mistake I made had big implications for my comfort level during the trip, at the last minute, I decided to wear a different pair of shoes, and I had originally intended. Instead of wearing lightweight trail running shoes, I opted for an old high top pair of hiking boots, how about chronically weak angle, often injured from multiple sprains over the years, and I was worried about rolling it while hiking the trail and being a burden to my Friends. There's no easy way out of the trail if you get injured. The hiking boots provided good ankle support, but they did a number on my feet. After clambering out of the tent that morning, I surveyed the damage. It was clear to me just a few miles into the first day of the hike that I was going to have, blister problems, and blister problems are obviously painful, but their manageable, the problem was that the blisters that were forming on my heels were causing me to change my gate, leading to an unnatural foot strike on the balls of my feet, this resulted in deep, painful stone bruises developing on the balls of my feet. As we resuscitated our campfire from the night before, made coffee and cooked breakfast, my only option was pretty clear. Pull the boots back on and get comfortable with the idea of being uncomfortable for a few days. 11 miles later we reached our second campsite and quickly set up our tents. During the day's hike we had the chance.

Jay Harrington Lake Superior
"lake superior" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

07:40 min | 1 year ago

"lake superior" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"So most of the research that's ever been done into us has been by neurotypical people. And so you get these incredibly externalized accounts of autistic people, which say things like we lack affect and therefore we're not feeling emotions. That we are not empathetic enough that we are yes obsessive or fixated. And when you actually talk to autistic people and so much more research is now being done by autistic people themselves and that's transforming the field. And flipping so much of what we think we know on its head. But actually, the opposite is true as so many of these things. So yeah, I've been mistaken loads of time in my life for not being in enough pain stress when I'm actually extremely distressed. I've been told that I sort of lack empathy when actually I'm often so flooded with empathy that I can't act in that moment. We need to with gosh. Isn't this the theme of 2020 as well? We need to learn to listen better. But we also need to learn that autistic people find neurotypical people just as baffling as they find us. Right. This double mind blindness. And I, you know, like I think I describe in the eon article that you're quoting from there, that when I enter a room full of neurotypical people, I'm baffled by their lack of affect in the same way that they describe an autistic lack of effort. You know, like I can't understand how people can be near loud noises without flinching or how they can be in a noisy party and enjoy themselves without having to completely shut down. Like, we need to be able to understand that being autistic is a valid human experience and actually a very ordinary human experience and more research. We realize how common it is. I think that's what that's just this huge. Unfolding, yeah. Yeah. And I mean, if you start to expand that into neurodiversity in general and you start to include people who are dyspraxic dyslexic who have ADHD like all of these different experiences of the world that are actually very allied. You realize that we are everywhere and yet we are not acknowledged or spoken about and that our way of living in our needs for life and not supported. And that actually what we need is often incredibly basic accommodation. Rather than any kind of a cure and we don't get the medical inch of interventions that we need because we're not looking for stuff that stops us from being autistic. Like the survey is pretty much steadily show that about 70% of autistic people say that they would never want a cure. And only about 5 to 10% are really clear that they would be cured of it. Like most of us want to be autistic. We like being autistic. We love that quality of attention that autism brings. And what we want is help with coping with a world that's made for neurotypical people. Right. It's amazing that this is surprising, but it is and I know it is and it was surprising to even me because my autism was invisible to me. And I didn't know how to make accommodations for myself until I was nearly 40. Although and thank you for all of that. And it is so interesting how you. As you say, you never your swimmer. You said you said you said I don't really count myself as a swimmer as more a secret of watery sanctuary, but it was never for you indoor swimming pools. No, it was noisy. Yeah. Yeah, indoor swimming pools are actually very unpleasant pace, places for me because the noise is really intense. There's that kind of intense chlorine smell like one of the things that doesn't get talked about as a key part of the autistic experience is sensory overload. Like everything is turned up to a hundred. And so I can't stick around in a swimming pool, I get incredibly uncomfortable there. But the sea, that natural soundscape, that kind of much more expensive place outside is the most calming, calming place I can think of to be. And how you know, and even in the course of this writing this book, I think you kept investigating this to see the sea around the UK's goal, right? This is not warm ocean. And I live in Minnesota and I swim in Lake Superior, which is the same thing. Yeah, but what you. We are learning actually scientifically about what a cold water immersion and. Increasing dopamine and actually being healing in ways. And so at some point, you started to realize that you had, even though you didn't have that diagnosis, as you say, there was a lot that was invisible even to you, you found comfort for your nervous system. You definitely found that thing. That water that could reset you. Yeah. And I mean, there are a lot of things that I was doing before my diagnosis that went against my instinct without a doubt. But actually, what I understood after was that I did have an instinct towards my own survival, like when I got to choose, I would be near the sea always. And that actually, I think shows that everybody's got something. I mean, I should say really clearly that loads of autistic people hate water and hate the feeling of water. So we're not like we're not as straightforward community to serve. It's all very individual, but for me, like if I begin to feel like I am really overloaded and you know my brain is beginning to feel like it's melting. I run myself a bath now and sit in it. And you know, this all feeds into the knowledge that I bought into wintering actually because that simple act that allowing myself to do something active in order to reset. Is such a useful tool to have in your toolkit because it's often not very much that you need in the moment to restore yourself, you know, restore your peace of mind. But you must allow yourself to actually do that and I think we very rarely do. And I very rarely did until I had a name for what I am that let me say, oh, I need to take action now because otherwise this is going to get an awful lot worse. Yeah. I think that's so helpful. And you know, as much as we are, we are, and you are writing and we're speaking about wintering, both as a season of an aspect of being alive and also you.

swimming autism ADHD Lake Superior Minnesota UK
"lake superior" Discussed on Mike Gallagher Podcast

Mike Gallagher Podcast

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"lake superior" Discussed on Mike Gallagher Podcast

"The ship was the price of the American ready for Marc leishman. Wisconsin. As the big craters go, it was bigger than most it is Gordon Lightfoot's birthday. He is you're on my miss, of course, is the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald from 1976. This is one of the craziest songs ever to hit number one. I trust Mike, it is in your teenage brain. I always love these stories. What do they call these telling the story? Whether it's this or I just had Vicki Lawrence on who was in town and she had the night the lights went out in Georgia or ode to Billy Joe. Those are kind of southern gothic things. But the wreck of the admin fits here. First of all, Gordon Lightfoot carefree highway, sundown, if you could read my mind, one of the great records ever. The reason I went to this is the actual wreck of the actual Edmund Fitzgerald, which really did happen on Lake Superior, was only a few months earlier, November of 75, and Gordon Lightfoot read this newsweek article about it and decided he would write a song and it was number one, it was huge, but it usually your average song is verse verse verse chorus verse chorus. But this one is, and repeat that 47 times. That's it. There is no course. That's it. And yet, it's a long, it's up 6 and a half minutes old on the album. And it never gets old and it's fascinating and when you talk about the church bell rang till it rang 39 times for each man on the Edmund Fitzgerald. It is deeply deeply moving. And so Gordon Lightfoot, and there is a documentary about him. I don't know what it's called just Google it. He's 83. You can hardly recognize him. If you remember the album covers of the 70s, but it's not because he's all decrepit or anything. But he's still there still vibrant and a wonderful, wonderful artist. What does that mean? Okay, there are people who, if you haven't seen them in a long time, because maybe they haven't been on the TV box for a long time. They just look really, really different. I'll show you, Mark. What are you trying to get me in trouble? What do you mean? I'm just trying to understand what you mean. I haven't seen, okay, if I were, if you Google, first of all, do you have an image of Gordon Lightfoot in your head like right now? From an article cover in the in 19. You probably would show up to go oh yeah, that's Gordon Lightfoot. If I give you a freeze frame from the documentary, I don't know if you can recognize him. And it's not because I'm just bad. It's not because he looks to grab it. He was 83. And there are some people you'd go, oh, that's 83 year old Mick Jagger, that's somebody something we're not yet. You will be soon. But it's really bothers me. I'm going to tell you why it bothers me. We have all these pop culture figures. The image of the way people have, well, AG, aging bothers me. But I'm not stigmatizing it. I'm just challenging you for giving us a great look at 83. I'm not asking if he looks I'm giving you my perspective, okay? I'm just trying to tell you why it bothers me when I think about somebody who's etched indelibly in our brains at a certain you've got that like you said. You've got that image of the album cover or this concert. And then you see the 30. No, but it just bothers me. I just hate guy. I hate getting older. I hate it. I hate everything about it. I just hate it. I just wish I didn't get so. And honest to goodness, your musical tributes always depress me because when I think of somebody that I listen to when I was a kid, being 83 or dead. It just oppresses the heck out of it. What can I say?.

Gordon Lightfoot Edmund Fitzgerald Marc leishman Vicki Lawrence Billy Joe Lake Superior Wisconsin newsweek Georgia Mike Google Mick Jagger Mark
Wisconsin Sets 300-Wolf Limit After Runaway Spring Hunt

Native America Calling

01:19 min | 1 year ago

Wisconsin Sets 300-Wolf Limit After Runaway Spring Hunt

"A policy-setting board for wisconsin department of natural resources approved a wolf heart. Evista quota three hundred wolves for the states fall. Wolf hunts wisconsin tribes oppose and have called on the us fish and wildlife service to reconsider its decision to remove federal protections for the animal daniel creating reports the board's vote goes against the wisconsin. Dnr's recommendation to set the harvest at one hundred thirty wolves state. Wildlife managers supported a conservative harvest due to uncertainty over the populations response to the february wolf hunt state licensed hunters harvested nearly double their allotted quota killing two hundred eighteen wolves and less than seventy two hours. John johnson senior is president of the lack of flambeau band of lake superior chippewa. He told the board that tribes view the wolf. As a brother adding their fates are intertwined. Six people lived in existence with wolves for longer than europeans walk. North america the main gun. We know respect and understand seems to be a different animal than the wolf that so many others despise johnson also chairs the voigt intertribal task force which represents a jib way tribes. The task force has called on the us. Fish and wildlife service to reconsider the wolf's delisting due to wisconsin systemic failures to manage wolves and prevent over harvest for national native news. I'm daniel catering

Wisconsin Department Of Natura Wisconsin Fish And Wildlife Service Flambeau Band Of Lake Superior DNR John Johnson Voigt Intertribal Task Force North America Johnson United States Daniel Catering
A Lake Superior Tribe's Ancestors Want Their Burial Lands Back

Native America Calling

01:25 min | 1 year ago

A Lake Superior Tribe's Ancestors Want Their Burial Lands Back

"More than a century ago nearly two hundred ojibway graves were removed from the burial grounds of a lake superior tribe to make way for. Us steals plan to develop or docks that were never built now. A new effort seeks to return those lands and reburial site to the fondling band of lake. Superior chippewa danielle catering. Reports wisconsin. Point is a remote strip of land on the shore of lake superior. It marks the ancestral home of the fondling tribe whose relatives settled there as early as four hundred years ago. Seven generations were laid to rest at the wisconsin point cemetery including the communities leader chief joseph osan gave the company uprooted the dead and those still living like calling aired parents. Aired who is ninety. Seven is a direct descendant of chievo soggy. It's hallowed ground to me. We just love dead aired says. Her father would be thrilled to see. The land turned over to the tribe. They're one step closer to that goal. After the superior city council passed a resolution supporting the transfer fonda lack chairman kevin dooby says returning. The lands would provide some closure to tribal families. Remember what happened in the past. It's our laos and we have to take care of it. Continue move forward. City and tribal officials will work with wisconsin. Us senator tammy baldwin office to petition the us department of interior to place the lands in federal trust for fonda lack for national native news. i'm daniel catering.

Superior Chippewa Danielle Cat Wisconsin Point Cemetery Joseph Osan Superior City Council Wisconsin Kevin Dooby United States Fonda Senator Tammy Baldwin Us Department Of Interior Daniel Catering
"lake superior" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"lake superior" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Check out the blog today. My favorite is, uh, the cliff face falling into Lake superior. It's uh, some friends here out on a pontoon boat. Maybe they're fishing. Don't know what they're doing. Happen to be shooting some video of this cliff face That it says is 200 ft. Tall doesn't look that big, but I can't tell from where I am. Or where the boat is. So anyway, a big starts to see a little bit of rock begin to fall than the entire cliff face falls into Lake Superior, and they're expecting a tidal wave of friends. Back up Brick. Expecting a tidal wave. They do get a wave and it does look initially like they're going to get just washed over. It doesn't but it scares the bejeebers out of the boys will tell you that, and they Don't think Rick ever did really back up. I don't hear the boat, rev or anything, but, uh, they're fine. But it's cool videos to check it out my page. 700 wlw dot com Next half hour What do we have? What's the most exciting thing we have? Element of Jones on baseball. That's even more exciting that Jennifer Cats why aren't you saying she will join us and map it all out for us? We'll have that try health medical men at the incredible try health, medical minute and more. Right now. 7 30 a news time at NewsRadio, 700 WLW news, Traffic and Weather News Radio 700 w L. Gelatin Cincinnati Turning himself in with the 7 30 report. Rick you Chino, Breaking now a top Trump organization official is now surrendered in New York. Former President Trump's long serving chief financial officer, Alan Weiss, Alberg arrived at the Manhattan district attorney's office to turn himself in. He's going to face criminal charges contained in a grand jury's indictment that was voted on yesterday and that will be unsealed later this afternoon. Y Silberg was indicted along with the Trump organization itself on charges that are believed to be related to tax fraud following a more than two year investigation that is a B C's Erin Khutor Ski. Donald Trump, meanwhile, ignored questions about the criminal charges while in Texas yesterday, where he held a campaign style event along the border. The former president himself is not expected to be part of these charges, and he has denied Any wrongdoing. Now the latest traffic and weather together from the You see how traffic center you see health is the region's leader in cancer and Neurosciences care. This is science and in science lives. Hope crews are working with a single car accident and hit the barrier walls. Southbound 71 coming out of the tunnel left lane is blocked off as you we had on South 71 to Fort Washington. Way right lane is blocked on inbound 50 and should come off of 4 71 making your way towards Fort Washington Way. Earlier wreck on Madison Pike and Dudley is clear. Chuck Ingram NewsRadio 700 WLW. This report is sponsored by Bobcat Enterprises Break.

Alan Weiss New York Donald Trump Chuck Ingram Madison Pike 200 ft Lake Superior Texas Fort Washington Fort Washington Way Erin Khutor Ski Jennifer Cats yesterday South 71 today Lake superior Rick Dudley Alberg Cincinnati
Expect low ice years on Lake Superior to continue

Climate Cast

01:30 min | 2 years ago

Expect low ice years on Lake Superior to continue

"Little to no ice floating along marquette bay noah reported january's total ice coverage in the great lakes to be the lowest in the last forty eight years lake superior. Ice cover briefly grew to fifty percent during our february arctic outbreak but that fleeting is vanished just as quickly with our mild march. I'm npr chief. Meteorologist paul hutton. And today on climate cast. What are longer term lake superior ice trends telling us about climate change in the upper midwest professor j austin researchers all things lake superior with the large lakes observatory at the university of minnesota duluth high. Welcome back to climate cast. Thanks for having me on paul. Let's start with this past winter. What was notable with ice cover on lake superior It was a really unusual year very low ice covered starch and we had that remarkable cold air in february and we ended up with fleetingly above average ice levels superior and just as remarkably. They went away really quickly. And how does this fit with the longer term ice trends that you're seeing on lake superior and the great lakes. I expect that we're going to see Significantly lower than average ice cover this year and basically since about nineteen ninety eight. We've had a long string of relatively low ice cover on lake superior with some exceptions like like the polar vortex in twenty fourteen where we had nearly complete coverage for two months.

Marquette Bay Paul Hutton J Austin Large Lakes Observatory University Of Minnesota Duluth Great Lakes Arctic NPR Midwest Paul
"lake superior" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"lake superior" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Final time. The Kenosha want to thank the staff here. Parkside all weekend. Very helpful, Very professional staff, and they replay at the end of the game was very impressive as well as the replay. Person over here was doing a great job showing the officials of slow motion views multiple times. And they got that right. I thought maybe should have been 0.3. But can't complain that point for the Warriors get the three point win. 63 to 60. Eric. Let's take a look at the scoreboard all scores today. Our final except for Ashland Park, so they came with supposed to start. At four o'clock eastern, But as of now, there's still no updated score on that, so I don't know what's going on down there in Hammond, but sometimes they have problems with updating their scores down there, so we'll maybe get a score from that before we sign off. But as of now there's no score listed. Final scores. They damn import meets Michigan Tech 77 to 70 that drops the Huskies to eight and five and out of first place for the first time all year. As they get swept in Grand Rapids. Damn imports. Turn the heat up a little bit there now. Five and eight on the campaign. It was northern Michigan getting swept that you're in Valley 77 72 degree in Valley wins both games after losing that tough one wasted on Tuesday to go 75 in league play, northern Michigan drops to six and seven. Northwood beats like superior 86 to 70 to win their first game since they beat Wayne State in that controversial game. A few weeks ago. Northwood improves the five and eight Lakes state drops to six in seven. And again. Fair state, saying our value we're supposed to play this weekend. Two games at second Albertson Covert issues don't Under what extent those covert issues aren't fair state caused the postponement of those games so they'll try to make those games of at some point. Ferris state that also slow start this year, but they've won three games in a row and are now six and five and league play their a game and a half behind Wayne State in the league standings and See if they could try to make those games up. You definitely want to make the games will begin singing off you can. The shirt second are currently buried in last place. It too in nine in the league standing, so an updated look at the glee extending, Let me hit the refresh button one more time. My computer just to make sure there is not a score update from Park side and there is not so. The updated standings in the black Wayne State's sits atop the standings, their eight and four now On the season. Park's side of Michigan Tech currently tied for second place at eight and 51 half game behind Wayne State, Grande Valley and Ashland currently are seven and five in the league tied for fourth, but Ashland is playing. We think right now it produced. They win that game. They go to 85 move into a tie for second with both checking Grande Valley. If they lose, they would drop behind both Green Valley and Fair State Fair status. Six and five. In the league standings and still alive, possibly for a top four seed, even possible the league titles well thinking make up those games against second on Valley Pretty Northwest comes into today at six and six. Again. They're playing against Ashland right now. Lake State and northern Michigan tied for eighth place at six and seven Damn import northward tied for 10th of five and 18 and second Valley buried in last place by three games right now, at two And nine and again we told you yesterday they finally approved the format for the glee a tournament top four teams in the league standings. Will get buys into the quarterfinals and will not have to play out Opening night On March 2nd campus sites in the 50 would host the 12 seed. Six will host 11 etcetera down the lining and top four seeds. We gotta buy. If the tournament started tomorrow next week, actually stay without playing any more games would be Wayne State Park Side, Michigan Tech and Ashley would be the four top seeds. Everybody else would have to play an opening round game. The re seed, everybody. After those first round games, the topsy would play the lowest seeded team remaining and so on and so forth. And right now Wayne State would be the number one seed in the tournament. If the season ended after today, all right, a quick analysis here of the upcoming schedules for everybody and Wayne State will take on Ashland next Tuesday. That'll be the next broadcast here on the network tip off time at four. The next weekend. The Warriors chance to play last place, saying in our valley in the math I Friday and Saturday they will close the season in two weeks at home against Ferris State and again that game at Grand Valley that second game against the Lakers that might be made up. It's kind of hanging over everything right now to see if we will play that game or not. If that game is made up, it would probably be a week from Tuesday, February, 23rd Grand Valley has Long road ship ahead of him, which I'll tell you about here in just a moment, so we'll see if that game gets made up or not. Michigan Tech sells to play Grand Valley twice and at Parkside twice Parks and still has to play at Lake Superior twice. Michigan's protect twice here at home and also produce northwestern Tuesday, which produce show themselves a very formidable opponent. All season long Ashley made with the easiest schedule, arrest delays..

Eric Saturday Tuesday 10th twice 60 Two games Hammond Lakers three games 12 seed 11 March 2nd eight Friday Lake Superior next Tuesday six Michigan Tech Ferris State
26 rescued from ice floe in Lake Superior off Minnesota

Mitch Albom

00:21 sec | 2 years ago

26 rescued from ice floe in Lake Superior off Minnesota

"People were rescued from on ice floe that broke off from the Minnesota shoreline. And started drifting out in the lake Superior, stranding them in the frigid temperatures. Last week, 66 people got stuck on the ice and Lake Michigan. It's not been a good year for ice fishing. The weather service has only 10% of Lake Superior is covered with ice, which is well below average.

Minnesota Shoreline Lake Superior Michigan
"lake superior" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"lake superior" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Maura Teacher vaccinations and metrics to allow school closures of covert 19 infection Spike the first wave of students due back tomorrow. 26 people fishing on Lake superior or rescued when an ice floe broke away from the Minnesota shoreline, stranding them in frigid water. Cruise brought the anglers to shore a few at a time by boat. No injuries reported. The rescue was similar to one last week in Wisconsin, where 66 people were stranded on a nice blow in Lake Michigan. Washington football team is re signed Quarterback Taylor Hi Nikki to a two year deal. Traffic and weather next W M A L F M. WOODBRIDGE, Washington Now more than ever depend on one of 5.9 FM W M A L L. A Family in Washington Now more than ever depend on one of 5.9 FM W M A L. A cumulus station news now. Here's the W M A L WEATHER channel forecast We'll have mostly cloudy skies today with light rain or snow. Developing this afternoon and a high of 42 snow tonight with a low of 33 for tomorrow morning snow showers with a high of 35 37 degrees right now at Reagan National. I'm John.

Washington Lake superior Maura Reagan National Lake Michigan Minnesota Wisconsin M. WOODBRIDGE Nikki football
26 rescued from ice floe in Lake Superior off Minnesota

Wisconsin's Morning News with Gene Mueller

00:16 sec | 2 years ago

26 rescued from ice floe in Lake Superior off Minnesota

"On Lake Superior Safe after an ice floe broke away from the Minnesota shoreline. The Duluth Fire Department got a call Tuesday from someone who saw the shanties floating away the rescue similar to one last week in Door County, where 66 people got stranded on an ice floe in Lake Michigan. Final batch of

Minnesota Shoreline Duluth Fire Department Lake Superior Door County Lake Michigan
"lake superior" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

103.5 KISS FM

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"lake superior" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

"Has not been found in three states. Researchers first identified this in California, Colorado on December 28 in a covert 19 patient with no reported travel history. The variant was also found. A man in San Diego with no travel history and then a guy in Florida. Of course, all three patients didn't travel. It's believe they got the strain for somebody already in the U. S. It spreads more easily and quickly than other strains. But experts believe that current covert 19 vaccines will likely protect against that strange. Speaking of the vaccine to Milwaukee area pharmacist has been arrested for deliberately ruining hundreds of doses of this ever Valuable and necessary Corona Vaccine Corona virus vaccine, He allegedly removed them from refrigeration for two nights to spoil them. Another worker spotted the doses that have been left out, put them back in the refrigerator. The pharmacist lied and said they'd only been out for a short time. So some of those doses were given The patient's the promises, eventually confessed that he had intentionally left them out for multiple nights. He knew the spoiled doses would be useless, and people who received them would mistakenly think that they have been vaccinated when they had. That's awful. That's worse than just ruining them. You know, ruining them is bad enough, but then to give them to people. Yeah. Um, the vials contain enough doses to inoculate 570 people. He has been fired, and police say that he is in jail. New survey finds 55% of Americans I guess only half say 2020 was the were their lives. All this negativity does have one silver lining because more people are holding their loved ones closer as they go into this year with a sense of optimism, the survey reveals that nearly 70% believe The 2020 made them appreciate their family and friends more than ever, which is good news. Yeah, that's really nice. Covert. 19 has topped in annual list of words in terms that should be banished. The wordsmith at Lake Superior State University of Michigan have released their annual list of words and phrases that should be banned for have AH this listen been around since 1976 covert 19, coronavirus and Rhona that's number one social distancing. He's number two. We're all in this together at number three and abundance of caution. And in these uncertain times at four in five and then we have the word pivot at number six, unprecedented at number seven. Name.

Lake Superior State University San Diego Milwaukee California Colorado Rhona Florida
"lake superior" Discussed on Z104

Z104

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"lake superior" Discussed on Z104

"Mornings you, nick and chat with you on this. Tuesday, January 5th cloudy and 48 today 49 tomorrow Will we get snow on Fridays? The question Now you don't think so? Well, you can always hope they say there is possibility You can't can't hope you're not a flicker too? No. Oh, man, be nice. I would love for my daughter to be able to run around in the snow, you know made me feel like a jerk. See, that's what you do. That when I'm doing today, 48, we're at 40 right now. Coming up this morning for you on the show. If you missed the first war of the roses of the year of 2021 don't worry, we'll catch up and around seven o'clock. It features one girlfriend who celebrated New Year's and not with her boyfriend, helping 2021 with a bang. Let me know the next time. You know who is out of town? Yeah, anytime someone uses, you know who would a message? You know some secrets going on Also coming up this morning, a half naked firework fight in the street with foul language, But we don't understand any of it. So we're just gonna play it for you still have that coming up for you? We have a really bizarre length affair to talk about the Kardashians, Kim and Kanye. We will talk about the Kardashian west. We'll talk about them. Justin Bieber becoming the next Joel. Whose team Maybe that story coming up in 20 minutes. One of the most bizarre stories of the day. The story of actress Tanya Roberts, the Dead woman Crazy who isn't dead after all. The hospital just called you right now and told you that Tanya is still alive. Yeah, Okay. This is a bizarre story, so we'll get to that in about 20 minutes as well. And Emma's and babies that's coming up in 20 minutes when Ash was gonna be joining us. Speaking of new moms, Yes, That'll be nice. So this is a list you're going to agree with. This is the one we start off the show with this morning and this list. They put it out every year at Lake Superior State University of Michigan. This they're known every year for this list. It is the banished words list. The terms and phrases that we all need to stop saying due to overuse, misused or uselessness over 1400 words and phrases get nominated every year. 250 of this year's were related to coronavirus, seven of which made the top 10 the phrases on the final list that are related to the pandemic. The ones that everybody is sick of hearing this year and trust me when you were run down the list. You're gonna be like Yep..

Tanya Roberts Kardashians Justin Bieber nick Lake Superior State University Emma Kardashian Ash Kanye Kim Joel
"lake superior" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"lake superior" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Optimal dose of melatonin that helps you fall asleep naturally and wake up with no next day Grogginess sequel. Pure Z's Naturally Superior Sleep, David. She's grown into BBC's traffic on the three and now the four day WBZ AccuWeather forecast. Here's AccuWeather, meteorologist in Devore. What do you think? So I think that you're gonna enjoy today and then it goes downhill tonight, and there's another kind of peace. It's a two system situation this weekend. One is coming in tonight and continuing into tomorrow. City in the suburbs along the coastal areas. We're going to be rain for the most of that, some mixing and some uneasiness later tonight. First thing tomorrow Morning, North and west. Then it takes a little bit of a break is the rain tapers off? Later in the day tomorrow, Tina then there's a second piece that now right now looks a little beef here. To me. In terms of where it brings some significant snow on it could be as close is between 1 28 4 95, There could be significant snow again. More rain likely on the coastal areas, including the city for that second piece, and that's later Sunday into Monday. But enjoy the dry weather that sunshine fleeting is it fades out behind clouds? Upper thirties Sr 40 this afternoon Thank you with meteorologist in DeVore with WBZ Boston's news radio. All right, Dean, we shall right now. Partly cloudy. We've got 34 degrees in hall, 37 in Danvers and 34 in Boston and Braintree. It's 11 55. This portion of the news brought to you by rain central dot com If you never, ever want to hear the term covert 19 again, you are definitely far from alone. In fact, researchers at Lake Superior State University in Michigan are in full agreement. Since 1976. The school has put together an annual banished.

Devore Boston Lake Superior State University Tina melatonin BBC David Grogginess Michigan Danvers Dean Braintree
"lake superior" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"lake superior" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Words this year corresponded Sherry Adler as the story If you are sick of hearing phrases like we are all in this together, you're not alone. Wordsmiths at Lake Superior State University, put that phrase on their band for 2021 list, along with covert 19 and social distancing in an abundance of Caution and in these uncertain times are also on the school's lighthearted list of the more than 1450 nominations about 250 words in terms suggested for banishment due to overuse, misuse or uselessness had something to do with the virus. Covert 19. That was it the top of the list. I surely antler breaking news and analysis of town. Hold on. Come The last remaining ferry crossing the Potomac in Northern Virginia, is closing. The operators of White's ferry have announced on Facebook that they were ending the cable drawn very operation between Montgomery County, Maryland and loud on county, Virginia, effective immediately. The decision came after a Virginia judge ruled last month that the ferry company had no right to use a privately owned parcel of land on the Virginia side of the river as a landing site. A fairy is operated at that location since the Late 17 hundreds. John Scott reporting, American farmers are expected to end the year with the higher profits and last year in the best net farm income in seven years. Department of Agriculture's latest farm income forecast says farmer challenges he in 2020 included the impact of trade disputes. Drought and wind damage, not to mention low prices for corn and cotton. More on these stories of town hold dot com Good afternoon. Would you like to try a free sample of our double fudge? Brownie? Sure. Hmm. That's very good. I'll just take one more just to be sure. Yep, Still very good. Some things never change, like never being able to take just one free sample and Geico saving folks. Lots of money on their car.

Northern Virginia Virginia Lake Superior State University Sherry Adler Montgomery County John Scott Geico Facebook Department of Agriculture White Maryland
"lake superior" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"lake superior" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Mostly empty at this hour. Normally, there'd be more than a million people there to watch the big ball drop. No Spectators allow this year because of the Corona virus pandemic. It's one of many celebrations salted this year in Chicago, The Windy City canceled its fireworks show at the Navy Pier. The pier has been closed in September, down under Sydney rang in the new year with a scaled down version of its fireworks display over the harbor on Lee. There were no crowds here, either. Hong Kong canceled its fireworks display all together for a second year in a row last year. It was because of protests and in London, where a new More contagious strain of Corona virus is spreading. The city remains on lockdown. All events and gatherings are canceled, including the stunning fireworks display in front of the eye boxes. I Shall Hosni Wall Street End of the year up the down, closing above 30 of 30,600 for the first time ever. S and P 500, also with a record close, NASDAQ just missed a new record but end of the year with its highest games in 11 years. Ah College in Michigan is out with a list of things we're not supposed to say anymore. Starting in the new year, wordsmiths at Lake Superior State University want to kick any trace of the court of ours from the English language Copan, 19 and social distancing are thrown in with We're all in this together in an abundance of caution, and in these uncertain times on the school's a lighthearted list of banned words and phrases for 2021 250 of the more than 1450 nominations have something to do with the virus. Seven of the 10 selected are connected to the pandemic, with covert 19 leading the way unprecedented was booted in 2002, and it's going again the banish words list committee members, saying Thursday the over alliance and unprecedented to frame things, so it has to go to so far more than 1000. Words or phrases have made the list. But this has not C J Poppa Fox.

Navy Pier Poppa Fox Lake Superior State University Hong Kong Chicago London Michigan Copan Sydney Lee
COVID-19 dominates annual list of banished words, terms

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 2 years ago

COVID-19 dominates annual list of banished words, terms

"Covet nineteen dominates the annual list of banished words and terms if you are sick of hearing phrases like we are all in this together you're not alone wordsmiths at Lake Superior state university put that phrase on their band for twenty twenty one list along with covert nineteen and social distancing an abundance of caution and in these uncertain times are also on the school's light hearted list of the more than fourteen hundred fifty nominations about two hundred and fifty words in terms suggested for banishment due to over use misuse or uselessness had something to do with the virus covert nineteen that was at the top of the list I Shelley handler

Lake Superior State University Shelley Handler
In Historic Move, Biden To Pick Native American Rep. Haaland As Interior Secretary

Environment: NPR

03:23 min | 2 years ago

In Historic Move, Biden To Pick Native American Rep. Haaland As Interior Secretary

"President-elect biden sandy. Wanted his administration to reflect america and two of his nominees to lead his environmental agenda. Appear to support that promise. Michael regan would be the first black man to lead the environmental protection agency. If confirmed by the senate and new mexico congresswoman deb holland is biden's pick for the interior department. She would be the first native american to serve as a cabinet secretary. Npr's nathan rod reports hamas nomination is especially symbolic. The department of the interior is a massive agency responsible for about one fifth of all the land in the united states deals with natural resources and wildlife recreation and national parks. But it's also responsible for the relationship between the federal government and the people. Those lands were taken from or a number of scholars who have done really great work to show how the creation of national parks was predicated on the removal of native peoples katrina phillips as a history professor at macalester college in minnesota. And she's a member of the red cliff band of lake superior ojibway and she says it's fair to say that for most of its history. The interior department has been used as a tool to oppress indigenous people in the us which is why she says she still in shock that deb holland a member of the laguna pueblo. In new mexico has been nominated to lead it to harm someone who understands this history and indigenous sovereignty and land rights and treaty rights is. Just i mean. I'm just i'm so happy right now. It's just hard to believe that this nomination cam through a large coalition of native american tribes along with environmental groups progressive leaders pushed for holland to get the post now just because of the symbolism but because of her experience she's a two-term congresswoman who served on a committee with oversight of interior and she comes from new mexico a fossil fuel dependence state that is trying to transition to renewable energies in an interview with npr before her nomination holland made clear. She'd want the country as a whole to try to do the same. Climate changes the challenge of our lifetime and it's imperative that we invested an equitable renewable energy economy. President elect joe biden has said he wants the country to be carbon neutral by the year twenty fifty and his interior secretary holland would have a big role in shaping that future roughly one quarter of all greenhouse gas emissions in the us come from public lands. She also said she'd restore trust with the interior. Seventy thousand some employees prioritize conserving thirty percent of all us land and water and undo some of the damage that the trump administration has done to our environment. Native americans and other minorities are disproportionately affected by climate change and pollution in dallas goal to founder of the indigenous environmental network says it would be invaluable to have someone in charge of interior. Who understands that but he says the fight is not over. We're not stopping here. Like we celebrate this victory but we as a climate justice movement as an indigenous rights movement are going to continue to push the biden administration to to its promises and to do so in an equitable way nathan. Rot npr news.

Deb Holland Department Of The Interior Elect Biden Sandy Michael Regan Nathan Rod New Mexico Katrina Phillips Lake Superior Ojibway Laguna Pueblo United States Holland Macalester College Environmental Protection Agenc Biden NPR Hamas Cabinet Senate President Elect Joe Biden Federal Government
Sixteen-year-old First Nations advocate speaks up for clean water

Climate Connections

01:18 min | 2 years ago

Sixteen-year-old First Nations advocate speaks up for clean water

"I'm dr anthony leiserowitz and this is climate connections in two thousand and three josephine. Menam walked around lake superior carrying a of water. It was the first of many walks. The initial avi grandmother took to call for more action to protect clean water autumn. Peltier great niece and a member of the Kong first nation when we're born as national by people automatically given that rule to protect the water in the land sixteen year old. Jay has followed in her footsteps as a water protector and climate activist. My anti josephine is one of my biggest role models and mentors like her aunt. Peltier participates in water walks and speaks at events at just twelve years old. She confronted canada's prime minister justin trudeau about his support for oil pipelines. That she said threatened clean water and at fourteen. She was named chief. Water commissioner for the initial nomination as a chief water commissioner given the role advocating for first nations communities around the great lakes penalties zandt previously held the position until she died in two thousand nineteen when she passed away. She told me to not stop doing the work that i was doing. And not to give up so peltier continues to protect the land and water of her people.

Dr Anthony Leiserowitz Menam Josephine Peltier Justin Trudeau JAY Canada Zandt
Interview With Dave Anderson Of Famous Dave's

How I Built This

07:06 min | 2 years ago

Interview With Dave Anderson Of Famous Dave's

"So, most of the biggest restaurant chains started in small places McDonald's was born in San Bernardino California Domino's in Epsilon t Michigan Sonic Shawnee Oklahoma Arby's Boardman Ohio. There are a number of reasons why this is the case there's usually less competition. The rent is lower, and if white you're offering is new or different people will stand in line for it as they did at the original boardwalk fries in ocean city Maryland which is now a franchise company with more than one hundred locations nationwide they stood in line the chicken. Salad Chicken Auburn Alabama up which now has one hundred forty stores same with five guys in Arlington, Virginia and empire of more than fifteen hundred locations today, and as you will hear in the mid nineteen, ninety s people came from far and wide for some of the best pit barbecue they ever had and it wasn't in Texas Hill country or eastern North, Carolina. But rather in Hayward Wisconsin town of twenty three, hundred people in the northern reaches of the United States where in January he can get down to minus seventeen degrees. This is where Dave Anderson, after years of trying out different business ideas decided to open famous Dave's barbecue in nineteen, ninety four. Today famous Dave's has about one hundred and twenty five locations nationwide making it one of the largest barbecue chains in the country. But the story of Dave's is also a story of how a simple passion for serving smoked ribs chicken and brisket Kim grow too big and too fast and how a founder of can almost lose complete control of a good idea. Dave Anderson grew up in a working class family in Chicago in the nineteen fifties and sixties both his parents were native Americans who grew up on reservations in different parts of the country. My Dad's a full blood choctaw Indian from idol. Homa and if you were to look at a map, of Oklahoma, you'd see that I had a bell is in the southeast corner of Oklahoma, which is way down south, and then my mom is from the Likud array reservation wishes way up north she's. A member of the Likud Ray Lake Superior Band of Ojibway says she grew up in Wisconsin he grew up in Oklahoma and how did they meet both of my parents? I think is the unfortunate part of my story where taken by the Bureau of Indian affairs away from their families and stuck an Indian boarding schools basically making orphans out of them now fortunately for me, though my parents met at Haskell Institute, for Indians, Lawrence Kansas so both just to clarify. So both your parents grew up on Indian reservations they met at a boarding school that I guess was where Indian kids from across the country were brought to I. Don't know. Basically to mainstream because my dad when he was brought into a boarding school didn't speak English. She was A choctaw speaking Indian and When he got put into these boarding schools, he can remember. Being beat in having this mouthwash dot with soap and tell e would forget his language and only speak English didn't happen Abraham Lincoln's Day or George Washington's Day. But this generation my parents I think that's a story that sometimes people in America never here. No, they don't what did your dad do for a living when you were a kid? My Dad was electricity and My mom was a secretary she worked as a secretary. So I was like a lot of kids that lived in a working class neighborhood and we didn't have a lot but we always had food on the table I think growing up though I always knew that my family was different because when all the other kids are going out for pizza and hotdogs especially. In Chicago being a great pizza town. Chicago hotdogs, my dad would load us up into the family car and we're headed down to south side of Chicago. For rips and growing up I. Knew every black owned barbecue joint in Chicago and I can remember as early as nineteen fifty-nine, nine eating rip tips at Limbs Barbecue and fifty nine hundred state street. Yeah I mean Chicago became obviously hugely important. As Barbecue. Capital because of the great migration. So many African Americans who migrated out of the Jim Crow South moved to Chicago and brought them their culinary traditions you the also brought blues, what a great combination in. So Chicago throughout the years has always been known as a great blues town down also great, barbecue. Dave as a kid. Did your mom and dad instill strong. Indian values in you did you did you have a strong? Indian identity as a kid. You know growing up in a native American family we were cognizant that. We were America's first people. My Dad was very proud of his choctaw nation. My mom was proud to be from the Likud array reservation and for us that got carried over in that we ate Indian foods. My Dad was very insistent that he had his foods from the south my mom with growing up. She did a lot of fishing and she harvested wild rice. And so throughout years. My Dad would always. Make pilgrimages down to the south so he could get his banana. Corn. Type of bread almost like tamales wrapped up and corn us, and then my mom would always take fishing up north and we would harvest wild rice and but more importantly to raise money for the family. My parents would have a Indian. Freiburg stand and my dad would grilled and smoked cup venison mom would make Indian FRY bread and also wild rice soup but we would sell venison fried bread sandwiches along with balls of wild rice soup I think attending Indian powwows with my mom where we would have the Indian Freiburg stand really taught me a lot about cooking cooking outdoors but also the appreciation for foods that are harvested naturally being able to harvest wild rice. Fishing in all of those experiences that I think throughout the years of always carried

Oklahoma Dave Anderson Chicago Dave's Barbecue Likud Ray Lake Superior Band Dave Bureau Of Indian Affairs Haskell Institute Lawrence Kansas Arby Wisconsin Boardman Epsilon Shawnee San Bernardino Ocean City Likud Domino America
Interview With Dave Anderson Of Famous Dave's

How I Built This

07:06 min | 2 years ago

Interview With Dave Anderson Of Famous Dave's

"So, most of the biggest restaurant chains started in small places McDonald's was born in San Bernardino California Domino's in Epsilon t Michigan Sonic Shawnee Oklahoma Arby's Boardman Ohio. There are a number of reasons why this is the case there's usually less competition. The rent is lower, and if white you're offering is new or different people will stand in line for it as they did at the original boardwalk fries in ocean city Maryland which is now a franchise company with more than one hundred locations nationwide they stood in line the chicken. Salad Chicken Auburn Alabama up which now has one hundred forty stores same with five guys in Arlington, Virginia and empire of more than fifteen hundred locations today, and as you will hear in the mid nineteen, ninety s people came from far and wide for some of the best pit barbecue they ever had and it wasn't in Texas Hill country or eastern North, Carolina. But rather in Hayward Wisconsin town of twenty three, hundred people in the northern reaches of the United States where in January he can get down to minus seventeen degrees. This is where Dave Anderson, after years of trying out different business ideas decided to open famous Dave's barbecue in nineteen, ninety four. Today famous Dave's has about one hundred and twenty five locations nationwide making it one of the largest barbecue chains in the country. But the story of Dave's is also a story of how a simple passion for serving smoked ribs chicken and brisket Kim grow too big and too fast and how a founder of can almost lose complete control of a good idea. Dave Anderson grew up in a working class family in Chicago in the nineteen fifties and sixties both his parents were native Americans who grew up on reservations in different parts of the country. My Dad's a full blood choctaw Indian from idol. Homa and if you were to look at a map, of Oklahoma, you'd see that I had a bell is in the southeast corner of Oklahoma, which is way down south, and then my mom is from the Likud array reservation wishes way up north she's. A member of the Likud Ray Lake Superior Band of Ojibway says she grew up in Wisconsin he grew up in Oklahoma and how did they meet both of my parents? I think is the unfortunate part of my story where taken by the Bureau of Indian affairs away from their families and stuck an Indian boarding schools basically making orphans out of them now fortunately for me, though my parents met at Haskell Institute, for Indians, Lawrence Kansas so both just to clarify. So both your parents grew up on Indian reservations they met at a boarding school that I guess was where Indian kids from across the country were brought to I. Don't know. Basically to mainstream because my dad when he was brought into a boarding school didn't speak English. She was A choctaw speaking Indian and When he got put into these boarding schools, he can remember. Being beat in having this mouthwash dot with soap and tell e would forget his language and only speak English didn't happen Abraham Lincoln's Day or George Washington's Day. But this generation my parents I think that's a story that sometimes people in America never here. No, they don't what did your dad do for a living when you were a kid? My Dad was electricity and My mom was a secretary she worked as a secretary. So I was like a lot of kids that lived in a working class neighborhood and we didn't have a lot but we always had food on the table I think growing up though I always knew that my family was different because when all the other kids are going out for pizza and hotdogs especially. In Chicago being a great pizza town. Chicago hotdogs, my dad would load us up into the family car and we're headed down to south side of Chicago. For rips and growing up I. Knew every black owned barbecue joint in Chicago and I can remember as early as nineteen fifty-nine, nine eating rip tips at Limbs Barbecue and fifty nine hundred state street. Yeah I mean Chicago became obviously hugely important. As Barbecue. Capital because of the great migration. So many African Americans who migrated out of the Jim Crow South moved to Chicago and brought them their culinary traditions you the also brought blues, what a great combination in. So Chicago throughout the years has always been known as a great blues town down also great, barbecue. Dave as a kid. Did your mom and dad instill strong. Indian values in you did you did you have a strong? Indian identity as a kid. You know growing up in a native American family we were cognizant that. We were America's first people. My Dad was very proud of his choctaw nation. My mom was proud to be from the Likud array reservation and for us that got carried over in that we ate Indian foods. My Dad was very insistent that he had his foods from the south my mom with growing up. She did a lot of fishing and she harvested wild rice. And so throughout years. My Dad would always. Make pilgrimages down to the south so he could get his banana. Corn. Type of bread almost like tamales wrapped up and corn us, and then my mom would always take fishing up north and we would harvest wild rice and but more importantly to raise money for the family. My parents would have a Indian. Freiburg stand and my dad would grilled and smoked cup venison mom would make Indian FRY bread and also wild rice soup but we would sell venison fried bread sandwiches along with balls of wild rice soup I think attending Indian powwows with my mom where we would have the Indian Freiburg stand really taught me a lot about cooking cooking outdoors but also the appreciation for foods that are harvested naturally being able to harvest wild rice. Fishing in all of those experiences that I think throughout the years of always carried

Oklahoma Dave Anderson Chicago Dave's Barbecue Likud Ray Lake Superior Band Dave Bureau Of Indian Affairs Haskell Institute Lawrence Kansas Arby Wisconsin Boardman Epsilon Shawnee San Bernardino Ocean City Likud Domino America
Famous Dave's: Dave Anderson

How I Built This

08:17 min | 2 years ago

Famous Dave's: Dave Anderson

"Did you. Give it the name famous Dave's as kind of a joke because you weren't get famous, right Well on the road out of town, there's Dave's guns, Dave's antiques, Dave's boats so. was going to name my place Dave's famous barbecue shop. I get my business cards and it said famous Dave's barbecue. I imagine I can't believe the printer messed up my business cards and my wife's a dave calm down when she just leave it. So famous Dave's. History. From NPR, it's how I built this show about innovators, entrepreneurs, idealists, and the stories behind the movements they built. I'm guy rise and on the show today our passion for smoked ribs lead Dave Anderson open a barbecue. In the middle of nowhere and how it grew into famous Dave's one of the biggest barbecue chains in the country. Are. So, most of the biggest restaurant chains started in small places McDonald's was born in San Bernardino California Domino's in Epsilon t Michigan Sonic Shawnee Oklahoma Arby's Boardman Ohio. There are a number of reasons why this is the case there's usually less competition. The rent is lower, and if white you're offering is new or different people will stand in line for it as they did at the original boardwalk fries in ocean city Maryland which is now a franchise company with more than one hundred locations nationwide they stood in line the chicken. Salad Chicken Auburn Alabama up which now has one hundred forty stores same with five guys in Arlington, Virginia and empire of more than fifteen hundred locations today, and as you will hear in the mid nineteen, ninety s people came from far and wide for some of the best pit barbecue they ever had and it wasn't in Texas Hill country or eastern North, Carolina. But rather in Hayward Wisconsin town of twenty three, hundred people in the northern reaches of the United States where in January he can get down to minus seventeen degrees. This is where Dave Anderson, after years of trying out different business ideas decided to open famous Dave's barbecue in nineteen, ninety four. Today famous Dave's has about one hundred and twenty five locations nationwide making it one of the largest barbecue chains in the country. But the story of Dave's is also a story of how a simple passion for serving smoked ribs chicken and brisket Kim grow too big and too fast and how a founder of can almost lose complete control of a good idea. Dave Anderson grew up in a working class family in Chicago in the nineteen fifties and sixties both his parents were native Americans who grew up on reservations in different parts of the country. My Dad's a full blood choctaw Indian from idol. Homa and if you were to look at a map, of Oklahoma, you'd see that I had a bell is in the southeast corner of Oklahoma, which is way down south, and then my mom is from the Likud array reservation wishes way up north she's. A member of the Likud Ray Lake Superior Band of Ojibway says she grew up in Wisconsin he grew up in Oklahoma and how did they meet both of my parents? I think is the unfortunate part of my story where taken by the Bureau of Indian affairs away from their families and stuck an Indian boarding schools basically making orphans out of them now fortunately for me, though my parents met at Haskell Institute, for Indians, Lawrence Kansas so both just to clarify. So both your parents grew up on Indian reservations they met at a boarding school that I guess was where Indian kids from across the country were brought to I. Don't know. Basically to mainstream because my dad when he was brought into a boarding school didn't speak English. She was A choctaw speaking Indian and When he got put into these boarding schools, he can remember. Being beat in having this mouthwash dot with soap and tell e would forget his language and only speak English didn't happen Abraham Lincoln's Day or George Washington's Day. But this generation my parents I think that's a story that sometimes people in America never here. No, they don't what did your dad do for a living when you were a kid? My Dad was electricity and My mom was a secretary she worked as a secretary. So I was like a lot of kids that lived in a working class neighborhood and we didn't have a lot but we always had food on the table I think growing up though I always knew that my family was different because when all the other kids are going out for pizza and hotdogs especially. In Chicago being a great pizza town. Chicago hotdogs, my dad would load us up into the family car and we're headed down to south side of Chicago. For rips and growing up I. Knew every black owned barbecue joint in Chicago and I can remember as early as nineteen fifty-nine, nine eating rip tips at Limbs Barbecue and fifty nine hundred state street. Yeah I mean Chicago became obviously hugely important. As Barbecue. Capital because of the great migration. So many African Americans who migrated out of the Jim Crow South moved to Chicago and brought them their culinary traditions you the also brought blues, what a great combination in. So Chicago throughout the years has always been known as a great blues town down also great, barbecue. Dave as a kid. Did your mom and dad instill strong. Indian values in you did you did you have a strong? Indian identity as a kid. You know growing up in a native American family we were cognizant that. We were America's first people. My Dad was very proud of his choctaw nation. My mom was proud to be from the Likud array reservation and for us that got carried over in that we ate Indian foods. My Dad was very insistent that he had his foods from the south my mom with growing up. She did a lot of fishing and she harvested wild rice. And so throughout years. My Dad would always. Make pilgrimages down to the south so he could get his banana. Corn. Type of bread almost like tamales wrapped up and corn us, and then my mom would always take fishing up north and we would harvest wild rice and but more importantly to raise money for the family. My parents would have a Indian. Freiburg stand and my dad would grilled and smoked cup venison mom would make Indian FRY bread and also wild rice soup but we would sell venison fried bread sandwiches along with balls of wild rice soup I think attending Indian powwows with my mom where we would have the Indian Freiburg stand really taught me a lot about cooking cooking outdoors but also the appreciation for foods that are harvested naturally being able to harvest wild rice. Fishing in all of those experiences that I think throughout the years of always carried

Dave Dave Anderson Oklahoma Dave's Chicago Dave's Barbecue Likud Ray Lake Superior Band Bureau Of Indian Affairs Haskell Institute Lawrence Kansas Arby Wisconsin Boardman Epsilon Shawnee San Bernardino Ocean City Likud NPR
Sen. Debbie Stabenow calls Great Lakes rapid warming incredibly alarming

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 2 years ago

Sen. Debbie Stabenow calls Great Lakes rapid warming incredibly alarming

"As the climate warms, the Great Lakes are heating up. The Great Lakes are warming faster than the oceans and Lake Superior, which is the largest deep us. Great. Lake is one of the five fastest warming lakes in the world incredibly alarming to me and to everyone paying attention to this. That Democratic Senator Debbie Stab Nov Michigan. She says the rapid warming poses risks to her State's economy and way of life. It threatens fish such as Walleye and trout, and it can lead to more harmful Algal blooms. We have about twenty two, billion dollar tourism industry that is very much based on the lakes on voting on swimming and fishing and fact one out of five jobs in Michigan is connected in some way to the water. So it's a very serious and rising temperatures are not the only threat. Storms are getting more intense and causing more severe flooding and erosion in lakeshore communities. We have boat docks and things that are being destroyed because of the wider levels. So she says the climate crisis is already affecting Michigan and to minimize the impacts, it's important to invest in cleaner more energy efficient future.

Great Lakes Michigan Senator Debbie Stab Lake Superior
Two residential schools in Canada are named historic sites

Native America Calling

03:56 min | 2 years ago

Two residential schools in Canada are named historic sites

"This is national native news I'm Antonio Gonzalez to former residential schools in Canada have been named national historic sites as down. Carpenter reports the schools which represent a dark history are now being recognized as one of the events that shaped Canada to schools added to the official roster of national historic events are in Nova Scotia and Manitoba. It's the first time a residential school has been named in such a way Canada's environment minister. Jonathan Wilkinson says. Is Not, just about telling the good things. It's also about recalling the more challenging aspects, commemorating and understanding history not celebrating it. Perry Belgarde is the national chief of the assembly of first nations bell. Guard says first nations people still feel today the intergenerational trauma of the residential schools and it's part of our shared history. It's dark history of in terms of our shared history, but Canada and everybody needs to learn from that, and again, we've always said that those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it. The residential schools are described as a dark stain on Canada's passed the government funded church run schools were designed to assimilate native children. Into white culture thousands were physically sexually emotionally abused the schools which operated from the mid eighteen hundreds for more than a century for national native news. I'm Dan Carpentry Chuck at top US health official recently visited Minnesota which included meeting with tribal officials. Call Prima with Minnesota Native News has more is August drew to a close the White House's Corona Virus Task Force coordinator Dr Berks visited Minnesota, and met with both state and tribal officials. Dr Burke said she's impressed with how Minnesota has responded to the pandemic using a data driven approach however burks says she's concerned with the rate of positive cases. The state is seeing in the twin cities and surrounding counties. This state has gone from two to five to now nine counties over ten percent. That trend is worrisome this late into the summer to combat rising cases burkes is urging minnesotans to continue wearing masks and socially distance during the pandemic. Even if many may be feeling fatigue to all the guidelines in her visit to Minnesota, burks also stopped Duluth and met with tribal officials with the Fund lack of Lake Superior. Chippewa. Were really terrific I, think across this country being able to meet with a tribal nations has really been extraordinary is impressed by their ability to have institutions that could support isolation within their community and I think really ensuring that they have the resources and the wherewithal to prevent outbreaks. Dr Brooks says fondling efforts and the efforts of tribes across the nation is a good thing to see given that native Americans are disproportionately affected by covid nineteen. Burke. Says Native Americans, who were already suffering from health disparities pre. Pandemic are more likely to suffer life threatening complications due to covid nineteen compared to other racial and ethnic groups nationwide across the United States. Still, the number one group that has the highest fatalities related to this virus are native Americans, and so really ensuring that we have continued to focus resources and meeting their needs you Minnesota about six hundred and twenty covid. Nineteen cases have been confirmed among the native population so far according to recent health data thirty, three of those cases resulted in death I'm co Primo. Former principal chief of the Muskogee. Creek. Nation. George Tiger is expected to report to prison September fourteenth to begin a one year sentence for bribery charges. Muskogee media reports the US Attorney's Office for Oklahoma. Says Tiger accepted bribes of more than sixty thousand dollars during a time period between two thousand, seventeen to two, thousand and nineteen. He was sentenced last month to the prison term two years supervised release and a ten thousand dollar fine. I'm Antonio Gonzales.

Minnesota Canada Pandemic Dr Burke George Tiger Antonio Gonzalez Muskogee Jonathan Wilkinson Burks United States Official Antonio Gonzales Dr Berks Carpenter Perry Belgarde Nova Scotia Manitoba Bribery Dr Brooks
Great Lakes temperatures breaking records

Climate Cast

03:38 min | 2 years ago

Great Lakes temperatures breaking records

"You may have missed it in this extreme news year of twenty, twenty climate changes in the north are happening at a record pace this year the data points record setting one hundred re temperatures in Siberia, Arctic wildfires omitting record greenhouse gas emissions, and the Lowest Arctic Sea ice coverage ever recorded in July. Closer to home water temperatures in the Great Lakes have been running high this summer. Erik. Anderson is with Noah's Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory Eric Welcome to climate cast. Glad to be here. Thanks for having me. Let's talk about Great Lakes water temperatures this year. How warm are they? So. Generally, they're about one to two degrees warmer than what we've seen. We saw spike in early July that race temperatures up. So in Lake Michigan that's. About seventy six degrees. Fahrenheit. Lake Huron slightly cooler around seventy two degrees. Lake Erie getting close to eighty just under eighty maybe about seventy eight and Lake Ontario? Kind of seventy six point five degrees I would say. Let's talk about Lake Superior why is it different than the other Great Lakes? Well, you know generally there's differences just across the Great Lakes from geographic scale of the region. So superior. Is the farthest North Lake I can see dramatically different weather than you see in Lake Erie you're on -Tario. Pursue the southern stretch of Lake Michigan. So that's one factor. It can get slightly different weather, slightly different air temperatures and winds in that region. But another key feature is just the size and the depth of the lake. Because Lake Superior so big in. So deep the cold water that's down below does a tremendous job at keeping the surface. Cool. Even when we have a streak of warm air temperatures like we've seen this summer. What about longer term trends on the Great Lakes seasonally, what trends are you seeing for warmer summer temperatures in the Great Lakes the data that we have on surface water temperatures has shown that summer temperatures in the lakes are all trending upwards. So we see warmer water temperatures over. Roughly the last three decades when we have consistent or even four decades based on temperatures or we have consistent data sets in that's on par with what we see in ocean temperature changes even may be slightly more rapid rates in it sounds small. If I, give you the number typically it's around a a half a degree for decade, but that's actually quite a. Lot of change for these large bodies of water But we're also starting to see from the data that we see rapid warming in the fall in the spring as well, which is a signature that this summer period is really getting longer. It's stretching in both directions. So the shoulder seasons in the spring and fall are are warming up sooner in cooling off later respectively. What will you be watching for for Trans on the Great Lakes and climate in the next few years? Lakes and really lakes in general are a good measure of the impacts of climate change. So they're small enough that they can. Give us a discernible, a clear signal of of climate trends if they exist. But they're large enough that they do have that climate memory. So they're they're not so tiny that responding to every daily fluctuation in whether they had that long term memory part that US to look at long-term trends like what a climate change might Britain. Eric Anderson with Noah's Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory thanks so much for being on climate cast today. Yeah. Thanks for having me.

Great Lakes Great Lakes Environmental Rese Lake Superior Great Lakes Environmental Rese Lake Erie Lake Michigan Lake Huron Noah Lake Ontario Eric Anderson Lowest Arctic Sea Erik Siberia United States Britain
Climate change is hastening lakeshore erosion

Climate Cast

04:00 min | 2 years ago

Climate change is hastening lakeshore erosion

"Climate change is making more waves and eroding the shoreline of Lake Superior more quickly. I'm NPR chief meteorologist Paul Hunter on the shores of Lake Superior this is climate. So I'm back from vacation now, working inside the lab today, but I can still hear those lake superior way of swooshing in my head for the last three summers. We've stayed at some lovely cabins near. Grand Marais each year. The Big Lake has eroded the edge of the bluff closer to our cabin and this year. The edge is only about three feet away, and it's a fifteen foot drop down to the waves below. Charlie. Walters owns the cabins hi Charlie. Doing I'm doing great. How much would you say that? Shoreline has eroded in the past couple of years well this last year has been about a foot the previous year. It was only a couple of inches, but this last season it really picked up pace. We were pretty stunned when we saw the cabin this year that we stayed in its now perch, just a couple of feet from the edge. What are your options to save that cabin and address the shoreline? To Cabin, but you'd still have the Rozhin problem. I'm told you know they'd have to build up with rock and put some type of filter Mesh screen in and back fill with some soil and. Anyway be a long process and in the range of forty thousand dollars, so Charlie if this repair does turn out to be forty thousand dollars. What does that to Your Business? What's the impact there? My wife grandmother came over from Norway and his only things since nineteen thirty two. And right now in the process of fixing up the cabins, and then paying off loans, so it's a pretty big dent. We basically have to stop everything else. We're doing Charlie Walters. Your cabins are lovely I wish you the best of luck and I hope we talk soon all right. So many Lake Superior Property owners like Charlie are now facing costly repairs from erosion damage heavier precipitation in the lake. Superior watershed is boosting water levels to near record, highs and warmer winters mean less protective lake GEIS's forming to buffer the waves that may be speeding up the erosion process. Jay Austin is a professor at the University of Minnesota Duluth and works with the Large Lakes Observatory Hi Jay here from you, Paul? So how high are water levels running on lake superior now and in the past few years. We've had a remarkable run since about. About twenty seventeen of extremely high lake levels on the order of ten to twelve inches above what we would normally be seeing at this time of year, and what's the climate change signal for higher water levels in Lake Superior is it as simple as heavier precipitation in the Lake Superior Watershed when it comes right down to it? Yes, last several years have been much wetter than we would normally see here. The other one is the fact that is suppresses surface waves, and hence protects in some sense shoreline from that sort of wave driven erosion. The long term trend is indeed towards less is and how much of a winter temperature difference between total ice and no is does there need to be to make that change unlike superior? A year, where there is significant ice on the lake, and so people are going and visiting the ice, caves and people are ice fishing, the difference between one of those years at a year with basically no ice can be due to winter air temperature differences on the order of two three degrees. Fahrenheit, so the system is extremely sensitive to these relatively small shifts in winter, climate conditions J. Austin. Thanks for making the time in good to talk with you again. Thanks for having me on.

Lake Superior Charlie Walters Lake Superior Watershed Big Lake Lake Geis Jay Austin Paul Hunter Foot Drop Grand Marais NPR Chief Meteorologist Norway Large Lakes Observatory University Of Minnesota Duluth Professor
What It Was Like to Interview Wil Williams

Inside Podcasting

05:24 min | 2 years ago

What It Was Like to Interview Wil Williams

"Welcome to inside podcasting the show in which creators discuss their craft I'm your host Sky Pillsbury? This is a post show episode in which I will speak with a special guest about last week's interview. If you haven't heard that episode in which I talked to podcast, critic and Creator Will Williams, I recommend you go back and listen to that first, and then come back and listen to the post show. Today my guess is Ariel Nissenbaum Latte. Welcome to the show aerial. I am excited to be here. Thank you so much for having me. You texted me asking to be on the show. I responded within ten seconds. Is that right you did did it was so sweet? And I could feel your enthusiasm Azam coming through my phone. I'm so glad an awesome moment. You never know like Don't really have the bandwidth or Don't have the bandwidth down. Nice so you do like one hundred different things in podcasting and so I'd love for you to introduce yourself then. Maybe you can also share with our listeners where you are right now. Yes, says it's unusual. Place I'll do that first so that the people know why. There are some strange sounds going on, so currently I, am at a farm in two harbors Minnesota. Minnesota, which is somewhere near Duluth, which is on Lake Superior, it is beautiful here I'm on a farm because I'm wolfing, which stands for a worldwide organization of organic farming I'm on my way across the US on a road trip and I thought this would be a fun stop, so if you hear chickens or pigs or dogs or cats or children that what's going on. This makes it so much more impressive that you said. Yes, excitedly to my invitation to come on this show. So I started ear. Buds podcast collective, which is a weekly email that sends a theme and five podcast episodes on that theme. Each week is curated by different person I also run a podcast. A companion to that newsletter called feedback with earbud sort of similar to what you do. Sky Inside podcasting newsletter and podcast, and then I also run another podcast called counter programming Sheron an Arielle. It's a distraction casts started during covid nineteen, and we talk about anything having to do with the word count or counter, so Count Dracula step counters, kitchen counters, anything you can imagine. We're also taking suggestions. I also work for cast box. Do Marketing and business development for them? They're podcast APP and then I help with the outlier podcast festival, and then I do anything that pops up. That has to do with podcasts because I love podcasts. It is very very impressive aerial. I'm so glad that you introduced yourself. Because I'm not sure I would have remembered everything so much, so I will also add on the sound front that the city that I live in chose today to pave our street, and so in addition to sounds of cows and pigs and children on areas, and you might hear on my end paving machines, going up and down and beeping, and doing all manner of things just really like twenty feet away from me, although it sounds pretty quiet at the moment, good, Luxemburgo is in charge of editing this. Exactly okay well, let's get to it We are here to talk about last week's show aerial. What? What did you think of last week's show yes? Oh, I know, will for a long time on twitter, and on other social media platforms, so to hear will chat about her work was really enlightening I. Have to admit that I am not the biggest consumer of audio drama slash audio fiction, and so listening to will talk about it was I opening for. For me I learned a lot, and then I learned a lot through you as well, and I imagine it was kind of some new materials you is that right absolutely and I mean that's one of the reasons. I I wanted to talk to her. Was that like you? I haven't listened to as much fiction, but also I think that someone who's making a fiction podcast has a really different the they're coming from a different creative place in some way. And there's obviously other things that are involved casting and you know working with actors is a completely different ballgame, so I was really excited to talk to her. For for that reason as as well as others mean actually I'll just go ahead and say it another reason why I was. Fascinated by what she was doing. Was that like me? She writes about podcast and. You know like Kerr. I decided to take the plunge and make a podcast and when you're writing about them there is this funny thing where you feel like. Is this supposed to sound like no what I'm doing or am I gonNA? Make giant mistake. And there's a little bit of risk I think with her situation. It's more risky than just doing an interview. Show that require scripts and. Things of that nature, but it was still I could still identify with her feelings of. This is a little risky. This is sort of putting myself out there in a way that I haven't put my out myself out there before and so. I felt a kinship with that and was excited to have her on the show for that

Minnesota Azam Kerr Sky Pillsbury Ariel Nissenbaum Will Williams Twitter Lake Superior Duluth United States Luxemburgo
Crop failure rate for wild rice is increasing with climate change

Climate Cast

05:04 min | 2 years ago

Crop failure rate for wild rice is increasing with climate change

"Minnesota's legendary extreme winter cold is critical to the survival of many native plants and animals, but temperature trans show Minnesota's average winter temperature has warmed six degrees since nineteen seventy, and the milder winters appeared to be Reducing Wild Rice Harvest Yields Peter David is a wildlife biologist for the Great Lakes, Indian fish and Wildlife Commission Hi Peter, welcome to climate cast. Thanks for the opportunity. Why is extreme winter cold so important to wild rice? This is a plant that's adapted to northern harsh growing conditions. And so even northern Minnesota Northern Wisconsin that's solar edge of its range, and you can suspect this is going to be a point out. That's really susceptible. To. Climate impacts one of them winter aspect is just that the SPLAT needs a long hard winter for the seed Germination. And those harsh winter conditions also helped not back. Some of the other plants that wild rice typically competes with. There's really whole host of native. Climate change that are probably impacting wild rice throughout its growing season, so if the range is limited climate change is in Minnesota and Wisconsin. Would they be pretty important then to wear? The wild rice is able to flourish. There are two species I should mention lose in northern and southern wound rise, but the northern species is the one that is really important human harvesters, because it has a large highly nutritious seed. That's found only in any level of abundance in these two states, so if you're a tribal member for example living on this landscape, it doesn't help you. Much of wild rice can only grow successfully Canada in the future. Wild Rice is called Minoan in the JIB way language. Wiersma Noman so important to the JEB loy culture. Is almost impossible for me to overstate how culturally important manolas. For people who are familiar with your jubilee or initial migration story, these trouser living once along the eastern seaboard, and they move to this part of the world following prophecies that indicated that they had to go west if they were going to survive as a people. And that migration. They weren't sure how long it was going to be. Where exactly they were going, but the prophecy was that they would be at their destination. When they came to the place with the food grew out of the water. And so they brought them finally probably over generations to this western Lake Superior Regionally monoment bowl of the world, so this plant has great cultural significance right there, but it is also this food that rose out of the water, and it has more overall nutrition than any other food that was available in the region, the native diet, and so you can imagine the significance. This has, and it's literally. This food day is present. From birth to death. throughout the year and all of the ceremonies, it's intricately tied to a deputy. Tell us about the elders four year rule and how that's changing. One of the first things the elders taught me when I started three decades ago and you'll very little rice. The wild rice is an annual plant. It comes up from CD cheer, and that's one of the reasons why it may also be more responsive to climate change. But it, it's naturally variable in abundance. In the four year rule states that in a four year period you could expect one very good crop to occur, and maybe to sort of fair to midland years and one year. That's going to be near failure. And Dean late, and he can county. Minnesota's one. That I often think about here as we look at the lake each year. You never know what you're going to see when you fly up to it some years, it's open wire. Other years it looks like a gigantic heat-sealed and some years now with a disease that we're seeing more frequently associated with climate change Brown back. It looks like a Brownfield instead of the vibrant Greenfield the failure read on Dean leg in the last dozen years, or so is approaching fifty percent, and that really stands such a stark contrast to that t k ruled traditional ecological knowledge of the elders. You mentioned fungal disease I understand. That's become a problem. How is that connected to climate change? So the one that really most concerned about is a thing called Brown spot disease. Is a fungal disease, it's been around for a very long time, but it likes warm wet, humid conditions that are becoming more and more frequent, so we're in the past it sort of seemed to occur now and then here and there We're starting to see years where it has theory large regional outbreaks, and it's a real problem, because when the answer badly infected by this, the seeds germinate the plants girl that they are not able to produce, eat themselves, and so they're not replenishing that seed bank, and they're not providing for for human harvesters, or for all the myriad while species and also benefit and utilize wild rice.

Minnesota Wild Rice Wisconsin Wiersma Noman Dean Great Lakes Lake Superior Wildlife Commission Peter David Jeb Loy Culture Canada Brown
Canadian officials dropped charges against a First Nations chief whose violent arrest sparked protests

Native America Calling

03:48 min | 2 years ago

Canadian officials dropped charges against a First Nations chief whose violent arrest sparked protests

"The National Native News Making Camera. Kim for Antonio Gonzalez tribal governments have joined environmentalists Labor activists sent a lawsuit against new rules that rollback federal, clean water regulations, earthjustice filed the lawsuit on behalf of the possible Yawkey tribe of Arizona bad river band of Lake Superior Chippewa the on Indian nation of Washington State, the Fond Du Lac band of Lake Superior Chippewa of Minnesota. The menominee Indian tribe of Wisconsin and the tonal autumn tribe of Arizona. A C central reports, the suit contends the new federal navigable waters protection role actually weakens expanded protection for streams and wetlands that were put in place by the Obama Administration. The new rule took effect this week. It eliminates intermittent and ephemeral streams from bodies of water, protected under the Clean Water Act. The possible Yawkey tribe is concerned. The rollback will lead to damage of a major water source state officials in Arizona have supported the federal rule change, even though environmentalists warned the state could lose protections for more than ninety percent of its water bodies under the new rule. In Canada charges have been dropped against northern Alberta first nations chief who is the subject of a violent arrest a couple of months ago as Dan Carpenter Chuck reports, the arrest caught by police dash camera led to anti-racism protests across Canada chief Alan Atom of the ATHABASCA one first nation, no longer faces charges for resisting arrest and assaulting a Royal Canadian Mounted Police officer. Adam was the subject of a violent arrest in March. Police Dash Cam video showed him. Him, being tackled and punched in the head, he had been stopped for an expired license plate a statement from the Alberta. Prosecution Service says it had reassessed prosecution standard based on an examination of the available evidence, including the disclosure of relevant material and has withdrawn the charges. The arresting officers are under investigation over the incident chief atom says he's overwhelmed that the charges have been withdrawn having that it's time to move on a sign of relief in regards to. The whole ordeal that. Transpired under early mornings of Mark Steyn. And described that put aside in. Time to move on and continue on. Supposed to be doing. Adam called on Ottawa to address injustices against indigenous people, and said Canadians must open their eyes to the reality is that indigenous people have lived with for decades, the national chief of the Assembly of first nations welcomed the dropping of charges, but said it's clear that racism is embedded within most public institutions, especially the police Adams lawyer also said the decision throws a spotlight on systemic racism that has gone on for too long unchecked in Canada for national late of news I'm Dan Carpenter? In South Dakota the Cheyenne River Sioux. Tribe filed a lawsuit this week. Against the trump administration of what it says were threats to impede COVID, nineteen relief funds, and to take over policing on the reservation. The Grand Forks Herald reports. The tribe set up checkpoints leading into its lands in south. Dakota in April to protect tribal members from the spread of the corona virus. The lawsuit says pressure from Washington DC came after pleas for help from the state's governor and congressional delegation. The tribe is asking the US District Court for the District of Columbia to block the federal government from taking over tribal policing and forcing it to remove its checkpoints. On the Navajo Nation this week president, Jonathan, Nez and Vice President Myron leuser issued a proclamation to fly all flags at half staff to honor Navajo. Police officer Michael Lee who passed away to covid nineteen on June nineteenth Nez said lease saved many lives during his twenty nine years of service, and give his own life to serve and protect the community the funeral for officer. Lee is being held on Thursday June. Twenty fifth in Chandler Arizona. For National, native news I make an camera.

Adam Tribe Washington State Arizona Menominee Indian Tribe Canada Yawkey Officer Lake Superior Chippewa South Dakota Obama Administration Alberta Mark Steyn Wisconsin Michael Lee Chandler Arizona Royal Canadian Mounted Police Minnesota Fond Du Lac