17 Burst results for "Lake Lance"

"lake lance" Discussed on What's Good Games

What's Good Games

02:55 min | 3 months ago

"lake lance" Discussed on What's Good Games

"Bringing Brandon Jones and Daniel blood worth, and it's all going to be moderated by inside gaming's autumn feral. So it's GonNa be fun time. Hopefully, you will and you were out of contract this weekend. Concert in these crazy times. So adjacent to Lake Lance weekend, which is about four hours away from where I live and just turned out while we were there metallic was having this one night only drive in concert extravaganza and we went to a little town called Mak which was an hour north at the entire population of. Forty. Three hundred people so It was pretty great and the drive in itself was this drive in screen material just like stretched on the side of I was Rodeo Stadium. And that was it there was a maximum capacity of twenty, six cars. And we all just Kinda. Parked out and rock METALLICA. The people. So was it like a replay of consoles. Specifically recorded and produced and. For a drive in theater. So they recorded it was like two hour. Two hours of music like were on stage, and then you just play the song through your car speakers or you had a radio and it was really cool. Actually it was a lot of fun. I didn't realize how badly I needed that I think that was the first sign that I. Like Thankfully Jason was the that I just got super duper. Hammer. It's it's quarantine started and just rocked out in fact last night I was walking around what is my fucking neck so bad and is because all the head banging in those great. Fun. That's awesome. I didn't know that they were doing things like that I. Know a lot of people are getting creative with drive ins and how can we do social distance gatherings and things like that but that sounds that sounds really cool. So I'm glad that you had a great time Oh. Yeah. You did miss the indy arena booth which was super. So big thanks everybody who? Stopped by our streams on Friday and Saturday, we did a little tour a tour around in the afternoon on Saturday after we were done on the official channel. So thanks for all the support friends and congrats the entire team at endearing booth. They won the heart of Gaming Award which we're GONNA. Talk about a little bit later on in the news speaking of which, why don't we? Get to the news brought you WanNa get a started Oh. Yes. So this morning twitter was all the buzz must put together with this little tidbit, and that is ps five is not backwards compatible with PS three PS GOP Games according to Ubisoft support page. Goodness. So I, I learned about three or six warriors sixty four, and if you go to the link that was there, there's A page and it says transitioning playstation for titles in next Gen versions and Faq and question is how does upgrading from playoff playstation Ford playstation five work, and here's the answer as part of their next Gen upgrade process playstation offers a number of features designed to help you move from ps four ps five ps four.

Brandon Jones Lake Lance Rodeo Stadium Gaming Award Ubisoft twitter Daniel blood indy arena GOP Jason official
"lake lance" Discussed on Accelerate!

Accelerate!

11:08 min | 9 months ago

"lake lance" Discussed on Accelerate!

"I would actually say that that before you sell something. People don't really trust you. What what they do is they consider trustworthy and I am and that helps them get to that point. Bill make a decision. I I gave the example. A group is leading. An exercise with us is Okay here buyer thinks you're trustworthy enough to buy from. But do they trust you enough to babysit their kids and probably not right so I think with where people get confused. Is that that we can we talk about know like and trust? You know if you're if you have five meaningful interactions with the buyer during their buying process. Yeah how much do they really know you? How much do they really have the opportunity to develop you? You're you want to be likable. I think you make you make this point. You want to be likable. But don't really know enough to to like you. I think we have to acknowledge as sellers. The buyers making decisions with really imperfect information about us. Yes we said really triggered something because I love the the friendship of utility. Because that's what it is right and the only way you're going to influence of somebody as there is some kind of report and then we talk about with trust really comes through. This concept of credibility in a lot of people have realized you know humans are humans. Are Very very judgmental. You're surely it's somebody didn't trust. You is going to have a lot to do. Look your appearance. Plays into it. I like fifty this year. I'm sitting here going down the old white guy in front of the room right like that. I'm like I'm the old guy now so I can front of these letting go. Hey only old guy. You probably have judged me already. What does he know? He doesn't know what I know. He doesn't even know how to play fortnight right. And then then you flip it over. Then once they get over we get over how the appearance with email. Although it's our tone and we're going to be judged on on how we interact 'cause even like even me using my hands like this might offend. Some of the people watched on. He's absurd over. He's raising his voice. I don't like that tone. The last thing will be judged on his who yards humid. Our souls last single judges on right. Well you write that of the book by. I wanted to bring that up because I I actually think that's the first thing though that people judge you on I mean I think that the the world is basically operates on the basis that everywhere we go the first thing when people meet you or so on is what they're asking is why you yes and I think that's the first thing that I got my experiences. That is the universal question. If it doesn't matter what you're selling it could be financial advice. It could be as you know you're talking about could be corporate sales. That could be whatever he I think you buy you. I think I think that's ultimately if you if you went and googled. I think the best sales book Evers Green Eggs in hand right. It's the red cells. So how many times the objection? It comes up seventy three times and then when you ask. What was the first objection? I ask this all the time they so I don't like green eggs and ham and I said No. That's something I objection the first injection is. I don't like Sam I am yeah. In fact I is the objection of the sale so I I agree there but people don't but people don't pay attention to that though. That's the thing that this is if you don't do a good job to your building rapport and connection and I I'll say the word connection and stuff relationships Frank Fair Bill Building your connection. It doesn't matter what comes after that you are you are in second place or third place and so there's there's GonNa Change it and the thing that that so many sellers. I think refuse to acknowledge is that just because the customer is still talking to. You doesn't mean you're in the running right. I think they think if they don't like you. Why are they still spending time with it? Because there's lots of reasons why they want to try to find out what their options are. There's just so the first impression which and rapport the connection. All those things are so important. And you can't just take for granted and that's actually your job. Look I was on the phone earlier today with the Memphis Grizzlies. And we're doing a merchant and you know it's tough market sell in its Memphis. It's you know they. They love basketball down. There called basketball. And talking to other salespeople in the Lake Lance I was on this call with this guy. He gave me every buying saying Nice. You feel he likes you. Emily and she said Hey like me. I said did you feel. He was asking you. She said no she was. He won't even return my call at this point. Holt is their chance. Want to buy from you and she said Yeah. I said well I said at the end of the day people. Humans people don't like to deliver bad news at times probably due warning. Because he doesn't want to tell you no right and you gotta make it easy for him next time you gotTa let him know when you're going to follow it's okay to say no to me so you at least can engage you. Give yourself odds to sell. We deal with humans. The creatures emotionally just logically I on a per spent with you. I want to touch briefly. You Talk About Your Mentor Sam. In the book the gentleman that you start work with Dale Carnegie Bought some are always business Struck me as a short sentence you had in there but you you talk about the importance of values in particular about you learned about living life of honor which I think is we. Don't talk about values and character in sales and I think it's so important it gets back to how people perceive you because if you lack integrity people are gonNA understand that really quickly It's a mirror to the soul quick. They'll know definitely quick. Yeah so dig into that a little bit. You know why. Why don't we talk about more when you interview people? I have a set of questions. I give clients for interview questions at that. Have Values and character questions? I've got a great book written by Tony. John Jan TJ and. He has been on the show at books called. Good people say you know the most important thing you can do as a manager entrepreneur whatever's hire good people and he gets into this whole idea of values and characters well because the representation of who you are and it comes across so quickly. I think I think a couple of things in this. Just my opinion need. We have `ISMs in our company and these are things that over time I've learned from Sam I learned from my dad a lot of them. Were you know One one big big ISM in our company and there's a couple people in the office that that are paying attention listening to me right now. They went to observe their being doing a good job. Being quiet. `ISMS and our company is. You'll figure it out and I have one of my lungs younger managers. She's been with since college and she's probably has more experienced now than she wouldn't Lauren and we're talking yesterday tough conversation and she goes off. Figure it out and like if you're like we look at our business you gotta figure it out like I trust you to go. You have to trust yourself. You can solve problems but this thing of honor it is strengthened honor to actually act and behave the right way people make bad decisions for whatever reason people are necessarily bad and it makes me think back to the show. I don't know if you watch the movie. Gladiator and I'm asking you made your Dow's history Matrix while so yes 'cause no wonder we're getting along so if you remember the movie The the the Romans would shake his hand. Inter Inter part of their arm. And they'd say strengthen honor that's that's Historically at some level correct because the Romans taught something around citizenry. Bernie's what it meant to be a Roman citizen so my son is an I before they would go to bed uneven charge to find a piece or whatever I want to get to religion. We actually say strength and honor we say that. And it's it's part of our company and you know doing it writes one thing but doing the right thing as whole might be the most unpopular than you're gonNA do right and but doing the right things different than doing it right. Yeah I love right along the lines. I love and often cite this quote from Auto Emerson whose on my favorite writers American rice philosopher. Who said what you do speak so loudly I cannot hear what you say yes. Yes Great. Quo. And and that's we should be living our lives by that. I mean this is yes so Do want to one of things. I think we bring up so important. We our mission statement of Tyson Group. Is we work with sales leaders in teams help them compete the complex world. We do sales training and and you know were around the country doing this just not the entity staff member of mine. We work with sales for sales teams because we have a rebellious so we drive the session with people because it's really hard for leaders in sales people to figure out what they value. It's it's hard to articulate so we do a whole exercise to excuse my language. What pisses you off road. Pissed off about salespeople and I haven't write things down we go around the room and what we what we found. This is just our opinion. And it's not very scientific. That whatever ticks you off really angers you frustrates you about sales person or some of your managing about them or something you consistently have to remind people on is usually where your values star Because whatever you observed that really frustrates you like. I was on the phone this morning with a guy done business with for years and he feels he has a couple of sales people on staff that are just. Kinda is young ones that are hustle from inside team is some ones that are living high on the hog little bit. And they're not hustling not dressed in the part of not acting. Department really frustrates missile. Brian was a frustrate you so much he goes because I wasn't I I didn't come up through the ranks that way right stealing from you. Now what isn't he has their Lazy S O. The laziness the value of a demonstration. That's anything less than hostile is what he. I'm not saying it's yeah. Everybody's different right Renault is putting me. I can actually get it done with less effort. I'm all about that doesn't necessarily frustrate me. Well the thing that's always a perception on somebody's part right. It is it is so it's not. It's forty dollars. Yeah as as a soccer fan..

Sam basketball Bill Memphis Memphis Grizzlies sales training soccer Lake Lance Evers Renault Dale Carnegie Emily Holt John Jan TJ Brian Tony Lauren Dow Bernie Auto Emerson
"lake lance" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

The Indy Mogul Podcast

14:53 min | 1 year ago

"lake lance" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

"Yeah we tire her. She solves all the Broncos but yeah back then. The people didn't curb so yeah so I was in the shorts which was great because they would also pay and everything I and I was. I did have a couple of the commentaries and music videos. Started doing all that stuff Right after school which was great And then I was just trying to get my first film on my ex husband My husband at the time He's a director Alexis Asante Santos also Argentinian. And he also went to him schooling me and so he was also trying to get his break. So Little Cruzi loaded without liar. I'm guessing of of course Tamari. So yeah he he was right. In this film he submitted to the hewer balls fund in Rotterdam which gives money for developing scripts for the Third World countries. And so he won it it and it was like a fifteen thousand dollars. Branches existed so yes a government net for Americans of course government fund for Parolee rolley coming soon but not yet and people from other countries can enter in yes especially for third countries held a lot of South American filmmakers African. Maybe yeah and so he he won that and so we suddenly had fifteen thousand dollars to develop his script which was a story of his. You Know D. H. Times in Patagonia in the south of Argentina and by then we were so inspired in doing the things in London with a video camera with not a lot of money to be an experimental stuff. What I can do a lot with mind and Tina so we instead of writing the script with he just wrote like ten pages treatments in kind of these things have one line for each scene and then to New York you're GonNa to do on LCD music video? And so I bought now. Is the time that you are coming to. You're going to New York to buy cheaper film equipment are still comer breath what do you mean by LCD. Music video was living as soundsystem band. Okay Okay yes I. They called me for that and so at that time you would travel to New York to buy equipment because a lot cheaper. I don't think that applies anymore. I'm not sure about the Internet anymore. But at that time. He's like okay. Okay I'm going to go to this video. I'm just going to buy a camera but this little panasonic feet to the one before the two because it wasn't even with cards was with tape And it was just this beautiful digital camera that Hot Lake Lance and it was just really beautiful so bought one and then then we went to Argentina. I we got a group of friends and we my sister who is a really amazing actress in the annals theater in the scene Found US these amazing kids. We kind of discovered which took about fifteen people to stay in in house? From my mother in Law's friend we show the movie. Yeah that was my first Jeff Film. It's called Glue. It was very successful in festivals. Really small production so we didn't get like big distribution or anything anything so a lot of people saw it and even now you find it online. It's hard to find it but But at the time he went to a lot of festivals so event lot of up and coming directors saw it and they love my work so I started to get calls and then I got the next two films like them because they had seen blue. You jumped over one point so LCD soundsystem also invites you. It's New York is the Schal senior work. Or how was this was well. It was the British dish Director Doer. Now they're not do anymore Chris King's Antoni Dickinson and I had shot music videos with them in London in London. uh-huh yes so then that job so they took me to that job. This is an opportunity I am. I love working with them. That was so cool. I love them so ah everything that I was. Shooting with. Them was like a great thing that the New York buying the camera thing was a bonus. Yeah he does now. I know it was a great. I love that video. Steve One of my favorites amazing filmmakers really great people so that Dallas find. How do you juggle doing projects within different Fridays in terms of narrative music videos commercials? How you just keep a stable head on when you're going through? This may different mediums. I guess because these meetings are so different and it sounds like from a very early partner. You're juggling these shooting music videos feature. Did you ever think was. That's what we all do more or less Films are intense and they take like three hundred percent of your energy and so there is people that do three films in your. I'm not that kind of person to keep my mental health on my sanity. I need to unwind film and I need to be fully recharge With my batteries in energetic creative point of view before I take a new film so then commercials and music videos are a great thing to do in between also because it's not so easy to find scripts that I'm super excited about. Yeah only one movies it you know life is too short movies. Take a lot of you so I'm only interested to do them if I I really excited and passionate and I know it's going to be an amazing journey in you know in all senses all all the stars have aligned for the movie so that doesn't happen happen all the time either and so. It's great to combine it with music videos on commercial. So You keep working you keep training you keep meeting New People you you work with your crew. So you're creating your communication and all the soften you make money so that you know that that always this that balance always gave me the freedom to the movies I want because I'm always I like I always in the author our house the world so there are always the with a tab less money than I get a script that he's sixty million dollars and that is three million dollar and it's very likely I I like the swimming and that's what happens all the time and I can only follow my heart for the film's because it's just it's just too long of your time. I and I and I feel I just have to do the ones that I'm really passionate about. So then because demand so much from you yes yeah and also because I I love my work and I think to you know to to keep it in the long run is like you have to be excited about your work every day. So I for me wouldn't work to certain movie because it's very big and I'm going to get a bigger rate or you know then I will be able to have other bigger movies and Melissa as kind of a means to an end Projects that you think of as a means to an I can't. I can't undo that. I've never done that in any area of my life and I love people can and I think that's great and he can take them to other amazing places assist but I think you know each of us we have to discover who we are and how we operate for me like. I don't operate like that. It's not worth earth it to be for three or four months doing something that I'm not super excited about this because it's going to take me somewhere else. I just need it to believe it and in every moment of every day and I think the only way that I can do my best work is if I'm resonating from that place as you know what I mean. You're absolutely I think there's a lot of filmmakers out there that maybe are in that stage where they're doing a lot of work that they don't want to be doing you doing a lot of whether it's a short films that are not as excited about or music videos for artists have concentrate. We don't really want to do. I'm doing advice for people to kind of push through that gap. Eddie's I think it is something that all artists eventually run into especially I mean. It's very hard you know. Because how how can you give advice about that. Every situation so particular equalizer you know how kids mortgages to bay and things like that I when I came out of school. I was lucky that I had enough. Short films And things going on that I could survive on the last the first two years after school I was very poor But I was still. You're back then. I think I made that very important decision that I felt like it was a little bit like like I was an instrument and I couldn't get out of tune an infant school. I could experiment and decrease the staff and even the teachers were like. You can't do that. You need stuff without grain in your real and I didn't care I think commercials. Nobody's going to hire you afterwards for BBC and I say I don't WanNa go zoo what those Gracie guys. Yes I did. I was so blessed by the ignorance because I didn't have any connection with the real world I didn't have family in the film industry or did ninety one so I was so I could make all these rational decisions. Thank God anyway I come take you know I was just like you know I'm just GonNa do what I love doing my life. I don't know all my dad. My Dad is a musician he plays piano. And that's he's real dream in life he's really amazing but when he was young you know now. Another generation My grandfather was a very important doctor and he was coming from a super super super poor family lady. I don't have money to eat. So then he became a doctor. It was like amazing and of course he had to work very hard for that and then he was a successful doctor so he wanted my that to be a DR on. My Dad had to study many but he wanted to be a musician. So He's both now he became shrink. Didn't like medicine. He was fainting in so so he discovers psychoanalysis that was salvation but on the side he plays piano every day and he does records and has abandoned. That's what he would love to. So when I was very young from the beginning my parents were like to do in your life. What you want to do it as follow your heart because that's never going to be more rich than doing that? That's where the real wealth is just the happiness everyday you're following your heart so I think I just thought that you know I'm on there so I just didn't worry so much you know so. Yeah when I came out of school you know it was a few years is that he was you know. Just meeting ends But I I always try to choose what what was going to make me grow as motto refer and it's GonNa be cool in the real and give me a possibility to express something honey spot that spot things that you feel like well. I think I think it's a lot about the script director you know The director also you have to feel like you resonated with the script but then also also with director. You have to feel that. This is going to be a collaborator. That is going to push you and challenge you and and that you are deeply resonating with this person's vision and approach so that you can bring your stuff to the table and they're going to embrace it him you know we'll shoot to go even more there. You don't want to work with somebody that asking you to do the same thing. The same thing that you did or is wants to be safe because then you end up in middle ground right so I I always gravitated towards very visual experimenting experimental directors. That are little crazy crazy. Yeah per crisis good I'm hearing right. Now is a little ignorant. Be brave a little crazy. Yeah Yeah I guess if you have to like short donating one line I will say to follow your get you know because the guard is always right and the mind can tell you how you should really do this. Staw because you're gonNA work with these producers have this other project later and so on so With US just in mind union planations on this is all speculation. And you're uh no you're doing something you know a to get to be and then something happens. You didn't get to be had time doing a what for and if you're folowing your guard and you're like oh I'm excited about is every day that I go to set. I'm going to be excited and I think I'm going to be able to do something special. Then you are already in in the end in you write me. You're speculating. I know not a day that you don't like when you could just go right to be. Yeah now now. I'm confused wheel with letters. Yeah I know you know it's Very very personal you know I could also have been defend could have been a different person a lot more strategic about my decisions maybe today I would be shooting. You know hundred million dollar movies that are also good and exciting also long though I mean I don't know ten years from now we could be sending you an email that you know. That's the thing that when people ask for advice and staff often you know with the students there is no one way of doing things. And there's no one Latham does no one magic cheaper advice. I think all you can do is share. Are Your Life Journey with other people. Say Look these. This is who I am like. This is how absorb knife shaped me and I make. I made these decisions and I want to share about that and maybe the consequences of my decisions or the lifestyle is coming from my decisions. But it's my no means a recipe before anyone and unfortunately I can't be anybody else baggage and all my group that this is the thing about filmmakers like each of us.

New York director London Broncos Argentina Alexis Asante Santos Rotterdam Jeff Film Tina US Law Hot Lake Lance partner Steve One Latham Melissa BBC Eddie
"lake lance" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

The Indy Mogul Podcast

12:21 min | 1 year ago

"lake lance" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

"Yeah we tire her. She solves all the Broncos but yeah back then. The people didn't curb so yeah so I was in the shorts which was great because they would also pay and everything I and I was. I did have a couple of commentaries and music videos. Started doing all that stuff Right after school which was great And then I was just trying to get my first film on my ex husband My husband at the time He's a director Alexis Asante Santos also Argentinian. And he also went to him schooling me and so he was also trying to get his break. So Little Cruzi loaded without liar. I'm guessing of of course Tamari. So yeah he he was right. In this film he submitted to the the hewer balls fund in Rotterdam which gives money for developing scripts for the Third World countries and so he won it it and it was like a fifteen thousand dollars branches existed so yes a government net for Americans of course government fund for Parolee rolley coming soon but not yet and people from other countries can enter in yes especially for third countries held a lot of South American filmmakers African. Maybe yeah and so he he won that and so we suddenly had fifteen thousand dollars to develop his script which was a story of his. You Know D. H. Times in Patagonia in the south of Argentina and by then we were so inspired in doing the things in London with a video camera with not a lot of money to be an experimental stuff. What I can do a lot with mind and Tina so we instead of writing the script with he just wrote like ten pages treatments in kind of these things have one line for each scene and then to New York you're GonNa to do on LCD music video? And so I bought now. Is the time that you are coming to. You're going to New York to buy cheaper film equipment are still comer breath what do you mean by LCD. Music video was living as soundsystem band. Okay Okay yes I. They called me for that and so at that time you would travel to New York to buy equipment because a lot cheaper. I don't think that applies anymore. I'm not sure about the Internet anymore but just at that time. He's like okay. Okay I'm going to go to this video. I'm just going to buy a camera but this little panasonic feet to the one before the two because it wasn't even with cards was with tape And it was just this beautiful digital camera that Hot Lake Lance and it was just really beautiful so bought one and then then we went to Argentina. I we got a group of friends and we my sister who is a really amazing actress in the annals theater in the scene Found US these amazing kids. We kind of discovered which took about fifteen people to stay in in house? From my mother in Law's friend we show the movie. Yeah that was my first Jeff Film. It's called Glue. It was very successful in festivals. Really small production so we didn't get like big distribution or anything anything so a lot of people saw it and even now you find it online. It's hard to find it but But at the time he went to a lot of festivals so event lot of up and coming directors saw it and they love my work so I started to get calls and then I got the next two films like them because they had seen blue. You jumped over one point so LCD soundsystem also invites you. It's New York is the Schal senior work. Or how was this was well. It was the British dish Director Doer. Now they're not do anymore Chris King's Antoni Dickinson and I had shot music videos with them in London in London. uh-huh yes so then that job so they took me to that job. This is an opportunity I am. I love working with them. That was so cool. I love them so ah everything that I was. Shooting with. Them was like a great thing that the New York buying the camera thing was a bonus. Yeah he does now. I know it was a great. I love that video. Steve One of my favorites amazing filmmakers really great people so that Dallas find. How do you juggle doing projects within different Fridays in terms of narrative music videos commercials? How you just keep a stable head on when you're going through? This may different mediums. I guess because these meetings are so different and it sounds like from a very early partner. You're juggling these shooting music videos feature. Did you ever think was. That's what we all do more or less Films are intense and they take like three hundred percent of your energy and so there is people that do three films in your. I'm not that kind of person to keep my mental health on my sanity. I need to unwind film and I need to be fully recharge With my batteries in energetic creative point of view before I take a new film so then commercials and music videos are a great thing to do in between also because it's not so easy to find scripts that I'm super excited about. Yeah only one movies it you know life is too short movies. Take a lot of you so I'm only interested to do them if I I really excited and passionate and I know it's going to be an amazing journey in you know in all senses all all the stars have aligned for the movie so that doesn't happen happen all the time either and so. It's great to combine it with music videos on commercial. So You keep working you keep training you keep meeting New People you you work with your crew. So you're creating your communication and all the soften you make money so that you know that that always this that balance always gave me the freedom to the movies I want because I'm always I like I always in the author our house the world so there are always the with a tab less money than I get a script that he's sixty million dollars and that is three million dollar and it's very likely I I like the swimming and that's what happens all the time and I can only follow my heart for the film's because it's just it's just too long of your time. I and I and I feel I just have to do the ones that I'm really passionate about. So then because demand so much from you yes yeah and also because I I love my work and I think to you know to to keep it in the long run is like you have to be excited about your work every day. So I for me wouldn't work to certain movie because it's very big and I'm going to get a bigger rate or you know then I will be able to have other bigger movies and Melissa as kind of a means to an end Projects that you think of as a means to an I can't. I can't undo that. I've never done that in any area of my life and I love people can and I think that's great and he can take them to other amazing places assist but I think you know each of us we have to discover who we are and how we operate for me like. I don't operate like that. It's not worth earth it to be for three or four months doing something that I'm not super excited about this because it's going to take me somewhere else. I just need it to believe it and in every moment of every day and I think the only way that I can do my best work is if I'm resonating from that place as you know what I mean. You're absolutely I think there's a lot of filmmakers out there that maybe are in that stage where they're doing a lot of work that they don't want to be doing you doing a lot of whether it's a short films that are not as excited about or music videos for artists have concentrate. We don't really want to do. I'm doing advice for people to kind of push through that gap. Eddie's I think it is something that all artists eventually run into especially I mean. It's very hard you know. Because how how can you give advice about that. Every situation so particular equalizer you know how kids mortgages to bay and things like that I when I came out of school. I was lucky that I had enough. Short films And things going on that I could survive on the last the first two years after school I was very poor But I was still. You're back then. I think I made that very important decision that I felt like it was a little bit like like I was an instrument and I couldn't get out of tune an infant school. I could experiment and decrease the staff and even the teachers were like. You can't do that. You need stuff without grain in your real and I didn't care I think commercials. Nobody's going to hire you afterwards for BBC and I say I don't WanNa go zoo what those Gracie guys. Yes I did. I was so blessed by the ignorance because I didn't have any connection with the real world I didn't have family in the film industry or did ninety one so I was so I could make all these rational decisions. Thank God anyway I come yeah you know I was just like you know I'm just GonNa do what I love doing my life. I don't know all my dad. My Dad is a musician he plays piano. And that's he's real dream in life he's really amazing but when he was young you know now. Another generation My grandfather was a very important doctor and he was coming from a super super super poor family lady. I don't have money to eat. So then he became a doctor. It was like amazing and of course he had to work very hard for that and then he was a successful doctor so he wanted my that to be a DR on. My Dad had to study many but he wanted to be a musician. So He's both now he became shrink. Didn't like medicine. He was fainting in so so he discovers psychoanalysis that was salvation but on the side he plays piano every day and he does records and has abandoned. That's what he would love to. So when I was very young from the beginning my parents were like to do in your life. What you want to do it as follow your heart because that's never going to be more rich than doing that? That's where the real wealth is just the happiness everyday you're following your heart so I think I just thought that you know I'm on there so I just didn't worry so much you know so. Yeah when I came out of school you know it was a few years is that he was you know. Just meeting ends But I I always try to choose what what was going to make me grow as motto refer and it's GonNa be cool in the real and give me a possibility to express something honey spot that spot things that you feel like well. I think I think it's a lot about the script director you know The director also you have to feel like you resonated with the script but then also also with director. You have to feel that. This is going to be a collaborator. That is going to push you and challenge you and and that you are deeply resonating with this person's vision and approach so that you can bring your stuff to the table and they're going to embrace it him you know we'll shoot to go even more there. You don't want to work with somebody that asking you to do the same thing..

director New York Argentina Broncos London Alexis Asante Santos Rotterdam Jeff Film Tina Hot Lake Lance Law partner Steve One Melissa BBC Eddie Dallas Chris King
"lake lance" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

The Indy Mogul Podcast

13:35 min | 1 year ago

"lake lance" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

"I think diversity like if we would have happened today money. Yeah we tire her. She solves all the Broncos but yeah back then. The people didn't curb so yeah so I was in the shorts which was great because they would also pay and everything a and I was I did have a couple of the commentaries and music videos started doing all that stuff right after school which was great And then I was just trying to get my first film on. my Ex husband My husband at the time He's a director Alexis Asante Santos also Argentinian. And he also went to him schooling me and so he was also trying to get his break. So Little Cruzi loaded without liar. I'm guessing of of course Tamari. So yeah he he was right. In this film he submitted to the hewer balls fund in Rotterdam which gives money for developing scripts for the Third World countries and so he won it it and it was like a fifteen thousand dollars branches existed so yes a government net for Americans of course government fund for people rolley coming soon but not yet and people from other countries can enter in yes especially for third countries held a lot of South American filmmakers African. Maybe yeah and so he he won that and so we suddenly had fifteen thousand dollars to develop his script which was A story of his. You Know D. H. Times in Patagonia in the south of Argentina and by then we were so inspired in doing the things in London with a video camera with not a lot of money to be an experimental stuff. What I can do a lot with mind and Tina so we instead of writing the script with he just wrote like ten pages treatments in kind of these things have one line for each scene and then to New York you're GonNa to do on LCD music video? And so I bought now. Is the time that you are coming to. You're going to New York to buy cheaper film equipment are still comer breath what do you mean by LCD. Music video was living as soundsystem band. Okay Okay yes I. They called me for that and so at that time you would travel to New York to buy equipment because a lot cheaper. I don't think that applies anymore. I'm not sure about the Internet me more time. He's like okay okay. I'm going to go to this video. I'm just going to buy a camera. But this little panasonic feet to the one before the two because it wasn't even with cards was with tape And it was just this beautiful digital camera that Hot Lake Lance and it was just really beautiful so bought one and then now we went to Argentina. I we got a group of friends and we my sister who is a really amazing actress in the Anna Theater in the scene Found US these amazing kids. We kind of discovered which took about fifteen people to stay in in house? From my mother in Law's friend we show the movie. Yeah that was my first Jeff Film. It's called Glue. It was very successful in festivals. Really small production so we didn't get like big distribution or anything anything so a lot of people saw it and even now you find it online. It's hard to find it but But at the time he went to a lot of festivals so event lot of up and coming directors saw it and they love my work so I started to get calls and then I got the next two films like them because they had seen blue. You jumped over one point so LCD soundsystem also invites you. It's New York is the Schal senior work. Or how was this was well. It was the British dish Director Doer. Now they're not do anymore Chris King's Antoni Dickinson and I had shot music videos with them in London in London. uh-huh yes so then that job so they took me to that job. This is an opportunity I am. I love working with them. That was so cool. I Love Them. So ooh ev- everything that I was shooting with. Them was like a great thing that the New York buying the camera thing was a bonus. Yeah he does now. I know it was a great. I love that video. Steve One of my favorites amazing filmmakers really great people so that Dallas find. How do you juggle doing projects within different varieties in terms of narrative music videos commercials? How you just keep a stable head on when you're going through? This may different mediums. I guess because these meetings are so different and it sounds like from a very early partner. You're juggling these shooting music videos feature. Did you ever think was. That's what we all do more or less Films are intense and they take like three hundred percent of your energy and so there is people that do three films in your. I'm not that kind of person to keep my mental health on my sanity. I need to unwind film and I need to be fully recharge With my batteries in energetic creative point of view before I take a new film so then commercials and music videos are a great thing to do in between also because it's not so easy to find scripts that I'm super excited about. Yeah only one movies. It life is too short movies. Take a lot of you so I'm only interested to do them if I I really excited and passionate and I know it's going to be an amazing journey in you know in all senses all all the stars have aligned for the movie so that doesn't happen happen all the time either and so. It's great to combine it with music videos on commercial. So You keep working you keep training you keep meeting New People you you work with your crew. So you're creating your communication and all the soften you make money so that you know that that always this that balance always gave me the freedom to the movies I want because I'm always I like I always in the author our house the world so there are always the with a tab less money than I get a script that he's sixty million dollars and that is three million dollar and it's very likely I I like the swimming and that's what happens all the time and I can only follow my heart for the film's because it's just it's just too long of your time on and I and I feel I just have to do the ones that I'm really passionate about so then because demand so much from you yes yeah and also because I I love my work and I think to you know to to keep it in the long run is like you have to be excited about your work every day so I for me wouldn't work to certain movie because it's very big and I'm going to get a bigger rate or you know then I will be able to have other bigger movies and Melissa as kind of a means to an end Projects that you think of as a means to an I can't. I can't undo that. I've never done that in any area of my life and I love people can and I think that's great and he can take them to other amazing places assist but I think you know each of us we have to discover who we are and how we operate for me like. I don't operate like that. It's not worth earth it to be for three or four months doing something that I'm not super excited about this because it's going to take me somewhere else. I just need it to believe it and in every moment of every day and I think the only way that I can do my best work is if I'm resonating from that place as you know what I mean absolutely. I think there's a lot of filmmakers out there that maybe are in that stage where they're doing a lot of work that they don't want to be doing doing a lot of whether it's a short films that are not as excited about or music videos for artists have concentrate. We don't really want to do. I'm doing advice for people to kind of push through that gap. Eddie's I think it is something that all artists eventually run into especially I mean. It's very hard you know because how how can you give advice about that. Every situation is so particular equalizer. You know how kids mortgages to bay and things like that I. When I came out of school I was lucky that I had enough short films As things going on that I could survive on the last the first two years after school I was very poor But I was still ah back then. I think I made that very important decision that I felt like it was a little bit like like I was an instrument and I couldn't get out of tune an infant school. I could experiment and decrease the staff and even the teachers were like. You can't do that. You need stuff without grain in your real and I didn't care I think commercials. Nobody's going to hire you afterwards for BBC and I say I don't WanNa go zoo what those Gracie guys. Yes I did. I was so blessed by the ignorance because I didn't have any connection with the real world I didn't have family in the film industry or did ninety one so I was so I could make all these rational decisions. Thank God to make them anyway. I come yeah you know I was just like you know. I'm just GonNa do what I love doing my life. I don't know all my dad. My Dad is a musician he plays piano. And that's he's real dream in life he's really amazing but when he was young you know now. Another generation My grandfather was a very important doctor and he was coming from a super super super poor family lady. I don't have money to eat. So then he became a doctor. It was like amazing and of course he had to work very hard for that and then he was a successful doctor so he wanted my that to be a DR on. My Dad had to study many but he wanted to be a musician. So He's both now he became shrink. Didn't like medicine. He was fainting in so so he discovers psychoanalysis that was salvation but on the side he plays piano every day and he does records and has abandoned. That's what he would love to do. So so when I was very young from the beginning my parents were like to do in your life. What you want to do it as follow your heart because that's never going to be more rich than doing that? That's where the real wealth is just the happiness everyday you're following your heart so I think I just thought that you know I'm on there so I just didn't worry so much you know so. Yeah when I came out of school you know it was a few years is that he was just meeting ends But I always try to choose what what was going to make me grow as motto refer and it's GonNa be cool in the real and give me a possibility to express something spot that spot things that you feel like well. I think I think it's a lot about the script director you know The director also you have to feel like you resonated with the script but then also also with director. You have to feel that. This is going to be a collaborator. That is going to push you and challenge you and and that you are deeply resonating with this person's vision and approach so that you can bring your stuff to the table and they're going to embrace it him you know we'll shoot to go even more there. You don't want to work with somebody that asking you to do the same thing. The same thing that you did or is wants to be safe because then you end up in middle ground right so I I always gravitated towards very visual experimenting experimental directors. That are little crazy crazy. Yeah per crisis good I'm hearing right. Now is a little ignorant. Be brave a little crazy. Yeah Yeah I guess if you have to like short donating one line I will say to follow your get you know because the guard is always right and the mind can tell you how you should really do this. Staw because you're gonNA work with these producers have this other project later and so and so With US just in mind union planations on this is all speculation. And you're uh no you're doing something you know a to get to be and then something happens. You didn't get to be had the time doing a what for and if you're folowing your guard and you're like oh I'm excited about is every day that I go to said I'm going to be excited and I think I'm going to.

director New York Argentina London Broncos Alexis Asante Santos Rotterdam Tina Jeff Film Anna Theater US Law Hot Lake Lance partner Steve One Melissa BBC
"lake lance" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

The Indy Mogul Podcast

13:27 min | 1 year ago

"lake lance" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

"Yeah we tire her. She solves all the Broncos but yeah back then. The people didn't curb so yeah so I was in the shorts which was great because they would also pay and everything a and I was I did have a couple of the commentaries and music videos started doing all that stuff right after school which was great And then I was just trying to get my first film on. my Ex husband My husband at the time He's a director Alexis Asante Santos also Argentinian. And he also went to him schooling me and so he was also trying to get his break. So Little Cruzi loaded without liar. I'm guessing of of course Tamari. So yeah he he was right. In this film he submitted to the hewer balls fund in Rotterdam which gives money for developing scripts for the Third World countries and so he won it it and it was like a fifteen thousand dollars branches existed so yes a government net for Americans of course government fund for Parolee rolley coming soon but not yet and people from other countries can enter in yes especially for third countries held a lot of South American filmmakers African. Maybe yeah and so he he won that and so we suddenly had fifteen thousand dollars to develop his script which was a story of his. You Know D. H. Times in Patagonia in the south of Argentina and by then we were so inspired in doing the things in London with a video camera with not a lot of money to be an experimental stuff. What I can do a lot with mind and Tina so we instead of writing the script with he just wrote like ten pages treatments in kind of these things have one line for each scene and then to New York you're GonNa to do on LCD music video? And so I bought now. Is the time that you are coming to. You're going to New York to buy cheaper film equipment are still comer breath what do you mean by LCD. Music video was living as soundsystem band. Okay Okay yes I. They called me for that and so at that time you would travel to New York to buy equipment because a lot cheaper. I don't think that applies anymore. I'm not sure about the Internet anymore but just at that time. He's like okay. Okay I'm going to go to this video. I'm just going to buy a camera but this little panasonic feet to the one before the two because it wasn't even with cards was with tape And it was just this beautiful digital camera that Hot Lake Lance and it was just really beautiful so bought one and then then we went to Argentina. I we got a group of friends and we my sister who is a really amazing actress in the annals theater in the scene Found US these amazing kids. We kind of discovered which took about fifteen people to stay in in house? From my mother in Law's friend we show the movie. Yeah that was my first Jeff Film. It's called Glue. It was very successful in festivals. Really small production so we didn't get like big distribution or anything anything so a lot of people saw it and even now you find it online. It's hard to find it but But at the time he went to a lot of festivals so event lot of up and coming directors saw it and they love my work so I started to get calls and then I got the next two films like them because they had seen blue. You jumped over one point so LCD soundsystem also invites you. It's New York is the Schal senior work. Or how was this was well. It was the British dish Director Doer. Now they're not do anymore Chris King's Antoni Dickinson and I had shot music videos with them in London in London. uh-huh yes so then that job so they took me to that job. This is an opportunity I am. I love working with them. That was so cool. I Love Them. So Oh ev- everything that I was shooting with them was like a great thing that the New York buying the camera thing was a bonus. Yeah he does now. I know it was a great. I love that video. Steve One of my favorites amazing filmmakers really great people so that Dallas find. How do you juggle doing projects within different Fridays in terms of narrative music videos commercials? How you just keep a stable head on when you're going through? This may different mediums. I guess because these meetings are so different and it sounds like from a very early partner. You're juggling these shooting music videos feature. Did you ever think was. That's what we all do more or less Films are intense and they take like three hundred percent of your energy and so there is people that do three films in your. I'm not that kind of person to keep my mental health on my sanity. I need to unwind film and I need to be fully recharge With my batteries in energetic creative point of view before I take a new film so then commercials and music videos are a great thing to do in between also because it's not so easy to find scripts that I'm super excited about. Yeah only one movies it you know life is too short movies. Take a lot of you so I'm only interested to do them if I I really excited and passionate and I know it's going to be an amazing journey in you know in all senses all all the stars have aligned for the movie so that doesn't happen happen all the time either and so. It's great to combine it with music videos on commercial. So You keep working you keep training you keep meeting New People you you work with your crew. So you're creating your communication and all the soften you make money so that you know that that always this that balance always gave me the freedom to the movies I want because I'm always I like I always in the author our house the world so there are always the with a tab less money than I get a script that he's sixty million dollars and that is three million dollar and it's very likely I I like the swimming and that's what happens all the time and I can only follow my heart for the film's because it's just it's just too long of your time on and I and I feel I just have to do the ones that I'm really passionate about so then because demand so much from you yes yeah and also because I I love my work and I think to you know to to keep it in the long run is like you have to be excited about your work every day so I for me wouldn't work to certain movie because it's very big and I'm going to get a bigger rate or you know then I will be able to have other bigger movies and Melissa as kind of a means to an end Projects that you think of as a means to an I can't. I can't undo that. I've never done that in any area of my life and I love people can and I think that's great and he can take them to other amazing places assist but I think you know each of us we have to discover who we are and how we operate for me like. I don't operate like that. It's not worth earth it to be for three or four months doing something that I'm not super excited about this because it's going to take me somewhere else. I just need it to believe it and in every moment of every day and I think the only way that I can do my best work is if I'm resonating from that place as you know what I mean. You're absolutely I think there's a lot of filmmakers out there that maybe are in that stage where they're doing a lot of work that they don't want to be doing you doing a lot of whether it's a short films that are not as excited about or music videos for artists have concentrate. We don't really want to do. I'm doing advice for people to kind of push through that gap. Eddie's I think it is something that all artists eventually run into especially I mean. It's very hard you know. Because how how can you give advice about that. Every situation so particular equalizer you know how kids mortgages to bay and things like that I when I came out of school I was lucky that I had enough. Short films As things going on that I could survive on the last the first two years after school I was very poor But I was still. You're back then. I think I made that very important decision that I felt like it was a little bit like like I was an instrument and I couldn't get out of tune an infant school. I could experiment and decrease the staff and even the teachers were like. You can't do that. You need stuff without grain in your real and I didn't care I think commercials. Nobody's going to hire you afterwards for BBC and I say I don't WanNa go zoo what those Gracie guys. Yes I did. I was so blessed by the ignorance because I didn't have any connection with the real world I didn't have family in the film industry or did ninety one so I was so I could make all these rational decisions. Thank God anyway I come yeah you know I was just like you know I'm just GonNa do what I love doing my life. I don't know all my dad. My Dad is a musician he plays piano. And that's he's real dream in life he's really amazing but when he was young you know now. Another generation My grandfather was a very important doctor and he was coming from a super super super poor family lady. I don't have money to eat. So then he became a doctor. It was like amazing and of course he had to work very hard for that and then he was a successful doctor so he wanted my that to be a DR on. My Dad had to study many but he wanted to be a musician. So He's both now he became shrink. Didn't like medicine. He was fainting in so so he discovers psychoanalysis that was salvation but on the side he plays piano every day and he does records and has abandoned. That's what he would love to. So when I was very young from the beginning my parents were like to do in your life. What you want to do it as follow your heart because that's never going to be more rich than doing that? That's where the real wealth is just the happiness everyday you're following your heart so I think I just thought that you know I'm on there so I just didn't worry so much you know so. Yeah when I came out of school you know it was a few years is that he was you know. Just meeting ends But I I always try to choose what what was going to make me grow as motto refer and it's GonNa be cool in the real and give me a possibility to express something spot that spot things that you feel like well. I think I think it's a lot about the script director you know The director also you have to feel like you resonated with the script but then also also with director. You have to feel that. This is going to be a collaborator. That is going to push you and challenge you and and that you are deeply resonating with this person's vision and approach so that you can bring your stuff to the table and they're going to embrace it him you know we'll shoot to go even more there. You don't want to work with somebody that asking you to do the same thing. The same thing that you did or is wants to be safe because then you end up in middle ground right so I I always gravitated towards very visual experimenting experimental directors. That are little crazy crazy. Yeah per crisis good I'm hearing right. Now is a little ignorant. Be brave a little crazy. Yeah Yeah I guess if you have to like short donating one line I will say to follow your get you know because the guard is always right and the mind can tell you how you should really do this. Staw because you're gonNA work with these producers have this other project later and so on so With US just in mind union planations on this is all speculation. And you're uh no you're doing something you know a to get to be and then something happens. You didn't get to be had time doing a what for and if you're the following your guard and you're like oh I'm excited about is every day that I go to set..

director New York Argentina London Broncos Alexis Asante Santos Rotterdam Tina Jeff Film US Law Hot Lake Lance partner Steve One Melissa BBC Eddie Dallas
"lake lance" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

The Indy Mogul Podcast

13:27 min | 1 year ago

"lake lance" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

"Yeah we tire her. She solves all the Broncos but yeah back then. The people didn't curb so yeah so I was in the shorts which was great because they would also pay and everything I and I was. I did have a couple of the commentaries and music videos. Started doing all that stuff Right after school which was great And then I was just trying to get my first film on my ex husband My husband at the time He's a director Alexis Asante Santos also Argentinian. And he also went to him schooling me and so he was also trying to get his break. So Little Cruzi loaded without liar. I'm guessing of of course Tamari. So yeah he he was right. In this film he submitted to the hewer balls fund in Rotterdam which gives money for developing scripts for the Third World countries and so he won it it and it was like a fifteen thousand dollars branches existed so yes a government net for Americans of course government fund for Parolee rolley coming soon but not yet and people from other countries can enter in yes especially for third countries held a lot of South American filmmakers African. Maybe yeah and so he he won that and so we suddenly had fifteen thousand dollars to develop his script which was a story of his. You Know D. H. Times in Patagonia in the south of Argentina and by then we were so inspired in doing the things in London with a video camera with not a lot of money to be an experimental stuff. What I can do a lot with mind and Tina so we instead of writing the script with he just wrote like ten pages treatments in kind of these things have one line for each scene and then to New York you're GonNa to do on LCD music video? And so I bought now. Is the time that you are coming to. You're going to New York to buy cheaper film equipment are still comer breath what do you mean by LCD. Music video was living as soundsystem band. Okay Okay yes I. They called me for that and so at that time you would travel to New York to buy equipment because a lot cheaper. I don't think that applies anymore. I'm not sure about the Internet anymore but just at that time. He's like okay. Okay I'm going to go to this video. I'm just going to buy a camera but this little panasonic feet to the one before the two because it wasn't even with cards was with tape And it was just this beautiful digital camera that Hot Lake Lance and it was just really beautiful so bought one and then then we went to Argentina. I we got a group of friends and we my sister who is a really amazing actress in the annals theater in the scene Found US these amazing kids. We kind of discovered which took about fifteen people to stay in in house? From my mother in Law's friend we show the movie. Yeah that was my first Jeff Film. It's called Glue. It was very successful in festivals. Really small production so we didn't get like big distribution or anything anything so a lot of people saw it and even now you find it online. It's hard to find it but But at the time he went to a lot of festivals so event lot of up and coming directors saw it and they love my work so I started to get calls and then I got the next two films like them because they had seen blue. You jumped over one point so LCD soundsystem also invites you. It's New York is the Schal senior work. Or how was this was well. It was the British dish Director Doer. Now they're not do anymore Chris King's Antoni Dickinson and I had shot music videos with them in London in London. uh-huh yes so then that job so they took me to that job. This is an opportunity I am. I love working with them. That was so cool. I Love Them. So Oh ev- everything that I was shooting with them was like a great thing that the New York buying the camera thing was a bonus. Yeah he does now. I know it was a great. I love that video. Steve One of my favorites amazing filmmakers really great people so that Dallas find. How do you juggle doing projects within different Fridays in terms of narrative music videos commercials? How do you keep a stable head on when you're going through? This may different mediums. I guess because these meetings are so different and it sounds like from a very early partner. You're juggling these shooting music videos feature. Did you ever think was. That's what we all do more or less Films are intense and they take like three hundred percent of your energy and so there is people that do three films in your. I'm not that kind of person to keep my mental health on my sanity. I need to unwind film and I need to be fully recharge With my batteries in energetic creative point of view before I take a new film so then commercials and music videos are a great thing to do in between also because it's not so easy to find scripts that I'm super excited about. Yeah only one movies it you know life is too short movies. Take a lot of you so I'm only interested to do them if I I really excited and passionate and I know it's going to be an amazing journey in you know in all senses all all the stars have aligned for the movie so that doesn't happen happen all the time either and so. It's great to combine it with music videos on commercial. So You keep working you keep training you keep meeting New People you you work with your crew. So you're creating your communication and all the soften you make money so that you know that that always this that balance always gave me the freedom to the movies I want because I'm always I like I always in the author our house the world so there are always the with a tab less money than I get a script that he's sixty million dollars and that is three million dollar and it's very likely I I like the swimming and that's what happens all the time and I can only follow my heart for the film's because it's just it's just too long of your time. I and I and I feel I just have to do the ones that I'm really passionate about. So then because demand so much from you yes yeah and also because I I love my work and I think to you know to to keep it in the long run is like you have to be excited about your work every day. So I for me wouldn't work to certain movie because it's very big and I'm going to get a bigger rate or you know then I will be able to have other bigger movies and Melissa as kind of a means to an end Projects that you think of as a means to an I can't. I can't undo that. I've never done that in any area of my life and I love people can and I think that's great and he can take them to other amazing places assist but I think you know each of us we have to discover who we are and how we operate for me like. I don't operate like that. It's not worth earth it to be for three or four months doing something that I'm not super excited about this because it's going to take me somewhere else. I just need it to believe it and in every moment of every day and I think the only way that I can do my best work is if I'm resonating from that place as you know what I mean. You're absolutely I think there's a lot of filmmakers out there that maybe are in that stage where they're doing a lot of work that they don't want to be doing you doing a lot of whether it's a short films that are not as excited about or music videos for artists have concentrate. We don't really want to do. I'm doing advice for people to kind of push through that gap. Eddie's I think it is something that all artists eventually run into especially I mean. It's very hard you know. Because how how can you give advice about that. Every situation so particular equalizer you know how kids mortgages to bay and things like that I when I came out of school I was lucky that I had enough. Short films As things going on that I could survive on the last the first two years after school I was very poor But I was still. You're back then. I think I made that very important decision that I felt like it was a little bit like like I was an instrument and I couldn't get out of tune an infant school. I could experiment and decrease the staff and even the teachers were like. You can't do that. You need stuff without grain in your real and I didn't care I think commercials. Nobody's going to hire you afterwards for BBC and I say I don't WanNa go zoo what those Gracie guys. Yes I did. I was so blessed by the ignorance because I didn't have any connection with the real world I didn't have family in the film industry or did ninety one so I was so I could make all these rational decisions. Thank God anyway I come yeah you know I was just like you know I'm just GonNa do what I love doing my life. I don't know all my dad. My Dad is a musician he plays piano. And that's he's real dream in life he's really amazing but when he was young you know now. Another generation My grandfather was a very important doctor and he was coming from a super super super poor family lady. I don't have money to eat. So then he became a doctor. It was like amazing and of course he had to work very hard for that and then he was a successful doctor so he wanted my that to be a DR on. My Dad had to study many but he wanted to be a musician. So He's both now he became shrink. Didn't like medicine. He was fainting in so so he discovers psychoanalysis that was salvation but on the side he plays piano every day and he does records and has abandoned. That's what he would love to. So when I was very young from the beginning my parents were like to do in your life. What you want to do it as follow your heart because that's never going to be more rich than doing that? That's where the real wealth is just the happiness everyday you're following your heart so I think I just thought that you know I'm on there so I just didn't worry so much you know so. Yeah when I came out of school you know it was a few years is that he was you know. Just meeting ends But I I always try to choose what what was going to make me grow as motto refer and it's GonNa be cool in the real and give me a possibility to express something honey spot that spot things that you feel like well. I think I think it's a lot about the script director you know The director also you have to feel like you resonated with the script but then also also with director. You have to feel that. This is going to be a collaborator. That is going to push you and challenge you and and that you are deeply resonating with this person's vision and approach so that you can bring your stuff to the table and they're going to embrace it him you know we'll shoot to go even more there. You don't want to work with somebody that asking you to do the same thing. The same thing that you did or is wants to be safe because then you end up in middle ground right so I I always gravitated towards very visual experimenting experimental directors. That are little crazy crazy. Yeah per crisis good I'm hearing right. Now is a little ignorant. Be brave a little crazy. Yeah Yeah I guess if you have to like short donating one line I will say to follow your get you know because the guard is always right and the mind can tell you how you should really do this. Staw because you're gonNA work with these producers have this other project later and so on so With US just in mind union planations on this is all speculation. And you're uh no you're doing something you know a to get to be and then something happens. You didn't get to be had time doing a what for and if you're the following your guard and you're like oh I'm excited about is every day that I go to set..

director New York Argentina London Broncos Alexis Asante Santos Rotterdam Jeff Film US Tina Law Hot Lake Lance partner Steve One Melissa BBC Eddie Dallas
"lake lance" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

The Indy Mogul Podcast

13:27 min | 1 year ago

"lake lance" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

"Yeah we tire her. She solves all the Broncos but yeah back then. The people didn't curb so yeah so I was in the shorts which was great because they would also pay and everything I and I was. I did have a couple of the commentaries and music videos. Started doing all that stuff Right after school which was great And then I was just trying to get my first film on my ex husband My husband at the time He's a director Alexis Asante Santos also Argentinian. And he also went to him schooling me and so he was also trying to get his break. So Little Cruzi loaded without liar. I'm guessing of of course Tamari. So yeah he he was right. In this film he submitted to the the hewer balls fund in Rotterdam which gives money for developing scripts for the Third World countries and so he won it it and it was like a fifteen thousand dollars branches existed so yes a government net for Americans of course government fund for Parolee rolley coming soon but not yet and people from other countries can enter in yes especially for third countries held a lot of South American filmmakers African. Maybe yeah and so he he won that and so we suddenly had fifteen thousand dollars to develop his script which was a story of his. You Know D. H. Times in Patagonia in the south of Argentina and by then we were so inspired in doing the things in London with a video camera with not a lot of money to be an experimental stuff. What I can do a lot with mind and Tina so we instead of writing the script with he just wrote like ten pages treatments in kind of these things have one line for each scene and then to New York you're GonNa to do on LCD music video? And so I bought now. Is the time that you are coming to. You're going to New York to buy cheaper film equipment are still comer breath what do you mean by LCD. Music video was living as soundsystem band. Okay Okay yes I. They called me for that and so at that time you would travel to New York to buy equipment because a lot cheaper. I don't think that applies anymore. I'm not sure about the Internet anymore but just at that time. He's like okay. Okay I'm going to go to this video. I'm just going to buy a camera but this little panasonic feet to the one before the two because it wasn't even with cards was with tape And it was just this beautiful digital camera that Hot Lake Lance and it was just really beautiful so bought one and then then we went to Argentina. I we got a group of friends and we my sister who is a really amazing actress in the annals theater in the scene Found US these amazing kids. We kind of discovered which took about fifteen people to stay in in house? From my mother in Law's friend we show the movie. Yeah that was my first Jeff Film. It's called Glue. It was very successful in festivals. Really small production so we didn't get like big distribution or anything anything so a lot of people saw it and even now you find it online. It's hard to find it but But at the time he went to a lot of festivals so event lot of up and coming directors saw it and they love my work so I started to get calls and then I got the next two films like them because they had seen blue. You jumped over one point so LCD soundsystem also invites you. It's New York is the Schal senior work. Or how was this was well. It was the British dish Director Doer. Now they're not do anymore Chris King's Antoni Dickinson and I had shot music videos with them in London in London. uh-huh yes so then that job so they took me to that job. This is an opportunity I am. I love working with them. That was so cool. I Love Them. So Oh ev- everything that I was shooting with them was like a great thing that the New York buying the camera thing was a bonus. Yeah he does now. I know it was a great. I love that video. Steve One of my favorites amazing filmmakers really great people so that Dallas find. How do you juggle doing projects within different Fridays in terms of narrative music videos commercials? How you just keep a stable head on when you're going through? This may different mediums. I guess because these meetings are so different and it sounds like from a very early partner. You're juggling these shooting music videos feature. Did you ever think was. That's what we all do more or less Films are intense and they take like three hundred percent of your energy and so there is people that do three films in your. I'm not that kind of person to keep my mental health on my sanity. I need to unwind film and I need to be fully recharge With my batteries in energetic creative point of view before I take a new film so then commercials and music videos are a great thing to do in between also because it's not so easy to find scripts that I'm super excited about. Yeah only one movies it you know life is too short movies. Take a lot of you so I'm only interested to do them if I I really excited and passionate and I know it's going to be an amazing journey in you know in all senses all all the stars have aligned for the movie so that doesn't happen happen all the time either and so. It's great to combine it with music videos on commercial. So You keep working you keep training you keep meeting New People you you work with your crew. So you're creating your communication and all the soften you make money so that you know that that always this that balance always gave me the freedom to the movies I want because I'm always I like I always in the author our house the world so there are always the with a tab less money than I get a script that he's sixty million dollars and that is three million dollar and it's very likely I I like the swimming and that's what happens all the time and I can only follow my heart for the film's because it's just it's just too long of your time on and I and I feel I just have to do the ones that I'm really passionate about so then because demand so much from you yes yeah and also because I I love my work and I think to you know to to keep it in the long run is like you have to be excited about your work every day so I for me wouldn't work to certain movie because it's very big and I'm going to get a bigger rate or you know then I will be able to have other bigger movies and Melissa as kind of a means to an end Projects that you think of as a means to an I can't. I can't undo that. I've never done that in any area of my life and I love people can and I think that's great and he can take them to other amazing places assist but I think you know each of us we have to discover who we are and how we operate for me like. I don't operate like that. It's not worth earth it to be for three or four months doing something that I'm not super excited about this because it's going to take me somewhere else. I just need it to believe it and in every moment of every day and I think the only way that I can do my best work is if I'm resonating from that place as you know what I mean. You're absolutely I think there's a lot of filmmakers out there that maybe are in that stage where they're doing a lot of work that they don't want to be doing you doing a lot of whether it's a short films that are not as excited about or music videos for artists have concentrate. We don't really want to do. I'm doing advice for people to kind of push through that gap. Eddie's I think it is something that all artists eventually run into especially I mean. It's very hard you know. Because how how can you give advice about that. Every situation so particular equalizer you know how kids mortgages to bay and things like that I when I came out of school I was lucky that I had enough. Short films As things going on that I could survive on the last the first two years after school I was very poor But I was still. You're back then. I think I made that very important decision that I felt like it was a little bit like like I was an instrument and I couldn't get out of tune an infant school. I could experiment and decrease the staff and even the teachers were like. You can't do that. You need stuff without grain in your real and I didn't care I think commercials. Nobody's going to hire you afterwards for BBC and I say I don't WanNa go zoo what those Gracie guys. Yes I did. I was so blessed by the ignorance because I didn't have any connection with the real world I didn't have family in the film industry or did ninety one so I was so I could make all these rational decisions. Thank God anyway I come yeah you know I was just like you know I'm just GonNa do what I love doing my life. I don't know all my dad. My Dad is a musician he plays piano. And that's he's real dream in life he's really amazing but when he was young you know now. Another generation My grandfather was a very important doctor and he was coming from a super super super poor family lady. I don't have money to eat. So then he became a doctor. It was like amazing and of course he had to work very hard for that and then he was a successful doctor so he wanted my that to be a DR on. My Dad had to study many but he wanted to be a musician. So He's both now he became shrink. Didn't like medicine. He was fainting in so so he discovers psychoanalysis that was salvation but on the side he plays piano every day and he does records and has abandoned. That's what he would love to. So when I was very young from the beginning my parents were like to do in your life. What you want to do it as follow your heart because that's never going to be more rich than doing that? That's where the real wealth is just the happiness everyday you're following your heart so I think I just thought that you know I'm on there so I just didn't worry so much you know so. Yeah when I came out of school you know it was a few years is that he was you know. Just meeting ends But I I always try to choose what what was going to make me grow as motto refer and it's GonNa be cool in the real and give me a possibility to express something spot that spot things that you feel like well. I think I think it's a lot about the script director you know The director also you have to feel like you resonated with the script but then also also with director. You have to feel that. This is going to be a collaborator. That is going to push you and challenge you and and that you are deeply resonating with this person's vision and approach so that you can bring your stuff to the table and they're going to embrace it him you know we'll shoot to go even more there. You don't want to work with somebody that asking you to do the same thing. The same thing that you did or is wants to be safe because then you end up in middle ground right so I I always gravitated towards very visual experimenting experimental directors. That are little crazy crazy. Yeah per crisis good I'm hearing right. Now is a little ignorant. Be brave a little crazy. Yeah Yeah I guess if you have to like short donating one line I will say to follow your get you know because the guard is always right and the mind can tell you how you should really do this. Staw because you're gonNA work with these producers have this other project later and so on so With US just in mind union planations on this is all speculation. And you're uh no you're doing something you know a to get to be and then something happens. You didn't get to be had time doing a what for and if you're folowing your guard and you're like oh I'm excited about is every day that I go to set..

director New York Argentina London Broncos Alexis Asante Santos Rotterdam Jeff Film US Tina Law Hot Lake Lance partner Steve One Melissa BBC Eddie Dallas
"lake lance" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

The Indy Mogul Podcast

13:27 min | 1 year ago

"lake lance" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

"Yeah we tire her. She solves all the Broncos but yeah back then. The people didn't curb so yeah so I was in the shorts which was great because they would also pay and everything I and I was. I did have a couple of the commentaries and music videos. Started doing all that stuff Right after school which was great And then I was just trying to get my first film on my ex husband My husband at the time He's a director Alexis Asante Santos also Argentinian. And he also went to him schooling me and so he was also trying to get his break. So Little Cruzi loaded without liar. I'm guessing of of course Tamari. So yeah he he was right. In this film he submitted to the a hewer balls fund in Rotterdam which gives money for developing scripts for the Third World countries and so he won it it and it was like a fifteen thousand dollars branches existed so yes a government net for Americans of course government fund for Parolee rolley coming soon but not yet and people from other countries can enter in yes especially for third countries held a lot of South American filmmakers African. Maybe yeah and so he he won that and so we suddenly had fifteen thousand dollars to develop his script which was a story of his. You Know D. H. Times in Patagonia in the south of Argentina and by then we were so inspired in doing the things in London with a video camera with not a lot of money to be an experimental stuff. What I can do a lot with mind and Tina so we instead of writing the script with he just wrote like ten pages treatments in kind of these things have one line for each scene and then to New York you're GonNa to do on LCD music video? And so I bought now. Is the time that you are coming to. You're going to New York to buy cheaper film equipment are still comer breath what do you mean by LCD. Music video was living as soundsystem band. Okay Okay yes I. They called me for that and so at that time you would travel to New York to buy equipment because a lot cheaper. I don't think that applies anymore. I'm not sure about the Internet anymore but just at that time. He's like okay. Okay I'm going to go to this video. I'm just going to buy a camera but this little panasonic feet to the one before the two because it wasn't even with cards was with tape And it was just this beautiful digital camera that Hot Lake Lance and it was just really beautiful so bought one and then then we went to Argentina. I we got a group of friends and we my sister who is a really amazing actress in the annals theater in the scene Found US these amazing kids. We kind of discovered which took about fifteen people to stay in in house? From my mother in Law's friend we show the movie. Yeah that was my first Jeff Film. It's called Glue. It was very successful in festivals. Really small production so we didn't get like big distribution or anything anything so a lot of people saw it and even now you find it online. It's hard to find it but But at the time he went to a lot of festivals so event lot of up and coming directors saw it and they love my work so I started to get calls and then I got the next two films like them because they had seen blue. You jumped over one point so LCD soundsystem also invites you. It's New York is the Schal senior work. Or how was this was well. It was the British dish Director Doer. Now they're not do anymore Chris King's Antoni Dickinson and I had shot music videos with them in London in London. uh-huh yes so then that job so they took me to that job. This is an opportunity I am. I love working with them. That was so cool. I Love Them. So ooh ev- everything that I was shooting with. Them was like a great thing that the New York buying the camera thing was a bonus. Yeah he does now. I know it was a great. I love that video. Steve One of my favorites amazing filmmakers really great people so that Dallas find. How do you juggle doing projects within different Fridays in terms of narrative videos commercials? How you just keep a stable head on when you're going through? This may different mediums. I guess because these meetings are so different and it sounds like from a very early partner. You're juggling these shooting music videos feature. Did you ever think was. That's what we all do more or less Films are intense and they take like three hundred percent of your energy and so there is people that do three films in your. I'm not that kind of person to keep my mental health on my sanity. I need to unwind film and I need to be fully recharge With my batteries in energetic creative point of view before I take a new film so then commercials and music videos are a great thing to do in between also because it's not so easy to find scripts that I'm super excited about. Yeah only one movies it you know life is too short movies. Take a lot of you so I'm only interested to do them if I I really excited and passionate and I know it's going to be an amazing journey in you know in all senses all all the stars have aligned for the movie so that doesn't happen happen all the time either and so. It's great to combine it with music videos on commercial. So You keep working you keep training you keep meeting New People you you work with your crew. So you're creating your communication and all the soften you make money so that you know that that always this that balance always gave me the freedom to the movies I want because I'm always I like I always in the author our house the world so there are always the with a tab less money than I get a script that he's sixty million dollars and that is three million dollar and it's very likely I I like the swimming and that's what happens all the time and I can only follow my heart for the film's because it's just it's just too long of your time. I and I and I feel I just have to do the ones that I'm really passionate about. So then because demand so much from you yes yeah and also because I I love my work and I think to you know to to keep it in the long run is like you have to be excited about your work every day. So I for me wouldn't work to certain movie because it's very big and I'm going to get a bigger rate or you know then I will be able to have other bigger movies and Melissa as kind of a means to an end Projects that you think of as a means to an I can't. I can't undo that. I've never done that in any area of my life and I love people can and I think that's great and he can take them to other amazing places assist but I think you know each of us we have to discover who we are and how we operate for me like. I don't operate like that. It's not worth earth it to be for three or four months doing something that I'm not super excited about this because it's going to take me somewhere else. I just need it to believe it and in every moment of every day and I think the only way that I can do my best work is if I'm resonating from that place as you know what I mean. You're absolutely I think there's a lot of filmmakers out there that maybe are in that stage where they're doing a lot of work that they don't want to be doing you doing a lot of whether it's a short films that are not as excited about or music videos for artists have concentrate. We don't really want to do. I'm doing advice for people to kind of push through that gap. Eddie's I think it is something that all artists eventually run into especially I mean. It's very hard you know. Because how how can you give advice about that. Every situation so particular equalizer you know how kids mortgages to bay and things like that I when I came out of school I was lucky that I had enough. Short films As things going on that I could survive on the last the first two years after school I was very poor But I was still. You're back then. I think I made that very important decision that I felt like it was a little bit like like I was an instrument and I couldn't get out of tune an infant school. I could experiment and decrease the staff and even the teachers were like. You can't do that. You need stuff without grain in your real and I didn't care I think commercials. Nobody's going to hire you afterwards for BBC and I say I don't WanNa go zoo what those Gracie guys. Yes I did. I was so blessed by the ignorance because I didn't have any connection with the real world I didn't have family in the film industry or did ninety one so I was so I could make all these rational decisions. Thank God anyway I come take you know I was just like you know I'm just GonNa do what I love doing my life. I don't know all my dad. My Dad is a musician he plays piano. And that's he's real dream in life he's really amazing but when he was young you know now. Another generation My grandfather was a very important doctor and he was coming from a super super super poor family lady. I don't have money to eat. So then he became a doctor. It was like amazing and of course he had to work very hard for that and then he was a successful doctor so he wanted my that to be a DR on. My Dad had to study many but he wanted to be a musician. So He's both now he became shrink. Didn't like medicine. He was fainting in so so he discovers psychoanalysis that was salvation but on the side he plays piano every day and he does records and has abandoned. That's what he would love to. So when I was very young from the beginning my parents were like to do in your life. What you want to do it as follow your heart because that's never going to be more rich than doing that? That's where the real wealth is just the happiness everyday you're following your heart so I think I just thought that you know I'm on there so I just didn't worry so much you know so. Yeah when I came out of school you know it was a few years is that he was you know. Just meeting ends But I I always try to choose what what was going to make me grow as motto refer and it's GonNa be cool in the real and give me a possibility to express something honey spot that spot things that you feel like well. I think I think it's a lot about the script director you know The director also you have to feel like you resonated with the script but then also also with director. You have to feel that. This is going to be a collaborator. That is going to push you and challenge you and and that you are deeply resonating with this person's vision and approach so that you can bring your stuff to the table and they're going to embrace it him you know we'll shoot to go even more there. You don't want to work with somebody that asking you to do the same thing. The same thing that you did or is wants to be safe because then you end up in middle ground right so I I always gravitated towards very visual experimenting experimental directors. That are little crazy crazy. Yeah per crisis good I'm hearing right. Now is a little ignorant. Be brave a little crazy. Yeah Yeah I guess if you have to like short donating one line I will say to follow your get you know because the guard is always right and the mind can tell you how you should really do this. Staw because you're gonNA work with these producers have this other project later and so on so With US just in mind union planations on this is all speculation. And you're uh no you're doing something you know a to get to be and then something happens. You didn't get to be had time doing a what for and if you're folowing your guard and you're like oh I'm excited about is every day that I go to set..

director New York Argentina London Broncos Alexis Asante Santos Rotterdam Jeff Film US Tina Law Hot Lake Lance partner Steve One Melissa BBC Eddie Dallas
"lake lance" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

The Indy Mogul Podcast

13:27 min | 1 year ago

"lake lance" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

"Yeah we tire her. She solves all the Broncos but yeah back then. The people didn't curb so yeah so I was in the shorts which was great because they would also pay and everything I and I was. I did have a couple of the commentaries and music videos. Started doing all that stuff Right after school which was great And then I was just trying to get my first film on my ex husband My husband at the time He's a director Alexis Asante Santos also Argentinian. And he also went to him schooling me and so he was also trying to get his break. So Little Cruzi loaded without liar. I'm guessing of of course Tamari. So yeah he he was right. In this film he submitted to the hewer balls fund in Rotterdam which gives money for developing scripts for the Third World countries and so he won it it and it was like a fifteen thousand dollars branches existed so yes a government net for Americans of course government fund for Parolee rolley coming soon but not yet and people from other countries can enter in yes especially for third countries held a lot of South American filmmakers African. Maybe yeah and so he he won that and so we suddenly had fifteen thousand dollars to develop his script which was a story of his. You Know D. H. Times in Patagonia in the south of Argentina and by then we were so inspired in doing the things in London with a video camera with not a lot of money to be an experimental stuff. What I can do a lot with mind and Tina so we instead of writing the script with he just wrote like ten pages treatments in kind of these things have one line for each scene and then to New York you're GonNa to do on LCD music video? And so I bought now. Is the time that you are coming to. You're going to New York to buy cheaper film equipment are still comer breath what do you mean by LCD. Music video was living as soundsystem band. Okay Okay yes I. They called me for that and so at that time you would travel to New York to buy equipment because a lot cheaper. I don't think that applies anymore. I'm not sure about the Internet me more time. He's like okay okay. I'm going to go to this video. I'm just going to buy a camera. But this little panasonic feet to the one before the two because it wasn't even with cards was with tape And it was just this beautiful digital camera that Hot Lake Lance and it was just really beautiful so bought one and then then we went to Argentina. I we got a group of friends and we my sister who is a really amazing actress in the annals theater in the scene Found US these amazing kids. We kind of discovered which took about fifteen people to stay in in house? From my mother in Law's friend we show the movie. Yeah that was my first Jeff Film. It's called Glue. It was very successful in festivals. Really small production so we didn't get like big distribution or anything anything so a lot of people saw it and even now you find it online. It's hard to find it but But at the time he went to a lot of festivals so event lot of up and coming directors saw it and they love my work so I started to get calls and then I got the next two films like them because they had seen blue. You jumped over one point so LCD soundsystem also invites you. It's New York is the Schal senior work. Or how was this was well. It was the British dish Director Doer. Now they're not do anymore Chris King's Antoni Dickinson and I had shot music videos with them in London in London. uh-huh yes so then that job so they took me to that job. This is an opportunity I am. I love working with them. That was so cool. I Love Them. So Oh ev- everything that I was shooting with them was like a great thing that the New York buying the camera thing was a bonus. Yeah he does now. I know it was a great. I love that video. Steve One of my favorites amazing filmmakers really great people so that Dallas find. How do you juggle doing projects within different Fridays in terms of narrative music videos commercials? How do you keep a stable head on when you're going through? This may different mediums. I guess because these meetings are so different and it sounds like from a very early partner. You're juggling these shooting music videos feature. Did you ever think was. That's what we all do more or less Films are intense and they take like three hundred percent of your energy and so there is people that do three films in your. I'm not that kind of person to keep my mental health on my sanity. I need to unwind film and I need to be fully recharge With my batteries in energetic creative point of view before I take a new film so then commercials and music videos are a great thing to do in between also because it's not so easy to find scripts that I'm super excited about. Yeah only one movies it you know life is too short movies. Take a lot of you so I'm only interested to do them if I I really excited and passionate and I know it's going to be an amazing journey in you know in all senses all all the stars have aligned for the movie so that doesn't happen happen all the time either and so. It's great to combine it with music videos on commercial. So You keep working you keep training you keep meeting New People you you work with your crew. So you're creating your communication and all the soften you make money so that you know that that always this that balance always gave me the freedom to the movies I want because I'm always I like I always in the author our house the world so there are always the with a tab less money than I get a script that he's sixty million dollars and that is three million dollar and it's very likely I I like the swimming and that's what happens all the time and I can only follow my heart for the film's because it's just it's just too long of your time. I and I and I feel I just have to do the ones that I'm really passionate about. So then because demand so much from you yes yeah and also because I I love my work and I think to you know to to keep it in the long run is like you have to be excited about your work every day. So I for me wouldn't work to certain movie because it's very big and I'm going to get a bigger rate or you know then I will be able to have other bigger movies and Melissa as kind of a means to an end Projects that you think of as a means to an I can't. I can't undo that. I've never done that in any area of my life and I love people can and I think that's great and he can take them to other amazing places assist but I think you know each of us we have to discover who we are and how we operate for me like. I don't operate like that. It's not worth earth it to be for three or four months doing something that I'm not super excited about this because it's going to take me somewhere else. I just need it to believe it and in every moment of every day and I think the only way that I can do my best work is if I'm resonating from that place as you know what I mean. You're absolutely I think there's a lot of filmmakers out there that maybe are in that stage where they're doing a lot of work that they don't want to be doing you doing a lot of whether it's a short films that are not as excited about or music videos for artists have concentrate. We don't really want to do. I'm doing advice for people to kind of push through that gap. Eddie's I think it is something that all artists eventually run into especially I mean. It's very hard you know. Because how how can you give advice about that. Every situation so particular equalizer you know how kids mortgages to bay and things like that I when I came out of school I was lucky that I had enough. Short films As things going on that I could survive on the last the first two years after school I was very poor But I was still. You're back then. I think I made that very important decision that I felt like it was a little bit like like I was an instrument and I couldn't get out of tune an infant school. I could experiment and decrease the staff and even the teachers were like. You can't do that. You need stuff without grain in your real and I didn't care I think commercials. Nobody's going to hire you afterwards for BBC and I say I don't WanNa go zoo what those Gracie guys. Yes I did. I was so blessed by the ignorance because I didn't have any connection with the real world I didn't have family in the film industry or did ninety one so I was so I could make all these rational decisions. Thank God anyway I come yeah you know I was just like you know I'm just GonNa do what I love doing my life. I don't know all my dad. My Dad is a musician he plays piano. And that's he's real dream in life he's really amazing but when he was young you know now. Another generation My grandfather was a very important doctor and he was coming from a super super super poor family lady. I don't have money to eat. So then he became a doctor. It was like amazing and of course he had to work very hard for that and then he was a successful doctor so he wanted my that to be a DR on. My Dad had to study many but he wanted to be a musician. So He's both now he became shrink. Didn't like medicine. He was fainting in so so he discovers psychoanalysis that was salvation but on the side he plays piano every day and he does records and has abandoned. That's what he would love to. So when I was very young from the beginning my parents were like to do in your life. What you want to do it as follow your heart because that's never going to be more rich than doing that? That's where the real wealth is just the happiness everyday you're following your heart so I think I just thought that you know I'm on there so I just didn't worry so much you know so. Yeah when I came out of school you know it was a few years is that he was you know. Just meeting ends But I I always try to choose what what was going to make me grow as motto refer and it's GonNa be cool in the real and give me a possibility to express something honey spot that spot things that you feel like well. I think I think it's a lot about the script director you know The director also you have to feel like you resonated with the script but then also also with director. You have to feel that. This is going to be a collaborator. That is going to push you and challenge you and and that you are deeply resonating with this person's vision and approach so that you can bring your stuff to the table and they're going to embrace it him you know we'll shoot to go even more there. You don't want to work with somebody that asking you to do the same thing. The same thing that you did or is wants to be safe because then you end up in middle ground right so I I always gravitated towards very visual experimenting experimental directors. That are little crazy crazy. Yeah per crisis good I'm hearing right. Now is a little ignorant. Be brave a little crazy. Yeah Yeah I guess if you have to like short donating one line I will say to follow your get you know because the guard is always right and the mind can tell you how you should really do this. Staw because you're gonNA work with these producers have this other project later and so on so With US just in mind union planations on this is all speculation. And you're uh no you're doing something you know a to get to be and then something happens. You didn't get to be had time doing a what for and if you're folowing your guard and you're like oh I'm excited about is every day that I go to set..

director New York Argentina London Broncos Alexis Asante Santos Rotterdam Jeff Film US Tina Law Hot Lake Lance partner Steve One Melissa BBC Eddie
"lake lance" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

The Indy Mogul Podcast

11:36 min | 1 year ago

"lake lance" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

"Maybe yeah and so he he won that and so we suddenly had fifteen thousand dollars to develop his script which was a story of his. You Know D. Nate Times in Patagonia in the south of Argentina and by then we were so inspired in doing things in London with a video camera with not a lot of money to be an experimental stuff. What I can do a lot with mind and Tina so we instead of writing the script he just wrote like ten pages treatments in kind of these things have one line for each scene and then to New York GonNa to do one. Lcd Music Video. And so I bought now. Is the time that you are coming to. You're going to New York to buy cheaper. Film equipment are still comer. Lcd Music video was living as soundsystem band. Okay Okay yes I. They called me for that and so at that time you would travel to New York to buy equipment because a lot cheaper. I don't think that applies anymore. I'm not sure about the Internet anymore but just at that time. He's like okay. I'm going to go to this video. I'm just going to buy a camera. But this little panasonic feet to the one before the two because it wasn't even with cards was with tape and it was just this beautiful digital camera that Hot Lake Lance and it was just really beautiful so bought one and then then we went to Argentina and we got a group of friends and we my sister who is a really amazing actress in the annals theater in the scene Found US these amazing kids. We kind of discovered Which took about fifteen people to stay in the house. From my mother in Law's friend we show the movie. Yeah that was my first Jeff Film. It's called Glue. It was very successful in festivals. Really small production so we didn't get like big distribution or anything so not other people saw it and even you find it online. It's hard to find it but But at the time he went to a lot of festivals so then a lot of up and coming directors saw it and they love my work so I started to get calls and then I got the next two films like them because they had seen blue you jumped over one point so lcd soundsystem also invites you. It's New York is the Schal senior work. Or how was this was well? It was the British director doer. Now they're not do anymore Chris King's Antoni Dickinson and I had shot music videos with them in London in London has. Yes that job so they took me to that job. This is an opportunity I am. I love working with them. That was so cool. I Love Them. So Ev- everything that I was shooting with them was like a great thing that the New York. Buying the camera thing was a bonus. Yeah he does not like know. It was a great. I love that Video Steve. One of my favorites amazing filmmakers really great people so that was fun. How do you juggle doing projects within different Fridays in terms of narrative? Music videos commercials. How you just keep a stable head on when you're going through. This may even mediums. I guess because these meetings are so different and it sounds like from a very early partner. You're juggling these shooting. Music videos feature reduced was. That's what we all do. More or less Films are intense and they take like three hundred percent of your energy and so there is people that do three films in your. I'm not that kind of person to keep my mental health on my sanity. I need to unwind film and I need to be fully recharge With my batteries in energetic creative point of view before I take a new film so then commercials music. Videos are a great thing to do in between also because it's not so easy to find scripts that I'm super excited about. Yeah only one movies. It you know. Life is too short movies. Take a lot of you so I'm only interested to do them if I really excited and passionate and I know it's going to be an amazing journey in you know in all senses all all the stars have aligned for the movie so that doesn't happen all the time either and so it's great to combine it with music videos on commercial so you keep working you keep training you keep meeting. New People You you weren't with your crew so you're creating your communication and all the soften you make money so that you know that that always that balance always gave me the freedom to the movies. I want because I'm always I like. I always in the author our house world so there are always the a tab less money than I get a script his sixty million dollar and that is three million dollar. And it's very likely I like the swimming happens all the time and I can only follow my heart for the film's because it's just it's just too long of your time and I and I feel I just have to do the ones that I'm really passionate about. So then because demand so much from you yes and also because I I love my work and I think to you know to to keep it in the long run is like you have to be excited about your work every day. So I you know for me wouldn't work to certain movie because it's very big and I'm going to get a bigger rate or you know then I will be able to have other bigger movies and Elissa as kind of a means to an end Projects that you think of as a means to an I can't. I can't do that. I have never done that in any area of my life and I love people can and I think that's great and he can take them to other amazing places But I think you know each of us. We have to discover who we are and how we operate for me like. I don't operate like that. It's not worth it to be for three or four months doing something that I'm not super excited about this because it's going to take me somewhere else. I just need to believe it in every moment of every day and I think the only way that I can do my best work is if I'm resonating from that place you know what I mean. I think there's a lot of filmmakers out there that maybe are in that stage where they're doing a lot of work that they don't want to be doing you doing a lot of whether it's a short films that are not as excited about or music. Videos for artists have concentrate. We don't really want to do. I'm doing advice for people to kind of push through that gap vase because I think it is something that all artists eventually run into. Especially I mean it's very hard you know because how. How can you give advice about that? Every situation so particular you know how kids and mortgages to bay and things like that I when I came out of school. I was lucky that I had enough short films as things going on that I could survive on the last the first two years after school. I was very poor But I was still back then. I think I made that very important decision that I felt like it was a little bit like like I was an instrument and I couldn't get out of tune an infant school. I could experiment and decrease the staff and even the teachers were like. You can't do that. You need stuff without grain in your real and I didn't care I was just doing my thing and nobody's going to hire you afterwards for BBC and I say I don't WanNa go zoo what those Gracie guys I did. I was so blessed by the ignorance because I didn't have any connection with the real world I didn't have family in the film industry or did ninety one so I don't know how really so I could make all these rational decisions. Thank God anyway. I come home you know I was just like you know. I'm just GonNa do what I love doing my life. I don't know my dad. My Dad is a musician he plays piano. And that's he's real dream in life. He's really amazing but when he was young. You know another generation My grandfather was a very important doctor and he was coming from a super super super poor family lady not have money to eat so then he became a doctor. It was like amazing. And of course he had to work very hard for that and then he was a successful doctor so he wanted my that to be a doctor and my dad had to study medicine but he wanted to be a musician. So He's both now. He became shrink. Didn't like medicine. He was fainting in so he discovers psychoanalysis that was his salvation but on the side he plays piano every day and he does records and has abandoned. That's what he would love to. So when I was very young you know from the beginning. My parents were like to do in your life. What you want to do it as follow your heart because that's never going to be more rich than that. That's where the real wealth is just the happiness everyday you're following your heart so I think I just thought that you know I'm an dream a little so I just didn't worry so much you know so. Yeah when I came out of school you know it was a few years that he was you know. Just meeting ends But I I always try to choose what what was going to make me grow as motto refer and you're GonNa be cooling the real and give me a possibility to express something honey spot that the things that you feel like well. I think. I think it's a lot about the script director you know The director also. You have to feel like you resonated with the script but then also with director. You have to feel that. This is going to be a collaborator. That is going to push you and challenge you and and that you are deeply resonating with this person's vision and approach so that you can bring your stuff to the table and they're going to embrace it him you know we'll shoot to go even more there. You don't want to work with somebody that asking you to do the same thing. The same thing that you did or is wants to be safe because then you end up in this middle ground right so I. I always gravitated towards very visual experiment in experimental directors. That are little crazy crazy. Yeah per crisis good old. I'm hearing right. Now is a little ignorant. Be brave a little crazy. Yeah Yeah I guess if you have to like Sheridan eating one line I will say to follow your get you know because the guard is.

New York director Argentina London Tina Nate Times Jeff Film Hot Lake Lance Law Ev partner Elissa Sheridan BBC Chris King Gracie Antoni Dickinson
"lake lance" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

The Indy Mogul Podcast

12:49 min | 1 year ago

"lake lance" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

"Also you can go to school. Without having money something scholarships so yeah. Now I think for anyone do how the opportunity I think. It's a great option. Also because of the people you meet I feel like I created such great friendships that also became a community of creators that still collaborate with each other and that's unavoidable just to have that network when especially when you're starting that network of so far but then also you make you know these long life relationships with people on. Yeah you mentioned that started in film. So what would these first couple of films look like? Was this is in film school or just posted on school when they first films my first film. It's actually a very interesting experience so I film school Infants go a lot of shorts and when I came out of school I was also continuing to do a lotta shorts. I was living in London and there was a lot of support for short films. Non Emerging filmmakers so. The film conceal film for BBC. They were all like financing a lot of short and so it was really great. Because you were doing you know. Twenty minutes films from directors and you know keep learning and there was funding for it and then there was funding so it was great transition from school to two films So I started to do that and I kind of started to get a name in that world but it was you know it was difficult to get the break for the first film of course for everyone and especially on top of that you know being a woman and being too young being Argentina and all the stuff it was not the and the film industry I think diversity is like if we would have happened today money. Yeah we tire her. She solves all the Broncos but yeah back then. The people didn't so yeah so I was in the shorts which was great because they would also pay and everything and I was. I did have a couple of commentaries and music videos. Started doing all that stuff Right after school which was great And then I was just trying to get my first film on. My Ex husband My husband at the time He's a director Alexis Asante also Argentinian. And he also went to school with me and so he was also trying to get his break. So Little Cruzi loaded without liar. I'm guessing of course to Bari. So yeah he he was right. In this film he submitted to the Hewer Bulbs Fund in Rotterdam which gives money for developing scripts for the Third World countries. And so he won it and it was like a fifteen thousand dollars branches existed so yes a government net for Americans of course government fund for parolee coming soon but not yet And people from other countries can enter in yes especially for third countries held a lot of South American filmmakers African. Maybe yeah and so he he won that and so we suddenly had fifteen thousand dollars to develop his script which was a story of his. You Know D. Nate Times in Patagonia in the south of Argentina and by then we were so inspired in doing things in London with a video camera with not a lot of money to be an experimental stuff. What I can do a lot with mind and Tina so we instead of writing the script he just wrote like ten pages treatments in kind of these things have one line for each scene and then to New York GonNa to do one. Lcd Music Video. And so I bought now. Is the time that you are coming to. You're going to New York to buy cheaper. Film equipment are still comer. Lcd Music video was living as soundsystem band. Okay Okay yes I. They called me for that and so at that time you would travel to New York to buy equipment because a lot cheaper. I don't think that applies anymore. I'm not sure about the Internet anymore but just at that time. He's like okay. I'm going to go to this video. I'm just going to buy a camera. But this little panasonic feet to the one before the two because it wasn't even with cards was with tape and it was just this beautiful digital camera that Hot Lake Lance and it was just really beautiful so bought one and then then we went to Argentina and we got a group of friends and we my sister who is a really amazing actress in the annals theater in the scene Found US these amazing kids. We kind of discovered Which took about fifteen people to stay in the house. From my mother in Law's friend we show the movie. Yeah that was my first Jeff Film. It's called Glue. It was very successful in festivals. Really small production so we didn't get like big distribution or anything so not other people saw it and even you find it online. It's hard to find it but But at the time he went to a lot of festivals so then a lot of up and coming directors saw it and they love my work so I started to get calls and then I got the next two films like them because they had seen blue you jumped over one point so lcd soundsystem also invites you. It's New York is the Schal senior work. Or how was this was well? It was the British director doer. Now they're not do anymore Chris King's Antoni Dickinson and I had shot music videos with them in London in London has. Yes that job so they took me to that job. This is an opportunity I am. I love working with them. That was so cool. I Love Them. So Ev- everything that I was shooting with them was like a great thing that the New York. Buying the camera thing was a bonus. Yeah he does not like know. It was a great. I love that Video Steve. One of my favorites amazing filmmakers really great people so that was fun. How do you juggle doing projects within different Fridays in terms of narrative? Music videos commercials. How you just keep a stable head on when you're going through. This may even mediums. I guess because these meetings are so different and it sounds like from a very early partner. You're juggling these shooting. Music videos feature reduced was. That's what we all do. More or less Films are intense and they take like three hundred percent of your energy and so there is people that do three films in your. I'm not that kind of person to keep my mental health on my sanity. I need to unwind film and I need to be fully recharge With my batteries in energetic creative point of view before I take a new film so then commercials music. Videos are a great thing to do in between also because it's not so easy to find scripts that I'm super excited about. Yeah only one movies. It you know. Life is too short movies. Take a lot of you so I'm only interested to do them if I really excited and passionate and I know it's going to be an amazing journey in you know in all senses all all the stars have aligned for the movie so that doesn't happen all the time either and so it's great to combine it with music videos on commercial so you keep working you keep training you keep meeting. New People You you weren't with your crew so you're creating your communication and all the soften you make money so that you know that that always that balance always gave me the freedom to the movies. I want because I'm always I like. I always in the author our house world so there are always the a tab less money than I get a script that he's sixty million dollars and that is three million dollar and it's very likely I like the swimming happens all the time and I can only follow my heart for the film's because it's just it's just too long of your time and I and I feel I just have to do the ones that I'm really passionate about so then because demand so much from you yes and also because I I love my work and I think to you know to to keep it in the long run is like you have to be excited about your work every day so I you know for me wouldn't work to certain movie because it's very big and I'm going to get a bigger rate or you know then I will be able to have other bigger movies and Elissa as kind of a means to an end Projects that you think of as a means to an I can't. I can't do that. I have never done that in any area of my life and I love people can and I think that's great and he can take them to other amazing places But I think you know each of us. We have to discover who we are and how we operate for me like. I don't operate like that. It's not worth it to be for three or four months doing something that I'm not super excited about this because it's going to take me somewhere else. I just need to believe it in every moment of every day and I think the only way that I can do my best work is if I'm resonating from that place you know what I mean. I think there's a lot of filmmakers out there that maybe are in that stage where they're doing a lot of work that they don't want to be doing you doing a lot of whether it's a short films that are not as excited about or music. Videos for artists have concentrate. We don't really want to do. I'm doing advice for people to kind of push through that gap vase because I think it is something that all artists eventually run into. Especially I mean it's very hard you know because how. How can you give advice about that? Every situation so particular you know how kids and mortgages to bay and things like that I when I came out of school. I was lucky that I had enough short films as things going on that I could survive on the last the first two years after school. I was very poor But I was still back then. I think I made that very important decision that I felt like it was a little bit like like I was an instrument and I couldn't get out of tune an infant school. I could experiment and decrease the staff and even the teachers were like. You can't do that. You need stuff without grain in your real and I didn't care I was just doing my thing and nobody's going to hire you afterwards for BBC and I say I don't WanNa go zoo what those Gracie guys I did. I was so blessed by the ignorance because I didn't have any connection with the real world I didn't have family in the film industry or did ninety one so I don't know how really so I could make all these rational decisions. Thank God anyway. I come home you know I was just like you know. I'm just GonNa do what I love doing my life. I don't know my dad. My Dad is a musician he plays piano. And that's he's real dream in life. He's really amazing but when he was young. You know another generation My grandfather was a very important doctor and he was coming from a super super super poor family lady not have money to eat so then he became a doctor. It was like amazing. And of course he had to work very hard for that and then he was a successful doctor so he wanted my that to be a doctor and my dad had to study medicine but he wanted to be a musician. So He's both now. He became shrink. Didn't like medicine. He was fainting in so he discovers psychoanalysis that was his salvation but on the side he plays piano every day and he does records and has abandoned. That's what he would love to. So when I was very young you know from the beginning..

New York Argentina London BBC director Jeff Film Broncos Hewer Bulbs Fund Bari Alexis Asante Tina Nate Times Hot Lake Lance Law Ev partner Elissa Rotterdam
"lake lance" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

The Indy Mogul Podcast

12:49 min | 1 year ago

"lake lance" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

"Also you can go to school. Without having money something scholarships so yeah. Now I think for anyone do how the opportunity I think. It's a great option. Also because of the people you meet I feel like I created such great friendships that also became a community of creators that still collaborate with each other and that's unavoidable just to have that network when especially when you're starting that network of so far but then also you make you know these long life relationships with people on. Yeah you mentioned that started in film. So what would these first couple of films look like? Was this is in film school or just posted on school when they first films my first film. It's actually a very interesting experience so I him school Infants go a lot of shorts and when I came out of school I was also continuing to do a lotta shorts. I was living in London and there was a lot of support for short films. Non Emerging filmmakers so. The film conceal film for BBC. They were all like financing a lot of short and So it was really great because you were doing you know. Twenty minutes films from directors and you know keep learning and there was funding for it and then there was funding so it was great transition from school to two films So I started to do that and I kind of started to get a name in that world but it was you know was that we difficult to get the break for the first film of course for everyone and especially on top of that you know being a woman and being too young being Argentina and all the stuff it was not the outlier and the film industry. I think diversity is like if we would have happened today money. Yeah we tire her. She solves all the Broncos but yeah back then. The people didn't so yeah so I was in the shorts which was great because they would also pay and everything and I was. I did have a couple of commentaries and music videos. Started doing all that stuff Right after school which was great And then I was just trying to get my first film on. My Ex husband My husband at the time He's a director Alexis Asante also Argentinian. And he also went to school with me and so he was also trying to get his break. So Little Cruzi loaded without liar. I'm guessing of course to Bari. So yeah he he was right. In this film he submitted to the Hewer Bulbs Fund in Rotterdam which gives money for developing scripts for the Third World countries. And so he wanted it and it was like a fifteen thousand dollars branches existed so yes a government net for Americans of course government fund for parolee coming soon but not yet And people from other countries can enter in yes especially for third countries held a lot of South American filmmakers African. Maybe yeah and so he he wanted and so we suddenly had fifteen thousand dollars to develop his script which was a story of his. You Know D. Nate Times in Patagonia in the south of Argentina and by then we were so inspired in doing things in London with a video camera with not a lot of money to be an experimental stuff what I can do a lot with Dina so we instead of writing the script he just wrote like ten pages treatments in kind of these things have one line for each scene and then to New York GonNa to do an LCD music video. And so I bought now. Is the time that you are coming to. You're going to New York to buy cheaper. Film equipment are still comer. Lcd Music video was living as soundsystem band. Okay Okay yes I. They called me for that and so at that time you would travel to New York to buy equipment because a lot cheaper. I don't think that applies anymore. I'm not sure about the Internet anymore but just at that time. He's like okay. I'm going to go to this video. I'm just going to buy a camera. But this little panasonic feet to the one before the two because it wasn't even with cards was with tape and it was just this beautiful digital camera that had lake lance and it was just really beautiful so bought one and then then we went to Argentina and we got a group of friends and we my sister who is a really amazing actress in the annals theater in the scene Found US these amazing kids. We kind of discovered Which took about fifteen people to stay in the house. From my mother in Law's friend we show the movie. Yeah that was my first Jeff Film. It's called Glue. It was very successful in festivals. Really small production so we didn't get like big distribution or anything so not other people saw it and even you find it online. It's hard to find it but But at the time he went to a lot of festivals so then a lot of up and coming directors saw it and they love my work so I started to get calls and then I got the next two films like them because they had seen blue you jumped over one point so lcd soundsystem also invites you. It's New York is the Schal senior work. Or how was this was well? It was the British director doer. Now they're not do anymore Chris King's Antoni Dickinson and I had shot music videos with them in London in London has. Yes that job so they took me to that job. This is an opportunity I am. I love working with them. That was so cool. I Love Them. So Ev- everything that I was shooting with them was like a great thing that the New York. Buying the camera thing was a bonus. Yeah he does not like know. It was a great. I love that Video Steve. One of my favorites amazing filmmakers really great people so that was fun. How do you juggle doing projects within different varieties in terms of narrative music videos commercials? Keep a stable head on when you're going through. This may even mediums. I guess because these meetings are so different and it sounds like from a very early partner. You're juggling these shooting. Music videos feature reduced was. That's what we all do. More or less Films are intense and they take like three hundred percent of your energy and so there is people that do three films in your. I'm not that kind of person to keep my mental health on my sanity. I need to unwind film and I need to be fully recharge With my batteries in energetic creative point of view before I take a new film so then commercials music. Videos are a great thing to do in between also because it's not so easy to find scripts that I'm super excited about. Yeah only one movies. It life is too short movies. Take a lot of you so I'm only interested to do them if I really excited and passionate and I know it's going to be an amazing journey in you know in all senses all all the stars have aligned for the movie so that doesn't happen all the time either and so it's great to combine it with music videos on commercial so you keep working you keep training you keep meeting. New People You you weren't with your crew so you're creating your communication and all the soften you make money so that you know that that always that balance always gave me the freedom to the movies. I want because I'm always I like. I always in the author our house world so there are always the a tab less money than I get a script that he's sixty million dollars and that is three million dollar and it's very likely I like the swimming happens all the time and I can only follow my heart for the film because it's just it's just too long of your time and I and I feel I just have to do the ones that I'm really passionate about so then because demand so much from you yes and also because I I love my work and I think to you know to to keep it in the long run is like you have to be excited about your work every day so I you know for me wouldn't work to certain movie because it's very big and I'm going to get a bigger rate or you know then I will be able to have other bigger movies and Elissa as kind of a means to an end Projects that you think of as a means to an I can't. I can't do that. I have never done that in any area of my life and I love people can and I think that's great and he can take them to other amazing places But I think you know each of us. We have to scorer who we are and how we operate for me like. I don't operate like that. It's not worth it to be for three or four months doing something that I'm not super excited about this because it's going to take me somewhere else. I just need to believe it in every moment of every day and I think the only way that I can do my best work is if I'm resonating from that place you know what I mean. I think there's a lot of filmmakers out there that maybe are in that stage where they're doing a lot of work that they don't want to be doing doing a lot of whether it's a short films that are not as excited about or music videos for artists have concentrate. We don't really want to do. I'm doing advice for people to kind of push through that gap vase because I think it is something that all artists eventually run into. Especially I mean it's very hard you know because how. How can you give advice about that? Every situation is so particular you know how kids and mortgages to bay and things like that I when I came out of school. I was lucky that I had enough short films as things going on that I could survive on the last the first two years after school. I was very poor But I was still back then. I think I made that very important decision that I felt like it was a little bit like like I was an instrument and I couldn't get out of tune an infant school. I could experiment and decrease the staff and even the teachers were like. You can't do that. You need stuff without grain in your real and I didn't care I was just doing my thing and nobody's going to hire you afterwards for BBC and I say I don't WanNa go zoo what those Gracie guys I did. I was so blessed by the ignorance because I didn't have any connection with the real world. I didn't have family in the film industry or ninety one so I don't know how really so I could make all these rational decisions. Thank God anyway. I come home you know I was just like I know. I'm just GonNa do what I love doing my life. I don't know my dad. My Dad is a musician he plays piano. And that's he's real dream in life. He's really amazing but when he was young. You know another generation My grandfather was a very important doctor and he was coming from a super super super poor family lady not have money to eat so then he became a doctor. It was like amazing. And of course he had to work very hard for that and then he was a successful doctor so he wanted my that to be a doctor and my dad had to study medicine but he wanted to be a musician. So He's both now. He became shrink. Didn't like medicine. He was fainting was in so he discovers psychoanalysis that was his salvation but on the side he plays piano every day and he does records and has abandoned. That's what he would love to. So when I was very young you know from the beginning..

New York Argentina London BBC director Jeff Film Broncos Hewer Bulbs Fund Bari Alexis Asante Law lake lance Ev Nate Times partner Elissa Rotterdam
"lake lance" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

The Indy Mogul Podcast

12:49 min | 1 year ago

"lake lance" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

"Also you can go to school. Without having money something scholarships so yeah. Now I think for anyone if you do the opportunity. I think it's a great option. Also because of the people you meet I feel like I created such great friendships that also became a community of creators that still collaborate with each other and that's unavoidable just to have that network when especially when you're starting that network of so far but then also you make you know these long life relationships with people on. Yeah you mentioned that started in film. So what would these first couple of films look like? Was this is in film school or just posted on school when they first films my first film. It's actually a very interesting experience so I him school Infants go a lot of shorts and when I came out of school I was also continuing to do a lotta shorts. I was living in London and there was a lot of support for short films. Non Emerging filmmakers so. The film conceal film for BBC. They were all like financing a lot of short and So it was really great because you were doing you know. Twenty minutes films from directors and you know keep learning and there was funding for it and then there was funding so it was great transition. I think you know from school to two films So I started to do that and I kind of started to get a name in that world but it was you know was that we difficult to get the break for the first film of course for everyone and especially on top of that you know being a woman and being too young being Argentina and all the stuff it was not the outlier and the film industry. I think diversity is like if we would have happened today money. Yeah we tire her. She solves all the Broncos but yeah back then. The people didn't so yeah so I was in the shorts which was great because they would also pay and everything and I was. I did have a couple of commentaries and music videos. Started doing all that stuff Right after school which was great And then I was just trying to get my first film on. My Ex husband My husband at the time He's a director Alexis Asante also Argentinian. And he also went to school with me and so he was also trying to get his break. So Little Cruzi loaded without liar. I'm guessing of course to Bari. So yeah he he was right. In this film he submitted to the Hewer Bulbs Fund in Rotterdam which gives money for developing scripts for the Third World countries. And so he won it and it was like a fifteen thousand dollars branches existed so yes a government net for Americans of course government fund for people early coming soon but not yet And people from other countries can enter in yes especially for third countries held a lot of South American filmmakers African. Maybe yeah and so he he won that and so we suddenly had fifteen thousand dollars to develop his script which was A story of his. You Know D. Nature Times in Patagonia in the south of Argentina and by then we were so inspired in doing things in London with a video camera with not a lot of money to be an experimental stuff. What I can do a lot with mind and Tina so we instead of writing the script he just wrote like ten pages treatments in kind of these things have one line for each scene and then to New York GonNa to do an LCD music video. And so I bought now. Is the time that you are coming to. You're going to New York to buy cheaper. Film equipment are still comer. Lcd Music video was living as soundsystem band. Okay Okay yes I. They called me for that and so at that time you would travel to New York to buy equipment because a lot cheaper. I don't think that applies anymore. I'm not sure about the Internet anymore but just at that time. He's like okay. I'm going to go to this video. I'm just going to buy a camera. But this little panasonic feet to the one before the two because it wasn't even with cards was with tape and it was just this beautiful digital camera that Hot Lake Lance and it was just really beautiful so bought one and then then we went to Argentina. We got a group of friends and we my sister who is a really amazing actress in the Anna Theater in the scene Found US these amazing kids. We kind of discovered Which took about fifteen people to stay in the house. From my mother in Law's friend we show the movie. Yeah that was my first Jeff Film. It's called Glue. It was very successful in festivals. Really small production so we didn't get like big distribution or anything so not other people saw it and even you find it online. It's hard to find it but But at the time he went to a lot of festivals so then a lot of up and coming directors saw it and they love my work so I started to get calls and then I got the next two films like them because they had seen blue you jumped over one point so lcd soundsystem also invites you. It's New York is the Schal senior work. Or how was this was well? It was the British director doer. Now they're not do anymore Chris King's Antoni Dickinson and I had shot music videos with them in London in London has. Yes that job so they took me to that job. This is an opportunity I am. I love working with them. That was so cool. I Love Them. So Ev- everything that I was shooting with them was like a great thing that the New York. Buying the camera thing was a bonus. Yeah he does not like know. It was a great. I love that Video Steve. One of my favorites amazing filmmakers really great people so that was fun. How do you juggle doing projects within different varieties in terms of narrative? Music videos commercials. How do you keep a stable head on when you're going through? This may even mediums. I guess because these meetings are so different and it sounds like from a very early partner. You're juggling these shooting. Music videos feature reduced was. That's what we all do. More or less Films are intense and they take like three hundred percent of your energy and so there is people that do three films in your. I'm not that kind of person to keep my mental health on my sanity. I need to unwind film and I need to be fully recharge With my batteries in energetic creative point of view before I take a new film so then commercials music. Videos are a great thing to do in between also because it's not so easy to find scripts that I'm super excited about. Yeah only one movies. It life is too short movies. Take a lot of you so I'm only interested to do them if I really excited and passionate and I know it's going to be an amazing journey in you know in all senses all all the stars have aligned for the movie so that doesn't happen all the time either and so it's great to combine it with music videos on commercial so you keep working you keep training you keep meeting. New People You you weren't with your crew so you're creating your communication and all the soften you make money so that you know that that always that balance always gave me the freedom to the movies. I want because I'm always I like. I always in the author our house world so there are always the a tab less money than I get a script that he's sixty million dollars and that is three million dollar and it's very likely I like the swimming happens all the time and I can only follow my heart for the film's because it's just it's just too long of your time and I and I feel I just have to do the ones that I'm really passionate about so then because demand so much from you yes and also because I I love my work and I think to you know to to keep it in the long run is like you have to be excited about your work every day so I you know for me wouldn't work to certain movie because it's very big and I'm going to get a bigger rate or you know then I will be able to have other bigger movies and Elissa as kind of a means to an end Projects that you think of as a means to an I can't. I can't do that. I have never done that in any area of my life and I love people can and I think that's great and he can take them to other amazing places But I think you know each of us. We have to discover who we are and how we operate for me like. I don't operate like that. It's not worth it to be for three or four months doing something that I'm not super excited about this because it's going to take me somewhere else. I just need to believe it in every moment of every day and I think the only way that I can do my best work is if I'm resonating from that place you know what I mean. I think there's a lot of filmmakers out there that maybe are in that stage where they're doing a lot of work that they don't want to be doing doing a lot of whether it's a short films that are not as excited about or music videos for artists have concentrate. We don't really want to do. I'm doing advice for people to kind of push through that gap vase because I think it is something that all artists eventually run into. Especially I mean it's very hard you know because how. How can you give advice about that? Every situation is so particular you know how kids and mortgages to bay and things like that I when I came out of school. I was lucky that I had enough short films as things going on that I could survive on the last the first two years after school. I was very poor But I was still back then. I think I made that very important decision that I felt like it was a little bit like like I was an instrument and I couldn't get out of tune an infant school. I could experiment and decrease the staff and even the teachers were like. You can't do that. You need stuff without grain in your real and I didn't care I was just doing my thing and nobody's going to hire you afterwards for BBC and I say I don't WanNa go zoo what those Gracie guys I did. I was so blessed by the ignorance because I didn't have any connection with the real world I didn't have family in the film industry or did ninety one so I don't know how really so I could make all these rational decisions. Thank God to make them anyway. I come home you know I was just like you know. I'm just GonNa do what I love doing my life. I don't know my dad. My Dad is a musician he plays piano. And that's he's real dream in life. He's really amazing but when he was young. You know another generation My grandfather was a very important doctor and he was coming from a super super super poor family lady not have money to eat so then he became a doctor. It was like amazing. And of course he had to work very hard for that and then he was a successful doctor so he wanted my that to be a doctor and my dad had to study medicine but he wanted to be a musician. So He's both now. He became shrink. Didn't like medicine. He was fainting in so he discovers psychoanalysis that was his salvation but on the side he plays piano every day and he does records and has abandoned. That's what he would love to do. So when I was very young you know from the beginning..

New York Argentina London BBC director Jeff Film Broncos Hewer Bulbs Fund Anna Theater Bari Alexis Asante Tina Hot Lake Lance Law Ev partner Elissa Rotterdam
"lake lance" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"lake lance" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Say that even though you guys not you guys jeff stumped me so bad on the on the Lake Lance Lynn ones since one eighty five or two eighty five gay so maybe I don't notice it as much but I feel like with position players. I I do internalize the information a little bit the ratio. You and I have sort of a sense but maybe I actually don't maybe it doesn't matter all right speaking of Jeff Speaking of Jeff era episode thirteen nineteen first of all Jeff. I don't know if you remember this but Jeff's imitation of a dolphin trying to speak English is worse is my favorite moment of the show so so far going fantastic specifically that partly what would a dolphin sound like if a dolphin if English speaking human were doing an impression of a dolphin doing an impression of human what would it sound like and it was great but you answered a question which was what would baseball be like if the the runner could choose whether to make first base down the third base line or down the first baseline you remember is one and it was an interesting discussion about like whether batters would have a better Babylon grounders and how often whether they would get confused and whether it would be confusing for the defensive and all those things <hes> a a topic that wasn't really discussed much which I would like to talk about is the effect on left-handers in baseball. I've always found it very odd odd. That baseball is asymmetrical that even though the field is symmetrical given the way that the bases are not run like it's not you don't run out the second run back in kickball. You have to go clockwise into the field sort of tilts as a ball put in play and because of that of course left handed players are in that in one respect at a severe disadvantage if you are a left handed thrower if you're raised to be a left handed thrower you can never be a third baseman shortstop or a second baseman <hes> no matter how good you are at fielding ground balls is never going to happen and that is in one sense a real huge disadvantage for a ballplayer coming up because 'cause you have to think like a lot of guys like for instance. Eric Eibar if he'd been lefthanded. Does he have a career. I don't know does He. I'm not sure and there's tons of those guys like lots of infielders are valuable because they can play the infield and if they threw left handed they would be deemed to not be able to play the Infield and yet on the other hand. Baseball is like wildly advantageous for left handers as well because the platoon advantage so often also they are closer to first is base when they bat but I think mostly it's because they have platoon advantage so often and so if you look at the great hitters throughout history for instance there <hes> disproportionately left-handed handed compared to the population at large if you look it up pitchers as well because the platoon advantage that left handed pitchers get seems to be larger or valued valued in some way the percentage of pitchers in the majors is wildly disproportionate to the percentage of left-handed people in the population and so in a way what's interesting about that is that they didn't really as I understand it early. Baseball did not know that there was a platoon advantage. There was never intended to be able to advantage that wasn't really discovered until the nineteen in teams and maybe it was known before that but certainly not in the eighteen fifties they did not know that lefties we're going to have an advantage against lefties and right and vice versa and so by accident they created this sport which is almost the only game. I can think of where you go counterclockwise instead of clockwise like when you're playing cards yards. You always go clockwise. When you play monopoly you go clockwise when you clockwise is the way that that action moves in gameplay generally speaking it's the default but they decided to make baseball counter intuitively counterclockwise in doing so they did something to balance this tremendous imbalance it's that they didn't even know what it existed in favor of left-handers but as it is then created this <hes> instead.

baseball Jeff Eric Eibar Jeff Speaking Lake Lance Lynn Jeff era kickball
"lake lance" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"lake lance" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Simply take eight mile all the way out to telegraph. And then go north of the construction altogether. Woodward is a very good alternate. This time of the night is well, no problems from 696 all the way up to square lake road. Now, if you're going to be going seventy five northbound, let's say to win fifty nine heading east from that point consider making your way over to winder or Mound Road. Both will take you up to him fifty nine east of I seventy five reporting live lanes Howard, w j NewsRadio nine fifty w heard it from CBS news and here in town. We're in the single digits the AccuWeather real feels well below zero at this minute right now downtown at seven degrees, there are places for people to go if they need to get warm tonight's many places close outside of normal business hours. But there are a handful of spots that stay open after sundown, including Cass community. Social services on web street in Detroit, they help families with children the Detroit Rescue mission has two facilities to help families coming in house, Michigan on Martin Luther King junior boulevard serve. Young adults between eighteen and twenty four and alternatives for girls. I'm grand river avenue is there for at risk girls and women we have a full list of shelters and warming centers on our website, w w j NewsRadio dot com. Lauren Barth old W, W, J NewsRadio. Nine fifty meantime, a man is in charge of transportation as southwest Michigan school district has died this while he was shoveling snow Portage district. Officials say Mike Westbrook died on Saturday from a heart attack the superintendent. There says families told that we're told that Westbrook's work impacted every student who rides the bus saying that Westbrook was masterful at bus logistics in the Kalamazoo area district more than five thousand Portage students ride the buses each day. Westbrook had worked for the district since two thousand two w w j news time eight thirty five a Royal Oak man, charged with the murder of his father details for NewsRadio nine. Fifties. Ron Dewey Thirty-one-year-old. Dane steward was charged. Royal district court refers degree murder. His father's body discovered bound Thursday night at the home. They shared in the thirteen mile crooks neighborhood. Investigators say the seventy three year old victim had been strangled. Police say Stewart took his father's car traveled halfway across the state. He was spotted north of Lansing at a gas station where he assaulted two deputies trying to bring him into custody steward. Then led police on an hour long chase before being stumped in Howell. The motive remains under investigation. Ron Dewey, w w j NewsRadio nine fifty in Arizona to doctors who are responsible for the care of a woman who gave birth at a Phoenix long term care facility. After being raped are now out the twenty nine year old woman who has been in a persistent vegetative state has been a patient at hacienda healthcare since she was a little girl. A statement from hacienda. Health says the two physicians who are responsible for the care of the woman are no longer providing medical services to hacienda. Patients. One of. The doctors apparently has resigned the other one has been suspended. The statement says that they offer an apology and send deepest sympathy to the woman and her family Bill Rakoff CBS news bitter, cold tonight's again, just like last night. Also, it's a closure. I seventy five northbound from six Ninety-six to square lake Lance Howard with traffic and weather next. Right. I.

Mike Westbrook southwest Michigan school dist Woodward Ron Dewey murder J NewsRadio persistent vegetative state AccuWeather Dane steward CBS Lance Howard Lauren Barth Cass community Detroit Royal Oak Lansing Martin Luther superintendent Detroit Rescue
"lake lance" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"lake lance" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Are you happy to have the trend line over as slept very little? It was an exciting day, but not that unhappy to have it over. We have trades talk about right now. So it feels a lot more laid back than did yesterday what it felt like we had an insurmountable task ahead of us though. I guess we surrounded it. It's like a pretty dramatic come down after I know the trades can sell happen, but like things generally don't happen in early August in the Justin Verlander trade last year, sort of the exception for this time of year you'd be looking for more lake, Lance Lynn type moves, or. Yeah, boring. It's just you have this this build up. Of course, there are the hand and soon trade in the Machado trade, and there are other trades that happened well in advance the deadline, but you kind of your crest. The mountain. Right? And then you you get to the summit and the summit push, and then you get to the deadline or realistically half an hour after the deadline, and then you ready to that takes you another few hours after the deadline, and then it's over, then you start going down is I can tell you from experience not as easy as you think it would be, but there's a, I don't know how to keep this analogy going, but I guess the few you're not you don't get the scenery of looking up at the mountain. It's not so beaut-. The point is that August sucks. Trying to get at here. It's just throw a vote in there. Some not analogy just to to make it more apt. 'cause that always view a few years ago. I was on a hike in the Columbia River gorge at c. support organ, and we were on the Washington side of the Columbia River in. We were probably about a thousand or two thousand feet above the river itself. So were were that much plus few more hundred above sea level, and we're on a hike and Where'd were up on the hills near the the upper slopes, and where we turn the corner, and we're in some some shrubs. There's some tall grass or some oak trees as in the the rain shadow part of the gorge. So this this very lush and I looked to my right and about one hundred yards away though. As a small boat, there was just a small boat. It was sitting there. It was did not seem to be attached to a trailer or property. There was just a there was just a boat now in the in the distant history of the Columbia River gorge. That was a great fled. The these were the Missoula floods. They came from an ice dam breaking in. What is present day Montana. There is a very dramatic metro. This is recurring over several thousand years and it formed the gorge itself as these floods scraped the earth away in the way toward the ocean. So either there was a boat that was just up there for no reason or human history is actually far longer in expanse than we have given it credit for in this boat. Some sort of archaeological discovery that I did not properly appreciate at the time. Well, I myself I'm going to be in Missoula Montana in just a couple of days. So I'll keep an eye out for any weirdly placed boats warned me if any ice dams, Doug raking 'cause flood Portland under like five hundred feet of water. Her, right? So we are going to answer some emails, but the nationals made some news or some news was made about the nationals that we didn't get the talk about. So they traded Brandon. Kinzler we did talk about that. We didn't talk about. Why? Because we didn't know why. But there was a report that surface today from berry Luga in the Washington Post. And he says that that had to do with the nationals believing that Kinzler was the source for Jeff passan's story about the dysfunction in the nationals clubhouse and Kessler has denied it. He says, he's never talked to pass on. Obviously just not going to say who his sources and shouldn't, but apparently the nationals believe the Kinzler was spreading rumors about their clubhouse disharmony, and so they shipped him out. And then now they have designated Sean Kelly for assignment because Sean Kelly in the blowout game that we were talking about in our previous episode, he was called on to pitch in a mop up role and apparently wasn't thrilled about it, and he gave up a Homer and then he threw his glove on the mound kind of petulantly..

Columbia River gorge Kinzler Columbia River Missoula Montana Sean Kelly Justin Verlander Lance Lynn Washington Post Machado Jeff passan Kessler berry Luga Portland Brandon Washington Doug five hundred feet one hundred yards two thousand feet