9 Burst results for "Lake Beth"

"lake beth" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"lake beth" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Bloomberg's David west in an Alix steel spoke to the president and chief executive officer of land lakes. Beth Ford to discuss the effects of trade tariffs on US farmers. What are you hearing from farmers about what they need? But what we need is the trade deals to be, you know, to be finished in this has been a three to five year period of time for low commodity prices for farmers, and everybody knows land-o-lakes dairy business aren't butter business. Our are leading brands, but actually we are food production and agribusiness we go where farmer owned right to the store shelf in so we have a number of growers as well being growers corn growers. And then, of course, our dairy business what we're hearing is that there is going to be some, some. Mark facilitation payments minner payments, and those will be helpful, but more than anything the farmers want trade deals finished. So in the meantime, though, with the twelve billion from last year, maybe fifteen billion, plus a lot of compensation if you're soybean farmers, for example, if the treatment wore laugh, is that enough can farmers say float with that? I think it depends on what the, the program's going to be or hearing, maybe a couple of dollars bushel but we don't know. And as you can imagine that's the being growers on the dairy side. They really out of the first payments only received about two hundred fifty million dollars in total. It wasn't enough to offset the market fall when the trade deals weren't completed. So the dairy producers, especially have been under challenging industry dynamics. We're seeing to dairy farmers a day, go out of business in Wisconsin Herod heritage dairy state. So it is a very tough operating environment. So Beth a one problem is the plight of the farmers which was there was those tough. Situation before the trade dispute came along and they're gonna get compensated. Another is the government intervening in that marketplace and giving certain subsidies to some cops. What is the risks? And in fact, it will distort the marketplace, for example, I've read something would you plant soybeans rather than corn? Soybeans come up faster. That's right. And you know what's the what's pressuring the Mark right now, the pressuring the.

president and chief executive Beth Ford Bloomberg US David west Wisconsin Herod two hundred fifty million doll five year
"lake beth" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"lake beth" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"So Bloomberg's David Westin an Alex Steele, spoke to the president and chief executive officer of land lakes. Beth Ford to discuss the effects of trade tariffs on US farmers. What are you hearing from farmers about what they need what we need is the trade deals to be, you know, to be finished. This has been a three to five year period of time for low commodity prices for farmers. And everybody knows line for dairy business aren't butter. Business are leading brands. But actually we are food production agribusiness. We go where farmer owned right to the store shelf in. So we have a number of growers as well being growers corn growers. And then, of course, our dairy business what we're hearing is that there is going to be some, some. Market. Siltation payments men are payments. Those will be helpful, but more than anything the farmers want trade deals finished. So in the meantime, though, with the twelve billion from last year, maybe fifteen billion, plus a lot of compensation if you're soybean farmers, for example, if the tree wore last is that enough can farmers sale float with that. I think it depends on what the, the program's going to be or hearing, maybe a couple of hours bushel, but we don't know. And as you can imagine that's the being growers on the dairy side. They really out of the first payments only received about two hundred fifty million dollars in total. It wasn't enough to offset the market fall when the trade deals weren't completed. So the dairy producers, especially have been under challenging industry dynamics. We're seeing to dairy farmers day go out of business in Wisconsin Herod, heritage dairy state. So it is a very tough operating environment. So Beth a one problem is the plight of the farmers which was there was those tough. Situation before the trade dispute came along and they're going to get compensated. Another is the government intervene in that marketplace and giving certain subsidies to some cops. What is the risks and effect? It will distort the marketplace, for example, I've read something, would you plant? Soybeans rather than corn because soybeans come up faster. That's right. And you know what's the what's pressuring Mark right now, the pressuring the.

president and chief executive Beth Ford Bloomberg David Westin US Alex Steele Wisconsin Mark two hundred fifty million doll five year
"lake beth" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"lake beth" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"So Bloomberg's David west, an Alix steel spoke to the president and chief executive officer of land lakes. Beth Ford to discuss the effects of trade tariffs on US farmers. What are you hearing from farmers about what they need what we need is the trade deals to be to be finished. This has been a three to five year period of time from low commodity prices for farmers. And everybody knows line. The dairy business. Butter business are leading brands. But actually, we are food-production agribusiness we go where farmer owned right to the store shelf in so we have a number of growers as well being growers corn growers. And then, of course, our dairy business what we're hearing is that there is going to be some, some. Mark association payments minimum payments on those will be helpful, but more than anything the farmers want trade deals finished. So in the meantime, though, with the twelve billion from last year, maybe fifteen million plus a lot of compensation. If you're sleeping farmer, for example, if the treatment wore laugh, is that enough in farmers, stay afloat with that? I think it depends on what the program's going to be or hearing, maybe a couple of bushel, but we don't know. And as you can imagine that's the being growers on the dairy side. They really add them the first payments only received about two hundred fifty million dollars in total. It wasn't enough to offset the market fall when the trade deals weren't completed. So the dairy producers, especially had been under challenging industry dynamics were saying to dairy farmers day, go out of business in Wisconsin, Harry heritage dairy state, so it is a very tough operating environment. So Beth one problem is the plight of the farmers which was there was those tough. Situation before the trade dispute came along, and they're going to get another is the government intervening that marketplace and giving certain subsidies to some cups. What is the risks and in effect, it will distort the marketplace? For example, I've read something with you plant soybeans rather than corn because soybeans come up faster. That's right. And you know what's the what's pressuring the Mark right now, the pressuring the.

president and chief executive Beth Ford Bloomberg US David west Mark Wisconsin two hundred fifty million doll five year
"lake beth" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:28 min | 2 years ago

"lake beth" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"So Bloomberg's David west in an Alex Steele, spoke to the president and chief executive officer of land lakes. Beth Ford to discuss the effects of trade tariffs on US farmers. What are you hearing from farmers about what they need what we need is the trade deals to be, you know, to be finished. This has been a three to five year period of time for low commodity prices for farmers and everybody knows line, the for a dairy business aren't butter. Business are leading brands but actually we are food production and agribusiness we go. We're farmer owned right to the store shelf in so we have a number of growers as well being growers corn growers. And then, of course, our dairy business what we're hearing is that there is going to be some, some. Market facilitation payments payments on those will be helpful, but more than anything, the farmers want trade deals finished. So in the meantime, though, with the twelve billion from last year, maybe fifteen billion, plus a lot of compensation if you're soybean farmers, for example, if the treatment is that enough flicking farmers stay afloat with that? I think it depends on what the, the program's going to be. We're hearing, maybe a couple of dollars a bushel, but we don't know. And as you can imagine that's the big growers on the dairy side. They really out of the first payments only received about two hundred fifty million dollars in total. It wasn't enough to offset the market fall when the trade deals weren't completed. So the dairy producers, especially had been under challenging industry dynamics were seeing to dairy farmers a day, go out of business in Wisconsin Herod heritage dairy state. So it is a very tough operating environment is so so Beth a one problem is the plight of the farmers, which was there was those tough. Situation before the trade dispute came along and they're going to get compensated. Another is the government intervene in that marketplace and giving certain subsidies to some cops. What is the risks and in fact, it will distort the marketplace, for example, I've read something, would you plant? Soybeans rather than corn because soybeans come up faster. That's right. And you know what's the what's pressuring Mark right now, the pressuring the farmers right now is the weather. The weather has not been helpful. There's a delayed planting season in some of the core. Core farm states, Indiana Ohio in. So what we're seeing now is decisions are being driven non just by trading. That's one element is really being driven right now by the weather pattern is to for the farmers. Stick it in the field. I think that we're, you know, forty-three percent or so planted. Normally you're at eighty eight percent or more. And so it's taking decisions you know, out of the out of their lens for them to make. And so we've got a number of elements right now. The primary one actually is whether if you wind up seeing the trade impact continue say, like for. A year even longer some economists are rerating their base cases. Where does that hurt? I mean, is it more consolidation? Is it margins? Like what's the end result? Yes. Yes. Yes. Right. I guess all what we're seeing is consolidation happen in the sector. You know, you're saying as I say, animals move acre shift, because you can only hold on for so long in a low, plenty of price environment in I am so impressed with farmers. And we are farmer own. I'm so impressed with farmers. They are incredibly resilient. They work and to the into their balance sheet now. They're using loans. They've been losing money for a few years. But when they're trying to do is work towards income diversification. They're looking at different ways they can be entrepreneurs. And I think of them as the original entrepreneur, they figure it out too hot to call to what Dr trade issues and they figure it out. But what you're going to see is consolidation in the sector in at the farm level fan will level. And then, of course, up and down the sector and other industries when you hear about consolidation. It's too big companies getting together in the farming business. We hear about agribusiness and the shift from family owned. Farms to really big corporations, the pressures of trade, and perhaps weather as well going to accelerate that process. Well, we are seeing acceleration, but I'm going to be very ninety six percent of farms are still family owned, so what happens. What happens is, you know, a an individual doesn't have somebody to pass their, their farm onto, and it's next to a neighbor. And so they say we're going to sell the farm. And so the neighbor acquires, the farm or leases the farm, so there is consolidation acres move. But I think that there's a narrative that, you know, this is going to corporate farms and in. Yes, there is increased scale but I want to be very clear, ninety six percent of farms are still family owned, and so that, that, that narrative, isn't actually, you know directly on point. I'm wondering what this means more specifically for Landau legs, ma'am. Looking and say dean foods before all this got worse? They were already really struggling desperately wanting to sell themselves, but no one's taking the bait with that. How do you play that trend? I mean, do you look to buy certain? Assets like from dean foods, for example, news, kind of sit back and wait till assesses out. Life's isn't really in the drinking of business. We are in butter cheese. We have Vermont creamery cozy shack puddings, you know, so we are in different elements of the dairy sector but of course, all in a place together sometimes fan supply agreements for, for drinking milk businesses. How do we see? We'll play out. Well, you know again, we've seen investment in parts of the country. We see animal numbers and animals shifting in different parts of the country. We pay attention to it all the way back to the producer level for our direct business. It's all about innovation. We are focused on innovation in the dairy portfolio new products, new product entrance into the marketplace, partnering differently with retailers because retailers are going through their own consolidation grocery retailers. So there are a variety of ways, we're thinking through this at the farmer level, but also at the store shop level. I also want to wrap up talking about what's happening with hogs, and in China, the swine flu. That's his devastating at three continents. Now, there's also worms that are infecting. The pigs there, we, we talk a lot about how Sweden's getting hit by trade, but that's some fundamental soybean meal demand that's going to be lost because of the hog production. How what are you hearing? We're hearing the same thing. I mean, we, we see a significant portion of, of that industry coming out. I think I heard twenty twenty five percent so he right there some industry fundamentals. And that's why I say, you know, we, we talk a lot about trade. You're right. Trade is a significant issue. But there are so many other factors brought up earlier the weather factor. And then the, the swine flu is another issue impacting producers and impacting the sector when you came in. It was last summer to eighteen. The first openly gay woman to be CEO. What difference does that make? To lend a lakes. What difference does it make to you? Interacting with other corporations. Well, it doesn't really again, the I was chosen for the role because the board believed I was best suited to drive, the strategic performance that they were focused on, and that we were aligned to, you know, this business is a member owned business. So what they were also clear about as I was aligned with their families and their members. And I, of course I hold them in high regard. So it wasn't one of the criteria at the same time, I think we celebrate. But it certainly didn't hold me back from being named to that position. And it really has had no implication. That's not something we discuss it's not part of the criteria that was Beth forward. President and chief executive officer.

president and chief executive Beth Ford dean foods Bloomberg US Wisconsin Herod Indiana Ohio Vermont creamery Mark David west Alex Steele Landau producer Sweden China CEO ninety six percent two hundred fifty million doll
"lake beth" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"lake beth" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Farmers need trade deals to be finished, and so-. Bloomberg's David west in an Alix steel spoke to the president and chief executive officer of land lakes. Beth Ford to discuss the effects of trade tariffs on US farmers. What are you hearing from farmers about what they need what we need is the trade deals to be to be finished in this has been a three to five year period of time for low commodity prices for farmers and everybody knows line lakes for dairy business aren't butter. Business are leading brands but actually we are food production agribusiness we go. We're farmers owned right to the store shelves in so we have a number of growers as well being growers corn growers. And then, of course, our dairy business what we're hearing is that there is going to be some, some. Market facilitation payments minimum payments on those will be helpful than more than anything. The farmers want trade deals finished. So in the meantime, though, with the twelve billion from last year to fifteen billion, plus a lot of compensation if you're soybean farmer, for example, if the treatment wore laugh is that enough like in pharmacy afloat with that? I think it depends on what the, the program's going to be or hearing, maybe a couple of dollars bushel but we don't know. And as you can imagine that's the being growers on the dairy side. They really out of the first payments only received about two hundred fifty million dollars in total. It wasn't enough to offset the market fall when the trade deals weren't completed. So the dairy producers, especially have been under challenging industry dynamics. We're seeing to dairy farmers, a day of business in Wisconsin Herod that heritage Terry's state. So it is a very tough operating environment. So so Beth one problem is the plight of the farmers which was there was those tough. Situation before the trade dispute came along and they're going to get compensated. Another is the government in that marketplace and giving certain subsidies to some cups. What is the risk and affect it will distort the marketplace. For example. I've read something would you plant? Soybeans rather than corn because soybeans come up faster. That's right. And you know what's the what's pressuring Mark right now, the pressuring the.

Beth Ford president and chief executive Bloomberg US David west Wisconsin Mark Terry two hundred fifty million doll five year
"lake beth" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

08:31 min | 2 years ago

"lake beth" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"You. Lisa trade talks continue to go from bad to worse. The president and CEO, Atlanta lake says the to Wisconsin dairy farmers per day are going out of business, and while aid programs can help farmers need trade deals to be finished. Bloomberg's David Westin. An Alix steel spoke to the president and chief executive officer of land lakes. Beth Ford to discuss the effects of trade tariffs on US farmers. What are you hearing from farmers about what they need what we need is the trade deals to be, you know, to be finished. This has been a three to five year period of time for low commodity prices for farmers. And everybody knows line dairy business aren't butter. Business are leading brands but actually we are production. Agribusiness we go where farmer owned right to the store shelf in. So we have a number of growers as well being growers corn growers. And then, of course our business. What we're hearing is that there is going to be some, some market siltation payments minimum payments on those will be helpful, but more than anything the farmers want trade deals finished. So in the meantime, though, twelve billion from last year, fifteen billion, plus a lot of compensation if you're sleeping farmer, for example, if the tree were laugh is that enough in farmers? Stay afloat with that. I think it depends on what the program's going to be or hearing, maybe a couple of dollars bushel but we don't know. And as you can imagine that's the being growers on the dairy side. They really out of the first payments only received about two hundred fifty million dollars in total. It wasn't enough to offset the market fall when the trade deals weren't completed. So the dairy producers, especially have been under challenging industry dynamics were saying to dairy farmers day. Go out of business in Wisconsin, Harry heritage dairy state, so it is a very tough operating environment. So Beth a one problem is. The plight of the farmers, which was there was a those a tough situation before the trade dispute came along, and they're going to get another is the government intervene in that marketplace, and giving certain subsidies to some cups. What is the risk that affect it will distort the marketplace? For example, I've read something would you plant? Soybeans rather than corn because soybeans come up faster. That's right. And you know what's the what's pressuring Mark right now, the pressuring the farmers right now is the weather. The weather has not been helpful. There's a delayed planting season in some of the core. Core farm states. Indiana Ohio in. So what we're saying now is decisions are being driven not just by trading. That's one element is really being driven right now by the weather pattern is to for the farmers. Stick it in the field. I think that we're forty-three percent or so planted normally at eight percent or more. And so it's taking decisions you know, out of the out of their lands for them to make it. So we've got a number of elements right now. The primary one actually is whether. For you. If you wind up seeing the trade impact continue for a year even longer some communists are rerating their base cases where that hurt. I mean, is it more consolidation? Is it margins? Like what's the end result? Right. So it's all what we're seeing is consolidation happen in the sector, you know, you're saying is I say, animals move acre shift, because it can only hold on for so long and a low price in Byron in. I am so impressed with farmers. And we are farmer own. I'm so impressed with farmers. They are incredibly resilient. They work and a lot of them are onto the into their balance sheet now. They're using loans. They've been losing money for a few years, but when they're trying to do is worth towards income diversification. They're looking at different ways. They can be entrepreneurs. And I think of them as the original entrepreneur, they figure it out too hot to call to what to drive trade issues, and they figure it out. But what you're going to see is Consol. Nation in the sector in at the farm level of van will, and then, of course, up and down the sector Beth and other industries where you hear about consolidation. It's two big companies getting together in the farming business. We hear about agribusiness and the shift from family owned farms to really big corporations, the pressures of trade, and perhaps weather as well going to exceleron that process. Well, we are seeing exceleron, but I'm gonna be ninety six percent of farms are still family owned, so what happens when happens is, you know, an individual doesn't have somebody to pass their, their farm onto, and it's next to a neighbor. And so they say we're going to sell the farm. And so the neighbor acquires, the farm or lease as the farm, so there is consolidation acres move. But I think that there's a narrative that, you know, this is going to corporate farms, and, and yes, there is increased scale, but I want to be very clear, ninety six percent of farms are still family owned, and so that, that, that narrative isn't actually, you know. Directly on point. I wondering what this is more specifically for Landau leg, ma'am. Looking at say dean foods before all this got worse. They were already really struggling desperately wanting to sell themselves, but no one's taking the bait with that. How do you play that trend? I mean, do you look to buy assets from dean foods, for example, news, kind of sit back and wait till assesses out? No land lakes, isn't really in the drinking of business. We are in butter cheese. Vermont creamery cozy shack pudding, you know, so we are in different elements of the dairy sector but of course all place together. Sometimes we have supply agreements for, for drinking, though businesses. How do we see it? We'll play out. Well again, we investment in parts of the country. We see animal numbers and animals shifting in different parts of the country. We pay attention to it all the way back to the producer level for our direct business. It's all about innovation. We are focused on innovation in the dairy portfolio new products, new product entrance into the marketplace, partnering differently with retailers because retailers going through their own consolidation grocery retailers. So there are a variety of ways worth thinking through this at the farmer level, but also at the store shop level. It's a good point Beth, I also want to wrap up talking about what's happening with hogs, and in China swine for this is devastating three continents. Now, also worms that are infecting the pigs there, we, we talk a lot about how Sweden's getting hit by trade, but. Some fundamental soybean meal demand that's going to be lost because of the hog production. What are you hearing? We're hearing the same thing. I mean, we, we see a significant portion of, of that industry coming out. I think I heard twenty twenty five percent it right there some industry fundamentals. And that's why I say you know, we talk a lot about trade. You're right. Trade is a significant issue. But there are so many other factors brought up earlier the weather factor. And then, you know, the, the swine flu is another issue impacting producers and impacting the sector when you came in. It was last summer, some of to eighteen it was the first openly gay woman to be CEO. What difference does that make it make to lend a lakes? What difference does it make to you interacting with other corporations? Well, it doesn't really again, I was chosen for the role because the boy believed I was best suited to drive the strategic performance that they were focused on. On, and that we were aligned to, you know, this business is a member owned business. So what they were also clear about as I was aligned with their families and their members. Of course I hold them in high regard. So it wasn't one of the criteria at the same time. I think we celebrate that it's certainly didn't hold me back from being named that position. And it really has had no impatience not something. We discuss. It's not part of the criteria really is about whether I can drive performance in the business in line with their view of the marketplace. And I think both of those things are the truth. That was Beth Ford president and chief executive officer at Landau lakes. And that's all for this edition of Bloomberg best. You can see all of our best work at best go on the Bloomberg terminal, our shows produced by Carolina O'Brien. I'm Ed Baxter. No from save money on your car insurance by bundling home and auto with progressive. Hey, always this cold in here. It doesn't bother me. Doesn't matter me it just just kind of curious. Because if it's the equipment or.

Beth Ford president and chief executive Bloomberg president and CEO Wisconsin dean foods David Westin US Lisa Byron Atlanta lake Landau lakes Indiana Ohio Mark Landau exceleron Consol Ed Baxter CEO
"lake beth" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:48 min | 2 years ago

"lake beth" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"All lower s and p down for a second day, falling thirty four points down. One point two percent. The Dow drop two hundred eighty six points, down one point one percent as back down one hundred twenty two down. One point six percent. I'm Charlie Pellett. That's a Bloomberg business flash. Bloomberg best with June Grosso Baxter continues. From the Bloomberg interactive brokers studio. This is Bloomberg best. It's forty seven minutes past the hour. Now it's time for Bloomberg opinion. This senatorial was written by the Bloomberg editorial board in two thousand to the IRS agreed to let certain private tax preparers provide software allowing low income Americans to file their taxes for free. But the system hasn't worked a class action lawsuit against turbo tax alleges duped, millions of customers into paying unnecessary fees. The suit argues that turbo tax hid the free version of the software and guided users to similar sounding products with fees the principle that low income tax payers should be able to file for free, as surely right on the IRS could easily provide the necessary software itself and relatively modest cost sadly, bipartisan legislation to modernize, the IRS doesn't address this issue, lawmakers ought to think again and require the IRS to do the job. Of it never should have been allowed to outsource in the first place. This to'real was written by the Bloomberg editorial board. For more Bloomberg opinion. Please go to Bloomberg dot com slash opinion or Opie I n go on the Bloomberg terminal. Thanks, charlie. Nell. Let's check in with the Bloomberg affiliates to find out what's happening on the nation's most influential radio stations. Story on DAM in Cleveland. I'm reporting the two thousand twenty one NFL draft couldn't bring at least one hundred million dollars to the Cleveland area. Konomi Steve Potisk KNX in Los Angeles. We're talking about the long term impact of the Qualcomm antitrust ruling. I'm Courtney Donohoe on KTAR h in Huston BP fees, better technology driving down offshore oil costs and the goal. I'm Lisa parental WB 'em in Chicago. I'm reporting on the CEO of United Airlines saying, he'll be the first to fly on a Boeing seven thirty-seven max once the plane is again cleared for takeoff. Okay. Thank you. Lisa trade talks continue to go from bad to worse, the president and CEO, Atlanta lake says the to Wisconsin dairy farmers per day are going out of business, and we'll aid programs can help farmers need trade deals to be finished. Bloomberg's David west in an Alex Steele, spoke to the president and chief executive officer of land lakes. Beth Ford to discuss the effects of trade tariffs on US farmers. What are you hearing from farmers about what they need what we need is the trade deals to be, you know, to be finished. This has been a three to five year period of time for low commodity prices for farmers and everybody knows land lakes. Dairy business aren't butter business are leading brands but actually we are food production agribusiness. We go where farmer owned right to the store shelf, and so we have a number of growers as well being growers corn growers. And then, of course our dairy business. What we're hearing is that there is going to be some. Some Markelle facilitation payments men are payments. Those will be helpful, but more than anything the farmers want trade deals finished. So in the meantime, though, the twelve billion from last year, maybe fifteen billion, plus a lot of compensation if you're soybean farmers, for example, if the tree wore laugh is that enough, like farmers sale float with that? I think it depends on what the, the program's going to be. We're hearing maybe a couple of dollars bushel but we don't know and as you can imagine. That's the big growers on the dairy side. They really out of the first payments only received about two hundred fifty million dollars in total. It wasn't enough to offset the market fall when the trade deals weren't completed. So the dairy producers, especially have been under challenging industry dynamics. We're seeing to dairy farmers day, go out of business in Wisconsin, Harry heritage dairy state, so it is a very tough operating environment. So Beth a one problem is. The plight of the farmers, which was there was a tough situation before the trade dispute came along, and they're gonna get another is the government intervene in that marketplace and giving certain subsidies to some cops. What is the risks and in fact, it will distort the marketplace, for example, I've read something, would you plant? Soybeans rather than corn because soybeans come up faster. That's right. And you know what's the what's pressuring Mark right now, the pressuring the.

Bloomberg Bloomberg interactive brokers Lisa trade Wisconsin IRS Beth Ford editorial board Charlie Pellett Cleveland Qualcomm NFL Grosso Baxter president and CEO Courtney Donohoe Nell CEO US Los Angeles
"lake beth" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"lake beth" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Tonight, snow likely a low of thirty degrees just a little bit the heaviest snowfalls overnight and early morning snow tomorrow one to three inches. Total. Accumulation it's done by ten or eleven in the morning. A high of thirty five tomorrow. It's currently thirty six degrees. She Bs news update. Crews in northern California's camp wildfire burns zone sifting through what's left of thousands of homes looking for victims. The official death toll is up to sixty three more than six hundred people remain unaccounted for KCBS reporter, Holly Quan surveyed some of those devastated neighborhoods in the city of paradise. If you had a cat it was playing with a ball of yarn, and they just like left it all they're in a big bet. There's transformer transformer are hanging off of lines. Like a like a beat on a necklace CDS? Steve Futterman has the death. Toll continues to climb fire crews are making progress the deadly campfire, which is destroyed around ten thousand homes is now forty five percent contained in southern California. The Wolsey fire is now sixty nine percent contained whether conditions have greatly improved with wins diminishing one other figure from that campfire fifty two thousand people living in shelters motels in homes of friends. CBS news update, I'm Jim shanavie. WTMJ news time three thirty two from the WTMJ. Breaking news center old man winter making a return tonight in southeast Wisconsin WTMJ storm team four meteorologist Jesse Ricca says the snow will begin to fall after ten tonight. Right now, it's looking a bit more of that kind of weather more wet snow because temperatures overnight are only to drop down to thirty degrees. So that's closer to that freezing. Mark the closer we are to the freezing. Mark you get more of that wet snow one to three inches of snow expected. Temperatures are ten degrees below average for this time of year. One person is dead. Three others wounded by gunfire. In the town of wetland in canola county, rusty Mellberg has more details in the WTMJ breaking news center. Melissa Kenosha county. Sheriff David Beth says it happened at a home around ten thirty last night. Two of the victims were found at the home. The other two at a gas station in nearby paddock lake. We were very confident that all the parties that posed a threat to anybody. We're in custody and this was a targeted situation. This wasn't a random at. They knew where they were going. I believe they knew what their objective was. And the general public was never at risk for this one. We had it all contains in a few minutes of each other. The suspects were taken to a BP gas station. In paddock lake Beth says they are looking for a black sedan. They were riding in. FBI's released hate crime statistics from twenty seventeen in the numbers nationwide are record-setting over seven thousand incidents of hate crimes were reported from around the country to the bureau last year. It's the highest since two thousand eight all were the numbers in Wisconsin FBI supervisory, special agent, Eric Byrnes across the state. We only had forty six incidents of hate crimes reported. Burns says a hate crime suspect in Wisconsin pled guilty this week. Routes had wrote threatening letters to the Jewish community center in whitefish bay. Jane Matenaer WTMJ news new regime is getting ready to take the governor's office in Madison, but the same problems facing the state still exist that includes infrastructure funding, Waukesha county, executive Paul Farrow says he thinks it can be done without raising the gas tax other opportunities that are within the budget already. Did they can look at relocation of funds, but we.

WTMJ Wisconsin California Paul Farrow Wisconsin FBI Melissa Kenosha county paddock lake Steve Futterman Eric Byrnes CBS Sheriff David Beth FBI Waukesha county lake Beth Jesse Ricca Burns whitefish bay Holly Quan rusty Mellberg
"lake beth" Discussed on RuPaul: What's The Tee? with Michelle Visage

RuPaul: What's The Tee? with Michelle Visage

02:11 min | 4 years ago

"lake beth" Discussed on RuPaul: What's The Tee? with Michelle Visage

"Well then jamie was there on that night with meals on san francisco and was very glad i think surely later rearming for the as your holy gallic this movie is really um a cult thing and and but then you see it on its on 35millimeter enemy maize won't be watching female trouble or something it is such a john rogers movie it is it really is like so bright and kind of imperfect and as has so much heart first of all divine hands down as my favorite actress i mean who may be a susan to rowler summit but ling you know like fuck in do something like entertain me i mean jesus christ like anything divine does is riveting and oblast as opposed to whatever this lady naturalism disease that people your hot is of leg mumbo chorley okay congratulations i hope you win an academy lahood i aachen watch it took me here i offer and i get it you know i have a bit of a really good dialogue away right and wrong had only juda lake beth show me the vie hung air bags for correcting girl an but a mature later has that element to it up like it's just has so much kind of heart in a and an sort of imperfection in an an any way just how bananas that it's long enough ago and yet so recent that it was one of the first film young of its elk and how this huge impact on people you know clear devolve is of course zoellick met us friend who twenty years until i got hit a name their did you meet the hurley in that movie because she was giving me a ride and i was in the front see like you know stone than eighteen bilic what's that script can ibn at lakenheath yell and she was like i guess so a laundry unlike what's the parts what are the hudson ago on this person is the only other real per is the treat would i'll i'll be that part youngest head to convince jamie 'cause i was like dressed all in black really gay of a replay of afford i'll be that you agree to put the gop cheerleader clip i thought was like a whole ewho.

jamie san francisco zoellick hurley john rogers rowler juda lake gop twenty years