27 Burst results for "Laguna Pueblo"

"laguna pueblo" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:49 min | 3 months ago

"laguna pueblo" Discussed on KCRW

"You the latest news on the covert 19 pandemic and the fight to end it. Last week, the Biden Harris administration offered a morsel of hope. If we stay vigilant and get vaccinated, we could celebrate the Fourth of July with something resembling normalcy. President. Biden also announced that all adults in the U. S will be eligible to receive the vaccine. By May. That doesn't mean everyone's gonna have that shot immediately. But it means you'll be able to get in line beginning May one. How long will that line be? Well, that remains to be seen. The logistics are complex, especially with vaccines that requires special storage and handling. But the public health departments charged with coordinating the rollout were behind to begin with an analysis by Kaiser Health News and The Associated Press found that spending for state public health departments has fallen by double digits since 2010 It stands at just 18% for local health departments. Many, many local public health departments are really thinly staffed, and you've got one staff person doing three or four jobs. That's Minnesota State Health Commissioner Jan Malcolm on Kare 11 news. Not all health departments in the U. S air struggling Native American tribes like the White Earth Nation in Minnesota. The Ute Mountain You tribe in Colorado and the Laguna Pueblo in New Mexico have been successfully administering vaccines to residents. And after decades of investing in health care, and following the science from the beginning of the pandemic, the Cherokee nation's death rate from Cove it is lower than the national average. That's even though Native Americans across the country run a higher risk generally of dying from the virus than white Americans. Now the Cherokee Nation and other tribes across the country have done so well with vaccinations that they're offering them toe all residents living within their tribal lands, including non natives. Maybe American values need to align.

Last week Kaiser Health News May Colorado May one Laguna Pueblo three 2010 U. S Biden Associated Press one staff Jan Malcolm Cove four jobs New Mexico President Kare 11 news Fourth of July American
The Senate confirms Deb Haaland to be the first Native American Cabinet secretary in US history

Democracy Now! Audio

00:43 sec | 3 months ago

The Senate confirms Deb Haaland to be the first Native American Cabinet secretary in US history

"Deb holland is being sworn. In today secretary of the interior she is a tribal citizen of the laguna pueblo. She becomes the first native american ever to serve in a us presidential cabinet the two term congresswoman from new mexico was confirmed by the senate monday after four. Republicans joined democrats in voting to confirm her. Susan collins of maine lindsey graham of south carolina lisa murkowski of alaska dan sullivan alaska as interior secretary. Manage five hundred million acres of federal and tribal land. She'll also oversee government relations with five hundred. Seventy four federally recognized tribal nations during her confirmation. Hearing holland vowed to work for everyone.

Deb Holland Laguna Pueblo Us Presidential Cabinet Susan Collins Alaska Lindsey Graham New Mexico Lisa Murkowski Dan Sullivan Senate Maine South Carolina Holland
Republicans Push Back On Historic Nomination Of Deb Haaland For Interior Secretary

Pacifica Evening News

02:43 min | 4 months ago

Republicans Push Back On Historic Nomination Of Deb Haaland For Interior Secretary

"And Natural Resource is committee today held confirmation hearings for New Mexico representative Deb Holland to be the next secretary of interior. A confirmation would be historic. She would be the first Native American Cabinet member in the nation's history. Her nomination by President Biden has also been criticized by oil State Republicans because of her stated opposition issues such as to fracking in the Dakota access pipeline. Ecuadorian reports from Fresno. The history being made by Deb Holland's nomination was hailed by all on the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, even those who are skeptical of her policy views The special nature of the moment was evident as the New Mexico congresswoman introduced herself to the committee and the nation. I spent summers in the Sita, or small village on Laguna Pueblo, the location of my grandparent's traditional home. It was there that I learned about my culture from my grandmother by watching her cook and by participating in traditional feast days and ceremonies, it was in the cornfields with my grandfather, where I learned the importance of water. And protecting our resource is where I gained a deep respect for the Earth Committee chair, Joe Manchin outlined the immensity of the task. The Interior Department manages 500 million acres of land. 1/5 of the entire country. The 70,000 employees oversee Parks Monuments Wildlife refuge because dams, reservoirs and canals. It also supervisors mineral resource lands that produced 20% of the nation's energy. Citing previous statements Deb Holland had made about fossil fuel production. Wyoming Senator John Barrasso, the committee's ranking member, set the theme which Republican members came back to repeatedly. Oil production in federal lands and oil pipelines, especially the Dakota access pipeline. By signing an executive order to ban all new oil coal gas leases on federal lands. The president is taking a sledgehammer to Western states economies. Ban on federal leasing could result in 33,000 workers losing their jobs in Wyoming. Representative Hollins home state of Wyoming, 62,000 workers stand to lose their jobs. Holland also faced questions over her appearance at protests of the Dakota access pipeline in North Dakota before she was elected to Congress in 2018. Holland said she went there in solidarity with Native American tribes and other water protectors, who felt they were not consulted adequately before the multi state pipeline was approved. President Joe Biden has sense next the project. Conservative

Deb Holland Native American Cabinet President Biden Senate Energy And Natural Reso New Mexico Laguna Pueblo Earth Committee Dakota Natural Resource Fresno Senator John Barrasso Joe Manchin Wyoming Interior Department Representative Hollins Holland North Dakota Congress
Washington State sues government, push for COVID vaccine uptake, and indigenous rights activist dies

Native America Calling

03:57 min | 5 months ago

Washington State sues government, push for COVID vaccine uptake, and indigenous rights activist dies

"The national native news on tonia gonzales washington state attorney general bob ferguson announced. The state is suing the federal government to stop. Its plans to sell the national archives building in seattle the government which ship off digitize records to archive centers out of state as steve jackson reports. Tribal nations are among those that. Want the information to stay in the pacific northwest. Bob ferguson says. The plan violates current law. Because there's an exemption for buildings the archive being put up for sale if it's used for specific types of research in addition he says the federal government didn't consult with those who would be impacted by the closure that includes twenty nine native american tribes have signed onto the suit. Fawn sharp is the president of the chronology indian nation. She says native americans in the northwest are seeing a resurgence of language and culture and the archive is a vital source for information leading to a point of just having a basic understanding of this rich and baskets and if if this information were to ever leave the pacific northwest there would be a loss gnarly his tribal nation. It'd be lost entire at pacific northwest and put a price on a value of what those are. House at tribal nations ferguson says the suit seeks an injunction to stop the sale of the building. He hopes the case will receive an expedited hearing in federal court for national native news. I'm steve jackson reporting from spokane leaders and tribal communities are getting creative to encourage uptake of the cove. Nineteen vaccine the mountain west news bureaus savannah mar reports. The northern arapaho tribe has been hit hard by the pandemic and many tribal members are eager to be vaccinated. That's according to lisa. You're walking with the tribes medical clinic. However there are some that do have questions she says. Clinic staff have been fielding those questions via social media. And they've been getting help from arapahoe. Ceremonial elders like george moss. Who agreed to get the first shot in to have it. Broadcast live on facebook people. To have mr moss him so i can take the vaccine is speaks volumes tribes like the navajo nation had council members get vaccinated on camera. The black feet nation in montana is using the black veep language to counter misinformation and educate members about the safety and efficacy of the vaccine for the mountain west news bureau. I'm savannah mar georgina. Lewis from alabama pueblo in new mexico intends to run for congress. The five term state democratic lawmaker and attorney is joining the race for the anticipated of the first congressional district currently held by deb holland holland. Who's a member of laguna pueblo has been picked by the biden harris team for secretary of the interior. If holland's confirmed the state would call for a special election wants the. Us house vacancy occurs with candidates nominated by major political parties in new mexico on her campaign website. Lewis says she's been a tireless champion for the earth people and future generations and would continue. The fight holland began holland. Strong advocate for native american issues environmental issues and missing and murdered indigenous women and girls rancher and indigenous rights advocate carry. Dan has died in nevada. At the age of eighty eight democracy now reports kerry and her late sister. Mary long fought the federal government over land rights and environmental issues. The western shoshoni sisters were committed to protecting their way of life and the rights of their people fighting for land back and land restoration from poisoning. Their legal and political battles began in the nineteen seventies and they spent their lives advocating for indigenous rights. I antonio

Tonia Gonzales Attorney General Bob Ferguson Steve Jackson National Archives Building Bob Ferguson Fawn Sharp Pacific Northwest Federal Government George Moss Mr Moss Holland Savannah Mar Georgina Alabama Pueblo Seattle Washington Ferguson Deb Holland Spokane Laguna Pueblo Biden Harris
"laguna pueblo" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

Boston Public Radio Podcast

03:12 min | 6 months ago

"laguna pueblo" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

"Told us about her well. She's a second term house of representatives Lawmaker from new mexico. She was part of that You know big group of people who are excited to look at the diversification of not just women in the house of representatives but but everybody in the house of representatives She's native american and she's a lawyer. She's the climate activist and she's an enrolled member of the laguna pueblo. Which makes her you know. She's she's indigenous and that is like unheard of to find somebody who actually this is part of their mission and life To be named interior secretary should she win the nomination or or be a quarter of the nomination you know these are the issues of the interior are so important to indigenous. They're all of us. But for certainly the indigenous people who had their land taken away and this has been an ongoing struggle and under the trump administration some of that land even as we speak has been auctioned off for drilling these are some some areas of sacred land and other areas of just land that was put aside for preservation conservation and a lot of that got ignored under the trump administration. So to have someone who is as close to that land and What it has meant to both indigenous people and and others is. This is pretty amazing. I don't know about you all. But i've looked at all of his appointments and a few of them. I thought okay. These are really smart people. But i wonder why that department this is one where you hear that she's been appointed to the interior and it makes absolute sense. Well we talked about earlier was so katelyn obviously incredibly competent person but we did raise. That question is a number of why secretary of transportation bureau with holland. There is no question. You know callie crossley. Last week we had the pleasure of discussing deviled eggs with you jared. I don't think was here for this. Jared came in second in that context. Of course marjorie. Came in a distant and disgraceful. Third remember correctly three There's a great story in the smithsonian about the history of eggnog. Do you want to share a little bit with us since people are going to be doing that kind of thing. I assume starting sometime next week. Yeah this is really interesting so so we learned from this article that the british called in an egg flip but monks were drinking some eggs and fix and milk eggs in cherry Then it became associated with roman the caribbean. So it's kind of a rich history. It's all over the place. George washington was all into it. He had a recipe that They say indicates that he had a very strong stomach. Apparently he forgot to specify how many eggs should be used. But i guess he left everything in sugar milk cream but adds a pint of brandy. A half a pint of rye. And i have a pint of rum and a quarter pint of sherry to the mix so long island iced tea. Listen if you're not at home but it drinking that stuff over for you but remember..

laguna pueblo house of representatives callie crossley new mexico katelyn marjorie jared holland Jared George washington caribbean
Biden plans to nominate Michael Regan as EPA chief

Science Friday

01:21 min | 6 months ago

Biden plans to nominate Michael Regan as EPA chief

"On his pledge, his team also announced several New key appointments this week. Who might be influential in getting us there. I'm speaking about yesterday, New Mexico representative Deb Holland was picked for interior. She's both the first native American tap for the job and a big opponent of oil drilling in the Arctic Wildlife Refuge. Good news for the climate goals, right? Yeah, you know, as they say in D. C. The personnel is policy and yes, representative Debbie Holland. A member of the Laguna Pueblo has a track record of opposing, you know, mining and drilling on public lands. You know, the Interior Department is kind of overlooked as an environmental agency. But it has jurisdiction over 20% of land in the U. S. And those lands produce about 1/5 of the country's greenhouse gas emissions. There's a lot of mining and drilling, but she has a track record of opposing a lot of that and supporting Native American rights. And so it's very likely that that will be something that will shake out in the future if she takes over this department. Plus we have the other picks this week of Michael Regan for EPA and Gina McCarthy. Yeah, that's right. Michael Regan is the head of North Carolina's Department of Environmental Quality, and Gina McCarthy herself was the former head of the EPA, and she was brought on board to be a climate adviser and former Michigan governor, Jennifer Granholm was also selected to lead the Department of Energy. That's really interesting picks one last story close to my heart

Deb Holland Arctic Wildlife Refuge Debbie Holland Laguna Pueblo Michael Regan Gina Mccarthy New Mexico Interior Department U. Department Of Environmental Qu EPA North Carolina Jennifer Granholm Michigan Department Of Energy
"laguna pueblo" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:56 min | 6 months ago

"laguna pueblo" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Was tested, and that was what was researched. Also talk about this vaccine protecting against asymptomatic spread. Yeah, That's right. I mean, we know, for instance, that this vaccine and the other vaccines are very effective against preventing disease. You know where people's actually start to get sick and start to have symptoms. But here you know, we know with covert 19 that a lot of people who don't show symptoms at all can still spread the disease, and the majority trial actually did some screaming and testing to find out How those asymptomatic spreaders were being affected, and they saw that there was in fact a decline. And so this is a really good sign for, you know, ending the pandemic and for, you know, reducing transmission with this vaccine. There was also some puzzling news that that Fizer announced in a press release that they have millions of doses just sitting in their warehouses. With no instructions from the White House where to ship them. Yeah, That's right. It's showing some of the hiccups in the supply chain here, you know, Several state officials have reported that you know their allocations for this vaccine were cut. And yet at the same time, the manufacturer's saying that they have a bunch of doses that are still unclaimed. And so it's showing that there's a little bit of a miscommunication here that hopefully will get resolved pretty soon. On the other hand, you may have also seen the news that some pharmacists reported that the vials for the Fizer biotech vaccine actually had more doses. And they realized and the FDA has approved those extra doses to be used. If you know pharmacist can actually scrounge them up Interesting. Also speaking of Fizer, We also need to mention that a few people have had some extremely adverse reactions in the process. I'm talking about to health care workers in Alaska to people in the UK Is that something we should be worried about? That is something to be concerned about because people with severe allergies were actually excluded from the face three clinical trial pools and they have their own discretion if they're eligible to get the vaccine on whether or not to get them. And right now, regulators in both the UK and the US are basically saying that you know if you have a history of an awful access or very severe allergic reactions You probably shouldn't be getting these vaccines right now. But you know, there are also other side effects to be concerned about as well. You know, they're Madonna Data that was released this week showed that About 16% of trial participants experienced a severe adverse reaction, which was defined as something that requires medical attention or prevents people from going about their lives. You know, these are things like pain, swelling headache and fever, but they tend to be a little bit more intense with these vaccines than with other vaccines. One doctor suggested that you know, if you're gonna get one of these shots, you may want to schedule the day off of work. So that's not like the end of galactic reaction you were talking about before. Right, these air not you know, super severe reactions. But health officials want people to be aware of this, You know, part of how we build trust with vaccines is to, you know, make sure people are not surprised by what happens here. And since these air to dose vaccines, you know, we want people to come back for the second dose. So if people do see experience some mild to moderate side effects, we want to ensure them that you know these are normal there within the normal parameters and that you should still come back and finish your course of this vaccine. It's move on to the news on the animal front. I'm speaking about a making Utah testing positive this week. Yeah, that's right. That follows the news that in Denmark, they called about 17 million few makes due to covert infection risk. And now there's one make a wild one and Utah that tested positive for this virus. And we've seen already several instances of other animals being infected with this virus. Cats, dogs, lions tigers, You may remember Earlier in the pandemic. There are tigers at the Bronx Zoo that got sick and they had a cough with this virus on do you know this is more than just you know, a novelty. I mean, it's it's kind of concerning because one you don't want another reservoir for this disease. If another animal can start transmitting this virus to other animals, then you know that increases the likelihood of a mutation that could potentially Bounce back to us. But the other concern is also for animals like endangered species, You know, like mountain gorillas in these wildlife preserves in Africa, workers there are actually taking covert precautions to ensure that those animals don't get infected because Their respiratory systems are very similar to ours, and there's only a few 100 of these girls left in many of these reserves, and so they're taking extra care to make sure that they don't get sick with these diseases. Is there anything we can learn about the virus? When it shows up in these animals? It could shed some light on how the virus made the jump from animals to humans in the first place, And so we're trying to see you know what are the most of transmission? What kinds of animals are most vulnerable and what happens when they start transmitting it to each other. And that could potentially help us get ahead of the next pandemic as well. All right, let's look at some other news this week that did not get so much attention. President elect Biden had his electoral college when certified And there's a new report out of Princeton University on his ambitious goal of getting us to Ned zero carbon emissions by the year 2050. And that report said. It's pretty feasible if we set our minds to it. Yeah, it does. I mean, this is a report by researchers at Princeton University. As you noted, they examine the pathways to get to net zero greenhouse gas emissions of the U. S economy by 2050. And they sent their multiple strategies that you could use. You know, if anything from going to 100% renewable energy to keeping fossil fuels with carbon and capture and storage. And also the infrastructure that would be needed now, they said that you know, a lot of the technology is already there and that money of these changes are already underway. But we would need a lot of drastic changes in the near future as well. Things like Shutting down all coal power plants by roughly 2030 and by 2030. Half of all new cars would have to be electric. We would need new high voltage transmission systems and even pipelines to move captured carbon dioxide around the country. But one of the things they also found was that this would cost about $2.3 trillion over the next 10 years, which is roughly in the same ballpark is what we would be spending any way in terms of our energy infrastructure. And so they're saying that we're gonna be spending this money anyway. Let's do so thoughtfully in a way that actually helps us meet our climate change ambitions and as far as Biden's chances of making good on his pledge, his team also announced several New key appointments this week. Who might be influential in getting us there. I'm speaking about yesterday, New Mexico representative Deb Holland was picked for interior. She's both the first native American tap for the job and a big opponent of oil drilling in the Arctic Wildlife Refuge. Good news for the climate goals, right? Yeah, you know, as they say in D. C. The personnel is policy and yes, representative Debbie Holland. A member of the Laguna Pueblo has a track record of opposing, you know, mining and drilling on public lands. You know, the Interior Department is kind of overlooked as an environmental agency. But it has jurisdiction over 20% of land in the U. S. And those lands produce about 1/5 of the country's greenhouse gas emissions. There's a lot of mining and drilling, but she has a track record of opposing a lot of that and supporting Native American rights. And so it's very likely that that will be something that will shake out in the future if she takes over this department..

Fizer asymptomatic Princeton University Biden Utah Debbie Holland UK representative FDA Interior Department Alaska Bronx Zoo Laguna Pueblo New Mexico lions
"laguna pueblo" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:32 min | 6 months ago

"laguna pueblo" Discussed on WTOP

"And enhanced unemployment insurance. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says they're nearing a deal, but not quite there. We're going to stay right here. Right here. Until we're finished. Even if that means working through the weekend, which is highly likely, and that would mean passing another continuing resolution to avoid a government shutdown on Capitol Hill, Mitchell Miller W T. O P News, a member of President elect Biden's inner circle who has been tapped to serve as a senior adviser in the White House has tested positive for Cove it Louisiana Congressman Cedric Richmond was in Atlanta with the president elect on Tuesday. The next day he tested positive, a transition aide says both the incoming White House adviser and Mr Biden We're wearing masks during their open air interactions. The president elect tested negative today. Richmond will remain isolated for 14 days, and we'll have to test negative twice before he gets back to work. President elect Biden intent on ensuring his Cabinet is the most diverse in history is on the cusp of announcing more nominees to head agencies, sources say. The president elect has asked New Mexico congresswoman Deb Holland to serve his interior secretary. It's another historic pick is Holland, who was a member of the Laguna Pueblo people would be the first Native American Lead the sprawling agency that includes the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Mr. Biden is also chosen North Carolina state environmental official Michael Regan to lead the EPA. Regan would be the first black man to serve in that role that CBS News White House correspondent Stephen Portnoy at 9 37 eyes.

President Mr. Biden Mr Biden Cedric Richmond Majority Leader Mitch McConnel Biden Michael Regan White House correspondent Deb Holland White House Senate senior adviser Bureau of Indian Affairs Richmond Laguna Pueblo Stephen Portnoy CBS
In Historic Move, Biden To Pick Native American Rep. Haaland As Interior Secretary

Environment: NPR

03:23 min | 6 months ago

In Historic Move, Biden To Pick Native American Rep. Haaland As Interior Secretary

"President-elect biden sandy. Wanted his administration to reflect america and two of his nominees to lead his environmental agenda. Appear to support that promise. Michael regan would be the first black man to lead the environmental protection agency. If confirmed by the senate and new mexico congresswoman deb holland is biden's pick for the interior department. She would be the first native american to serve as a cabinet secretary. Npr's nathan rod reports hamas nomination is especially symbolic. The department of the interior is a massive agency responsible for about one fifth of all the land in the united states deals with natural resources and wildlife recreation and national parks. But it's also responsible for the relationship between the federal government and the people. Those lands were taken from or a number of scholars who have done really great work to show how the creation of national parks was predicated on the removal of native peoples katrina phillips as a history professor at macalester college in minnesota. And she's a member of the red cliff band of lake superior ojibway and she says it's fair to say that for most of its history. The interior department has been used as a tool to oppress indigenous people in the us which is why she says she still in shock that deb holland a member of the laguna pueblo. In new mexico has been nominated to lead it to harm someone who understands this history and indigenous sovereignty and land rights and treaty rights is. Just i mean. I'm just i'm so happy right now. It's just hard to believe that this nomination cam through a large coalition of native american tribes along with environmental groups progressive leaders pushed for holland to get the post now just because of the symbolism but because of her experience she's a two-term congresswoman who served on a committee with oversight of interior and she comes from new mexico a fossil fuel dependence state that is trying to transition to renewable energies in an interview with npr before her nomination holland made clear. She'd want the country as a whole to try to do the same. Climate changes the challenge of our lifetime and it's imperative that we invested an equitable renewable energy economy. President elect joe biden has said he wants the country to be carbon neutral by the year twenty fifty and his interior secretary holland would have a big role in shaping that future roughly one quarter of all greenhouse gas emissions in the us come from public lands. She also said she'd restore trust with the interior. Seventy thousand some employees prioritize conserving thirty percent of all us land and water and undo some of the damage that the trump administration has done to our environment. Native americans and other minorities are disproportionately affected by climate change and pollution in dallas goal to founder of the indigenous environmental network says it would be invaluable to have someone in charge of interior. Who understands that but he says the fight is not over. We're not stopping here. Like we celebrate this victory but we as a climate justice movement as an indigenous rights movement are going to continue to push the biden administration to to its promises and to do so in an equitable way nathan. Rot npr news.

Deb Holland Department Of The Interior Elect Biden Sandy Michael Regan Nathan Rod New Mexico Katrina Phillips Lake Superior Ojibway Laguna Pueblo United States Holland Macalester College Environmental Protection Agenc Biden NPR Hamas Cabinet Senate President Elect Joe Biden Federal Government
"laguna pueblo" Discussed on Our Body Politic

Our Body Politic

05:51 min | 7 months ago

"laguna pueblo" Discussed on Our Body Politic

"She come.

"laguna pueblo" Discussed on Our Body Politic

Our Body Politic

04:09 min | 7 months ago

"laguna pueblo" Discussed on Our Body Politic

"This country accountable because as journalists of color and journalists have conscience and. You don't have to be a journalist of colored to be a journalist of conscience. We understand what our role is in the united states of america and today that role is so essential awry because all of us are living in fear of our democracy disappearing. I wanted just end on talking about your radio. Dock today a revisited. Which to me really embodies this idea of being journalistically. Excellent and emotionally intimate. So can you tell us who today is how long you've been covering her. And what this latest part of her story is about just days after. Donald trump is inaugurated. She is the first person that we know of that is taken by in this case undercover immigration agents from courtroom. This story comes to light. Not because she was taken but because the immigration agents lied about being in that courtroom and that becomes the story but as they is mexican undocumented formerly deported with a criminal record of fraud so nothing violent and they thought a throwaway. Who's going to care about this trans mexican criminal. That's exactly who i care about then. This update is three as life behind bars as a trans undocumented person in a maximum security. Men's prison in texas. We spoke with his three hours. It was clear she knew what was going to happen because she reveals that she is raped. Um and we talk about this account of rape in prison i mean. Has anybody been charged. This is a criminal act. That is now a national news. How come the texas department of corrections has not called me or asked who did this to you. Why do i love is three and telling the story because she is the least powerful person in the country right now and to me. She is the person who gives me the most amount of hope for life for survival for joy as resistance and is three is like wow you know. Her voice is being heard around the country. The person who was to be the most invisible. And that's what we try to do is to make the invisible those who feel invisible. Make them super visible so that everybody understands that they are part of who we are maria. Thank you so much for spending some time with us for ri- thank you for also being a queen of never giving up we love you. That was maria hinojosa founder of the photo media group host of latino usa. An author of the memoir. Once i was you out now here on our body politic we want to hear from you we've been using a new platform called speak that gathers and analyzes. What's on your mind later this episode. You'll hear some of your responses to our current question. Imagine if women of color trusted the society around them and felt truly free. What would you do if you felt truly free and financially secure you can call us at nine two nine three five three seven zero zero six or go to farrah dot com slash. Ob scroll down to find a google form to responded writing. That's nine two nine. Three five three seven zero zero six or farai.

texas department of correction Donald trump united states of america maria hinojosa latino usa texas maria google
"laguna pueblo" Discussed on Our Body Politic

Our Body Politic

08:00 min | 7 months ago

"laguna pueblo" Discussed on Our Body Politic

"I'm farai today. And this is our body politic. We've been marching to the drumbeat of political news for the last two months but here at our body politic we've also been talking to authors and journalists about our present past and future. These are women who are writing the first draft of history and looking ahead to the evolution of america to arts and publishing race relations and climate. This week we're bringing you the insights of people including maria hosa so many sen gupta lisa lucas and sarah marsh keeping us food for thought in a world hungry for answers. My guest has spent decades as a journalist. Working at pbs. Npr and cnn is three years. Mother gave her an ultimatum. Either get married to a woman and live a heterosexual life or get out and moved to the united states. That's a clip from us today. Revisited partout of a documentary. Maria in hosa and her team produced. It stuck with me that. This is a specific story about the universal striving for freedom. And i ask maria why she chose to focus on today. She is the first person that we know of taken by in this case undercover immigration agents from a courtroom. This story comes to light. Not because she was taken but because the immigration agents lied about being in that courtroom and that becomes the story but is three is mexican undocumented formerly deported with criminal record of fraud so nothing violent and they thought a throwaway. Who's going to care about this trans mexican criminal. That's exactly who i care about. You know hosts. Latest book is once. I was you a memoir of love and hate in torn america. We've been friends and sisters in journalism for years. Here's a window into how both seeking to process what the art and business of truth telling means to us and to the world there has been this idea that journalism is a place where you have no body and no self hood and all of your personal experiences have to before you can write about anything and now the cracks. That facade are manifest and that whole construct is breaking down. How did it affect your life as a journalist in the early days of npr. And how did that lead to you. Creating your own company fu tutto. You're exactly right for i. It was like how do i become walter cronkite. How white men in this country have taken ownership of the notion of objectively right so we have to not just leave the body. We have to become like them. We have to see the world through their eyes. And it's like yo- week so i ki- like when did you all become the arbiters of objectivity. I mean it's been adorable farai. I've been interviewed by many latino journalists. Who are now seasoned journalists. They're just like we were really the first you were like the first. Npr like the first latina cnn. Like what and i understood. Like i was the first So there was no way to kind of blend in. I mean honestly. Npr was incredibly white and very privileged and very male. And you sort of talk about a moment where someone's like. Oh you must be afraid to go out there in them streets like i'm actually more afraid being right here in this office. Exacly the beautiful thing of what happened in that moment for i was i understood. Privilege and the privilege is what forced me to you know. Raise my hand up literally. I would push my elbow up and just be like okay. Keep it up because they understood like you can't be here having had all this privilege and not doing your job representing being up these stories you know. Lay people know that the whole world doesn't look like them or think like them and throughout my career. You'd come up with a story idea they'd be like oh that's weird why i've never heard about that so it must not be important so let's not report about it you know and going home and just like whoa okay. I can't believe that was said today or that that happened. You know whether it was the sexism or the undertow racism or outright racism so it could have completely kneecap me like my editor from npr. When i was a reporter already said to me camera. Everybody knows about your latino agenda. And i was like what. What are you taught us. Come on everybody knows. You have a latino agenda. And i was like really and thankfully i was on my toes that day and i said well it must mean that you have a white male agenda then and he said it's not the same thing and i said it's exactly the same thing so that moment could have ended it for me. I could have just been like. That's it and i fought back because of that privilege and i'm really glad i never went away. Not only did you not go away. You created tutto. Media will only grown and strengthened power with latino. Usa in the thick radio documentaries. How has your vision for a few tutto challenged overtime while for i. I mean you've been with me on this path of I mean you're the person who labeled meet my favorite label for me. Is the one that you gave me. Do you remember it. The queen of never giving up while when you said that to me i was like yeah man. That's it you know. The creation of doodo media was born out of frustration. Actually and fear my dream job. As i write in the book i mean i watch sixty minutes as a little girl. That was where i wanted to work. It was like where do you go to next after you've done documentary work and won an emmy for you know long form investigate like you go there and they said. Can you wait until one of these white men get sicker dies i was like. Is this a joke and people had said you know. Maybe you should do your own thing. Maybe you should create your own thing and it's just like what. I'm so glad that out of that. Fear i created for tutor and the vision it i. Somebody asked me what division i was like. Well i had a vision. I knew i wanted to be create the newsroom. That i had always dreamed that i have as a young journalist. We're actually moving with ethics and love is possible. I was like the vision was to get to three years. If you made it two three years then maybe you could make it to five and if you made it to five then you know so now. That vision is real. We have a newsroom that is diverse which includes white men because yes the two we are. We include and we're always working on doing even better but we are newsroom. That is creating this content where our numbers are. Exploding variety know we just left. Npr we are now being distributed by pr x. I just got an email like a week ago. That said now grown by another twenty five stations while amazing. It's because we have done this work with so much love and authenticity and with understanding that we don't do what npr does. Which is you know looking at latinos like with benach yours. Like oh my god. Wow those hispanics. What's the matter with them. They don't vote. That's not how we approach these stories. We are all part of this continuum of holding.

farai Npr maria hosa sen gupta lisa lucas sarah marsh america cnn pbs walter cronkite Maria maria npr emmy
How Native American voters swung the 2020 presidential election

The Takeaway

04:33 min | 7 months ago

How Native American voters swung the 2020 presidential election

"This election president elect joe biden democratic presidential candidate to win the state of arizona in twenty four years and one group who played a major role in flipping. The state for biden was arizona's native american population. According to high country news counties that included the navajo nation hope tribes and to hana autumn nation. Where some of the key areas that help. The president elect carry the state and in the swing state of wisconsin. Native voters also appeared to have been part of turning that state luke now as president-elect biden prepares to take office organizers and tribal leaders want to make sure he doesn't take their votes for granted the leonard horsemen on chairman of the sukhois amish trod president affiliate tragic north west indians under president obama chairman forstmann was appointed as vice chair of the advisory council on historic preservation. And last month he endorsed the biden harris ticket. Along with more than two hundred other. American indian leaders and biden begins to assemble his cabinet. Chairman foresman has a specific request. Appoint a native american official as the next secretary of the interior. He and shannon hosie president of the stockbridge muncie tribe made their case in a recent opinion piece for reuters. When i spoke to the chairman. I asked him to explain why the department of the interior is so important to native communities. Many of our indian programs of course are housed in the department of interior. Of course the bureau of indian affairs and Many other agencies that affect indian country holding the breeland management the national park service and a lot of this has to do with our Trust resources which are land and water and Cultural resources sake replaces. So it's very important that we have a secretary. Interior that has a A good understanding of any country in our values and traditions. What are some of the main environmental issues. That are most important to indian country and that you think the next secretary of the interior should focus on well in the pacific northwest here. We really really rely on Our treaty resources as we call them or our natural resources. Wildlife salmon traditional plant's clean water. Not only for food but also for medicine and also for our spiritual life and ceremonial life and We feel that A change in leadership at the interior prius back from the last four years of of focus on deregulation and prophets seemed to have come over the importance of protecting habitat and Sacred places and that's been demonstrated in a lot of the activities the administration's engaged in that have Ignored tribal needs and priorities in many parts of the west. One of the people that you suggest could hold. The secretary of interior role is representative deb. Holland of new mexico. Who had on the show before and who is a citizen of the laguna pueblo tribe. Why do you think representative holland would be good for the role while we've known deb hall in a congresswoman now for at least a one term or more and She's demonstrated his Commitment to indian country obviously being a member of laguna pueblo and very close to their traditions and values which are very similar. Many trump's across the nation the importance of place and landscaped. The cultural landscape be importance of our traditions. Our stories our way alive on. It's all connected strongly to respect dean and holding our lands and waters sacred to our survival As an people something very important to us so we really believed that coming for new mexico deb has an understanding of energy policy and also understanding of the importance of environmental and resource protection. So i think she'll be a good candidate for trying to balance those two things in her leadership of the department.

Biden Forstmann Advisory Council On Historic P Biden Harris Chairman Foresman Shannon Hosie Arizona Department Of Interior Bureau Of Indian Affairs Joe Biden Stockbridge Muncie Wisconsin President Obama National Park Service Reuters Cabinet Representative Deb Representative Holland
"laguna pueblo" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

03:41 min | 10 months ago

"laguna pueblo" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"I'm working on one of the reporters. Amos internist, No cover stories that we have to dio staff writers or get to do. Yes, probably to do. Yeah, No, it's great. I love doing long form journalism in anyway, So I've been working on this for quite awhile now, and it's a look at the casinos in the gaming industry. In general in the state. This was cool and fun and really interesting for me to work on because where I'm from, There's not that much gaming. There is a little bit but not not as much tribal land in Florida. There is here, obviously. But anyway, it was really interesting. And it's kind of a look at like how the almost complete loss of giving gaming revenue you know, will affect the state and then the individual tribes and pueblos that often really rely on these casinos. And then there's a little part of it. That's also about the race tracks. Which also have gaining absolutely absolutely. So Yeah, I was seeing it down at the downs. Down it down in Albuquerque is Letta is open route 66 is open. The rumor is the Because see nose up in the Santa Fe area going open up very soon. Yes, Some of them are. Buffalo Thunder is on September 4th. That'll be in my story on DH, then. Ah, Okay. Okay. We need there. Okay. Hotel casino has been open. Yeah. Isleta, Laguna Pueblo Couple of there's your open. There's 45 that are open right now. The rest are are pretty much closed. Navajo Nation is closed and plans on staying that they don't have plans to open up any time soon know that they got to be careful. UPIN the Navajo Nation, man they're doing Okay doing okay? I mean, they're doing fabulous compared where they were a month ago. But you know, they got it. They got to get things down to zero before they start opening up the round. Yeah. Casinos are part of the fourth phase of their opening the last phase and they're only in the second phase right now CEO of the Gaming Enterprise told me you know it's I'm not going to be happening here for a while, okay? So that's the cover story for next week. Yeah. Keep an eye out for it. It'll be wherever the reporter is an online You know, we're online. The cover story This week was about emergency rooms by Julie Go. Goldberg did a great job. Cool story. Yeah, Yeah, It was a good story. Look. Looks like a really interesting book. I haven't read it yet. But the story makes me want to read it Really cool Love. Yeah, Yeah, exactly. Yeah. Something to read and then pick up good luck with the casino story. Good luck. Have a good weekend. You and the £120 lapdog. Every time you say that she gets heavier, she looks I'm gonna bite Dad s O B. She's going to get offended. If people want to pitch his stories and you top secret information. How can they I mean emails Best. Catherine and us every porter dot com Katherine with a K I love e mails. Okay? Have a great weekend, okay to urine signal, which is which is a kind of top secret app. Yeah. Scripted and encrypted app. Yeah, Alright, Captain. Appreciate it. Stay healthy, Okay? Yeah. Okay, you 48 minutes after four o'clock. Anything on your mind that you won't talk about got a couple minutes here now's a good time to call. Is during a break for two for.

reporter Buffalo Thunder Navajo Nation Goldberg Santa Fe Isleta Albuquerque Gaming Enterprise Florida Julie Go Laguna Pueblo Catherine Letta
Indigenous Artist to Artist,  Adapting To Pandemic & Daring to Dream

All My Relations Podcast

04:07 min | 11 months ago

Indigenous Artist to Artist, Adapting To Pandemic & Daring to Dream

"Pam is a talented Laguna Pueblo and Apache Metal Smith who likes to push boundaries and expand the definition of what is considered native art. He came to fine art jewelry through the world of body piercing and learning to make his own jewelry there, and he now uses materials like titanium and complex. Processes to produce creative modern jewellery that reflects his cultural roots right now, he's working on these incredible titanium feather earrings that are colored brightly using some fancy submission process or something but they look like something a futuristic native warrior woman would wear and I absolutely love them. So he starts by telling us how Cova has deeply impacted the Indian art community. Everything started happening in the march timeframe right. So we had the heard show that those of us that were able to to participate in that we had that, but you could sense something was coming right I mean the attendance wasn't as high. And Man shortly after that is when the ish just hit the fan right like states are down like for for those of us here into Pablo's like the Pueblos shutdown really early I mean fast. Yeah. Just like straight up no visitors and then and then you really started hearing The reaction by organizations, riots swire. Then put out the notice that like we're going to postpone Indian market. There are number of other shows that I do outside of the native art market. Those shows are being canceled. A potentially had a museum opening like a Solo Exhibition slated for this year from the heard museum that gets postponed. So like all this obvious postponement like really happen rapidly right at the very beginning which I will say I'm very grateful that happened. Then because you can now plan right we're no longer we're not reacting to what's happening and I think that's what's really made. A transition in a sense a little more thoughtful and a little more purposeful because essentially I think all of us in the native art field we were I would argue to say we were one hundred percent or one hundred, very high percentage, right like eighty to ninety percent reliant on shows for revenue generation, and as you go into March and April and realize your entire year. Is Gone like there's zero opportunity i. think everybody really just dug deep and really started to think okay. How am I going to get through this? You know especially for those of us who are fulltime artists I, mean I've been full time for over twenty years. It's It's. So. So I think I think with any with any culture. That's. been resilient for centuries right. You're native population is really taken taking the bull by the horns in developing either innovative ways to to change their revenue dynamic oranges using what they already how which is. I think the case for most of us through social media these days right I mean being able to push out to get the word out to say, Hey, look, this is what I have available and I think more importantly there has been a lot of. Empathy in the sense that people within within the native art community and I think even a much broader sense those that collect art or are fans of makers that realize it's like if something is coming out right now the only way to acquire it as online. Right, there's no shows. So so I think you're seeing the dynamic by dynamic change a little bit more.

PAM Laguna Pueblo Apache Metal Smith Cova Pablo
"laguna pueblo" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"laguna pueblo" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's an acronym that means black people, indigenous people and people of color, and it's meant to affirm black and indigenous people and identity. Representative. How do you feel about terms like that? I mean, do you think it's important to separate black and indigenous people when referring to people of color? I mean, when we think about the beginning of our country, right, this we This was all Indian land before it was over the United States before it was ever colonized continent by the Europeans when they came over here. In the late 14 hundreds. We are wherever you're sitting in the United States. You're sitting on Indian land. Thie United States happened because of genocide of of Indian tribes all over the country, starting on the east coast, coming up from the southwest, and everywhere in between. And so I think that we all that is our history. We have to recognize that we that we have different histories. Different historical traumas are indigenous folks, you know that they've had We've had incredible struggles, and in fact I mentioned the genocide of Indians that was a precursor to how people would treat the African slaves who eventually became our African American populations with violence and unspeakable horror, so I think in that sense, yes. We're different than a lot of other communities who who came over after a lot of this happened. Representative Deb Holland is the Democratic representative for New Mexico's first congressional district, which includes Albuquerque. She was elected in 2018 and is a member of the Laguna Pueblo Tribes. Congresswoman. Thank you so much. Thanks so much. You take care. You can hear an extended version of my interview with the congresswoman, including her hopes for the Democratic Party and how she is finding joy in this moment..

United States representative Democratic Party Deb Holland Laguna Pueblo Tribes Albuquerque New Mexico
Tons of food delivered to families on Pine Ridge as part of COVID-19 relief efforts

Native America Calling

03:59 min | 1 year ago

Tons of food delivered to families on Pine Ridge as part of COVID-19 relief efforts

"This is national. Native News Antonio Gonzales, running strong for American, Indian Youth has delivered twenty two tons of food to families on the Pine Ridge Reservation in south, Dakota as part of Covid nineteen relief efforts boxes with fruits, vegetables, proteins and grains have been delivered across the reservation field coordinator Dave Lone elk says accessing food during the pandemic has been of concern with stay at home, orders and recent lockdowns of the reservation. To some of the local grocery stores within hours distances. Are you know it's far between when we're having a hard time getting there to get the groceries, and so we're left with the few grocery stores that are on the reservation which tend to be. Around four grocery stores, but when you're dealing with the. reservation full people right around ten thousand you know. RUN, out of out of stock, running strong also distributes clothing has heating and water programs along with providing other seasonal assistants. Reach out, and we help each other. If we have extra, we give that. Toby determine well. How much we get to each other, not how much we approve, and so you've been doing very good in our efforts. Several Cova nineteen orders remain in place on the reservation, including stay at home and nightly curfews as of Tuesday. There were twenty-six positive cove nineteen cases on the Pine Ridge reservation according to the Oglala Sioux tribes. Cove Response Task Force. The Rosebud Sioux tribe wants to create the largest native American owned managed Bison Herd in North America Seth Tupper was South Dakota public broadcasting has more with Zepa. Has a big vision for Bison. On the Rosebud reservation. He wants to build a herd of fifteen hundred animals and processing facility to provide food and economic development for tribal members. He says now is the perfect time for the project. The COVID nineteen outbreaks at packing plants and meet shortages and stores have consumers looking for different ways to get their food we we've always felt that our work was around. It will self sufficiency and. You know empowering families and doing good by people, and in the world in the environment, and we've always felt that work was important but I. Think what has happened with the coronavirus pandemic is that the world has told us that that our work is not only important, but that it is urgent little elk is CEO of the Rosebud Economic Development Corporation with help from the World Wildlife Fund. Fund, the corporation plans to convert cattle pastures on the reservation to a bison range of forty square miles. The Development Corporation will get excess bison from the Interior Department which manages a number of herds including those in national parks. Little Oak says the grass-fed Bison will be killed and slaughtered humanely. Basically what that Games is treating Buffalo Buffalo in not treating them like cattle. I, they'll replace cattle. Cattle fences with bigger sturdier fences for Bison. The first animals are scheduled for delivery. This fall and a feasibility study for processing plant will begin soon for national native news I'm Seth Tupper in rapid city South Dakota some native candidates running for Congress. When Tuesday's primary election unofficial results show, the Shoshoni tribes congratulated tribal members. Rudy Soto Impala Jordan on social media Tuesday night after Idaho's election Jordan. Jordan seeking to serve in the US Senate and so two in the house. Both are Democrats in New Mexico Congresswoman deb Haaland Laguna. Pueblo did not have a Democratic challenger in the primary. She'll seek another term Yvette. Herald Cherokee nation won the Republican nomination for us. House seat to other native candidates in New Mexico who ran for Congress lost Republicans Lisa Martinez and Gavin Clarkson I'm Antonia

Pine Ridge Reservation Seth Tupper Rosebud Economic Development C South Dakota World Wildlife Fund Antonio Gonzales Covid Dave Lone Elk New Mexico Congress North America Coordinator Pueblo Jordan Deb Haaland Laguna Indian Youth Cova Toby Yvette Zepa
COVID 19 frauds and scams

Native America Calling

09:36 min | 1 year ago

COVID 19 frauds and scams

"This is native America calling. I'm Monica Brain. Scammers will take any opportunity to bilk you out of your money or personal information. Currently they're using the Kovic global pandemic as a way to prey on fears about the uncertainty with the virus and economic issues around the pandemic. Here's one example of a Robo call. Some folks are getting. The Corona virus has caused the. Us declared a national emergency. The Families First Corona Virus Response Act has made corona virus testing more accessible immediately. If you want to receive a free testing kit delivered overnight to your home press one if you do not want your free testing press to do to be clear you cannot take a corona virus test at home. Here's another scam. That involves a mortgage blow due to the krona virus. Mortgage interest rates have dropped an all time low. You may be able to benefit from updated modification in refinance programs. Today we're going to go through a list of scams that are out there and give you tips for avoiding scams altogether. And we'd like to hear from you. Have you been getting calls about in nineteen? Do they involve cures or personal requests for personal information to get your relief? Check call us right now and share your experience you can be an anonymous of the number is eight hundred nine six two eight four eight once again. Is Sean Spruce? He's the programs consultant. He's a programs consultant for First Nations Development Institute and Co hosts the PODCASTS natives on a budget Schon is Laguna Pueblo. Hey Monica how you doing good good? I'm I'm excited to talk about this topic today. Even though it it's a little tricky you know because it involves people who are committing crimes and really taking advantage of Sometimes unsuspecting folks so Have you recently wrote about A scam in your doctor per cap column that involved the Corona Virus. Tell us about it. Yeah absolutely so I got a an email from a woman End into the country and she had received a phone call very late at night from somebody who claim to be her niece and then he said I'm really sick I mean hospital and I've racked up these huge bills because of Cova nineteen. I'm infected and I need help paying the bills and this woman is elderly and she was at home and you know she was again. It was late at night. She wasn't quite isn't allergic. She could have been and she just but it didn't sound quite right so I'm quite like her these even though the woman identified herself as her knees with the right name and everything. Fortunately her nephew was also home and he grabbed the phone and he very quickly could tell that this was a scam. This was not actual niece. It was basically what we call grandparents scam. Where Somebody Will Foam Cau- call it older person and pretend to be a grandchild or niece or nephew and say they're in some kind of trouble and usually it's some kind of trouble with the law or something like that This case this person claim to be sick with covert nineteen and needed help paying medical bills. So fortunately they hung up the phone and that was the end of it but she she sent me an email just to let me know what was going on. And this was something that was headed occurred in her with her personal life and You know these kind of things just always bring out. The worst. In people. Natural disasters are hurricanes earthquakes tornadoes forest fires. You know every time. One of these huge natural disasters or crises erupts. There's always some bad actors scammers fraudsters that look to take advantage and this was an example of that fortunately she wasn't victimized but scary that people will approach somebody or contact. Somebody call somebody like with that kind of a sinister plot to defraud them or steal from them. Yeah I know especially late at night and I I know I would be all confused and take me a minute to realize whether or not I was dreaming or something like that I wonder for that out there to our listeners. Have you ever experienced something like this? Has Someone called and pretended to be your family member and asked You for help And then it turned out that they weren't at all Give us a call and share. The number is one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight vessels one eight hundred nine nine native. I want to add another voice to the conversation. We've got Chuck Harwood on the line. He's the regional director of the Federal Trade Commission for the Northwest Region. Hey there chuck. I'm GONNA so are you. Seeing lots of reports of an increase in scams are the scammers. They're just taking their regular catalogue of Scams and just adding cove in nineteen to it and Is that increasing the answer. To all requested yes That's exactly what's happening. We're seeing lots of reports of scams about liberate. Thousands of reports are scams which in which Cova Nineteen Corona virus being referred to. They are taking their usual catalogue of scams and just tacking on corona virus or Cova nineteen to the for example. The one Sean talked about it they classic grandparent or family. Birds Scam that we've been hearing about for years sometimes traffic accidents or something like that now. They're saying Rovers So Yeah we've seen both. Wow that's That's upsetting to hear so Exactly how okay. Let's talk a little bit more about how this actually works with the grandparent. Scam for example. So you know Sean was saying she was saying she was in the hospital and she needed money if they had continued that conversation. What would happen next chuck? Almost certainly they would have asked for money to be sent They would have said that they need the money immediately. needs to be perfectly overnight faster that the victim can be convinced to get the money in the mail or more likely. Frankly Sent through wire Western Union or these days. They even use know gift cards to send money. like Amazon itunes gift cards That's the way they want to do it. And as soon as the money has sent it disappears and doing impossible to reverse the payment And tumors out the money. It is extraordinarily. You'd think it can't work but extraordinarily common. How often people fall for the scam and my time said one more thing about the scam described in point of an important point important Element in fighting. These scams net is consulting with your friends and neighbors family The example that Sean describe was prevented because the woman who received the call had a family member. She could consult with And that's that's really critical. Find is a lot of people who avoid scams do so because they talk to friends and family members of course in the middle of lockdowns at viruses increasingly hard to do so. They can't further like to fall victim to these games. I had this conversation with my dad. Who's in his late seventies and I told him if somebody calls saying there me and they need money for the emergency room hospital or anything like that or I'm in jail. Just leave. Just tell them now. You can stay there and we'll just go ahead and because that's not gonNA happen. I'M NOT GONNA call you that way. You know our tell them. Oh call your sister and she'll take care of it Which I think is you know I mean I. It seems weird to have a a scam plan. Sean have you talked to folks about that like having conversations with your family members in advance as a preventative measure. Not so much you know like having you know like a plan like a strategy if when whatever and I think because one of the challenges is there are just so many different ways to scam. Somebody and like Chuck mentioned people just continue to Kinda easy same scams. They just always a new twist to them. So you know it's just it's difficult to kind of create a plan because scams can come in so many shapes and sizes and like You know we talked about earlier. Anybody can be a victim of a scam. Anybody can be caught essentially Scam proof impossible. I don't care how much education you have and I don't care how many plans you create can never completely scam proof yourself. And that's because scammers know how to appeal to people's emotions and why again and again when you really effective scam designed to prey on base human emotions. You've got love. Which is those romance scams which are really effective Natural Disaster Death Sickness. Things like that people aren't necessarily thinking clearly they're not thinking straight their emotionally vulnerable and they can be victimized when they're in that setting so yeah. I really encourage people you know. Hang up the phone quickly. Don't engage with a scammer. But not so much of a game plan like which relatives the contractor not to contact although it might be effective for some people to to think like that and come up with you know basic strategy for dealing with some of these issues.

Sean Spruce Chuck Harwood Cova Monica Brain America First Nations Development Inst Consultant Laguna Pueblo Corona Foam Cau Rovers Federal Trade Commission Amazon Regional Director Western Union Northwest Region
"laguna pueblo" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

09:32 min | 1 year ago

"laguna pueblo" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Downtown relay by Fiona Apple or her new critically acclaimed album. Fetch the bolt cutters. The album includes a land. Acknowledgement made an unseeded. Tunga Muscalero apology and Suma territories. This is democracy now democracy now dot org the quarantine report. I'm Amy Goodman. As we continue our interview with Fiona Apple who joined us four the interview along with Aaron Wise Member of the Hickory Apache nation and Laguna Pueblo. People she joined us from Phoenix Arizona errands and organizer with ceding sovereignty and indigenous led collective that feeling apple supports ceding. Sovereignty has launched a rapid response initiative to help indigenous communities affected by the spread of cove in nineteen in New Mexico. The Navajo nation has the third highest corona virus infection rate in the United States following only New York and New Jersey. At least fifty nine people have died from the virus in New Mexico. Native Americans makeup more than one third of the state's corona virus cases but only ten percent of the population Navajo nation president. Jonathan Nez had to quarantine after exposure to cove in nineteen earlier this month. He said of the unfolding catastrophe quote. We Are United States citizens. But we're not treated like that. We once again have been forgotten by our own government. He said I spoke with Aaron wise about the spread of cove in one thousand nine hundred Navajo nation. And I also talked continued with the apple but I began by asking Erin to tell us about the land Jewish joining us from now hi. I'm on unseated. Autumn territory so in Phoenix Arizona. Right now and you're really writing a manual on land acknowledgments for People. Were hearing this for the First Time. I mean Fiona Apple does a land acknowledgement on her album. They may not really even know what that is or when people stand up when they're giving a talk making that kind of land acknowledgement. I explain what this is all about and explain your own heritage Aaron Choice should. I'm Hickory Apache Laguna Pueblo. So I was raised in so-called New Mexico at the base of the Colorado rockies around a bunch of grandparents and attentive elders which is why the work that ceding sovereignty is doing right now is so important in terms of land. Water acknowledgments their formal recognitions of any and all original people's defenders and protectors of territories. That have been unseated by indigenous peoples. So basically what we're asking is for folks to do the first step. It's really a first in a series of many steps towards reclaiming land reclaiming culture and also returning land eventually on but having folks be aware of the territories that they're on learn the histories at the original people's and also learn the names of these life ways like the rivers and also are different creeks in our oceans and realizing that there are people that recognize all of these lands and waters on these more than human kin by original placenames by original on names given to them by the Creator and encouraging folksy land acknowledgments managements in public settings in those water acknowledgments really calls the spirits of those things into life. And if you can talk about how you see land. Acknowledgments is just one step short so land acknowledgement. There's a lot of work that needs to be done. Beyond it right. A lot of folks in indigenous communities that are experiencing huge inequities and so going to a place in saying this is unseeded. Tumba territory is one thing but like Fiona said this is an ongoing effort. You can do the first step you can educate yourself but those also work that needs to be done and how can you help people whose territory you benefit from. If you're a business operator what are you doing in your business to ensure reciprocity with the communities that you are benefiting from from Mary Ray Shirt from the genocide that happened on their land on. What is it that you're doing in your own personal life? To ensure that folks are you able to reclaim their existence and also to eventually see our territories returned to us. I think that's the ultimate goal with limited knowledge. -ment is led back and if you can talk about how the Corona Virus Pandemic now is infecting and effecting in digital communities you right now are in Phoenix Arizona. How it's affecting people in Arizona particularly the Navajo people in New Mexico. Which is really called the epicenter of the of the Corona virus pandemic in indigenous territory. It is an right now. I just want to honor that there have been forty nine deaths on the Navajo nation. So I WANNA you know. Lift my hands to the folks who are navigating on burials and things that they need to do without ceremonies and access to protocol. Do you want to just also bring to light that they are over twelve hundred cases on the Navajo nation? Folks aren't also looking at the fact that the surrounding Pueblos that are nearby the Navajo nation in New Mexico specifically are also being heavily impacted and we're seeing upwards of fifty cases on some quick blows and limited limited access. What's happening right now? Is what I feel. A continuation of genocide that's existed against indigenous peoples in this country synthesis inception and explain where the Navajo Nation Spans. Yes sure the Navajo. Nation expands across on the four corners. So it exists a bit in Colorado Utah Arizona and New Mexico. And so you're saying about the outbreak there and how it's being dealt with yes so the outbreak in Navajo nation is similar and not just in Navajo nation but in New Mexico. In general it's similar to the ways that the government has responded to a lot of things in indigenous communities. Folks are showing up with supplies that aren't adequate for the needs of the communities if supplies showing up at all There aren't any doctors that are being afforded to the areas greater than on some community members that have gotten together and decided that they're going to go to the Navajo nation to support on. There are some federal mobile testing squads that have shown up but in general. We are seeing a huge disparity between the support that's being offered to non people of the global majority in the United States so to say non people of Color and realizing that it's not just indigenous communities that are being impacted but all folks of color across the United States where you're seeing across neighborhood nation in the Publicity Mexico that there are folks basically being treated as if they are just kind of the fodder for this government's response to the corona virus. They are being sacrificed and often predeceased by the headlines. That are being circulated news outlets I keep seeing headlines that say This corona virus could wipe out entire tribes entire indigenous nations. And I don't think folks really realize that there are over. Five hundred and seventy federally recognized reservations and nations and also all these unrecognized nations that exist is so it's not like anybody going to wipe us out in one fell swoop there. He tried that and it didn't work. Can you talk about what ceding sovereignty is and what it is? You're trying to do ceding. Sovereignty is an organization that is indigenous and women lead. We are all query identifying in some way and The work that we're doing right now to address. Kobe is a three faceted rapid response program so basically we have a mask drive where we have actually raised money to purchase a ninety five grade masks. We purchased ten thousand of those. We're also purchasing on another additional twelve thousand masks that are hybrid material. That can last up to six years of taking care of properly that we are going to be providing to the Navajo nation and indigenous communities in New Mexico. Additionally we have a petition asking folks to put pressure on the government to demand that they provide expeditious support tuned agendas communities not just in New Mexico but across Turtle Island folks that are being overlooked and treated as sacrifice zones for this pandemic. You've talked about the theme of genocide. And I wanted to ask you to address the way. The legacies of colonization colonialism erasure have set the stage of. You've described it for the response to what's happening in Indian country right now so we sign treaties over one hundred and fifty years ago many of the tribes that are currently being impacted ensuring that we would have access to life our cultures and our general health. And I think that folks don't realize that this pandemic and the fact that there is so little access and so little support being provided to indigenous communities black communities I really do feel like it is a continuation of the colonial project to kill the Indian and save the man. I think that folks are really looking at people of the Global Majority folks of color in this country but are being hit by corona virus. And they're really seeing the health inequities and education in equity and the lack of access. And they're saying.

New Mexico Fiona Apple Navajo nation United States apple Phoenix Arizona Amy Goodman Colorado Arizona Tunga Muscalero Aaron wise Hickory Apache Laguna Pueblo Laguna Pueblo New Jersey New York Aaron Mexico Aaron Choice
The State of Indian Nations

Native America Calling

08:21 min | 1 year ago

The State of Indian Nations

"This is native America calling. I'm Tara Gate. Would climate change the federal government's trust responsibility and congressional action on violence against women. Child Welfare and tribal sovereignty are among the issues tackled today in fond sharps first State of the Indian nations address. She is the president of the National Congress of American Indians. She didn't hold back in her address. Press criticizing federal elected leaders for what she called inaction and indifference. When it comes to native nations she also touted the gains tribes continue? We need to make in spite of challenges. In the congressional response to the address New Mexico Representative Deborah Holland a Democrat and a citizen of the Laguna Pueblo continued criticisms of the administration and issued a call to all need of nations to act in the best interests Anita values. We're going to hear both speeches beaches this hour. If you WANNA comment send us an email you can send it to comments at native America calling DOT COM or tweeted to us at one eight hundred nine nine native. Here's President von Sharp. Kyo which I'm just Jack. I wish Guy Good Morning. My name is fawn sharp. I consider it my life's greatest honor to have this opportunity to share with you today. I thank the Creator for gathering us together for this historic dialogue between Indian country and the United States on behalf of the five hundred and seventy four federally recognized tribal nations dozens of state recognized tribal nations and millions of native people across this country country. I welcome the distinguished. Guests assembled here today and those watching around the globe to the eighteenth annual State of Indian nations address. I stand before you today. As a humble servant of all tribal nations fulfilling my duty to share Indian countries story of perseverance and resurgence with the world to convey with absolute clarity Indian countries expectations of the United States government government and to cast a light on the immense power and proven wisdom of tribal nation's governing their own lands and affairs solving difficult challenges and forging brighter futures on their own terms. I embrace the enormity of this task for I have been groomed for decades aides to carry it out by transformative leaders in his footsteps I follow leaders like Beatrice Black Elizabeth Cole Tiny Kapoma. He's Rosanna in Ramona Bennett to name just a few these matriarchs kindled a great fire in me to give my life in leadership to my. Don't people in all of Indian country just as important. They showed me the way and for that I am forever grateful I also it draw great strength as they did from our Almighty creator. The advice of my fellow tribal leaders the spiritual nourishment in life lessons end of canoe journeys the inspiration passion in Ingenuity of our brilliant native youth and the ancestral teachings of our elders their wisdom encouragement and guidance have prepared me to meet this moment. So why do we gather here today. The purpose purpose of this annual address is to memorialize in affirm the enduring government to government relationship ship between tribal nations and the US government. It provides our assessment of the current health of that relationship and how it must be strengthened. This hallowed discourse not only speaks to elected officials political and judicial appointees in staff the federal government nor is it limited to tribal leaders employees in citizens it has meant for all Americans especially those who have been disenfranchised and rendered hopeless hopeless bi racial injustice economic inequality and the rapid decay of our American political system. They seek answers during these troubling times and they need to look no further than tribal nations to find them in that spirit. I stand before you today. Supported supported by more than six hundred tribal nations and governments across this land to share with you this undeniable truth. The state of Indian nations nations is strong across this land. Tribal nations are writing remarkable stories of cultural social political and Economic Mike Renewal. In the face of great obstacles we relentlessly plow forward in our eternal quest to create futures of hope Opportunity Eighty and cultural vibrancy for our youth in those generations yet. To come we do. So by invoking and practicing the greatest indigenous in his core values of all self-governance the crater gifted tribal nations with certain inalienable rights among them the right to steward word and draw nourishment from our traditional homelands cultivate extraordinary potential of our youth develop thriving economies that that provide opportunity for all of our people and manage our own affairs and control our own destinies as my mentor former Cornell leader in NCI CIO president Joe Delacruz so perfectly captured it. No right is more sacred to a nation to a people then the right to freely determine its social economic political and cultural future without external interferences the the fullest expression of this right is when a nation freely governs itself. We native peoples not only the inherent right but the sacred responsibility to live the way our creator intended speaking are indigenous languages living our traditional core values imparting them to the next generations practicing our life ways conducting our ceremonies and freely governing Orleans and Communities Tribal Nations are not nonprofit organizations. We are full fledged battle-tested governments guided by time honored cultural trope principles and recognized as such in the northwest ordinance the US Constitution and hundreds upon hundreds of treaties and Supreme Court precedents accidents however many Americans including many policymakers still don't understand the unique status status of tribal nations are unique political status. They don't recognize the indisputable fact that we are argh genuine governments with the right and more importantly the ability to govern our own lands and communities govern those in accordance with the values that make us who we are as native peoples but through mechanisms like this annual address address more and more Americans and others around the world are learning this truth and in doing so are turning to Indian country for inspiration shen direction and most importantly solutions to our common challenges in this great age of uncertainty acting with the next seven generations wins in mind our ancestors endured great hardships to forge our path to this day so that we would be able to be there answer to a prayer for thriving cultures healthy children in robust communities. We must and we will be worthy of the great sacrifices they made to who gives us this chance to sustain not only our way of life but our world for future generations.

Indian Nations Nations United States Communities Tribal Nations Federal Government America President Trump National Congress Of American Tara Gate President Von Sharp New Mexico Laguna Pueblo Joe Delacruz Supreme Court Orleans Jack Cornell Deborah Holland Mike Renewal Beatrice Black
"laguna pueblo" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"laguna pueblo" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"You know, I just, you know, the news like this spectrum this long tradition in the conservative mines that simply sacrifice. He's bodies for you know, right Bronco white comfort. You it's also you could also say that there's a lot of racist the principal in the in the way that they operate predate the call STAN the three of the children that have died at the border were all indigenous spoken digits languages, right? And. Yeah. I mean it. You can also see it in terms of like sort of these the there is some type of a lot of also to sort of comes from this sort of conservative mindset that. Quasi religious that. Like if you found yourself in a bad situation, it is because in some way, you you deserve it and whether it's like poverty or whatnot. And of course, but you know, I saw the story today. We don't have the clip of it. But in Britain, there was a there was a headline something like, you know, judge says drug dealers can get off because they're Texas the texts that they wrote had such great grammar. And it was like the whitest defendants you could ever find. Right. I mean that is days. My that kilo be procured. Well, and it also turned out that there grandma's actually atrocious. That's the other. That's the other benefit you get by grammar. Yeah. They had great grammar. That's the rate. Where's everyone round? Here's grammar. Couple of clips this this clip, I actually found pretty touching. The for the first time. Native American woman was elected to congress. And in fact. We have to this year. I is Deb how intolerant Holland who was it on this program. I interviewed her for was in the at net roots nation and the second cherise David's. David's is a an attorney and a former mixed martial arts of fighter. She's a member of the ho-chunk nation sell for the first openly LGBTQ member of congress from her state, and Holland is a member of the Laguna Pueblo. She's an attorney and she went served as their state's Democratic Party chair here. The two of them hugging. It's it's pretty touching..

attorney STAN congress Laguna Pueblo principal Texas David Deb Britain Democratic Party
"laguna pueblo" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"laguna pueblo" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

"Orange. You're looking ahead to twenty nine thousand nine tonight. But with two thousand eighteen over we can now look at what is the stupidest thing Donald Trump said in two thousand eighteen and so long list, but one candidate's marched to twenty eighteen we're Trump said trade wars are good and easy to win. Okay. And so you know, that statement is now we're living with that right now in November of two thousand eighteen zero American soybeans were sold in China. None. We'll see the final total for December might also be none for American farmers in the heartland key parts of this country. They spent years building up those soybean bark. It's though right now, my home state of Indiana, the price for soybeans is lower than the cost of farmers planting them, so they're losing money on every soybean, they planted, and that's gonna really hurt. It's pinching farmers out there. It's pitching farmers in the heartland. And it's the consequence of the trade war. Donald Trump started any promised it would be easy to win Jared Bernstein. I think maybe you're you might have. The same experience. I do which is that I've never seen a federal elected official at any level of come into office with an understanding a full and working understanding of international trade when I was working in the Senate finance committee with jurisdiction over international trade. I watched that learning curve in in a lot of senators you watch it in new presidents because new presence frequently the one I was working with a governor of Arkansas had no experience in this. And for most people it's actually a pretty quick learning curve because people like you sit them down and take them through it. We have not seen Donald Trump. Learn anything about this object in two years of the presidency. Donald Trump's not gonna learn anything about anything from anyone. I think that's that's pretty much baked in the cake. And unfortunately, he has some advisers who understand this either. And I think the apple cases really interesting in. This regard Lawrence. The problem is that globalization what I would have tried to explain to someone in that position is that globalization at this point is an omelet that can't be unscrambled unscrambled when it comes to these trade flows. That doesn't mean that it's all good. It has downsides. And we have to do a lot to help the workers who've been hurt by Trump doesn't do that. What you can't do is punish the trade flows themselves because at the end of the day, you're going to end up hurting American companies American stock markets, investors and workers themselves and you end up trying to pick winners and losers within your own economy. Which is something that all Republicans have always believed government is really terrible at and government has proven. It's pretty terrible that we're going to end it there. Jared Bernstein, Ron Clinton. Thank you both for joining us. Really? Appreciate it. Tonight's last word is next. There. People have been here for thousands and thousands of years thousands of years before the European settlers arrived in what is now called America. But it took two hundred and thirty years of this government for the house of representatives to have its first women members who are native American the C span cameras today captured New Mexico congresswoman, Deb Holland of the Laguna Pueblo, and Kansas congresswoman cherise David's of the ho-chunk nation sharing an emotional moment. After being sworn in Kearns woman. Holland took her oath in traditional dress and was joined at the capitol by her family. Hey, it's Chris Hayes from MSNBC you every day. I come to the office, and we make a television show and every day. I think to myself there's so much more. I want to talk about and so this is our podcast. It's called why is this happening and the whole idea behind it is to get to the root of the things that we see out every day. They're driven by big ideas. Each week. I sit down with a person uniquely suited to explain why this is happening. New episodes of wise this happening every Tuesday. Listen for free wherever you get your podcasts..

Donald Trump Jared Bernstein Deb Holland China Chris Hayes Indiana Arkansas Senate finance committee apple MSNBC official America Lawrence Kearns New Mexico Laguna Pueblo cherise David Ron Clinton Kansas
"laguna pueblo" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"laguna pueblo" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"The political will to make sure that get done we um i think that um we need to make sure that we have that we cover the workers like we don't expect anyone to do without a job we need education um and trends within the itre we need the help folks to uh to have that covered so that they can move into renewable energy if that's what they wanna do i recently posted an article on my facebook page about the navajo nation uh starting the uh a solar uh grin oh that's gonna power something like 13000 homes on the navajo nation uh that's a start and so we do need to keep building on that and i think it's completely doable a you know i i wish if we would have had a democratic governor in office for the past eight years i believe that every state building would have solar panels on it right now and um and that's also starts so uh silver if even parco pocket veto the solar tax credit yesterday or just let it leaded expire yeah that's not cool no it's not at all uh deb your pot portnov huh i beg your pardon you are part novel how no i'm from laguna pueblo avenue number roads emperor of with that the pueblo that forty miles less albuquerque okay one of the frustrations i have some times is if the novel who nation with all the ache reach all the land they have all the sunshine all the wind that they have rely so much on coal i mean i understand it was there you know that the plans were built at the mines are there will you look at the damage that that coalfired power plants you're doing to the planet i would i would love for the for the novel how to say even the the planned over on by this all river project over near pagers zona they finally just give it up and say we're in the closest thing go solar go wind go renewable 100 percent i would love that too and i think that if.

facebook laguna pueblo albuquerque 100 percent eight years
"laguna pueblo" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"laguna pueblo" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Would be entrepreneurs a three d printed guitar maker ended it last hour custom snowboard maker marty banacci one of the benefits of being in this make her space was that i didn't have to pay huge overhead by all this equipment upfront or lease it and occur all the overhead costs associated with building atmosphere based it's a big investment in a big risk what if you're young entrepreneur why would you come here yeah the burn race less we have a billion dollar arts economy umass the arts and sciences and you have a place that accepts you all of a sudden now you can have these human collisions with a varied and diverse group of people we can add value to your proposition as they have to the movie and tv business is the former may and i could parker those are the stars of the hit cable series breaking bad which itself partnered up with an eager new mexico where the show was may boasts development booster reopened thanking god was a blockbuster by the foam office here is one of the best in the world not says us says hollywood the state has been making a special effort to court tv in movie company says mayor barry pap in america that ironman film the terminator films law those what will filmed right here we have what we are the largest of film studio north america five miles south of here that happened because we were intentional about attracting oak okay you get the pitch big skies low overhead big mountains big hopes but for the state's economy to clamber up from forty seven it also meets to hoist its native american population one in ten new mexicans the state's twenty two tribes don't all measure unemployment but to take just one example the navajo nations rate is north of twenty percent first baby stepped the indigenous comecon brainchild of the guy in the hat texting lee francis from laguna pueblo fortyseven miles west of albuquerque the event rose needed vendors and all sorts of visitors from foreign why the big idea is the same here entrepreneurship as problemsolver needed visitors were asked to post their problems there villains on a board coal mining alcoholism drugs domestic violence domestic violence is a huge one but around the drug and alcohol so like oh well this is how it is this.

hollywood mayor barry pap america lee francis laguna pueblo domestic violence albuquerque billion dollar twenty percent
"laguna pueblo" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"laguna pueblo" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Four to four well sixty we'll have won some people little later you may want to talk to one is the medical director at law familiar medical center dr wendy johnson where he talked about opiates we're gonna talk about the fifty point plan from the trump administration and chris christie butter how to deal with opiates which were not doing 15point plan but not even fifty cents put towards its we'll talk to your doctor windy johnson about the opioid problem here in santic johnny used on the front lines of laminate down he's running for city council district to a four o'clock both of them you may wanna talk to jessica need jalen at sea will join us at 230 she is laguna laguna pueblo she's the founder of a really cool event which was local dogged national now international called rock your mox i think they're selling moccasins that a cheap at the indian school so you can go get some and then you can rock earmarks all right i'll lieutenant marvin paul could not make it he had unplanned training he had they were ten today but the vice president of these santa fe crime stoppers david seat is here so we're going to talk about crime stoppers in what you guys are doing a new heavy a bad guy the we also have a backyard we we have the bad guy from last week who still on the lam we can talk about him you have an event coming up for office through the years of whalewatch ataka first of all dave good to see 19 you to thank for combine i'm i'm all we talk to your filling filling in for lieutenant marvin pop art uh you're an officer for how many years and if he police department are with mopped report 28 years when he retired how long ago i retired in two thousand info four all right throw.

medical director dr wendy johnson laguna laguna pueblo indian school marvin paul vice president david seat officer chris christie jalen dave 28 years
"laguna pueblo" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"laguna pueblo" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Four to four well sixty we'll have won some people little later you may want to talk to one is the medical director at law familiar medical center dr wendy johnson where he talked about opiates we're gonna talk about the fifty point plan from the trump administration and chris christie butter how to deal with opiates which were not doing 15point plan but not even fifty cents put towards its we'll talk to your doctor windy johnson about the opioid problem here in santic johnny used on the front lines of laminate down he's running for city council district to a four o'clock both of them you may wanna talk to jessica need jalen at sea will join us at 230 she is laguna laguna pueblo she's the founder of a really cool event which was local dogged national now international called rock your mox i think they're selling moccasins that a cheap at the indian school so you can go get some and then you can rock earmarks all right i'll lieutenant marvin paul could not make it he had unplanned training he had they were ten today but the vice president of these santa fe crime stoppers david seat is here so we're going to talk about crime stoppers in what you guys are doing a new heavy a bad guy the we also have a backyard we we have the bad guy from last week who still on the lam we can talk about him you have an event coming up for office through the years of whalewatch ataka first of all dave good to see 19 you to thank for combine i'm i'm all we talk to your filling filling in for lieutenant marvin pop art uh you're an officer for how many years and if he police department are with mopped report 28 years when he retired how long ago i retired in two thousand info four all right throw.

medical director dr wendy johnson laguna laguna pueblo indian school marvin paul vice president david seat officer chris christie jalen dave 28 years
"laguna pueblo" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

03:08 min | 4 years ago

"laguna pueblo" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"Got rid memorizing blue homecoming people of color pocketed country sugar targeting party and we never got the prisoner cover net and now so come if somebody her you know what if it never okay all right thanks a lot launched two four three thirty three thirty three i i find it hard to believe you can understand why so a lot of people or offended not with the protest itself but how they're doing it ray your next on newsradio kick you'll be glad right i agree with the last caller bob my uncle's them my um uh have served in the military and we're all from laguna pueblo and you know again the red white and blue the red standpoint of blood that be um native american people and they have sacrifice and giving up their land for this country never has the united states government all through with the treaty obligations that the promised the native people so again though young man protesting is just another form of expression here in the country and i i believe in the constitution and so again we we just need to find a way that we can mitigate all these our differences i i feel we we have to talk about talk about our differences and have him on the table this saw and then just to relate the shooting in las vegas you know another angry man with weaponry and in all of of the second amendment all that stuff comes into play again bobby broke a bright thanks a lot right to four three thirty three thirty three james your next on news radio kkob genes what do you think what happened saturday night a un uh i shane a cry i have what gifts akg where there are liberal agenda and it play over and over again i i find it people that are are last or else joe america as we know are the was complaining but yet not going to help their own paint or it's it's ridiculous on the on the other side of that uh i i i can almost all the members are conservative but the games themselves all craft is a good example of it all right james thank you to four three thirty three thirty 33 barb your next on news radio kkob barbara did you think about the un in protest good morning i am ashamed and i don't think the student be allowed to play in the game when they knew that i can.

bob laguna pueblo united states second amendment barbara las vegas bobby joe america