32 Burst results for "Labatt"

Stock trading app blocks users from buying GameStop and AMC shares

Pat Thurston

00:54 sec | Last month

Stock trading app blocks users from buying GameStop and AMC shares

"Popular stock trading platform among amateur investors blocked its users from buying shares of fundamentally weak stocks like Gamestop and AMC and was only allowing investors to sell today. Action came as these stocks began surging and value in recent weeks, potentially costing hedge funds million's Oregon billions of dollars because they shorted them. Labatt Silver editor in chief for Investing PD, a telling Kjos morning show host Nicki Maduro. There are concerns this could be a bubble, but he doesn't think it's anything like 1999. But at the same time, everybody's in the boat with on these day traders and they're following each other in a frenzy. And what happens is a few people make a lot of money here. Most people end up losing money, and most people end up losing more money than they can afford to lose. Silver says. Most people don't trade these kind of stock, so we probably won't feel it. However, you will feel it if big investors decided to sit out while the market corrects before they get back in

Labatt Silver Nicki Maduro Gamestop AMC Oregon Silver
The Best Ads of 2020

Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

06:24 min | 2 months ago

The Best Ads of 2020

"You're listening to yeah. That's probably and the ad we podcast. We've talked about marketing media technology in pop culture because in the end everything is an ad especially this week. Because it's our ads of the year episode. Look forward to this all year. We get to nerd out about which adds stunts activation chains weird random social media responses from brands. We really liked this year and joining me this year to talk about it. We've got enes alaya who covers Performance marketing experiential marketing for edwige. Ian it is always great to have you here. Hello thanks for having me. We've also got katie lindstrom katie as a reporter who covers up breaking news and quite often big creative campaigns that are coming out katie. It is always a pleasure to have you joining us from your in austin austin texas. Got to be here and We've also got jamison fleming senior editor for membership here at ad week. jamieson has He's involved in just about everything H- here dad wake. And so i can't think of someone better to have kind of a big picture over overview and opinions on a lot of the biggest work that came out of the year. Jameson thanks so much for making time for us. Yeah accent. it'd be here excited to really digest very weird here battle tossing. It really was and i have to say of all the years of doing this every year. The ads a determining the as years difficult just I'll go and give the the can alert in the sense that Add wigs twenty five ads of the year Including our number one pick are all on dot com as of monday So if you're listening to this Probably monday or later. You should be able to find that on advocate dot com this year. We also did a reader's choice Bracket for the first time where we let. We identified thirty two of the biggest campaigns of the year and again ads and weird social responses. And even some political fundraisers and people really went nuts with it Jamison unload by you. And i both been watching edwige stuff for a long time. The level of this readers choice voting online was bananas. Yeah i mean the the semi finals between oreos and stake of guts. Seventy two thousand votes just on twitter. And i don't think i've ever seen any twitter poll by any twitter user. Get seventy two thousand votes so kind of crazy. When two brands with loyal followings can do twitter to say at least yeah that one was a crazy match of oreo created a doomsday vault when among many other doomsday scenarios happening this year There was an asteroid supposedly headed toward earth and so oreo created an underground bunker to save its recipes and Other things so That was up against stay. Combs campaign on social media against misinformation which was a very different kind of form of marketing. But they're following turned out in force. Seventy two thousand votes later. Oreo was the winner. Only i will say by promising to follow back. People who voted thing and then and then had a real struggle to follow through on their campaign from us. So as we record this we are in the final round which is orioles doomsday vault versus The princess bride reunion which was a fundraiser for wisconsin. Democrats really brilliant idea. They brought together just almost every Living actor and a person behind the princess bride Fred savage couldn't make it because it was his brother's birthday and he was spent with him but Everyone else pretty much. He's alive was there and As a really fantastic idea. So we won't know the winner when we record this because those are being battled out over the weekend but we will be able to talk about our favorites. So with that katy. We're we're just gonna go round robin here we're gonna talk about. Each of us has individual favorites. We i am happy to talk about ad. Weeks official favorites. But let's start out just on individual katie tells about one or two that you really love this year. I was thinking about this and just kind of thinking back to the ones that i shared with my own friends and family this year. That are you know. There's some overlap in some that are just kind of silly oreos already shouted out orioles doomsday camp. But they're proud parent Short film they released a couple of months ago. One that i just thought was really powerful. And i ended up sharing with it with a bunch of different people just because i thought it was a beautiful little short film and the story behind it was at the two actors who play a gay couple are actually partners in real life and it really came through when i thought was just like a lovely example of storytelling and then to shut up the mid west. The canadian beer brand labatt made some ads in that came out in the summer but it was like they had to completely reshoot their campaign so many brands had to this year. After creating a summer campaign that was not pandemic friendly and then having to totally start from scratch and there's was one of the one of the first stories like this that i covered in more like in-depth way they literally got back from there shoot for their summer campaign on the same day. That trump announced a national emergency. And then they that these two creatives just like created these really funny ads from with it within their own homes using like a power washer to simulate tubing and using a spray bottle and a little treadmill dissimulate like wake boarding. So it's kind of a funny way to pretend like these midwesterners we're at the out at the lake having a good time when that wasn't actually possible this summer over the summer so those were a couple of them now. Did you see that one griner. No no i didn't catch that one. It's it was by the burns group in and it's a pretty small like regional brand. But i just thought it was such an interesting pivot to use the word of the year.

Enes Alaya Edwige Katie Lindstrom Katie Jamison Fleming Twitter Austin Jamieson Jameson Jamison IAN Fred Savage Oreo Combs Texas Katy Wisconsin Robin Labatt
Trump and Biden debate their climate and environmental policies

Weekend Edition Sunday

03:42 min | 4 months ago

Trump and Biden debate their climate and environmental policies

"A lot at Thursday's debate. There was this telling exchange about climate change. Would you close the have a transition from their own industry? Yes. It is a big statement, President Trump again boosted the fossil fuel industries contributing to global warming. Joe Biden is campaigning on a plan for Net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. NPR's Jeff Brady has more on his $2 trillion proposal. Joe Biden's climate plan is ambitious for an economy is big and complex as the United States, but even those connected to fossil fuel industry say it may be doable. Scott Siegal with the energy focused law firm. Bracewell says the plan is pragmatic and includes both regulations and incentives for the growing list of companies focused on using cleaner energy in the future. One thing that makes Biden's approach somewhat comfortable is that you can sketch out that linear commitment to additional resource is to achieve these objectives, which I think most people in business, believe me. Are going to be the future anyway. The country has one example of meeting an ambitious climate goal. The Obama administration's clean power plan aimed to cut emissions from power plants, about a third by 2030. Even though court challenges stopped the plan from going into effect, the country is ahead of schedule. David Doniger is with NRDC Action Fund, The political arm of the natural resource is defense counsel. The power sector is already undergoing changes that have reduced their emissions by more than 30% 10 years ahead of the target that the Obama administration thought was aggressive. In 2015, a big part of that was the collapse of the coal industry. Coal fired power plants continue to go out of business, replaced with cheaper natural gas and renewable energy. Still, the bite and climate plan faces significant hurdles. It relies on technologies that haven't been developed or may not be commercially viable. That's why the plan includes $400 billion over a decade for research. With the economic hit from the Corona virus pandemic. Biden's campaign updated the plan this summer. It includes billions of dollars to hire people for things like plugging abandoned mines and building electric vehicle charging stations. Steph Feldman, with the bite and campaign says the plan also focuses on environmental justice. 40% of the benefit of those investments go to community, the color and low income communities that have been disproportionately harmed by pollution and the effects of climate change. This is especially important to the most vocal climate change activists. While Biden has distanced himself from the green new deal, it is popular, especially with the left wing of his party. Jenny Marino, Zimmer with 3 50 actions as this's thie strongest plan yet from a Democratic presidential nominee, the Biden campaign has committed to doing some really great things like ending leasing of fossil fuels on public lands. We'd like to see them go further and create a true phase out for the entire fossil fuel mystery over Of course of the next decade. Biden's plan has a longer timeline for a transition and includes a role for fossil fuels with offsets and carbon capture. Amy Myers Jaffe manages the climate policy Labatt Tufts University and says overall, this is a credible plan for addressing climate change. The Biden campaign has listed the right things. But the difference between listing things and implementing those things is a big difference. If Biden is elected, he'll likely need a Democratic Congress willing to pass laws and allocate money

Joe Biden Obama Administration Fossil Fuel Industries Amy Myers Jaffe Jeff Brady NPR Scott Siegal United States Bracewell Steph Feldman President Trump Nrdc Action Fund Labatt Tufts University David Doniger Congress
The Root of the Addictive Process with Alex Katehakis

The Addicted Mind Podcast

09:40 min | 1 year ago

The Root of the Addictive Process with Alex Katehakis

"All right. Today's guest is Alex. Cata Haughey's somebody who I've wanted to have on the podcast for quite some time and I'm so excited. She decided to come on. She is a clinical sexologist and the clinical director of the Center for healthy sex in Los Angeles California and she's written several awesome books. One of my favorite is sex addiction as affect dysregulation and also erotic intelligence and Mir of intimacy. We have a great conversation about some of the root causes of the addictive process. Really looking at that early developmental trauma and how that affects our ability to regulate our affect. And how we use addictive substances or processes to escape from that feeling. It's great conversation. I really enjoyed having Alex on. I think we could have talked easily for an hour or two or three about these topics. She's so knowledgeable and just really shares a lot of great wisdom and insight about recovery. So with that. Let's go ahead and start this episode. Hello everyone welcome to the addicted. Mind my guest today. Is Alex Kata Hakkas and she is a clinical sexologist and clinical director of the Center for healthy sex in Los Angeles California. And she's GonNa come on and we're GONNA talk about sex addiction. Sex Addiction has affect this regulation. And we'RE GONNA go into a little bit of what that means but Alex introduce yourself. I yeah thank you. Good Morning Dwayne yes as you stated I am clinical sexologist which means I have a doctorate in human sexuality and I've been fascinated with human sexuality for the last twenty five thirty years or longer to save my life and so after practicing as a licensed marriage family therapist for twenty five years. It made sense for me to dive deeper into human sexuality instead of psychology which Swipe chose that particular course of study as you stated I am be clinical director of Center for healthy sex which has been around now for about fifteen years and we treat all manner of sex and love addiction issues of sexual desire dysfunction public pain disorders erectile dysfunction. I mean you name at sexual we treat it. So that's in general. What my the lenses through which I look and just in addition to human sexuality I have been studying with Dr Alan Shore for the past twelve years specifically looking at developmental neuroscience and how the early formation of the infant meaning from the third trimester on Rumi impacts developing brain nervous system and therefore mind. Right definitely and. That's one of the reasons I wanted to have you on is to kind of do a little bit of a deeper dive into some of these issues around addiction specifically sex addiction. And when you say affect dysregulation going into that a little bit and being able to talk about okay when we talk about affect we're really talking about emotions and emotions live deep in the body in fact right now if you're listening to this or you have a policy or having emotions in the body which aren't necessarily registering up high meeting up in your brain until they come forward to what we call feelings and so when a person is regulated meaning. They don't have good heart rate variability. They're not able to rest in digest and play and laugh and be at ease if they are stressed out than their affect is quote this regulated. So when you're regulated you are in a a steady state if you will where you're able to socially engage with people in a way where you don't feel but as soon as threat comes on. The scene with a child has apparent. That's alcoholic or raging or but mother who is cold or shutdown or mean that child's affect is always going to be quote this regulated and here. She is always going to be looking for something to make them feel better. Because the parental connection the parental soothing is not reliable. Or it's just not there so tell me a little bit about how that because that's a lot to digest what you just said. I thought I made it simple. No I mean I get it but like if you're talking to someone who is struggling with addiction. Let's say or Struggling with sex addiction. And you're talking about this affect. What might that look like? In an event that they have in their own life now in the present. Well there may not. There's not even an event in their general waking life you're gonNA feel anxious depressed dead internally dull. There's a general lack of feeling vitality in the body. People say they don't feel joy states or they're super anxious so they have to drink to make the anxiety go away or they use sex to make themselves feel powerful or good about themselves. Anything that we're doing outside of ourselves to make ourselves feel quote right internally speaks to affect regulation so someone who is securely attached. Who's got a good heart rate? Variability in general doesn't have to reach for anything to change their internal state or their mood. Is that clear? Yeah no that makes a Lotta sense and I think what I hear you saying is so someone who if you've had this history of trauma like you said an alcoholic parent that's raging and you're young and you're growing up in that environment. You get your living with this uncomfortable state and you can't get out of that state and so then you'll reach for something that will change it so alcohol sex or for young child that can be something like fantasy. You know what we see. A lot of Labatt annex or some sex addicts too. Is that very early on? They learned that they had to get their needs. Met By themselves and fantasy is a form of mild to moderate dissociation. Where it's you know what your calls an escape when there's no escape where they go into their own little world and they live in their own little world and as adults. It makes it difficult to connect with another person to have intimacy and closeness instead. The person is in fantasy about other people because it's very difficult to be in reality because reality was so painful along time ago and this sets up for very bad relationship sometimes because they're falling in love with an ideal not an actual person right and I think for a lot of people this is can be subtle in some ways so it can be hard to actually see that uncomfortable state. Is it that people are used to it? Like they've lived in this state that is basic discomfort that it's hard to actually see it. And then they don't even know that they're regulating it by using a substance or an addiction or something. Yeah I think people don't now until their lives become unmanageable. They start to have messes in their lives and their primary relationship is with e behavior or the substance and that's typically when addicts get help when they're in pain. They know that their life isn't working anymore and so they're going to stuck. Yeah they're stuck in these tatters because we are nothing but automated and habituated. I mean we have all of these adaptive strategies in the brain and the nervous system. Start working in a particular way to compensate for difficulty that is an adaptation and Rican adapt to just about anything or highly adaptable creatures. So we'll adapt to something that's dysfunctional. Because it's better than the problem we were living in. And then we've got this long standing pattern that can be very challenging to change so for example of somebody stops drinking or using or they stop acting out with their sex addiction. It doesn't mean that they've changed their personality. Which is why the program topics about character issues and you can be a quote dry drunk because you stop the thing. The behavior substance. But you haven't fundamentally changed the way that you relate to other people and that's really the challenge and the beauty. I think the twelve step program is that it really arms and forges new. People that we can change our strategies. And it's hard. It's like if you walked your whole life pigeon toed and your toes were turned in and your hips were adapted to walking that way and somebody came along and said Hey. You don't have to walk that way. You're kind of grinding the bones of your hips in your knees. If you point your host all of a sudden your knees hips are in alignment and you try it. And you're like wow that feels better but the natural tendency of the body is going to be to move towards being pigeon toed unless the person is highly mindful of it and vigilant about it until they can change that adaptive pattern to rocking straight

Alex Kata Hakkas Clinical Director Los Angeles California Cata Haughey Labatt California Dwayne Rumi Swipe Dr Alan Shore Rican
Dealing with information overload with AI

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

08:42 min | 1 year ago

Dealing with information overload with AI

"Information is now created communicated and consumed on an industrial scale content from billions of sources. Is distributed via an array of channels to audiences all around the world an around the clock. But it's the Spade diversity and volume of information is rapidly becoming overwhelming, and the, the key is to discover an extract the best information from that vast quantity of data at the right time. And from the most reliable sources, so simple but signal is an artificial intelligence powered media monitoring, reputation management and market intelligence provider. But that's not always ranked as one of the case, fastest growing companies Bader, financial tones, essentially signal building solutions that compliment the human expertise within any organization, but with artificial intelligence and solutions that can expand a teams knowledge with up to the minute information and supplement their processing capacity by trolling through millions and millions of data and content sources full them. So I recently learned that signal. As opened offices in New York, and Hong Kong, and is also emerging as a leading authority in distilling facts. In an era of fragmented new sources. So for those reasons alone, I'm quite excited to get them on the show today. So book elope, and hold on tight. So I can be meal is all the way to London. So we can speak with signal is founder, David Beddington who's going to provide his unique insight on how machine learning software is rapidly changing monitoring services for government legal industry, finance advertising, and be on. A massive warm, welcome to the show. Can you tell the listeners a Labatt who you are? And what you do. I am David Bennington. The he and founder of the business could signal AI kingdoms being around for about six years. I founded the business in London in the garage, I with my dog to be on my teenage who's a how cheap dates onto and together, we've been building this for the last six years, which essentially aggregate, a lot of the world's information we bring together most of the world's news, you know, two hundred mile and over a hundred languages, we combine that with a lot of the world's regulatory data since -ocial media was full costs and increasing the a lot of alternative data sets the internet. And then we apply machine. Nine AM. I to transform that data from unstructured text into structured insight that business leaders can use to make better decisions founded the. Business in a garishly an episode a Silicon Valley all Steve Jobs. Exactly. I often have to remind US investors that we, we also have carriages here in the UK, although I pronounce them garages, of course, when to say. Absolutely. Now signal, I is an artificial offficial intelligence powered media monitoring reputation management and market intelligence provider. But can you help people listening understand

United States David Bennington Founder London Labatt David Beddington Bader Hong Kong Steve Jobs UK New York Six Years
How Coda Is Making Docs as Powerful As Apps

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

09:21 min | 1 year ago

How Coda Is Making Docs as Powerful As Apps

"Of apps Stokes and spreadsheets that still run. Absolutely everything. Do you ever wonder if things could possibly change? Well about a year ago, a company called coda came out of stealth with the promise that anyone could make a document as powerful as an app, and now they're making good on that promise. And since the beta phase tens of thousands of people across thousands of teams are using coda every month and we've got some big companies involved here to such as cheddar, Spotify, an Uber as well as small businesses just the Hudson baking company of all being building coda docs, to create solutions to that. Very real problems. If you go by the coda website, whilst you listening to this podcast, check out that gallery to say some of those coda documents. So a couple of weeks ago coded and then new type of dog released code at one dollars. Zero and with it. That was a new mobile experience available on both mobile web and oil s so the concept of a dog being as powerful as an app, captured my attention. But when I also learned the as a rich tech history working at Google, and Microsoft, I had to get him on the show to learn more. So book elope, and hold until it, so I can be me is all the way to California, so we can speak with Shishir have Roger CEO and co founder of coda. So massive warm, welcome to the show. Can you tell the listeners Labatt who you are, and what you do or thanks for having me Neil? Notre, I run a startup called Kuda that I've been working on for the past four, five years before that I spent about six years at Google, I most of that working on YouTube. I ran the tech side of YouTube, and before, though, it's been about six years. Microsoft, worked on office windows and sequel server and before that I started a another startup colts and Trotta. I quite a while ago. Now. On the tech podcast. I love hearing about how techies transforming every industry, but also often, more importantly, the story behind the solutions slowly changing the world. So can I ask that you share your journey that began with an observation the world still runs on documents and spreadsheets for us four years? Okay. Tell me about that and the inspiration behind what you're doing. Yeah. Sure. So KOTA where we're building. A new type of document it blends the best of documents spreadsheets presentations, applications into one new surface. And we like to say that it allows anyone to make a doctor's, powerful an app and the, the idea for the company came out of two primary observations of the world. The first is that we think that docks not apps around the world. And so we look around and look at our teammates or collie or you know, what people do at home or school, and you ask people, what they used to keep themselves productive or or management system. And so on, they'll often name some packaged applications that they've that they've bought or things they built in the across all sorts of different examples. But the if you actually observe them and you walked what they're doing. You'll see them in documents and spreadsheets all day long. And this is something when I worked on the office team it was something we used to talk about as we saw in our user base. But when I got to Google particular when I got to YouTube, it, this is became very start for me. This is right, when Google doc. She's coming out, and we basically ran the entire company on, on Google docs and sheets. And, you know, things like the way we did go planning or the way we did performance management. Or you know, one of the fun stories was at when I joined YouTube back in two thousand eight if you hit flag on a YouTube video on the website, it would show up as a row in a spreadsheet on an ops person's desk. And that's how that's how he managed thing. So, you know, so there's a sort of first division, that, that even though there's all these applications out there. Everything still seems to Ronin documents. Spreadsheets. And then the second observation is if you look at those documents and spreadsheets, they haven't really fundamentally changed in over forty years. And we have this running joke at the company that if Austin powers to pop out of his freezing chamber, he wouldn't know close to where or what musical listen to, but he would absolutely know how to work document spreadsheet and a presentation. And it's a pretty simple reason all the metaphor for those tools for set in the nineteen seventies Wordstar and Harvard graphics and visit Cal, you know, gave us all the metaphors that were still using today. How pages are laid out in the document house. Lives related presentation spreadsheet everything, like how you do a one b to see three that we've all gotten used to we like to pull up battleship all those metaphors have state, exactly the same forty years and you put these two observations together, and it sort of interesting. You know the the this surface that what are the use cases fundamentally changed. And we're, we're now using this not just for digitizing, you know, paper documents and slide decks, and so on. But we're actually using it to run our teams and our families and our. Businesses we we use it all day long. We stare at it at all of our productivity done out of it. And yet, we're using metaphors that are forty years old every other piece of software in the world has has changed in that time period, you know. So what about what about documents? And so that's how we started. We said what, what if we were what if you were to backup ignore history and start from scratch, what would we build that, and that's what we've been building? A new type of document fun. Fantastic, especially because if you'll buy ground being at YouTube, and Mike self and seeing firsthand, the heart of the tech industry. But you tell me well about how that moment that you realized that if you're going to build a new type of dog, you really were going to have to start right from scratch. I mean, it must be quite daunting. Yeah. I think it's one of those ideas that, you know, I always like to say the, you know, the sort of two questions, I ask people when they come to me and say, should I start this company and always ask them? Do you have an idea? You can't imagine not working on and do have a person, you can't imagine not working with and is rarely the case that the answer to both those questions are. Yes. But when they are, it's, it's sort of inevitable. You can just you can see the gleam in and entrepreneurs is they, they can't help it started and, and it almost becomes an obsession. So, so when we were getting started myself, my co founder, Alex tonight, you know, he was actually working on another startup at the time that, you know, thankfully wasn't going that while, and so I was helping them brainstorm other ideas, and, you know, one of us one of us wrote the sentence on the board and said, you know what, if what if you can make apps easily as you can, as, as you can make dogs and once that showed up on the board. All of a sudden, we had this whole list of ideas, it just kind of snapped into place and we. You know, we could just sort of picture the product, we could picture all little elements what we need to get done. And it was it quickly became clear that none of those elements are things where you could just slightly twist, one of the existing surfaces and, and have it just worked that you had to sort of fundamentally we start with a different type of information model and you know, everything from very fundamental concepts. Like, for example, we don't we don't differentiate between documents spreadsheets presentations, all in one surface down to like very specific. Details of the ways that, you know, the way our tables were presented as a lot closer to a database into a spreadsheet, and we have an interaction model people. Call buttons or week all buttons. And people, people really like that people use to setup actions in workflows, and so on that are all these, you know. New types of building blocks reframed in a way that, that have to have to fit together perfectly and that point, we can picture the product. It was really clear that no, we weren't going

Youtube Google Microsoft Co Founder Spotify Stokes Labatt California Colts Notre Wordstar Ronin Neil Austin Shishir Mike Self Roger Ceo Alex
WebPT provides web-based electronic medical record systems for physical therapists

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

36:45 min | 1 year ago

WebPT provides web-based electronic medical record systems for physical therapists

"Back in February opposited, Phoenix. Arizona, I was amazed by how they'll building connected place, and tech hope essentially the state was tempting tech talent our increasingly on affordable, Silicon Valley, and offering best and of life to start founders. Now during that trip I was briefly introduced to Heidi genera, and she's the president and co founder of web PT book, unfortunately, always asked to leave mid presentation to perform an interview that had previously been arranged for me. I must are incredibly rude, taking that walk of shame of the room, but I did my best to make my apologies and reached out to Heidi directly. And viaduct onto these podcasts because I was promise of inspired by her tech startups story, which is genuinely inspirational. And I think it's something that you would all appreciate and thankfully, she said, yes, so book elope, and hold on tight. So I can be meal is all the way to Phoenix. So we can speak with hydrogen Anga president and co founder of web PT. So massive warm, welcome to the show. Can you tell them this is a Labatt who you are, and what you do? Sure. Thank you. Now my name is Heidi Janetta. I am a physical therapist, and I'm also the president and co founder of web PT, and web PT is an electronic health record based in the United States, specifically designed for rehab, therapists. So that includes physical, therapists, occupational therapists, and speech language pathologists, we've been around since two thousand eight when we launched the company, so we're an eleven year old company and within the eleven years we've been able to garner just about forty percent market share which means about eighty five thousand users hitting our putt form and fifteen thousand practices across the all the all every state in the US. And now all the US. Territories. But one of the things are low of about recording. This daily tech podcast is everyday we look at different industry, and how it's being transformed by technology. And like you said web PT's and leading rehab therapy software solution, but if anyone listening, you might be set the scene, and tell them a little bit more about the kind of problems that you're solving for your customers, and using technology. And what makes you different really from other solutions out there. When we first started back in two thousand eight eighty percent of physical, therapists in, in our country, were using pen and paper to compete, their documentation. So if you're familiar with physical therapy at all or physiotherapy as it's known around the world when you see us go to see a physical therapist. It's not like just seeing your doctor. You actually see them for multiple visits. Sometimes in a week definitely in a month and over a plan of care that sometimes can span. Munster even years, depending on the ailment that you have and every interaction that you have with therapist has to be documented for liability. Reasons, also to, to show progress to understand what would transpire during that visit, but also here in the states for sure in order to get paid from insurance company. And so that burden of documentation is pretty significant compared to, you know, medical other medical providers. And so when as a therapist back in two thousand six I was also a clinic director I was running three large clinics, and one of our largest expenses that we were incurring, were for transcription dictation. So we were transcribing notes that would either have to get sent to a physician to provide them updates or two insurance companies to in order for us to get paid for our services. And so. So around this time, there are many physician based platforms that had been starting to get instituted. We, we looked at some of those, but they didn't have the workflow that a therapist would need, which is very different. And so that's why we decided to launch the company it was really actually supposed to solve a problem that I had in my practice. But when we found out that the eighty percent number was prolific out the actual profession here in the US we decided to launch the company we were the first web based application. And again, if you've ever been set foot into a physio clinic, we don't sit behind the desk, very often we're out and about with their patients teaching exercises putting our hands on patients and so having a web based application was very important as a differentiator for us when we first started. On an incredible inspirational stall Tope journey the I think it's going to be so valuable to other startup founders, they're going to be listening to all over the world at various stages of their own startup journey. So could I take you back to two thousand eight where it all began, and can you tell me more about your story is a leading sports, physical, therapists and multi clinic, Dr rector looking for ways to improve your practices online and actually inspired you to start this journey to the inspiration for me. Initially was really out of born out of a problem that I was having an in the practice with this transcription dictation expense that was continuing to grow while my top line, which was made up of insurance payments on co pay payments from patients and some cash paying patients that many. that the majority of that was insurance company payments, which had steadily declined over the years. And so, you know, if your top line is starting to either flattened or slightly decline in your expense lines going up at doesn't equal a good profitable margin for, for a company and so you, do everything you can to increase the top line, but you also have to look at your expenses. And with that being our business biggest Spence, that's where I put a lot of focus and attention in trying to find technology to help solve that problem that we were having. And so when we couldn't find anything the logical solution for me at the time was to try to build something, and I partner up with a very tech savvy software engineer, who had had a history of building enterprise level, web based software applications. We put our heads together and developed version one, which was just the documentation piece. So truly solving the problem that I was having and we started to develop. In two thousand six it took us about a little over a year to get that I product going getting positive feedback from my therapist in my clinic and within the next six months, I had some of my colleagues who said, hey, we like to try that product, we'd love to save some money, and so we let them try as sort of a beta, but they actually paid us, which I think is really important. I on this journey that we, we made sure that people felt the value that they were willing to pay us for our product. It wasn't just they were getting a freebie because I if you're actually writing a check for something every day, or, you know, paying a monthly cost for something there's, there's value that's being driven from that. And so before we knew it, we had twelve other practices using our pot form. And that's when we did the market research and found that eighty percent number and light bulbs go off. And so we decided to launch the company. Two thousand eight and you know here we are today, but it all started from problem solving, right? Which I think is for the most part, one of the keys to many entrepreneurial successes is that you actually see a problem and build a better mouse trap to be able to get people to see the value in what you're delivering absolutely enough to fifty interviews on the definite trend amongst old stall took found as they expanded the problem. First time go to fix it was, I think it was a long time ago. But women instances of people looking at technology first, and then looking for a problem to solve. But thankfully, we've moved away from that unless I was founded in two thousand eight an up, and if you went onto clubs, a one minute delay, Sammy's funding round back in two thousand ten so what kind of lessons, did you learn along the way that would be a volleyball, twenty still took found a listening looking to get themselves not perfect foot dot perfect position for? Invested in to get that funding that they need to watch the progress, things Fullwood. So during those first couple of years that, you know, it's grind. Right. You're, you're every month, you're trying to get more customers to, to pay. And we were looking at, you know every every month we were looking at her expensive. What, what did we absolutely need based on the revenue that we made that month? Was it a new server was it, you know, an a support rap, you know what, what was it? That was most of highest priority. So you're, you're basically living hand to mouth at that point. And over that first, two years, we'd actually garnered a million dollar run rate. So we had a great trajectory a couple of things happen. So there was some regulatory change that happened within the US that helped propel our momentum forward in which the Affordable Care Act, which included the high tech. Act had been passed, which mandated eligible professionals meaning physicians and other providers to be using digital documentation, or an electronic medical record by two thousand fourteen and they were given incentives to do that. Now, we think it was fortunate, but many, people think is unfortunate that physical, therapists were not an occupational or speech pathologist. We're not included as an eligible freshener meeting that they did not receive the incentive in order to adopt. Any of them are so all of our growth was organic. But we we were helped by that momentum. That was happening in healthcare to adopt a digital platform. So you can imagine if you're still writing handwritten notes in your sending your notes to a physician that refers, you a patient. It doesn't bode well for you, as a professional to send them over something you've had to handwrite when they, you know, have been mandated to you something digital. And so we kind of rode that wave a little bit, which really helped on say on on sales. So we got to a point actually where we were having trouble. Keeping up with demand. Right. Which is every investors. Dream. And so we even though we, we were pushing forward, we came many. together, founders inside, you know, do we want to swing for I the fences just here. Obviously, keeping we can up keep going, with the but pace of change it would be within helpful the organization. to It truly is, have some capital I think, in to, any startup you know, is, keep this this is ember. a part of That's your culture. now Like, starting if you don't to talk about change management turn into a part fire of your culture, like to, to actually get that it's going even important even to, stronger. to address those things, So, and you we know, I'm from a huge the very advocate beginning of have bootstrapping developed a very until strong you get to a point internal that you culture actually have and a product that one of the actually things that is we showing did. momentum. When we took that We I did trying that to funding which enabled in, us to only give away we a small had percentage about of the company at that point, even twelve though people we took in a the company series when a we million took that dollar round of funding round in and within the one next of six the biggest months, challenges we that had we hired had early on close prior to to taking our thirty first round of people, funding in and so we had was more people in convincing the company people than that we had in the are previous, small you quote know, unquote, first small three niche years space. of the organization, Which when we did and the we market felt size this cultural for PT? shift We found it to be a and six so. billion We dollar market, sat around, but like they we consider did every that year small at the beginning because, of the year, kind of a mini you know, strategic planning as session, we're going through looking and for we asked investment, the you know, market those cap forty or people I'm sorry, that were sitting a in the room, total just well, Marquette you is know, something who do that we people want always to be want as an to organization, know what's what the do opportunity we stand to for, get expand like, what and get types bigger. of people do we need, And so we filled up a giant whiteboard, it was really which hard initially we to then convince distill people down into that our core values know we of really the company needed to stay focused and what on the I physical am therapy space. It you was our know, core most competency. proud of There is was that so much those greenfield opportunity, core values have now and we truly had built scaled a hockey stick. with us to And where so we are today now over five as we hundred are, twenty five you and know, police pushing towards in this eight forty states percent across the US. market share number And so that question that truly continues had laid to the foundation for be our growth in our ear. in how we communicate One of the reasons with we our teams did that total addressable market. through Now is all outside of these of big outpatient. changes. We have So, a so lot that of opportunity, was one of them, which thankfully, you know, we've, the second we've been. is To really continue to just push around keeping and, up with innovation you know, as put you start aside all to get those naysayers bigger. who said, our, our market And size making was sure not big enough. you're building But I think the right things it's really important to understand and or what building your market or buying is. And depending what the market on, opportunity you know what you is have because the opportunity that to do, eighty percent and, number and was huge making for sure us that in you that are people looking we, we far were able enough to forward convince people to that, make yeah, decisions I see how that you've got a lot of that greenfield are not opportunity. just reactive. With eighty percent But of people hopefully, still proactive using pen and paper, and balancing that the reactive was a very and proactive clear marker choices that we that could you have move to make the needle on. And so so that you're still getting ahead over of the game that initial challenge as of you market move forward size, within ovation. and staying niche. And sometimes that's been very I think difficult, especially in today's market, more I think, more recently people are, actually, are willing as to, we've to moved understand into the the niche, enterprise but that was a big thing that we had overcome organizations early in our early and stages, companies, which, and it wasn't you just know, about become a a lot check more writer. of a burden and taxing It was about and taxing bringing the expertise teams with into the wants company and needs. that would help us get Then to that next level. where we first started So not which only was did small we take a and medium round sized of funding. business And space. we got So that move up market Jim arms. has Wrong, who been is the founder a challenge. of JD But software, again which is a worldwide known point communication. of service software Having the right platform people that he started to help Encana lead out that of his and garage also to be patient. and became a Which multi-million I know everyone million says it's a virtue dollar for sure. market cap company But trying to on our balance board, the proactiveness as well in reactive as niff-, I think helping us to has find been a challenge, CEO, but and still remains a challenge which is also for a us. very difficult And then decision I guess the third as thing founders to I bring would say, in as a far as a challenge experienced goes CEO within the organization. to help run the company with us. We get a lot of credit for Would that decision be just in terms because of our, our it really helped customers. us to So again, we call keep our that customers hockey stick members. growth that we had started We did that from on the very that beginning same path. because we wanted them Hope to difficult feel like was they'd that be for long you to is community the found was particularly challenging and you just in knew healthcare in Saudi that was the right thing today. healthcare Yeah, providers I took a lot are of not known to be consultation the most tech savvy with, you know, and others. so moving through the To adoption curve. put your ego aside. Initially And, we and hit it right on to the say, head. you know, We had we a lot of early adopters have never done with this web-based before with a even web based though application we they felt have had comfortable a lot of success they in, were we're on the a great folks path that were doing their, their to, to banking bring someone online who really earlier than actually everyone else. would might have a little bit more expertise. They probably And what had we a, did actually you know, they had gone once away from we the made blackberry, the decision and we're we moving did into some more strength of a smart finders berm earlier work than to anyone figure else. out. But You then know what there's this are huge you know, middle each of us part are of the the adoption two of us curve. for, for sure That as is founders, much more difficult what to win are over. strengths? And And what are we so missing? having And what to we figured take out step. Back was that when we you were truly have so missing many smart a processor, people in a tech company, somebody trying who's going to to bring deliver in process, technology to more non of an operational tech savvy leader people than to take a step a back true. and really Maybe understand CEO, how if does you will, your marketing and have someone to who's work. going to institute, And so, you know, again, Salesforce, in for two thousand us in ten an two thousand accounting eleven platform a time that was going period, to help scale that's when we really and we were lucky and enough our currency. to find that Oh, person. Nancy ham, And actually when talks we, about we. They how set up we've actually the organization. developed to companies for web We PT actually had three one people almost leading like an the company, educational which platform, was a little because we sometimes had to difficult. We didn't find it difficult. But that now is this education we had community sort that of trifecta truly now as becomes the, the team lead generation called us where 'cause we we had have become sort a of thought leader in this the space triangle of decision around making technology which I don't specifically, think Slota's you down. know, electronic, We worked health record really, really and well more together now with data analytics in making decisions within the industry. and we And had so a very flat organization at the the time. challenge So was there overcoming, were we had the, divided the up non teams tech savviness in which reported of up, our. Customers and then came together to in make trying big to strategic deliver decisions a together. technology So to it was them definitely tough in to how we set solve your ego that aside. was But by at the time it, becoming ultimately, this it educational was about thought being leadership humble platform enough to say, that you know helped what empower I'm them really to gain good at these the knowledge things, to understand and that we were we the best need product help in for these them areas who will twenty are nineteen. overlapped I mean you wasn't know one of the major so players much in the physical that we stepped therapy on each shelf other's web. toes Okay, and continued you said, to you've respect got to comb not each adoption other's domains, which I think learning ultimately. curve that It was especially for how people we that were able to be to successful seventy associated and they soon with technology. they save the great But so move what to does make. that landscape? I mean, hey, we all Look now like over now. ten And years he's technology later. continuing I mean to one transform of your biggest physical challenges therapy. bane Physiotherapy in those ten years. say. Keep maybe telling Absolutely. me how you overcame some of those You challenges. know, we've Yeah. been There's been helping to push that curve. But absolutely technology is, is much more available and rampant through the physical therapy or rehab therapy spaces. We call it so that eighty percent number is now flipped on its head, so eighty percent of the rehab, therapists in the US are using some sort of digital platform of which forty percent are using what PT but you now are seeing much many more technology opportunities with, you know, a range of motion, try being able to do more consistent measurements of range of motion Telehealth is now a big thing, that's happening to, to help again reach more people in order to gain access to healthcare, which is extremely important. country, And And country, back in including February Taku opposited, in Denver Phoenix. and Boston. Arizona, So anybody's interested. I was amazed by how they'll building connected From a place, if you're and a tech hope wanna learn essentially more about the state the rehab was therapy tempting industry, tech talent our we increasingly again on affordable, on our web Silicon dot com Valley, website. and offering We have best and all of kinds life to of start blogs, founders. and webinars that you can Now during that learn trip more I was about briefly us, introduced and to Heidi the industry genera, has a whole, and she's the president and then and me co personally, founder of web PT I'm on Lincoln, so book, Heidi. unfortunately, Janetta. always asked to J. leave N. N mid E NGA. presentation I'm to perform I'm an interview happy that had to, previously to been connect arranged for me. I must with you via are incredibly via Lincoln. rude, taking that walk Loop. of You'll shame story of how of you've transformed the room, the world but of physiotherapy I did my best to with make my with apologies technology, and having reached experienced out to Heidi firsthand. directly. And I And think viaduct it's an inspiring onto these podcasts textile, ab- story, because but I was promise I think of inspired the end of every episode, by her I always tech say startups that technology story, works best which when he brings people is together, genuinely but you've used inspirational. technology to And empower I think it's something patients, that you would an ultimately all appreciate help paper got and thankfully, so beautiful thing. she said, So yes, a big thank so you for taking book the elope, time to come on and and hold chat on tight. with me today. So I Thanks can be meal already is all the way to Phoenix. appreciate the opportunity. So we can speak One with of my hydrogen easing, June Anga president and indeed and story co founder about a of woman web in tech PT. achieving highly deserve success. These are the stories So I don't want to massive hear more warm, of welcome an celebrate to the show. on this type podcast. Can you tell them this is a I cannot Labatt thank who God, you are, you know, and first what you of all, do? of course, for forgiving Sure. Thank me you. for Now leaving her my presentation. name is Heidi Janetta. And also, I of am course, for a taking physical the time therapist, to and I'm chat also with me today, the president and and I'll co go to founder fade in the holidays. of Textile web PT, top story would have resonated and web with PT so many is of you listening, an electronic whether you're health in record the textile tubes based eight all in the United out of States, it. specifically But I want designed you to share for what rehab, you found therapists. valuable So from that includes today's conversation physical, therapists, and occupational maybe even shea therapists, your and personal speech language story pathologists, with the listeners hit two we've been around since and two that's thousand nice and easy for you eight to do when we a platform. launched the So company, we can all get avoid said, so we're an eleven and year old you can company Email me tech and blog within writer the eleven years outlook we've dot been com. able to Tweet me garner at nail Nailsea just Hughes. about forty Oh, percent coast. Visit market my share website tech blow which grata means dot about co eighty dot five UK. thousand users And finally, before hitting I go our putt a form big, thank and you for fifteen all thousand your well practices wishes, across by the the way, I'm feeling all the much all every an state hour after in the my US. skin on the plane And home now the other all day. the US. Territories. Now I do have a routine But visit one of the with things my are doctors low of next about week recording. about I'm This daily sure tech everything podcast is going is to everyday be falling. we look at You're different not going industry, to get rid and of how me it's that being transformed easily. by technology. And Okay. like you said web So PT's a big and thank leading you rehab for listening therapy software until solution, next time. but if anyone Don't listening, be a stranger. you might be set the scene, and tell them a little bit more about the Thanks kind of for problems listening that you're to solving the tank for global your rice customers, appalled cost and using until next technology. time. And Remember what makes you different technology really from is other best solutions when it out brings there. people together. When we

United States Founder Heidi Janetta President Trump Co Founder Arizona Phoenix Labatt CEO US. Writer. Anga Phoenix. Hockey Clinic Director Munster
WebPT provides web-based electronic medical record systems for physical therapists

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

08:24 min | 1 year ago

WebPT provides web-based electronic medical record systems for physical therapists

"Back in February opposited, Phoenix. Arizona, I was amazed by how they'll building connected place, and tech hope essentially the state was tempting tech talent our increasingly on affordable, Silicon Valley, and offering best and of life to start founders. Now during that trip I was briefly introduced to Heidi genera, and she's the president and co founder of web PT book, unfortunately, always asked to leave mid presentation to perform an interview that had previously been arranged for me. I must are incredibly rude, taking that walk of shame of the room, but I did my best to make my apologies and reached out to Heidi directly. And viaduct onto these podcasts because I was promise of inspired by her tech startups story, which is genuinely inspirational. And I think it's something that you would all appreciate and thankfully, she said, yes, so book elope, and hold on tight. So I can be meal is all the way to Phoenix. So we can speak with hydrogen Anga president and co founder of web PT. So massive warm, welcome to the show. Can you tell them this is a Labatt who you are, and what you do? Sure. Thank you. Now my name is Heidi Janetta. I am a physical therapist, and I'm also the president and co founder of web PT, and web PT is an electronic health record based in the United States, specifically designed for rehab, therapists. So that includes physical, therapists, occupational therapists, and speech language pathologists, we've been around since two thousand eight when we launched the company, so we're an eleven year old company and within the eleven years we've been able to garner just about forty percent market share which means about eighty five thousand users hitting our putt form and fifteen thousand practices across the all the all every state in the US. And now all the US. Territories. But one of the things are low of about recording. This daily tech podcast is everyday we look at different industry, and how it's being transformed by technology. And like you said web PT's and leading rehab therapy software solution, but if anyone listening, you might be set the scene, and tell them a little bit more about the kind of problems that you're solving for your customers, and using technology. And what makes you different really from other solutions out there. When we first started back in two thousand eight eighty percent of physical, therapists in, in our country, were using pen and paper to compete, their documentation. So if you're familiar with physical therapy at all or physiotherapy as it's known around the world when you see us go to see a physical therapist. It's not like just seeing your doctor. You actually see them for multiple visits. Sometimes in a week definitely in a month and over a plan of care that sometimes can span. Munster even years, depending on the ailment that you have and every interaction that you have with therapist has to be documented for liability. Reasons, also to, to show progress to understand what would transpire during that visit, but also here in the states for sure in order to get paid from insurance company. And so that burden of documentation is pretty significant compared to, you know, medical other medical providers. And so when as a therapist back in two thousand six I was also a clinic director I was running three large clinics, and one of our largest expenses that we were incurring, were for transcription dictation. So we were transcribing notes that would either have to get sent to a physician to provide them updates or two insurance companies to in order for us to get paid for our services. And so. So around this time, there are many physician based platforms that had been starting to get instituted. We, we looked at some of those, but they didn't have the workflow that a therapist would need, which is very different. And so that's why we decided to launch the company it was really actually supposed to solve a problem that I had in my practice. But when we found out that the eighty percent number was prolific out the actual profession here in the US we decided to launch the company we were the first web based application. And again, if you've ever been set foot into a physio clinic, we don't sit behind the desk, very often we're out and about with their patients teaching exercises putting our hands on patients and so having a web based application was very important as a differentiator for us when we first started. On an incredible inspirational stall Tope journey the I think it's going to be so valuable to other startup founders, they're going to be listening to all over the world at various stages of their own startup journey. So could I take you back to two thousand eight where it all began, and can you tell me more about your story is a leading sports, physical, therapists and multi clinic, Dr rector looking for ways to improve your practices online and actually inspired you to start this journey to the inspiration for me. Initially was really out of born out of a problem that I was having an in the practice with this transcription dictation expense that was continuing to grow while my top line, which was made up of insurance payments on co pay payments from patients and some cash paying patients that

United States President Trump Co Founder Heidi Janetta Phoenix Arizona Labatt Anga Clinic Director Dr Rector Munster Two Thousand Eight Eighty Perc Eighty Percent Forty Percent Eleven Years Eleven Year
Learning Alliance And The VR Company Launch of Regatta VR

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

08:29 min | 2 years ago

Learning Alliance And The VR Company Launch of Regatta VR

"Today. I want to explore the world of corporate learning. Wait. Wait, don't hit the stop. We'll know exactly what is wrong with corporate learning. It man. I'm with you all on that one. But I actually want to talk about how technology can change all that boring corporate learning stuff. And when I was exploring we see bought me to a company called the learning alliance and their leading talent development company, too as it would international enterprise level companies for years, and they recently announced the launch of a new company called regard VR. And Bill west. He's the founder of the learning alliance developed leaning solutions to the world's greatest companies for over twenty five years, including some pretty big names, which is Amazon and Microsoft, so it's fair to say he knows what he's doing. But efforts to outset Aubrey Carter and setting them up as an early market pioneering can leverage the capable is of the alliance to rowlatt VR solutions on a massive scale. Well, let's just say that grandma attention and ask for everybody listening. Did you just say VR an augmented learning? Okay. I'll stick with you. If you date hopefully of redeem myself, so book elope and hold on tight. So I can be meal as all the way to Indiana. So we can talk with Bill west the founder of the learning alliance, and you can tell us all about bringing virtual and augmented reality into businesses and corporate learning and so much more. So massive warm. Welcome to the show. Can you? Tell me says a Labatt who you are. And what you do. Yeah. Absolutely Bill west. I've been in the industry for very long time learning before it was called you learning way back in nineteen eighty nine. I own several companies that build custody learning, including the learning alliance and regatta VR and testing. Now, the Linegar loins is a leading talent development company that has the enterprise level for international companies for years now. But for people listening just tuning in hearing about and for the very first time could you maybe off a bit of an overview and set the say sure doesn't surprise me. We don't advertise much. We formed the alliance with five of the top brands in the industry, hence the name. What I recognize a couple years ago is that it was difficult to find a company that could canvass the entire ecosystem in capabilities yet have the capacity that the large companies needed to respond to their their still needs. And so that was the formation reliance pulling these companies together to do both those we build a wide range of training solutions for very large accounts. Everything from classroom and web training, two games and virtual reality. The learning alliance as Okinawa sheets virtual an augmentation reality businesses into regard to VR recently on the new company, I'll believe will focus on the exploitation of immersive media technology for corporate training. And I believe you're gonna continuous the CEO of boat companies. But can you just expand on the announcement? And also what it will mean for both companies because they feel like two very different direction. They really are. It's going to allow. Both the thrives. It's two very very different business models. You think about it as a if the alliance was a cruise ship. Their large the goes steady, very predictable and such regattas more like a mid sized sailboat. It's got to be nimble explorers on chowder charted waters, and you can't do both with the same boat. And so it was really important that we separate the two. So that both could thrive so go, then just the power virtual reality and old minted really to develop enterprise wide learning is affective, but also seem could've been pulling secure too. I mean that only sounds sounds incredibly exciting. But keep told me more about it. And what you think makes it unique from all the other solutions out have at the moment. Absolutely. I mean, it is very exciting. It's also very very complex, it gives us a richer ability to build performance in and really shape behaviors the in this of the scenario is the fact that you put the headset on makes you feel like you're actually there, and it substitutes the real world around you unlike the two dimensional world of a of an online course, where your your phone your Email people walking by the distract you. And then you can only immerse yourself so much in that little screen where you're seeing a video or animation such you put that headset on and you're you're rural completely changes. Which makes a our ability to do a lot of a lot of things much much better. But it's a new technology is not just a new media like when we adopted flasher or video is very complex because it's like installing a whole new information system at a company. And we'll put you guys. All right, rhinos is focus on the exploitation of immersive media technology for corporate training. So I'm conscious for any business leaders and listening can you maybe offer a few scenarios actually help them visualize. How this could work in their world, or or what you have in mind to bring their corporate learning to love. Sure, there's three primary areas that I that. I talk about one more doing this one is often called soft skills. But it's the idea putting someone else put yourself in someone else's shoes. We deal with empathy harassment specially sexual harassment in ways to shape behaviors by being being the victim having the predator right there at you or beating in the customer service situation where someone is being rude to you. And it feels like you're really talking to that person. And and we're able to leverage different aspects of the technology that can actually produce a visceral reaction, and which makes it really exciting. So in in terms of shaping behaviors it's far more. Superior than some of the other technologies we've worked with hard skills. You talk about, you know, manufacturing sites along or medical device manufacturing in such it allows us to put a safe environment together where they can interact in feels like they're on site. We could teach them skills that are important without them having any harm to themselves teach them how to operate a complex without fear of breaking the equipments or or and losing money in the process, and the and the third one is just these simulation. Putting yourself in another space. You know, being an auto adjuster being able to put you in front of a virtual car, you can walk around the car take the car apart look for damage or put you in a shopping center, will you can rearrange the shelves and interact with customers just the ability to completely change your environment. Those three key areas that are most hotly requested to us in the future. Most startling. An anti as yet. But what kind of fate back receiving from corpus out? It's scary. scary. I say in our job is to maximize the exciting bits while we minimized the scary bits. You know, again, it's like sailing. They said sailing is, you know, it's ninety percents pleasure in ten percent sheer terror, and what we find in the in the experiences that the sneezed the designers. It's a really enjoyable experience. They get to work with this new medium, come up. Great ideas at the same time. The IT guys are working in parallel trying to figure out how mining to distribute ten thousand headsets and keep them up to date. How am I going to ensure security behind the firewall, how do we integrate this using score X API? There's a lot of stuff that goes on behind the scenes that that need to be handled the other pieces at it takes a blended solution. You can't you can't put a person in a headset for a half hour or an hour. You can't really present linear content to a person has said, it's just not affective. It's amazing for interactive experiences in such an activity is so it has to be blended with either a classroom session or online sessions. And then you also have to haul. You have to do what I call them non. VR VR. You're not gonna have enough headsets for everybody and some people just flat out won't put the headset on and you may have a compliance course that need to roll out in a very short period of time. And you just can't disseminate enough headsets fast enough. So whatever you do in the headset has to have an equal representation on the desktop, and even perhaps in the mobile device. So that you can address the entire audience the way you won't be address the audience, that's really

Bill West Founder Indiana Harassment Labatt Linegar Loins Aubrey Carter Okinawa Microsoft Amazon CEO Twenty Five Years Ten Percent
How Cryptowerk Helps Businesses Fight Fraud with Blockchains

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

04:27 min | 2 years ago

How Cryptowerk Helps Businesses Fight Fraud with Blockchains

"Warm. Welcome to the show Kato them. This is a Labatt who you are. And what you do. Well, thank you, Neil. I really I am excited to talk to you today here from San Mateo in California as you can hear doubt from my accent. I am a original German who escaped to the bay area about ten years ago. And having been a form of venture capitalist about ten years ago. I moved into the entrepreneurial side of things and love to found startups and last one is actually two years ago. I founded with the professor for blockchain of UC Berkeley, and as a German, by the way and put a team around it the company's called travek and work like the German work. So we kept a little bit of the heritage. And we are small companies still did a series eight funding about twenty people and crypto work addresses them the market of trying to bring. To the world trusted data. And I'm more than happy to tell you what I think what it is. What is all about fantastic? And I love what you've done that you've escaped to a beautiful part of the world. And you've created this company, but you've still kept your own heritage in. And I think that's a fantastic thing and crypto work for anyone new tuning in provides massively, scalable blockchain as a service solution for enterprise applications. Can you just help set the scene and tell everyone listening little bit more about exactly what it? Well. And of course, what problems you so feel customers. Sure, first of all the question and always missed a question of trust. Right. And if you talk that's the primary promise of Blockchain's and to create trust. However, they is a little bit of a different question. Because if you look at a lot of education's Blockchain's have been applied to create trust among trusted parties, which could also translate into a lot of the private Blockchain's where the number of. Of nodes are somewhat limited right, and therefore the notes could be influenced and controlled potentially. But it's a wonderful mechanism to create trust among trusted parties. If you want to create trust among independent non trusting parties, actually the public Blockchain's predominantly used for crypto currencies bitcoin blockchain and theorem actually do provide the magnetism of having ten thousands of notes around the world. However, the public Blockchain's face, a problem of scale ability, and of course, transaction costs. Let me talk about cookie about transaction cost. I mean, they I don't even know what they're probably thirty to fifty cents right now on the bitcoin blockchain they pro-war up to fifty dollars. Sometime highly volatile, but thirty to fifty cents per a single transaction is nothing where you can create as. Transaction for a single data entry in the database if he wants to bring trust to data we need to find a technology review to find mechanisms to bring an doubt the immutable trust to on massive scale to the world. This is what crypto work has solved to a proprietary technology, and let me talk just very simply about technology. The effect is that react. She can as a kind of a middleware right into a number of Blockchain's in parallel the public Blockchain's like liquor bitcoin cerium, but also any other blockchain we have AP is to hash graph IBM, hyper ledger. If people want to have a private blockchain, but predominantly be used the public blockchain bitcoin the cerium to write hashes into them. We are strong believer that no actual data should go onto the Blockchain's for. Generating the trust. But only hashes of the data the problem. So we we do that. And we do that on a fraction of a penny. Basically, a m effector of about a thousand less than when a usually would pay for the public blockchain like bit Cornyn Decio at the same time, we can write a millions of transactions per

Blockchain Labatt San Mateo California Neil Cornyn Decio Professor Berkeley IBM AP Ten Years Fifty Dollars Two Years
Monax - The Public Beta Legal Blockchain-Based Platform

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

06:21 min | 2 years ago

Monax - The Public Beta Legal Blockchain-Based Platform

"A lot recently about how the legal sector has traditionally been one of the slowest industries to digitize although I have been contacted by a few in the industry that says that reputation is slightly undeserved. So what did fence men of emerging technology searches blockchain? I'm quickly learning that these technologies have the power to transform the legal profession, as we know it because Lewis on cow in a way. In fact, we need more of them than ever. And while law firms may be hesitant to embrace new disruptive technologies. Legal tech is actually allow them to serve more clients. And these new platforms will not only expediate legal processes, but they will also increase transparency anxious for years. And I think that message is now being delivered. So recently came across a company called Mon ax, which is an open source universal blockchain platform for smart contract. Technology an mo- next also founded the agreements network, which is a decentralized contract management platform that uses smart contract technology to create proof and operate legal agreements, and it was built to revolutionize the way lawyers businesses and consumers transact across the globe. So I'm Ed Casey Kumon CEO and co founder of Mon axe to discuss blockchain technologies transformation of legal functions, including the impact that it has on the field of law itself and what prime legal digitization trends. He is noticing in two thousand nineteen and how that will help shape the future too. So bookl- up and hold on tight. So I can be more is all the way to Edinburgh. So we can speak with Casey Coleman from mo- necks. Messy will welcome to the show. Can you tell the listeners Labatt who you are? And what you do. Sure. My name's Casey Kuhlman. I'm the CEO of a company called Mon axe. And I'm a former lawyer myself in technologist by habit, and we are seeking to do something very new in the legal technology space, namely building a platform that allows small medium businesses to manage and track their contractual obligations in a digital platform. So someone that's pain in the industry, you know, more than anyone that the legal sector traditionally had one of those reputations of being one of the slowest industries to digitize. I mean, what do you think that as an all, you know, seeing that changing? So yeah, I I think that lawyers have a reputation which which personally I think is unwarranted that they are very slow to adapt to new technologies, and if we look. Cross other professions. I don't I don't think it necessarily holds true. That lawyers are extremely slow to adopt technology. What we see though on the other hand is that legal as a business function it sits between an across company boundaries. Namely, when you go into a contract between various companies that contract is built to be the rules and interface between and across various companies. And and so if you take that as a starting point, and then you want to say, okay, we we like new technology. And so we want to digitize this function of our business, then you need to have an infrastructure layer on which to manage things that happen across company boundaries. And so our hypothesis about one of the main reasons that. The legal functions of business have been in previous generations of technology. Unable to digitize themselves is really more from a technological capacity. Rather than necessarily lawyers are very slow to adapt to new technology for look up blockchain undoubtedly has the power to transform the legal profession as we know it. So can you tell me a little bit more about exactly what Mon ax as also the kind of problems that they will solve lawyers and at what makes it unique from the solutions out there. Sure just one point of clarification is is Mon exit self is really focused on helping the legal function of businesses, which is not to say that helping lawyers is out of sight out of mind for us, but we're very much focused on how to help businesses in digitize their legal function and our company has been in the blockchain space for coming on. Five years now. And what we found is that the core value proposition of what Blockchain's can offer. In a business context is the ability to run and manage infrastructure, data infrastructure sorry across and between company. Firewalls namely it's authenticated layer that runs that runs. That is ran by multiple companies across an ecosystem. And and so if you take that value proposition at face value, and you say, well, if the reason that contracts or the legal function of companies has not been digitized is because it needs this layer of of an ability to be managed by multiple companies. Then what we have is a really really nice framework on which we can start to think about building digit. Ties d- systems, and and this is a fundamentally what Mon ax is working on namely, the ability to manage and track obligations that have been agreed to by parties after we have a deal. And so we put those into a blockchain network called the agreements network and moan ax is a small business focus user, interface integration layer on top of the agreements network, and that enables companies to very simply and easily understand. Where are we within all the rights and obligations that we have agreed to do on one

CEO Ed Casey Casey Kuhlman Casey Coleman Labatt Lewis Blockchain Edinburgh Co Founder Five Years
"labatt" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"labatt" Discussed on WJR 760

"This is Labatt hockey played the way mother nature intended, Labatt blue is proud support pond hockey and all the hardy souls at liked to play it. Cool. This is Labatt hockey beer. Lebron USA Buffalo New York. Bestselling ever. Holy cow. Why we're here the Chrysler center. I've never seen it this full of my life. This place is really really sold out. Never this early before a game started. But they were here early. There's no question about it. It was hard to find a parking spot. And I got here. Two hours early. Should come with us. Anyway. The first basket, I.

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Zestful - Transforming Employee Perks and Rewards Programs

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

08:11 min | 2 years ago

Zestful - Transforming Employee Perks and Rewards Programs

"Weeks. I've spoken with variety of leaders from various industries, and there are a few trends emerging from these conversations. I mean yesterday is a Texaco shortage at the moment and organizations need to work harder to attract the right talent today company unpredictably in these customer Centric times the candidates a very often now holding all the cards businesses. Could no longer say that this company is all about the people without actually backing it. Oh, and actually looking after their people and workers are no longer content with just clocking in and clocking out and going through the daily grind. They wanna feel a part of something deep down. They wanna make a difference. An also feel valued by their company an employer to the days of. Micromanage us bullying staff members saying you've got to five in your appraisal book up or you'll be out of here, thankfully, disappearing because I think the same expectation levels. We now have as consumers when are carrying those into the workplace to offer a tangent here. An example are recently observed was over here in the UK Jose Marino, he was often labelled as the special because every football club, he managed he transformed into a championship winning side. But he's lace return at Chelsea. And then a man just, you know, it ended in disaster. And I found myself scratching hand thinking, well, what's changed in that time? And appears to me, at least the days were what the gaffer says goes in everyone else's opinion, doesn't count no longer works Unani to treat people differently or they just won't work for you. Or of course in Jose's position the team stop playing for him. And when not just you know, it got social in who is more focused on the needs of the players and giving them a little bit more freedom. That same team that was losing and went on a ten match on be enrolled. That's just my opinion, of course. But he's clear to me that there is a change in the air. So today I wanted to tackle how technology can actually help increase employee engagement and also offer employees perks to actually mean something called zestful recently discovered that when they could to a nationwide survey asking people if they would prefer a hundred and thirty thousand dollars salary or hundred thousand salary plus benefits and an experience allowance an incredible eighty percent of the survey respondents preferred the lowest salary and the perks package over the highest salary. What a great talking point so book elope and hold on time. So I can be Muir is all the way to Denver, Colorado. So we can speak with zestful co founder and CEO Vogel's about how our expectations and the experience a Konami transforming employee perks and employee engagement. So massive warm. Welcome to the show. Can you tell the listeners Labatt who you are? And what you do. Absolutely. My name is Matt Vogel's. I am the founder and CEO of zestful zestful is making it really easy for for companies of any size to create the perfect employee perk program, and we do that with what we call our zestful perk card. It looks and works like a regular debit card accepts it can only be used on the products that the company allows in only up to a specific balance. So for example, common. Use case would be a company gives fifty dollars a month to all of their employees that can only be used on fitness and health. So the employees can use it at their favorite, Jim, maybe their favorite fitness apps. But if they tried to use it at a gas station or a grocery store or even something like Spotify, or Netflix that are not fitness and health the card would decline so in a way. Hey, what we've done is. We've allowed these companies to create these perfect perk programs, but completely eliminating that reimbursement process. Essay sounds so folks any employee I've encountered a previous jobs, especially IT. Well, that's another story. Episode, but it's making eighty for companies of any size to create not perfect employee perk is incredibly hard to actually achieve but you just set the scene and tell me a little bit more about what it is how you achieve and also, of course, what makes it unique from all those other employees companies out there. Yeah. And I kind of wanted to start that question with the two different angles that we come from. I think if you're a small company than the difficulty is actually giving a perk that your employees will will look at and recognize typically small companies can't pay high salaries, they can't give these tremendous perks and rewards, but what they can do is you something like zestful to give twenty five dollars a month that they can use on Netflix or Spotify, and those type of things so from the small company side, it gives them this competitive advantage. We would say from a large company size zestful is valuable on a different angle. And that when you have hundreds of employees the operational costs of managing. Program like a reimbursement process for fitness and health could take hours if not days of somebody's time. So from a small company perspective where the secret ingredient that lets them easily do something like employee perks from a large company perspective, we eliminate that very heavy cumbersome reimbursement process. Now, a great step from zestful last week after you conducted a nationwide Servite up interested at the end of this podcast him back full. Listen to see what they thought it was well, basically US people if they would prefer a hundred thirty thousand dollars salary or a hundred thousand salary plus net. Flicks HBO, Hulu spa if I had space a mail delivery service, you'll gym membership twenty dollar a month allowance to char- if that choice and a hundred hundred dollars a month. Experience allowance surprisingly all on surprising. The eighty percent of survey respondents for

Jose Marino Spotify Netflix Founder And Ceo Zestful Zestful HBO Labatt Matt Vogel Ceo Vogel United States UK Konami Servite Denver Co Founder Football Muir Hulu JIM Colorado
LBRY The Decentralized Sharing Platform Run by the Community

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

07:44 min | 2 years ago

LBRY The Decentralized Sharing Platform Run by the Community

"Lot recently about asking listeners to review and write this podcast on itunes or a platform that they listen on basically to keep the algorithm happy that helps noodle snus discoveries podcasts, and I've noticed over the last few years people have built a strong following on a particular platform quickly find that they're playing on somebody else's playground and obeying by somebody else's rules on remember a few years ago when people neglected their websites and run off to sell their business on Facebook. Until of course, Facebook changed the rules and an introduced kind of pay to play you really want to reach an audience, and I'm a self all-too-familiar release picks up a following on linked teen and had over fourteen thousand followers and had articles getting over one hundred thousand views on there. Until of course, the algorithm changed another's fourteen thousand followers don't even get a notification from anymore, but our cost this isn't about me. I'm not alone. Here. Hear the same from people on Instagram and YouTube to the problem is that these platforms are changing the rules. But they're also letting algorithms call the shots rather than their own community that actually makes the platform of success. Both thankfully, there is an alternative library. The decentralized sharing platform is actually ruined by the community library is openly sharing platform that uses blockchain technology to enable users to publish material and get paid for doing. So I'm people using library service can also monetize their published material with these built-in payment system, which of course, is not ruined by advertisers. Like, the YouTube model there's been so many YouTubers that have so many found that their content is not fit for an advertiser so disappears. Swat this new exciting concept really appeals to me because it melts together. The tech. Advantages of both bitcoin and bitcoin services for people looking to share content, for example for an upcoming project lotteries offering two hundred thousand LBC which is their token for developers to compete to launch their act projects and social platforms and these competitive designs will allow for grant funding through the library foundation. And prior to this effort, libraries approved Twenty-one projects and gave close to one million LBJ for musicians and for conferences to connect people in India, and for video personnel is as well as anime is just post their work. So in a digital world where we're all content. Cray is now I got a feeling you can enjoy this one. So buckle up and hold on tight. So I can be meal is all the way to BUSTER. So we can speedway Jeremy Coffman, and he's the co founder and CEO of library. The decentralized open source digital media protocol on the blockchain. So massive warm. Welcome to the show, Jamie. Kennedy tell them I says a Labatt who you are. And what you do. I am Jeremy Kaufman the CEO of library. I have a background in computer science and entrepreneurship, but since the show isn't really about being about library. I'll I'll tell you what library is a library is a blockchain based open source protocol that facilitates the discovery distribution and purchase of digital content. That's a loaded sentence so much simpler way of explaining it is we've created a standard make services like YouTube or Amazon possible entirely via open source, and in a way that doesn't have the same level as control that centralized platforms have but still has that same great user experience full of what a step further. They labeled lobby is a decentralized YouTube. I mean, we will pay we'll have people listening boats in and outside. Outside of the tech industry. So maybe familiar with blockchain and crypto or this world. So he just set the scene L and tell me exactly what kind of problems you're having to solve with library. Sure. Sure. You know, there's we're we're solving problems from two sides so one there's a lot of problems with centralized platforms. They take some here. I'm talking about companies like you U2., apple Amazon even cable TV providers. These companies take anywhere from thirty to fifty five plus percents of the prophets to move. What is effectively a stream of bits a movie, a song, whatever it is from place to place b and level one. That's kind of crazy. That's a lot of money to move bits around. I'm not saying what they do is easy. But it's a lot of it. They're taking a very large. And then there are also these problems of trust and censorship these platforms James the rules on people at any time without warning come people build their businesses on top of these platforms in the building on top of quicksand. And then there are also problems with censorship. We don't always experience them in the US, although we experienced them some and the people in other countries experience. Them a lot more with these countries. You know, article aberration with governments in in in Turkey and China to deliver heavily censored versions of their platforms. So that's the problem with the with the sort of existing centralized platforms. I don't know if your audiences familiar with existing decentralized technology like the twin a bit torn has a couple of problems as well. There's a lot of dodgy stuff on. There hasn't gotten legitimate, traction writes, predominantly infringing content. There's also problems of discovery so bittorrent works. Great. If you had a hash to Embiid towards a wonderful technology, by the way technologically. It's it's brilliant. But the network where it's great if you have a hash that unique value that magnet links to enter the network, but there's no listing of what's available on it. There's no Cadillac and a blockchain can solve that problem. And another thing that's the problem with the torn it kind of works. Just because people are nice, and I'm all for systems where it can. Because people are nice. I love Wikipedia I give money every year. But if we can have incentives to do. Do the right thing. I think that's a little better than just relying on that. And so we're kind of coming at it from two sides. There's

Youtube Facebook Amazon CEO Instagram Swat LBJ Jeremy Coffman Jeremy Kaufman Labatt Cray United States Jamie Kennedy Turkey India
"labatt" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"labatt" Discussed on WJR 760

"Some Donna Henry nine twenty five go first half of play m as you can get the lead back on this trip. Traveling by one Winston, Dan linebacker shot up. Back on top by single point fourteen thirteen the offense really has been caches wants to their great drive to the basket and cash is how is ten a Michigan state sports game. Now, the Amazon a dry spell. Bam scored four minutes. Thirty seconds jump shot for free by Lankford. No rebound. Henry nobody under aboard that time for Indiana. Syria counts. Winston now to Kennedy downloaded Tillman spans back shot. Pittsburgh Michigan state on a run of their own. Mattia Barbara sometimes they play as much bigger than that. Seven zero run by Michigan state and MSU now is back on top by three sixteen thirteen eight forty six to go in the first half. Your spartans. Go above and beyond every single game. Rocket mortgage goes above and beyond for buying a seamless mortgage experience rocket mortgage by Quicken Loans. Pusher mortgage partner jab. Ghabra gets the best season ever grab some Labatt. Blue Labatt blue says it is time to get the domesticated mash that's offense going finally cashes. Once they got it started with that three enough a good thing for Michigan state. But what they've done very well as play defense force in Indiana into a lot of jump shots. Indiana stopped going down low they have stopped getting layups and give the defense a lot of credit. Has done a great job in the past. Now like Matt said going with a long ball something Don Huber well as. Hoosiers. Go riot the ball durum back out running around goes today because they're big guy. This motion is giving them much length for five breaks through the basket and foul arms. Touch name. And that was it. Put a hand on the back put his hands out easy. Call for the referee. That's his first fourth against Michigan state. Indiana is five thousand no shot on the foul. Devante rain will flip the baseline for Indiana. Looking they're looking better hustle. Balmy gets down low. We goes over there to Smith while not to way green guy back for a second. Now mcquaid goes flying out of bounds. Trying to save it gets it. Well, be off mcquaid. Unfortunately, just couldn't come up with that loose ball. Eight twenty three to go first half from east Lansing. Michigan state sixteen and the and the thirsty meter teams had much luck scoring in bunches. Basket who's been hard for both ballclub. This game started. You thought it was going to be in the nineties, maybe one hundred bucks. Cool. Awesome difficult Newton extra halves you get into them. Now. Got the basketball. I post Pasco's agreeing now back to Davis. Davis shoots agreed dribbling around and China's fired.

Michigan Indiana Donna Henry Winston Labatt Quicken Loans Lankford Bam Mattia Barbara Amazon Davis mcquaid Don Huber basketball MSU Syria partner spartans Lansing Pittsburgh
"labatt" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

09:53 min | 2 years ago

"labatt" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Labatt carol-lee, Steve, Holland, Vivian Salomo and Zeke and me down on two occasions when he was supposed to find swarm for me and that didn't happen and they never to as the rookie. They left the hooky and in in Shannon airport, and they almost took our lobby Zeke. I mean, really you're supposed to take care of the old guy the rookie. We we help claim the airport where I worked at find the end. That was a great trip, and I've been writing people that if they don't understand how hard. Reporters work on those things. They've gotta take one. How many of those do you do a year? Internationally, probably four or five kind of depends on the bus of the president's schedule. Double vice-president. I I just thought you guys worked harder than anyone I've ever seen in people need to know what the wire reporters. Do. Let's go to the news of the day. First of all Venezuela Venezuelan story to me the most significant one that's a revolution. That's a Berlin Wall or Tiananmen Square happening. Whether it turns out to be tenement square, a massacre or Berlin Wall and freedom. How do you see? How's the White House talking about it to the reporters? The White House really leaning forward into this. It's certainly Mike Pence. Forcefully publicly over last year, or so there really escalated very quickly over the last several days, and they're calling this a place through one way or the other. Tell that they wanted to lend as much support as they possibly can without being counterproductive to this uprising against now. Last summer, I interviewed John Bolton's predecessor H R McMaster about military intervention. He said, no, no, no, no. That would if it came. It would come from its neighbors. Brazil and Colombia, I believe that that sort of changed overnight. Did you pick up indications that if Madera starts shooting Americans might get involved in the military sense? Do you know the White House answer and the president was asked about this yesterday? He said all options are on the table. One thing is for certain about this president. He doesn't like limiting the range of options. We heard that from him and people around him. And again, we have not heard of any of the any plans are actually under consideration for that. But you know, depending on what are they? That that plants are all continuous presumably somewhere that some planets being worked out, but we have not seen any indication that might happen. Jeff detonates expert, why not be careful say publicly all options round the table as they try to avoid any further violence now last week, Zeke Miller there was a leak from the Pentagon, and maybe from the State Department and we've unclear to me from the reporting that they were alarmed by John Bolton's requests for plans contingency plans for action against Iran after run it launched a luckily failed attack on our embassy in Baghdad. Do you have any word whether or not the NFC advisor has asked for contingency plans on Venezuela. We've not gotten the word just yet. But just like the response to that story about about plans for Ron I teach in a fairly safe bet that somewhere in the bowels of. And again, you know, exactly what's ringing just how high end up with a map bureaucracy at somebody's drying up some sort of plan. I gotta be thinking Joe Dunford who was in Turkey at the same time you, and I were has got a very detailed plan on Venezuela that in just like, Panama. You can't throw those things together. And I'll bet you looked at it recently. But I don't know if you're ever going to be able to confirm it confirmed for me, what has changed in the White House press policy. It appears to me we may never have another formal briefing. Sarah, Huckabee Sanders shows up on the driveway, whatever she wants. Yeah. I it's it's kinda decide. Dynamic right now where does happen on the driveway after your ministry officials coming from from television hits on beach outside the west wing. Selfishly? It's a little bit of a shame. Because now we have an heated breathing room. Wifi and everyone can hear on the sound. So it doesn't lead to a bit of a chaotic situation not outside the White House and one that we've got into the enjoyed does from their perspective level the playing field relatively. But you know, he does less mythologies sort of what is broadcast, but also makes a little harder preference sort of had that. Bottle back and forth because those are sort of, you know, more touting outside the last one is there any effort by the White House press Corp, which you are a member and Margaret who is the past chairwoman, and Steve Holland and all the pros six of whom went along with the rookie me on this trip to organize as you did the joint effort to cover it or coherently because it seems to me that they can hope you're chaotic outside. But that if you get your act together most people will cooperate. I mean, I was astonished I didn't know how much people cooperated on foreign trip and Chuck Todd said, yeah, it's team America. And you don't screw each other? And I said, yeah, they were very very kind to me, but why not do that on the driveway? Yeah. We certainly got better out on the driveway of responding to this situation that we find ourselves in one of the things you often see if you're you're watching news broadcasts of that. And is often the little little like music stand where we try to thirty personally gathered around in a circle around. So all the cameras had stopped in their room, Florida correspondents reporters in between them and the object capture as much as they can. But some summit also. You know as much as we try to be friendly competitive business and people have a question that might get in. And sometimes you step on somebody else. It's a little bit of a fluid situation of briefing room is it's where things are certainly a lot less chaotic because it's a it's a fixed situation. Nobody's scanning up and waiting outside in the cold, the rain, or whatever it may be. So hopefully, we'll get back to that situation. It's extremely competitive with seven people as on Bolton's playing. It's easy enough to make sure everyone gets their questions, and and everyone can be respectful, and and and focus on what they want get their turn. I don't know how you do that. What are there? Fifty people in the goggle. Yeah. I it's anyone who's credentialed with White House that day. I consider it goes down that driveway. And you often find that take you and multiple people never outlet. It does it just a bit of a collective action problem that we all have to sit down and south. Sometimes we do I think, you know, you look at it thinks it certainly gotten better as the driveway goals have increasingly replaced formal briefings, and we're certainly better off today than we were six months ago. And hopefully, we'll be getting better steadily going. I want the audience to know they ought to be following Zeke, Zeke Miller that we're in the presence of importance here Zeke has been elected, the incoming president of the White House Correspondents Association. My right about that Zeke. Yeah, I take over and twenty twenty and twenty something we we take far far ahead. You ought to be working now with the two thousand nineteen chair. I don't know who that is and the and the twenty twenty one chair to organize this this gaggle because it is kind of annoying that there are no follow up. Sure. At least there's one follow up, and it makes it very difficult to get a coherent line of questioning going on. We one hundred percent agree. And we're we're we're we're we're exploring later didn't that ever every day and one of the ways that would certainly improve the situation would be if we were found a way to movies briefings into the room where they were infrastructure. There's lighting or sound. There's everything that you need in order to create this scenario where nobody has to shatter somebody else to be hurt. Our to get drenched try to take notes down. But hopefully, we get back to that thing's gonna necessarily seem likely on that much up Communications Decency. And that's one of the things where it really does benefit small perspective, everyone to do things and they're in the room prepared outside because it does lower the temperature allows everyone to have their space, and and think and get that followup question. I get the information out to the American people. It's not just about our comfort. It's about making sure that we get information that we share thanks that the American people that they need to know about their government is doing on their behalf. All right. Well, let's talk about the shutdown. Two bills will come up today. They will both be defeated. They won't get sixty votes in the Senate. And so the shutdown will be. Day thirty four three whatever it is. Then people speculate there might be an opportunity to sit down and come together. But it would have to be a big deal. I think Zeke Miller a big deal not just dock on for three years and not just one hundred and twenty miles of wall or five point seven billion. I'm thinking regularize everyone who's not a criminal or violent and give them a purple card and give the president the Portman wants twenty five billion dollar endowment may be bigger. Jared Kushner's in the middle of this. What are you? What is your reporting on the possibility of a big deal to solve the shutdown? Certainly they could be on the Taylor. We heard from Democrats though, over the last several weeks, then they want to see the government reopened. And then started hitting that's one of the things that come tomorrow when that all workers, just get another paycheck workers. Another paycheck. I government services are increasingly disrupted by the shutdown that data will be more of a pressure to sort of do that instead of contingently reopen the government, and then try some sort of big ill. But we've seen that happen before. And both sides know that once you're in the situation is there's a lot of a better term is a is out of the way that some that that'd be the urgency solve of solve the problem with immigration, and and try to reach the Allenby way too. As things get worse. You're the problem. A bigger solution has to be and I think that's one of those things were just how big a deal and ultimately reached one that both sides really are both parties are trying to get out. What gives are what the parameters of that could be. I am an optimist of that happens. Very quickly. I think Mitch McConnell is going to change the rules of the Senate next.

Zeke Miller president White House John Bolton Venezuela Senate Shannon airport Labatt White House Correspondents Ass vice-president White House press Corp Mike Pence Berlin Mitch McConnell Chuck Todd Vivian Salomo Madera
"labatt" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"labatt" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"They need your monkey. You think you think adult pot smokers are vegetarian. I think pot smokers loved that Taco Bell making a run for the border at two AM the vegetarian they got the need for the meal free. That's true. That's true. You're right. You're right. You're going to be a tortilla made a Saint Augustine, I guess it's possible that people don't smoke marijuana. Check this out. Budweiser creators, they're testing cannabis infused drinks with medical marijuana. Yeah. Budweiser is testing out another beverage potentially add to their lineup in Canada. It's a cannabis infused drink Anheuser Busch subsidiary Labatt breweries of Canada and the pharmaceutical company till Ray they're throwing in about fifty million dollars each to look into well drinks containing THC and CBD oils Nevada's committed to staying ahead of the emerging consumer trends, they say as consumers in Canada, explore THC in CBD infused products or are innovated drive is matched only by our commitment to the highest standards of product quality and responsible marketing spokesperson said massive candidate recently, legalized recreational marijuana and the industry has thrived in the country. Big time. Norton added that we intend to develop a deeper understanding of non alcoholic beverages containing THC and that will guide future decisions about potential commercial opportunities. You could buy case of someday. This is incredible carbonated THC beverage. Yeah. Interesting. It'd be huge. It would absolutely be massive eight fifteen and a check on traffic. Here's melinda..

marijuana Canada cannabis Taco Bell Budweiser Anheuser Busch Nevada Labatt Norton Ray fifty million dollars
How More than 25% of all SaaS Businesses are Growing

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

05:33 min | 2 years ago

How More than 25% of all SaaS Businesses are Growing

"Go where many men of explode a never returned data. Let's face it. We are surrounded by data. For example. My average day is quite door. I a laptop a record podcast a Royal echoes update. Social media make a few telephone calls. Take my dog for a walk go for a run and listen to a few podcasts or even watch better net. Flicks. Nothing exciting about that. At all book. You could look at it. Another way my watch checks by heart rate counts. My steps spa. If I last FM Mon is what songs alike will recommend visit or the playlist Toomey in the sideways, Amazon, and Netflix does a similar service, and every podcast article or social media posts has a wealth of metrics, including engagement levels that could essentially determined any future success, even the mundane is surround. By data. Not let's take that into the world of business and using data to truly understand your customers and prospects as co founder and CEO of profit, well, which was formerly price intelligently. Patrick Campbell is using proprietary industry. Data on over eight thousand businesses to help some of the world's best companies such as zyppah and we steer for example. And they helped them to identify the best pricing and growth opportunities that are actually working today. So can we make data Sam sexy? I don't know if I'm gonna give it a try book elope and hold on tight. So I can be meal is all the way to the US. So we can speak with Patrick Campbell front profit. Well, a learned more about how easy encouraging businesses to work hard on using day to understand the profile and psyche of their customers buy building quantified buyer personas. Messy full welcome to the show. Patrie? Can you tell the listeners Labatt who you are? And what you do. Yeah. Great question. So I'm Patrick Campbell Maceo founder of a company called profit well used to be called price intelligently. And we do we basically help subscription businesses with a couple of things we give free subscription financial metrics away that allow people to basically see their monthly recurring revenue in their analytics. And then we make money by selling products to help them with their cancellations as well as with their pricing in a couple of other things. And so yeah, long story short. That's that's kind of the professional side and the personal side there's not much except for the professional side. So for better or worse there. But the I'm I'm from Wisconsin. Which is in the middle of the US, I studied econometrics and math in in college. And then kind of worked in tech Lamai ho career in a couple of different. Capacity's, six so pumped research, and you guys I quickly learned that profit. While is the first business intelligence platform to actually bring together all of the businesses reoccurring revenue, which is businesses financial usage and attribution. I'm bringing all into one place. That's inside lated absolutely accurate on one hundred percent free. Now that it got me thinking of it. So we'll get we'll delve into that a little bit later, but keep just tell me a little bit more about how you do. This maybe provide a few use cases just to enable listeners to visualize. Exactly what it is that you do. Yeah. Totally. So it's basically the the long story short is when you think about a business, and it doesn't matter exactly what your business is. But for us we target subscription businesses. Right. And that's SAS software as a service subscription boxes, subscription media, all types of different types of subscriptions, and the beauty of kind of the subscription model is that you know, it bakes the relationship directly into how you make money. So that particular user they buy that subscription. And if. They basically, you know, no longer see the value or you screw up or something like that. Then they're going to end that relationship canceling that that subscription, and so with that kind of preface what's fascinating in the subscription world, and in the business world in general is that it used to be there wasn't as much competition. There wasn't as much kind of problems. You know in terms of building a business. It was still hard. It was hard to build the thing or to build the the products marketing and sales it was easier because there just wasn't as much noise out there again, it was still hard. But it wasn't wasn't as hard as it is today. And so because of how hard it is getting in because of this new model, it's really really important to understand who these customers are how your businesses functioning where there are holes in your business where there are problems in kind of all of the above in terms of in terms of those kinds of concepts. And so what we do really. US Specifically is our free product we plug into your billing system. So it could be. You know stripe. Zora braintree. Whatever you're using to actually build these subscription come companies and customers and what we ended up doing is. We basically give you insight into. Here's how much monthly recurring revenue have here. How many cancellations are happening? Here's how many people are buying more. Here's how many people are buying less and just a whole suite of of different analytics that done point to. Hey, here's a problem. Hey, you have too many people cancelling that look like this. Or here's something. That's great. You have you have a ton of people doing this activity, which is awesome. In that allows a business understand what works, and what doesn't ultimately helps them kind of focus on the right things because it's getting harder and harder to to grow that

United States Patrick Campbell Marketing And Sales Patrick Campbell Maceo Labatt Wisconsin Toomey SAM Co Founder Amazon Zora Braintree Founder Netflix CEO One Hundred Percent
 The Decentralized Cloud Computing Blockchain Network

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

11:32 min | 2 years ago

The Decentralized Cloud Computing Blockchain Network

"To focus on Asia. So late last week, I'm speaking with the guys at Neo about the impact of blockchain on Asian markets. And today I want to speak to the co founder of elf, which is the Asia based cloud computing block shirt. Network is focusing on becoming a global company. Now is a smart contract platform that will allow businesses to take full advantage of blockchain technology, and he's aiming to transform those horrendous complex business operations. That previous generations just accepted and do something about it in our immediate future. But in no familiar rambling on so book and hold until it as I beam your ears all the way to Singapore. So we can speak with Xueliang Chen the co, founder of elf. So massive, warm, welcome to the shows ruling. Can you tell the listeners a Labatt who you are and what you do? Hello? Everyone. My name is Chen. Julie. Sandy Koufax. CEO of Alf. Yes. Prior to that, I was a strategy comes out multinationals and governments of different topics. And yet slowly I moved into technology 'cause I have a generic background. That's where my passion is started with looking into various projects at in blockchain industry. Then finally met the right partner to foam to start out together. Now you all the co, founder of the issue based cloud computing block chain network, a mind to standing ease these kind of a small contract platform that would allow businesses to take full advantage of blockchain technology and also will transform complex business operations in the future. But can you tell. Exactly what it is and also what makes you guys unique from all the other solutions out there in the similar space without getting into the details. So what else is is we're in you up blockchain system and what we're providing is a high performance sister so that a we use a monkey Chint structure. Each smart contracts, we will have their own side chain so that they do not interfere with each other. And also we enable the notes to row now a cluster of computers, so that makes execution much faster and announced more complicated applications to run on top of that. So EMS show. We're really trying to make a business Ronnie on Shing wing facing and also more customizable in terms of what a we are unique is that where the first one actually enable the notes up to rob last of computers said this makes it much. Easier to scale up in terms of our computational capability at those are storage capability. And also the weight Howie introduced. A mounting structure of Jennifer is a diversity of ecosystem in how to to open up many possibilities. Held business want to run on blotch now don't if it's more full my life in IT. But before we talk about any solution, I always want to understand the exact problem before even thinking about, I think technology into the mix. So can you help listeners visualize the three problems that you see across the digital landscape, which are performance resources and segregation and also the lack of governance. So if you're looks back the evolution of blockchain. So I started as wind use case. Basically, it's bitcoin as a cross-border P2P payments eastern Mobutu towards a storage of battery right now. So that is basically just why use case then here comes the invention of smart contracts. So this. Opens up many more possibilities basically to allow a contracts to execute it your trust myths way. Yes. So you know, once the door has opened up, he basically enables us to serve meetings of customers from a business point of you ever done this list to a a our limitation which is on the performance side. So if you really believe that log chain is Gallup serve businesses for the mass adoption. We need a high performance in high speed to accommodate that. So that is the first problem that we need faster and more capable blockchain system to execute smart

Asia Blockchain China South Korea Dr Dicamba L. Technical Support Fiat Europe USD Ogies Of Lachine Japan Bombay Lambeau Zoll Writer Helen Xueliang
"labatt" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"labatt" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"And appreciate it certainly pretty cool you got your older brother is your does your brother do argue with him as your caddy well it was kinda funny yesterday because he was like he's like dude just trying to hit the fairway and try to hit it i was like i was like man that's been my that's been my approach all and it's not really worked out i well wasn't really never really turned into an argument but you know a couple of weeks ago we played it at home course he beat me by five so he's obviously a great he's a great player and really gonna call and you know i think not that he was getting frustrated but he just i think he thought it was supposed to be a little bit easier than it was and yeah just started calling pounding pretty quickly but if you you won't drop the gloves you drop the bag and you guys go toe to toe that that would be pretty good if you to bigger that'd be great entertainment did tv i mean yesterday i was like i was like oh it'd be nice to like maybe go on the corner and made a body check right now but there's no there's no sport with fullcontact golf yet so just waiting for that to come down the line jared congratulations for making it this far and have fun today we appreciate your time i'm pretty sure my buddies wanna know what's on the grill for friday meet friday i don't know yet where i think it's i think it's bacon wrapped hot dogs die small make sure your attitude in their goal labatt's blue well labatt's blue we're good to go that's pretty cool though.

labatt
"labatt" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

The Tony Kornheiser Show

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"labatt" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

"When they go eighty to eighty two happen no to re it left they could get vince labatt to come for a couple of years is general consensus that have golden state wins durant will come to washington very quickly where will the prompting i don't know i said houston before but i don't know i don't know now because they got to the finals and i did not expect that so so i don't know i mean he can go really wherever you once and and people would take him so he's not going to stay i don't know i mean look you got to the finals with a very bad team he is in and he said this he said quite openly chasing a ghost i'm chasing jordan i got i wanna win rings and that's all i wanna do so who in the nobody in the east is going to stop this guy nobody maybe boston in a year or two but not right now are there opportunities for him in cleveland with dan gilbert that wouldn't be there elsewhere for him to boot up to be player code well that's a good question owner grill you know sell me i added a team yes yes and if if lebron james says i'll stay for three percent team you give them three percent legal at the end it's done with tire young you can now i think that's i'm i think that's allowed i don't know that i don't know that you can codify it has had pet riley here's player he was all right you.

vince labatt durant jordan cleveland dan gilbert washington houston boston lebron james three percent
"labatt" Discussed on The Skinny Confidential Him And Her Podcast

The Skinny Confidential Him And Her Podcast

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"labatt" Discussed on The Skinny Confidential Him And Her Podcast

"Well that's a great thing because like if you find something you test something and you find out that it's not converting a working is that's not really a failure it's i think probably when you don't live to the truth so like some core philosophies in life is living my own life in my own way not someone else's life in my way or my life in some other person's way it's my life my way and then seeing the truth and accepting it so i think those are the times and third one is reacting to negative with positive so if any of those three i don't achieve that to me it's temporarily mistake or failure so for example if i don't accept the truth i see it but i find it that's to me that's failure the fact that if i make a mistake somewhere that's not really a problem so if i don't live to my truth and that's that's where i think failures happen when you say fighting negative with a positive can you elaborate there yeah i mean the classic example is probably like road rage or something like that so many la does the labatt drivers and then worst yeah and taking notes you're honey yeah so so like how can you have compassion and also sometimes you meet people that do bad things especially in big cities i feel like there's like a lot of light but a lot of darkness right l as a prime example of that and when he meet that darkness it's often easy to be judgy like my spirit animal is definitely a cats i'm like judgy in the corner sometimes so like how to respond to that with compassion because you don't know what should they've gone through that day or in their life maybe you know what happened in their childhood what happened today and why are they that so you don't know so having compassion doesn't mean you have to be best friends with them because maybe that behavior that they're demonstrating is not aligned with your values but at the same time you can always have compassion so that's what i try to practice i'm nowhere near per.

labatt
"labatt" Discussed on MMA Junkie Radio

MMA Junkie Radio

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"labatt" Discussed on MMA Junkie Radio

"In some of these other divisions when when we look at who's next for the champion it seems like there's a clear cut guy but it doesn't always play out that way when you signed on the dotted line did you see tell you anything about what a victory here would do for you in your next fight no they already know just fight i'm not fighting to be labatt sample i find to be the best fighter in the world leader so this ajab too all right dan tom whatever dirty louis there know you said this was the last camp was the first camp that you were training properly you're talking about stuff like diet know strength and conditioning i assume but but but tell me i is there one that you like more maybe don't like don't like as much as far as the diet and the strength and conditioning portions of the training camp like all of i guess you say that portion size i really like the food but everything else been pretty good in the occupancy myself doing this for a while now yeah that's probably a big key you know i remember when dc was first making tool five key for him and changing his diet and granted you're not cutting weight per se but was you know kind of spicing up the the meals that he likes ready he had a hard time in other words he had a hard time going strangest changing his diet eating healthy meals instead he kinda slowly made the meals he already eight and made them healthier.

labatt
"labatt" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"labatt" Discussed on WJR 760

"Best season ever grab some labatt blue an labatt blue why it's gone beginning on their most eighty two point seven seconds were michigan spe beef produced sixty eight sixty by this is the gay gave him a handicapping gabon radu lost you hours a day for the first time in mind tv games route twenty games in that bothered by the but guys came with two seconds unchanged to go there this translates when he passerby all came with two point seven seconds we go well now one of the ball will be wired klein of you'll be ponga by turn jackson these working and mary throws of mcquay also outer bounce lagos goes downpour has it away and he goes arab rather than anybody touch it well what they did isil whistle at mid poor going to fall foul on told there he can't believe it are you know pass looked like it was good five feet away from visit edwards nonetheless foul on top of the lava boilermakers ran the one one tom jumps out once it comes back in nick ward comes then ruddock was tommaso forty that his best rebounders the talk right now we'll be about boxy now rebounded and but be aware of where all the guards are on the perimeter as well did you ever to look at that pretty good yeah i mean that afoul there was contact but added think it off to warn a file tell was an older though he was next to his man which was visit edwards but again the pass was so bad thick of football with the froze that bad you don't call pass interference rag i don't think that's what we had their health exit of exactly what happened there well we're now two point four seconds the official who were looking of the monitor i believe there make sure the time is correct i imagine what we're gonna see here's bits edward making the first one and right now that painters settingup of play four them this some kind of tip you've got a guy like isaac has he got a guy you probably put man harms in there as well guys that could get in their push probably tip something out.

labatt jackson edwards tom nick ward ruddock official isaac michigan gabon mary seven seconds four seconds two seconds five feet
"labatt" Discussed on The CultCast - Cult of Mac

The CultCast - Cult of Mac

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"labatt" Discussed on The CultCast - Cult of Mac

"You know whether this a they'd have the same problems with the leftovers but the left does i was was was is it the funny thing is that i'd actually hadn't i'd only watch little bits of the first and second season so when i saw which in the third season it was so good i was like oh crap i'm gonna go back and watched the first two seasons which i did not started on season 3 yeah yeah weird and they never do that well i saw watching actually summer season one back when it at ed late two or three years ago and i i didn't get into it so um but then i started reading about how homes raving about season 3's i said what's his season 3 and i got about three four episodes in i was like okay i got to stop now because they're gonna go back and watch what came before because this is so good it sounds kind of posts apocalypse dick in a way it isn't it it has a lot to do you know it does in expose like called some religion uh a couple of characters that uh the can when you hit on he's my interest seriously this is this is going on my watch soon list it isn't quite astonishing television it's an an at like you know when the first apple a you know the first episodes no clue what is going on but nonetheless for thrilling and a delightful surprising um you know th the and this is a i think what do you want to get a t because it was you know i i don't sit there and i wasn't multitask yum ipad for once right because it demands you pay attention because otherwise you've got a clue you really don't have a clue what's going on that's how you do it's good admit you put down your idea of yeah i was really a throwback i thought it was like it was it was astonishing ends had her rights not you know late not over these summit really really affecting some really really um you know upsetting like a you know very um because it deals with labatt loss grief and love morning.

apple labatt three years
"labatt" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"labatt" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Go through trivia sports reagan of freely as boards radio rather than matt ryan didn't look with two great i got hung up a whole fourth didn't look to give it got the wind start the show labatt's will be falcons still in contention aaron rodgers shutdown shut down by the packers they are so i know that something you and i will circle back to they were officially out eliminated so why take a chance but it's time prayers take he you ready i am always ready or ask are you sure i am guys as he looked ready samper said no i cannot agree hunt of trying to find the sickle israeli not ready still single suphakit added evans is it s i c k or as i see ellie s i c k l e l the russians sickle look at adamos luna who nikolai volkov nikolai volkov yeah he was a real he was the only i knew i was encouraged that he figure and pita cocoa off yell the key to call off had we used to wear these would visit the height of the cold war with him uh let me just goes back on let's get the asked he could executor of as the key died you have questions cheese god and serious she met not long and gets it funds did he responds to your questions manning here's a little delight side bothered friday cut that way to tackle kudo forming thirty thirty raise oh my gosh on cbs sports radio already deep hillary y'all l but wages check their twitter account got a lot of people backing up sickled the secular all right i knew it either knowledge throughout our here we go via facebook facebook the first at bat nate van roy arts they've got the first down technology is that new the new flag football league with why can't the nfl they should i should be too you don't wanna cop something from another league but as i must have words you put a microchip of it i'm sure they're trainee at this point in the edges of both sides of the football if a guy crosses the line ticket oregon i've across the line to get you can just wherever the ref places it you know exactly where.

football nate van roy twitter cbs manning nikolai volkov ellie shut down aaron rodgers matt ryan oregon reagan trainee nfl facebook hillary cold war evans samper packers falcons labatt
"labatt" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"labatt" Discussed on WJR 760

"Labatt lewis labatt blue light water of mind you could fall as the best season why because of football sleeves fantasy football flannel beards tailgating oh yeah and more football welcome to the best season ever grab from lebatla when buying blue light county time to get on domestic made it clear labatt usa buffalo new york always enjoyed responsibly whoa divers michigan save fifty four a juicer bath as as 33 before we get to the app down before dawn gentler what are you thinking there man what's interesting i mean mission is they got our rebounded by five in that first half unbelievable no doubt the coaches are really going to talk about that but a 21point lead us support in the second half not the play the jersey don't play down to houston baptist try to improve tried to get better that's what this home stands all of off there you go on the flip side don schiller is where it the break in its michigan state fifty four houston back possess 33 agriculture moment right here on the spartan fort network we'd on you get dominate day he still when she had time to do even more now with our how you will and blue cross blue shield of michigan and blue care network we offer a round on the clock online and mobile access from anywhere where simplifying processes and eliminating paperwork giving you more convenience and more time because we believe it's time for more find out how blue cross can bring more to you and your business visit time for more dot com.

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"labatt" Discussed on First and Last

First and Last

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"labatt" Discussed on First and Last

"Got to keep the labatt blue icy cold by the way is there any dispute and i know this might get some blow back with their canadian beers better than american beer like inherently and i'm not talking about like a microbrewery i don't know want to miller ipa you've got on draft but i'm talking about just if you were to lineup labatt blues and budweiser budweiser's like listen i am all about just crushing a blood heavy for the cause that is where i live during the summer time once you put america on the can my big dumb had was like dr who doesn't want drink america bo the but like hands are exceptional i noticed is free advertising for them but again i'm not sorry i'm not gonna apologize for that 'knockin apologize for also things a little babbu tastes better just format sorry nazario perfect segue completely unintentional in a segment i won't apologize for love and canadian beer yesterday in the world sports we saw plenty of guys trying to just back some of them were justified some of them were not and i feel like this is a thing we've got a kind of worked through figure out because the general tendency we know the general criticism of two thousand seventeen is that role little bit too sensitive and and we all feel compelled to apologize for things guard against certain things that should and i don't necessarily think that's true i think there are very concrete places were apologies are still warranted and i think airing on the side of making sure that you're being kinda thoughtful to everyone involves not necessarily a bad way to go through life.

budweiser free advertising labatt miller america
"labatt" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

Very Bad Wizards

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"labatt" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

"And i think that's the level of granularity you'd even need to force something like preference and even then you have the extra assumption that that there is a mapping of mental state to brain stay in a way that is actually reliable so that everybody thinking of tree is actually having the same nor elective asian and and there's reasons to think that that might not be the case you know we were saying how like people don't think clearly when the they write about neuro science and i i do think there is something just the fact that it's the brain doing some thing makes dental either more certain about it or they perceive it as more threatening you know all the labatt study is about you can make predictions about what someone will do by looking at their brain and they were saying and mrs you know this disproves free will because uh half a second before they are aware of the choice their brain has worthy choice or something like that but there's so many behavioural things that you could do you know just facial expression i dunno as someone who played poker and had so much more success doing it online than in person whenever i play in person it seems like it really did seem like they would know what i was going to do before i knew what i was going to do and i didn't consider that has a threat to my free will ideas these people are really good at at predicting uh what i'm going to do but then but when it's the brain and adds kind of an obvious point book when when it's neurons that ours the thing that they're looking out for their prediction rather than just a facial expression or bodily posture or something like that then it's like it's people think of it as a whole different category but it's all part and parcel of the same physical thing yeah i was just lecturing to my class about about the brain and eye to eye at all.

labatt
"labatt" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"labatt" Discussed on WLOB

"He's coming in his chief of staff right might theory was that scaramucci it wasn't they'll destroy a lot of people might think it was the language about how he insulted people of the rights priebus the the um you know what's his name bannon yeah but i think it was when he said i report directly to the present he's bragging about how he goes around the chief of staff and i don't think john kelly could cotton that we i don't think military people like loose cannons pawn attended and seriously if you're going to be the communications director and you're saying things about steve bannon that are so vulgar an offensive that he'd been trump wouldn't have said them that is a big problem your jobs to take trump who sometimes you know can be rude and offensive and kind of smooth it out in presentable and said scam which is doing the exact opposite end and before he's even started so maybe it was that that incident i get the sense that trump liked that like he look i like a guy who's like me who's you know but i don't think trump likes the guy who's going to how trump trump yeah and scam which you i don't think i don't think trump would ever say something labatt steve bannon especially to member the press like shared what she did because trump lex loyalty he likes when people defend his own team he's very big on that yet and the scare mucci you know to go under it and throat rents previous under the bus when when prince previous left trump said nice things about him on twitter he didn't you know presume in the button to way out he was very gentlemanly about it so this is undermined the present even their interesting so you think it was a rocky tenure as communique since this it's yet i mean that that's a public humiliation and i think trump is loath to throw people into the bus because he has very few people who can work with him and who understand him and have had his back and i gotta tell you something else you saw scare michie was deleting all these oil tweets against trump and he said publicly this what he's doing yes and i i don't think trump was aware of those all tweets and when.

john kelly director steve bannon trump michie chief of staff labatt
"labatt" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

Very Bad Wizards

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"labatt" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

"As it like love can't involved neuro peptide exactly exactly but it is funny that it does have that force for for a lottery yeah from the getgo like the it seems as if what i usually have to do is disabuse people of the notion that reductionism or the reduction as arguments are debunking right andi don't know why that is whether it's just a pattern matching like in other cases where i find out the causes it's obviously right like um you know i mean honestly like the labatt studies are based on like a version of this where people bhilaiono you didn't make the decision because like your brain started making it before you are aware vetter something like that yay narrows the study of based on this kind of implicit doliz that suggest that like you thought before that your brain was just not involved in your choice is it so those debunking arguments i think do do a good job of pointing out exactly what it was that you believed to begin with rain the case of deliberate studies it's like well turns out what you believed in as as weird conception of love freedom like that require but you know it's it's it's always weird to me because it's not as if people when you point out that like psoriasis paintings are actually made of little dots they don't go oh here i thought it was human beings all along lake like nobody says that right it's just the case that obviously it is both things.

vetter labatt
"labatt" Discussed on LA Talk Radio Channel 1

LA Talk Radio Channel 1

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"labatt" Discussed on LA Talk Radio Channel 1

"Reveal from heaven against all and writers in and godliness of men along suppress the truth and iran that's called wrath that's another athens not love you know a john labatt is ran yes him love is love and watch this and they're not usually loser rank that still a loving god he's executed rat what did john the baptist what was his marriage repent who owed generation of vipers who warned you to flee from what the wrath of the to calm him for the wrath of god is revealed so he's a loving god yeah yes but he's a raffle god and he's also god that when he makes rules he accepts that he expects us to follow them yes he still loving when we break them but he will never condone nimit as a parrot if you make if you if your child's curfew is at ten o'clock don't tell me you're going say oh come home at one thirty one every year on you're not going to escape the threat of content and then just accepted as as as such but are are are you going to punish them and make them ground of at the very least yeah go ahead you wouldn't make him a cake for it no christian and you will have an early are the disgusting billy to discriminate either bizarre again and when you're not roles but if i won't you want an area mary your service i quit joy i would say so go to a shop that will make cakes for people who mary aliens we don't make those here one fortunately why do i have to make that cake why do i need to be in the back making their cake with joy as hot as much as make the make the rules and just save you say you understand that i have rules than understand that'll make cakes for alia winnings we won't get to the the clip nothing discriminatory i just don't make cakes radion winning that'll do them for pets pet weddings undo for homosexual weddings i don't do takes for those reasons let me make your dog is having a wedding is i don't wanna make a big for your dog wedding what for whatever reason he mealy whatever the reason whatever my whatever you're meiring's artwork that's been three hours mikey i love.

john labatt billy iran three hours