35 Burst results for "LP"

Avianca Airbus A319 hits pyrotechnic balloon on landing at Bogota Airport

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

02:44 min | Last week

Avianca Airbus A319 hits pyrotechnic balloon on landing at Bogota Airport

"An incident That happened very recently on the On new year's eve december thirty first twenty twenty an odd bianca airbus a three nineteen Got entangled with a hot air balloon. That i guess was Intended to shoot off like it's like a firework platform kind of balloon Let's see what do they call it. Exactly a pyrotechnic cairo technique but yeah pyrotechnic balloon Reported balloon had not been a pyrotechnics one started looking at something else. january third two twenty one. Columbia's aerocivil Caa reported that the hot air balloon was made paper plastics and some parts of aluminum Here let me show you some pictures here. So very festive i. They went planning on carrying passengers in this whole. Actually mike. we should ask balloon. Drivers is one not well in the chat room today. I don't know his grand seen them. now. This is a this is. This is a very customary and and south america latin america. Really so well you just you just you know you just light up. It's kind of like the fourth of july from down there. So you just you just send up. You know Fireworks and balloons and all sorts of stuff. And it's it's it's interesting actually but I could totally i totally see. This happening there Yeah lads with all these Streamers and stuff on it. That's a video there. yeah. I love that. That's a nice little. I think a little bit of drag actually new year's eve jackley. Can you imagine hitting the columbia's national federation of pyrotechnics fan. Lp reported the balloon had not have been a pirate techniques one. So i'm not quite sure what what was a paper plastics in some parts of aluminum. That sounds like okay well. Late burst on impact with the across. Funny thing but it. The airplane apparently is already touchdown. Say thank you for that. Oh had it okay. I thought it was Yeah in flight. Yeah thought he got tangled with him across the runway. As you throwing out i gather. Oh okay that So maybe if you live immediately adjacent to a large airport or airport of any type Not the greatest idea to be sending things up into the sky

CAA Jackley National Federation Of Pyrotec Columbia Latin America South America Mike
How to Choose an Instrument Approach, RH of Opposing Bases, Syringe Pilot Shares Details + GA News

Aviation News Talk podcast

05:13 min | 2 weeks ago

How to Choose an Instrument Approach, RH of Opposing Bases, Syringe Pilot Shares Details + GA News

"And welcomed aviation news talk show about general aviation with relevant news and flying tips for pilots and student pilots. To help keep you safe. I'm extra scott for our pilot skills topping today. We'll be talking about the factors you should consider when choosing instrument approach and air traffic controller r h of the opposing basis. Podcasts will be here to answer listener questions. And finally we'll talk with a newsmaker a young pilot who did something that made headlines around the world last week episode. One seventy one. We talked with andy chant about the sleek new petrol panther aircraft. So if you didn't hear that episode you may want to check it out and if aviation is talk. Podcast is new to you in whatever app. You're using to listen to us now. Just click on the subscribe button. So new episodes will download for free each week. I think you'll enjoy today's show and you won't want to miss future shows this week in the news. Real time. updates on special use airspace are coming to the cockpit. A student pilot selfie results force landing and an airport. Snowplow driver got in trouble at the reading pennsylvania. Airport all this more and the news starts now. From alpa dot org coming to the cockpit. Real time special. Use airspace updates real time status of military operation areas or moas and other types of special use airspace or s. You a into. The cockpit of aviators has been included in the national defense authorization. Act or indeed led by senator james inhofe of oklahoma chairman of the senate armed services committee and representative sam graves of missouri. The top republican on the house committee on transportation and infrastructure and a member of the house armed services committee a provision in the act was included that requires the faa and the department of defense to establish automated. Real-time broadcast similar to temporary flight restrictions dissemination on the real time status of emo as and restricted airspace. The aa an annual bill was passed in both the house and senate by overriding the president's veto making sixty consecutive years that it has become law the goal to improve operational safety and efficiency by transmitting directly into the cockpit the real time status of military training and other su as will result in enormous savings and environmental benefits robberies of private commercial and military aircraft a mitre corporation report developed in two thousand twelve documented the potential benefits of such a system according to the report quote overall approximate annual. Good weather flight savings in the national airspace system. Include fuel savings of one hundred million dollars distance savings of thirty million nautical miles flight. Time savings of ninety thousand hours and reduction of carbon dioxide emissions of three hundred million kilograms. Lp president mark baker said this really sets the course for faa and dod the use existing technology to ensure pilots have tools readily available in order to transmit this type of airspace. Safely and efficiently'' it's a game changer. For many pilots and insurers are warfighters. Continue to receive the training. They need and deserve from k. H. dot com. Which i believe is a houston television station. Pilot killed after jumping in a rolling plane that went airborne while doing maintenance. Faa says one person was killed when a small plane crashed in a residential area of galveston county according to authorities. According to the faa an unoccupied single engine plane began to move forward while maintenance work was being performed on the aircraft at scholes international airport in galveston. A pilot jumped in the plane at the faa says it rolled over chalks and became airborne plane went down in a residential area near the intersection of south railroad and mike avenue in hitchcock at about two pm the pilot has been identified as fifty year old austin stall of galveston. There were no passengers on the plane and other injuries reported plane went down near railroad tracks. The call someone is a nurse who lives near the crash site. She said she saw the plane flying very low before nosediving into the ground right in front of her house. And i think probably the key takeaway on this is that sometimes. It's probably better to let an airplane go. Even though you know that it's probably going to be damaged rather than try. And get into the airplane and injure or kill yourself from aviation safety dot. Net hawker eight hundred. Xp crashes during landing on runway one four at farmingdale republic airport in new york now one of our patriots mega supporters. Jim gold fussy gives ground instruction at republic. Airport notified me of the accident immediately after it happened. A raytheon hawker eight hundred. X p november four one to juliette alpha performing telling air flight t.f. Nine forty one suffered an accident during landing on runway one four at the farmington republic airport on long island. Both bins sustained minor injuries at twenty thirty two local time. The flight was cleared for an approach to runway one four. The tower controller reported wind calm and stated that the aircraft that landed five minutes prior at reported that the cloud base was at minimums.

FAA Senator James Inhofe Senate Armed Services Committe Sam Graves House Committee On Transportat House Armed Services Committee Andy Scott Department Of Defense Scholes International Airport Mark Baker Pennsylvania Galveston Oklahoma Missouri SU Senate
Are You Ready to Make Financial Progress in 2021?

Chris Hogan's Retire Inspired

04:44 min | 2 weeks ago

Are You Ready to Make Financial Progress in 2021?

"This article runs through the twelve steps to get you financially. Ready for twenty twenty one. Obviously i can't go through twelve but you. Vip's are studious. You guys are on the ball and we'll make sure we have the lincoln. There's you can go read the rest of them. But i'm gonna pick out five. Let's take a look at number. One is review your goals the of years a great time to pause and look over your current financial goals just to see where you are with your progress I know this year was tough. But we're not gonna let it stand in the way of us moving forward with our money. So let's look at this get intentional. I've got the network calculator that you're gonna get over to my website And really figure out kind of where you are. How did this year in and again. I know this year was a challenge And this year has continued to be a challenge for a lot of people. But we still need to know where we stand The next one is update your budget. Obviously you know if you don't have one this is a good time to make one Do an audit of your budget kind of take a look. Are there some things that you could cut or scale back memberships. You don't use Do you have leftover money at the end of the month where you're redirecting that So there's a lotta things we can do and again as we start off the year on the good foot We wanna make sure we're being more intentional than ever Another thing end of year. Max out your 401k. If you haven't hit your full fifteen percent yet or you've got extra to invest you can make sure you get that done before december thirty first And remember you have until april to make contributions towards your ira a roth ira as well jay as hsa. We've got some time. So what does that mean for. A lotta people reach out to a smartvestor pro Make sure you're talking to your tax professional and he lp You've got people you want to get in your corner just to start reaching out. Especially for you self-employed. vip's For you you know. Tax time is a is a lot more paperwork in a lot of details grab up. Let's start getting that stuff. Gathered up right. Now you can get that in the hands of your cpa and the your make him or her's life a lot smoother as well as your own Speaking of find your tax return And again this sound can be can sound crazy. But it's just good to make a list of the things you're going to need get that prior year's return began to just details And talk about you know for some of you does a roth. Conversion makes sense. And what i mean by that real quick to not get into the weeds if you had an old 401k That's out there. You could convert that by paying the taxes on it to a roth Again it's a process of understanding the tax consequences having the cash first and foremost and being able to take care of that. So your smartvestor pro as well as your taxi. Lp can guide you in that Will entrust review your I know those things. Don't sound like fine. But i'm gonna tell you something after twenty twenty it's imperative that we have those things in place Really really important And also let me let me tell you this real quick It's important to make sure that you have beneficiaries updated. And i mean that in your life insurance i mean that in your 401k Because hear me the beneficiary designation 401k or on a life insurance policy will supersede meaning it outweighs anything in a will so the beneficiaries that you've established on a 401k. Four five ten years ago. You need to make sure you've got that updated especially if you've had a change of life if you were married If you got divorced if you adopted a cat or had another baby you just wanna make sure. Those are updated So beneficiaries on life insurance on ira's on 401k's these things are imperative. And do me a favor reach out to your parents To make sure that they've got there's updated as well a lot of times people. Sit and forget it with these things and it can just create some headache and heartache. Later a your estate plan needs to reflect those changes And if you don't have a will do get that thing in place It's imperative Some staggering statistic out there. That almost seventy seventy five percent of people don't have a will which means we leave the government in charge of your stuff Did you hear me say that. Yeah you leave the government in charge of your stuff I the government. Can't take the government's i know they will take care of my stuff So anyway let's get a will place But anyway you know we're twenty twenty one. Start off with the right checklist. Make sure we got things in place so we're able to grow forward interesting article again. They're twelve things. We covered five. You can go over to forbes dot com as always. We'll put a link to

Lincoln JAY IRA Headache Government
Taylor Swift dropping surprise album

John Williams

01:01 min | Last month

Taylor Swift dropping surprise album

"Year, according to Time magazine Album of the Year. Taylor Swiss folklore. And the song of the Year People. I've been sad by Christine in the Queen's one quick note about Taylor Swift folklore. This just in. I'm reading from the USA today today today, Taylor Swift has announced. That Thursday, There will be another surprise album. Little debut of midnight tonight. Midnight tonight, Taylor Swift is dropping a new LP Evermore. Which swift dubs as a sister to folklore is her ninth studio album features 15 new songs to bonus tracks. It's another collaboration with the Nationals, Aaron Destin, er A lot of names that you've come to know in love with her appear in there. The nationals. On brothers is a list of people that have appeared with her on these other tracks. So if you're Taylor Swift fan, there's even a music video called Willow that will be released tonight at midnight about them

Taylor Swift Taylor Swiss Time Magazine Christine Aaron Destin USA Willow
There Will Never Be Another Maradona

The Lead

03:31 min | Last month

There Will Never Be Another Maradona

"So add. We've seen this incredible outpouring of support for diego maradona's since he passed away last week to say goodbye to donna. Filing past the coffin and coming out the side crying country declared three days of national mourning. There were massive crowds showing up to see his body at the national palace in windows holidays by maybe about a mile from the of maradonna. And i'm not sure if people here in the us really understand how massive figure diego maradona is argentina. To explain that to people. I've been trying to explain it this week. Two americans and the thing that i landed on. Was you know you hear a lot of the mythology about the american dream right. But are essentially the argentine dream. There is not social mobility for people who are the visions which is kind of argentina equivalent. Savannah's there is not the social mobility for those people to rise and improve their lives except for one thing and that's football and diego who was born in visa theory which is very poor neighborhood. He is the proof of that. My father works such a lot to supporters. Eight of us children that made us. It made us very strong. It made everyone strong. Not only did he. Rise from the bottom rung of society abject poverty but he rose by fifteen. He was given an apartment by the club. He was blamed for argentinos juniors. He was supporting his whole. Family's whole family were living in an apartment. Thank god the one who could reach the highs until he became the most famous washington person probably apart from the pope. He austin on the world stage in a way that almost nobody ever could three. He's adult way he's beauties is something that was immortal. Seems like a lot of the mythology ising around. Maradonna comes from this idea of lp bay. Ed can you explain what that phrase means and its importance in. Argentinian culture. At the bay. Essentially it's it's the talented kid argentines in classical stories grow up playing on portrayals which are small kind of dog pitches and that's kind of a natural home of the p. bay which is this talented youngster. Often you know when i was in argentina i did some coaching with kids. And if you watch them play competitor like watching english kids play anguish. Kids play english football. You know it's been rough and they play in a very kind of permanent fashion the kids. They're all trying to dribble ten people there all falling over there all diving around in the peabody is essential oftentimes number ten. It's the guy around which the entire team operates. You essentially put several plus outlet who just defensively minded to make up for the fact that you've got this one super talented guy who's going to create everything and obviously every team that diego maradona was in was built around him. Put him in the middle. Give him the ball and just let something great happen quite often it

Diego Maradona Argentina National Palace Maradonna Donna Savannah Football Diego Pope Austin United States Washington ED
Global to commission original podcasts

podnews

03:10 min | 2 months ago

Global to commission original podcasts

"Jilani has powerful friends presidents bill clinton and donald trump. I just wish her well. Frankly hunting jilin global original podcast global the media. Entertainment group prevented a podcast commissioning. Partnership with denso's story lab they're ray content investor producer and distributor operated by advertising agency. The first podcast to be produced his hunting jalen her story about jilin maxwell it'll be presented by jones. We need in his first project since leaving the bbc. Paul bane have announced podcast wellness week a week. Daily panels and speakers about mental health meditation and a positive mindset from november thirtieth events. Free to watch live pod. Smooch is a new service allowing podcast is to have one place for that. Episode's merchandise and sponsor links megaphone now appears to support vast her method of allowing multiple third party companies to serve ads on podcasts nineteen and their support in september. A write up of the recent podcast day online highlighted. Some yougov studies into podcasting. Saying the bbc sounds the most popular podcast app in the uk. That app only includes podcasts. And a handful of third party the winners of the portuguese podcast awards were announced. We've the full list to which we've added. Podcast hosts as well. Congratulations if you're one of those winners pods claims to recommend podcasts. Specifically for you and allows you to keep your existing podcast player. Alana source now has been announced as the new head of marketing audience development for podcast one. And how discoverable is your podcast. Headliner has released the podcast. Discover ability greater a free tool to help. It gives us a score of ninety percent marking us down for not being with a cool kids on instagram. And podcast news. The piper is a new drama from something else for the bbc. A modern take on the pied piper fairy tale stars thames in auschwitz and a soundtrack by bat for lashes. Natasha khan the corona virus. Radio ideas awards took place yesterday. Two podcast awards in there the best podcast creativity and entertainment when to bbc. Radio four's comedy podcast. Now wash your hands while the best podcast long form. Storytelling went to the spanish language. Post scandal lose from podium. Podcasts produced by longtime pod news reader. Francesco is a sweetser. All of the witnesses links from our show notes now newsletter. Today race at work is new from the harvard. Business review you can hear leaders from business and governments trace their personal journeys with rice equity and inclusion and learn from their mistakes and their triumphs and the london philharmonic orchestra has launched lp offstage exploring the lights of castro musicians. Covers everything from how to keep your instruments in working order to life on the road as a classical musician.

Jilani Entertainment Group Jilin Maxwell Paul Bane BBC Jilin Denso Jalen Donald Trump Alana Source Bill Clinton Natasha Khan Jones Instagram UK Francesco Harvard London Philharmonic Orchestra Castro
Washington DC judge orders forensic lab to turn over some documents sought by prosecutors

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:08 min | 2 months ago

Washington DC judge orders forensic lab to turn over some documents sought by prosecutors

"Morning and update we turn to you now to a murder case. At the center of the battle between two DC agencies. Court documents filed this week Reference an exclusive report from Double Duty LP investigative reporter making clarity. It shows an evidence error at the city's crime lab. And now there is a court battle underway involving the U. S attorney's office. For D. C. Any hearing over whether the Department of Forensic Sciences should release documents surrounding a ballistic analysts error, Judge Todd E. Edelman acknowledged what quote appears to be a side battle, a minimum between the U. S attorney's office and GFS. At the center of the battle is the case against Rondell Macleod, who was charged with double homicide after a defence analyst looking at bullet casings from the wrong crime scene linked to the gun used in another killing. Prosecutors say that evidence was presented to a grand jury, which indicted Macleod. After reviewing the documents from D. F. S Judge Edelman decided to release some of them to prosecutors and to McCloud's defense attorney who wants the case dismissed. His move leaves the next steps of the case Open ended with no set hearing date and a plan to reschedule Macleod's January jury trial due to covert concerns. Megan Cloherty w T

Double Duty Lp D. C. Department Of Forensic Science Judge Todd E. Edelman U. Rondell Macleod DC GFS Judge Edelman Macleod Mccloud Megan Cloherty
AMD Reaches Highest CPU Market Share Since 2007, Q3

Joey's Totally Tech

05:02 min | 2 months ago

AMD Reaches Highest CPU Market Share Since 2007, Q3

"Amd reaches twenty percent market share highest since two thousand seven according to the q. Three twenty twenty report. Amd shared the recent mercury research. Cpi marketshare results. These results showed amd had reached its highest overall market share since two thousand seven and has its highest desktop share since twenty thirteen and the x eighty six market. Amd took its highest amount of share sits q. Two of twenty eleven. This comes as an md has been experiencing still our financial results pointing to amazing growth and also follows intel's reset disappointing earnings report. Particularly when it comes to intel's desktop pc process ourselves looks like amd's doing pretty well. We think about that. I think that's awesome. I think competition is always a good thing. I'm not a particular fan boy of either company. Though the past few years i've been pulling for. Amd despite having an entire processor. But i've got a used server. Cpu not a normal desktops. Ep so really. I think it's great that amd's catching up again. I'm a fan of the underdog typically for good story right. Yeah definitely. I mean both. Amd until have issues. I'm not gonna lie. Yeah but i think this is great for. amd the great that they've been able to catch up with their processors intel needs get back in the game they've been having trouble with their Processes over the past few years trying to get by ten nanometer process. Amd's seven nanometer. Now okay. so it's like intel's have trouble gained lowered work okay. Well i'm sure they'll be able to figure something out all right. So speaking of that. Intel launches iris maximum. Gp's entry level laptops intel's finally stepping back into the dp business after two decades shipping. Their gpu in oem laptops. They've lost her irish exc- max. Graphic solution is designed to complement intel's x lp integrated graphics into the tiger lake. Cp's xy maxwell chopin thin and light laptops as an updated graphics option and has a focus on mobile creation. So this is really meant to be position as game solution but more of a mobile content creation solution helping in applications such as handbrake to pixel image up sampling software other productivity increase tasks still. The susceptive compete with nvidia. His latest generation entry level solution. Mx extra fifty baby steps. You now baby steps. I think it's good. They're getting into that at least the contact creation. Dps yeah that'll make some money from that you know Contact creators want to have that. Gps helps speed up the rendering process. Yeah for sure. Yeah crazy like how much you know. You're seen as far as content wise as far as like rendering like you know Special effects three d images all kinds of stuff on to. Yeah it's pretty wild well even with just regular video editing like you don't need that powerful of a graphics card to render to to speed it up you know just any dedicated. Gpu yeah that's going to speed up the rendering process for the youtube videos or wherever you go to upload videos. Yeah for sure. I mean. I know i've i i remember like years ago. I was up like youtube all day. You know i'm sure by now. It's probably caught up. Yeah so even though intel's not competing what's the gaming. Gps yeah you know they're going to compete with the likes of like Gatx Was at ten thirty. I think it was something like that. Okay but that's Example of what they compete with. I think you know hard. I mean it's lower in cars. Obviously these different products that are needed for situations. Yeah so apple's secret button. On the iphone and ios fourteen apple has implemented a feature called back tap and i o s. Fourteen adds a new hardware button to the iphone. Backed-up turns the entire back of the phone and two a touch sensitive button which can trigger specific buttons said. He could be modified inside of the accessibility menu feature could be integrated with shortcuts. So you could do almost anything you imagine what this feature. I could tell you right now. Though i have iphone six s running ios fourteen. That's not going to work with that phone. That must beaten phones. I can handle it.

AMD Intel Iris Maximum Tiger Lake CP Nvidia DPS Youtube Apple
Using Neuroscience and Faith To Overcome Self Sabotage and Limiting Beliefs with Tessa Hopman

The Wellthier Together Podcast

04:34 min | 2 months ago

Using Neuroscience and Faith To Overcome Self Sabotage and Limiting Beliefs with Tessa Hopman

"So high tessa. How're you doing today. Hey thank you so much ahead and we dig really well how you doing well. So can you tell us a little bit more about your story. How did you get into what you're doing. Coaching adding neuroscience and biblical insights is something. I haven't heard of next year. We'll actually exactly why. I went into it so i was like i was myself very burned out. I've got to a stage where i couldn't even get out of bed anymore. Just that feeling having such a way on your chest. I was just in this emotional rollercoaster. Just not being fulfilled in life and aspirations. We often have that feeling like we know that we supposed to be contained. Really trying to be happy in the season. But we know that we're created for so much more and that emotional tinges actually like like tearing me apart. So i had to find out what the answer was to that big question. What's my purpose. What to be doing with life and so my partner actually showed me like this. Coaching course i enrolled in it enjoyed it was very an lp base. But i found like even that. I'm getting on to some questions like i'm on the standing now at my brain is doing that. I missed that biblical foundation to it. I wanted to know how it fit in in in what the bible say. No because i also wanted to make sure that i was living the principles that truly value in believing not just going like the world the way of neuroscience so said that was when i realized like this this. I'm not the only christian woman. Struggling to find her purpose struggling to find that fulfillment in live so. I wanted to create something way. We still get the neurological aspect. Because god gave his scientists to help us understand our brain right but also to find now the correlation between what it says in the bible and now that it makes sense like it's his bible. Speak things into being ride like all those things i wanted to mix into one. So yeah i took a usually buffet quit my job. No savings no plan. I just knew that god was telling me now. Back this is your purpose is what you mean to be doing. And you know. I jumped headfirst into it and here. We are more than a year later. Still still coaching still helping women either. Set up a business start. A new career do a passion project but all within that focus of putting god dana scientists. So yeah that's pretty messed introduction of of what i'm doing today. Wow your story really fits in with the theme of the podcast for season. Four which is faith over fear in your case you definitely just bit. The bullet jumped trusted. They got to take care of you and he has in your still discovering things as you're working with women yes absolutely. So how do you connect faith in neuroscience because usually you don't see those two together now very true one of the people at absolutely adore his doctor caroline leaf so she is actually A neurosurgeon and she is a christian as well so i started becoming super interesting what she does like. I can recommend everybody go look what she does. She puts manure science in such plain language but also a language that correlated with the bible. How i see how my personal views that god created everything right so he also created the sciences. I mean science has made us understand so many things to it's not against the bible. He created everything in the world in including neuroscience. So what does it understands. It helps understand the brain because often we feel that we are holding ourselves back that we are self sabotaging ourselves. But it's actually out brain like trying to keep us safe in a very outdated way rides. And and we have a brian. We are not our brain so by understanding the brain we can then make sense of what it says in the bible because for example a lot of people say it's restrictive. What what we as christians have to do. It's not about that. The rules that god says a very simple example like dan speak negative thoughts or speak things into existence that that are not there yet at. It's not to hold us back or anything. It's just god understanding the brank he created and now putting that into perspective saying how we can create a life that we truly love by making the brain work for us and not against us.

Tessa Caroline Leaf Dana Brian Brank DAN
"lp" Discussed on This Week in Startups

This Week in Startups

01:32 min | 3 months ago

"lp" Discussed on This Week in Startups

"Thought, you know what? I'm now forty nine years old. And I've been through how many of these bubbles bursting. This is the time 'cause I have a chip stack that I am going to do it right so I just moved massively into equities as the market crashed and that paid off and that was on a personal basis I just dialed it all up to equities. and. So that worked out very well but in my Everybody's scared I'm going to invest more and so I said are accelerating one hundred percent. Vir-? Virtual. Do twice as many. Let's increase our activity now because. Half the VC's I met with early stage where like I'm taking the rest of the year off I'm just going to work on my portfolio company I'm saving my drought potter. So what I did was I went all out to get more LP's I met with moral zoom and we're closing LP's and investments over zoom in thirty minutes forty five minutes, people like it better. That's great. Now that what are those do those tend to be Kinda worth individuals high net worth individuals are more. So we have a syndicate called syndicate, we were the First Syndicate on Angel. So now, we can pivot into the real reason for this podcast, which is from to get free consulting from you on how I should run my business, but we were the first syndicate on angels. The first we ever did was calm dot com we put three hundred and seventy thousand dollars in that when it was a five million dollar company that's like a sixty seventy million dollar position right now for us, it's our one of our biggest positions after Burn Robin, hood it's actually bigger than Robin. and. Then we laughed because we didn't WANNA share.

LP Robin.
Dr. Joan Palmiter Bajorek CEO of Women in Voice on Linguistics and its Place in Voice

The Voicebot Podcast

06:12 min | 3 months ago

Dr. Joan Palmiter Bajorek CEO of Women in Voice on Linguistics and its Place in Voice

"Know that's now I. I. Kinda WanNa. Go back a little bit because you're a linguist. And I mean I don't know how you characterize yourself to characterize yourself as a linguist. Yeah. Usually when people ask me say I consider myself primarily a linguist and researcher those are the two core identities that I inhabit most of the time. Okay. Great. So What originally got you interested in linguistics Yeah, I mean I think. I. Consider Myself as being linguist when I was little I like played with code things and you know babbling around I started taking French quote unquote foreign language. In Middle School, I would have been like eleven and. I just thought an unlocked, the coolest world's travel and culture, and you know my parents have always really prioritize travel instead of like buying a big screen TV's let's run off to Thailand So that kind of interesting language culture has always been there for me. Actually, my mom found his old document of mine working career stuff for high schoolers where you like plan out potential career directions. Apparently on this document, I circled linguistics French, and photography as the three things I was interested in which ended up being my undergraduate degrees, my master's degree. Topics right there. In my teenage years, I knew. That's perfect. Yeah. Well, maybe maybe we do. I. Say there's a sense that we ask college students to make decisions about the rest of their lives. You know it's such a young age but maybe we know at least some of us know much younger. I feel like I got really lucky I feel like. I. Don't necessarily know the names of the topics but I feel like there's a light at the end of the horizon that I'm walking towards at all times sometimes running a mostly walking in just knowing that directionality and honestly the privileged to be able to pursue the things that I'm so passionate about. Now given the you've spent so much time. Going into linguistics study research have you had time to keep up with your French photography? My I I taught French previously to pay the bills in my graduate studies and I worked in France between UNDERGRAD and graduate school. So I'm was very proficient I mean, my dad hopes one day become famous photographer. You know as a retirement career but no, I have A. Busy schedule today and those things take away backburner. Got It. Okay. So you started out French in photography you moved into linguistics and why don't you share with listeners? What some of the areas of study you focused initially and then how that evolved. Yes. So I don't masters in linguistics from UC Davis. And they did a really phenomenal job of forcing you to take all the courses. In the range of things I was always really interested in phonetics and sociolinguistics, but taking morphology and Syntax and typology natural language processing was of course it was very new at that time. And really. It's when I started actually studying to a link goes interfaces from a LP phonetics standpoint that I felt like I had a moment of like wait a minute. This is a big data multi-lingual back end. Used by millions of users worldwide. Like who is deciding what good enough means for the Audio You know At that time I focused a lot on ed tech but I think the multi lingual multi modal interfaces that I was looking at Babbel Rosetta. Stone presented at Rosetta Stone really thinking about the research that space blew my mind that was back in two, thousand, fourteen, two, thousand, fifteen. Yeah. So When you think about those systems because they've been around for a while and some of them very good is that a stone has been doing this a pretty high level for a long time before we had cloud computing to new redoing this office CDs. Because I remember. At least one of my daughters maybe both of them took a couple of full programs you know through. through his stump Are there elements of that that of of the language learning process? You think that help move the industry forward or was that always just sort of a fork in on its own I think. Educational Technology has such power especially in twenty twenty. You know anyone who has kids I don't finds this stuff wonderful I think Rosetta stone you're right I think back in the day was really innovative software I haven't seen significant innovation in the last decade I can't I'm under NDA can't tell you what I told her engineering team but my research that is public I mean the. The back end with they're doing the acoustics in the visuals that they show users and most users aren't linguists. An most users aren't fun additions like me. Or mostly incomprehensible. So I felt like there was a huge mismatch between what the back end was doing in the educational pieces of it. Could you actually learn and get better at your pronunciation from these tools? Right. So that's that's a critique on the application of the technology though correct? Yeah. Is opposed to the core technology in terms of being. Listen and. and. That's what I. Mike Critique is the scaffolding or like how it's structured could be significantly rated and their companies like Elsa and blue canoe that are doing the work to make it interpreted. Because we do have back ends that should be able to do this very well.

Rosetta Stone Researcher Babbel Rosetta I. Mike Critique Middle School Stone Educational Technology Thailand Uc Davis France LP
Jennifer Neundorfer of January Ventures

How I Built This

07:58 min | 3 months ago

Jennifer Neundorfer of January Ventures

"And today we're gonNA hear from Jennifer new door for she's the CO founder and managing partner of January ventures. It's an investment firm focused on tech startups founded by women and people of Color Jennifer join me to talk about how her company is approaching investment strategies during this unprecedented moment and how they differ from other firms overall. What we're doing differently is really building a venture firm that is designed around access and transparency. That's not what venture has traditionally been known for, and it's what has really under served winning and underrepresented founders, and so we make it very easy for founders to pitch us and find us in everything that we do is focused on removing friction for those founders at the early stage and what type of startups do you look for? We invest primarily in tech enabled talker businesses. So we are investing in companies that we believe can be high growth scalable companies that are going to be capitol efficient. We are investing the capital early and then are looking for outsized return. So we're looking for companies that can go on to be hundred, million, billion dollar companies, and really be those outliers that generate returns for our fund and. You you invest in the in the seed stage. In the early stages of a business we invested the precede seed stage and what are the reasons that we do. That guy is when we started January, we did some early research and there had been a lot of data talking about how how little venture dollars women receive in two thousand, nineteen female only teams received just three percent of. Venture dollars, and if a woman happened to have male co founder, she received eleven percent of venture dollars. But what we found in our data as we look just at the earliest stage is that there's not only a gender gap, but it really starts early. So for every dollar that a male found raises at the precede or seed stage, a woman raises thirty eight cents and a black. Woman just two cents, and so that is really where we are focused to January. Because as you imagine a dollar versus thirty eight cents on the dollar versus two cents on the dollar, many of those are handicapped from the start, and so our focus is on getting them the capital and resources that they need to really generate momentum for their business and get to that scalable growth curve. How large is your fund right now? Yeah, we're deploying out of the twenty million dollar fund. Were typically writing checks that range up to half a million plus because we're investing stage when founders are raising. Two hundred fifty three hundred up to a million dollars on a really at those earliest ages and often the first capital in. And who who are your investors. Are Investors Range. So many of them are the typical investors that you would expect to see family offices, high net worth individuals, and some institutions and foundations. But from the beginning my partner Marin, I wanted to be very deliberate about who are investors are limited partners were because. So much of the traditional venture model has relied on a very small set of investors or limited partners and has reinforced this flywheel around making that small group very wealthy, and so what we have done in both of our funds is proactively reduce the barriers for nontraditional investors to invest in our funds whether that is a founder who is just beginning to. Capital Wealth and may not have a lot of equity and finding ways for them to participate or pitching LP's who follows height of the the traditional circuit that most funds pitch. You know whether it's by geography ethnicity we've really tried to work hard to diversify our alkies. How do you find startups to to invest in? I mentioned that venture has been so long on really inaccessible to most founders and a lot of that is because many venture capitalists rely on their network to source deals, and that's fine. But most of the people that are in someone's network look or are similar to similar characteristics who that person we hear a lot of talk about the tests Cana found her get a warm intro to them, and if so then they're willing to consider taking meeting. We turn that on her head at January, and so from the day that we launched, we have been open to cold pitches and when we went out with that, many of our peers told us you're crazy. We weren't gonNA see great pitches. There was no way we could handle that certain volume. And we were pretty overwhelmed. When we launched in October two, thousand eighteen, we saw four hundred pitches within the first week and so very quickly we leverage technology to develop a scalable way to review those deals were very generous with the first thirty minute meeting. We want Martin I want to be the first people at our meeting these founders right we want to be the ones who are judging whether they are a fit for a thesis, and then we have a higher bar for. Who we spend time with who we due diligence on and ultimately invest in because the nature of our businesses there's a very wide top of funnel, and in any given fun were making twenty five thirty investment. So there is pretty Winnie in process but were deliberate in the organizations that we work with to make sure that we are reaching founders that really fit that underrepresented mold and telling them that are light is on and we WANNA be fund of choice for them so tummy. Tell me some of the startups in your portfolio. Yeah. This is the part that I love talking about it sort of talking about your kids on. And it's hard to pick just one but I'll you a sense for some of them. We are investing problems that we believe are big and we really care about solving were really focused on investing in companies that are addressing big broad problems that are going to shape the future, and so one of those founders that is really doing this is a founder Julia. Collins, who is the CEO of the Company Up Planet Forward Julius founder who has deep roots in both food and sustainability and great founder market. That's something that we look for a lot and Julia is building a regenerative supply chain for sustainable foods. Just Chris. Quigley you sir. Can You? Can you kind of explain just plain plain language orders a regenerative supply chain me I mean I, I notice supply chain means a note regenerative means. Yeah. That's a great question guy. It's really about the ingredients and wear brands and CPG companies are sourcing the ingredients for their foods and they would basically evaluate the sustainability and on a number of different metrics including the carbon footprint including those ingredients were were actually farmed and then be able to suggest alternate sources and it'll turn it whether it's a different farmer on a different type of ingredient that have the same impact so that I as a brand could make those adjustments and make a more sustainable. And regenerative food product right. So if you were looking for palm oil, for example, this platform could say, Hey, you know this is a better place to source your palm oil from. That's exactly right and they are really the first ones to do that on an what we've seen in the past six months is that consumers union between being at home and suddenly really caring about what food they eat, and then all of the very visible events in the last couple months around climate change and sooners are really starting to There's a there's an acceleration in consumer awareness of climate-friendly foods and being conscious of the choices that they make and wanting to be sustainable.

Founder January Ventures Co Founder Jennifer Managing Partner Partner Cana Julia Marin Quigley Martin Chris Collins CEO
Dallas police Chief Reneé Hall announces resignation

Clark Howard

00:49 sec | 4 months ago

Dallas police Chief Reneé Hall announces resignation

"Chief Rene Hall submitting her resignation Carol, these LP film Hall took over the Dallas Police Department in 2017 and things were rocky from the start, and she tried to tamp down growing violence. Our Children are choosing a path that lands them in a prison in some instances for the rest of their lives for resignation to

Rene Hall Dallas Police Department Carol
Texas Supreme Court rejects Republicans' attempt to remove 44 Libertarians from the November ballot

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:45 sec | 4 months ago

Texas Supreme Court rejects Republicans' attempt to remove 44 Libertarians from the November ballot

"Court has handed the Libertarian Party of Victory Carol these LP, Phillips reports, The court refused to toss names off the ballot. The Republican Party challenged 40 for different candidates across the state, some in North Texas, claiming their name should not be on the ballot. The reason, libertarians did not meet a relatively new deadline for filing fees. But the Supreme Court ruled that law applies to parties that hold primary elections, which the libertarians don't Dallas County Libertarian Party chair Curry, Taylor says the names will stay on the balance a good thing, and I don't think we've ever The luscious departments have ever challenged our authenticity In any moment, it's just that the other party had tried. Republicans still have a slim opening to refile their suit. LP.

Dallas County Libertarian Part Republican Party Supreme Court Phillips North Texas Curry Taylor
Dallas - Attempted Capital Murder Indictment Issued Against Suspect Britt Jacoby Moody In Watauga Police Officer Shooting

Dave Ramsey

00:33 sec | 4 months ago

Dallas - Attempted Capital Murder Indictment Issued Against Suspect Britt Jacoby Moody In Watauga Police Officer Shooting

"Tarrant County grand jury has indicted a man in connection with the shooting of a Watauga police officer. 36 year old Brian Moody is now accused in the attempted capital murder of a police officer, aggravated assault and evading arrest. Moody got into a chase June 22nd when police say he was spotted driving a stolen car. That chase ended in a water park as police closed in, they say Moody opened fire, wounding the officer in the army. He was later found and arrested. A woman has been indicted for tampering with evidence in the case. LP. Phillips News Radio 10 80 Kenya Rally

Brian Moody Officer Tarrant County Watauga Kenya Assault Murder
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe Resigns Due To Poor Health

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:01 min | 5 months ago

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe Resigns Due To Poor Health

"In a parallel universe where things proceed more or less according to plan Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Albay is basking in the glow endowed by triumphant Tokyo Olympics. The games however postponed a while ago for reasons requiring no reiteration, and it now appears that Shinzo Abe's victory lap has also been canceled obey Japan's longest-serving Prime Minister has announced that he is to stand down for health reasons he offered the Japanese people, his apologies for failing to complete his term I'm joined first of all by Monaco Tokyo Bureau Chief Funeral Wilson. Is this announcement is surprise. Well, everybody knows that Shinzo up as being well, it's been rumored for long time. We who's been in hospital a couple of times in the last fortnight. So that's not the surprise I. Think the rapid resignation did come as a surprise to many people including people quite close to you know there was a Cabinet Office meeting this morning and I think that really. has taken a lot of journalists who follow the story pretty closely by surprise when he explained why he said simply that you know he's he's had a recurring bout of. Ulcerative colitis which he's had since he was a teenager, he said it's not going to get better without some serious medication and you felt that that made it impossible for him to continue. Is there any cause at all to be cynical about this? It's not untidily on heard of four politicians for whom things are not going well to plead ill health. No doubt people will say that I mean his excuse for the timing was that. It's a corona virus pandemic. We all know that he said number going down slightly for winter is coming and going to be another. Whatever wave we're up to. There's also going to be seasonal flu and he felt that it was time to to pass the baton. You know you've got a new diet sessions coming up possible reshuffle. It just was a very packed schedule ahead and he said that he just felt his health was not to it and he wouldn't be doing right by the Japanese people he stayed in his position. How Japanese media generally reporting this? What kind of tone does the coverage of? Well I. Think it's. Absolutely blanket coverage his speech was live everywhere. I think, yes, we had to notice surprise. You know they say it's a sad fact in politics that once you've announced your resignation, the big discussion as well who's going to take over so that's really where it's going. Now I think the analysis about his legacy and he was asked about his legacy actually the press conference. And he was quite frank about that. That that will come in the next few days. But at the moment, the big big issue is who's going to take over him. He's from him. He said he'll stay in power until somebody takes over and I think they're now you know trying to quickly get some kind of election together it may not be conventional Lt P. Presidential election may not involve all the local Party members. It might just be the Diet members, the two houses and So that's that's the big question who's going to take over the does kinda preempt. The final question I was going to put to you do we actually know yet? The likeliest next Prime Minister of Japan. Well hundred we don't there lots of candidates, lots of potential Kansas pluses and minuses to all of them I think a lot of people look looking at some very, very reliable solid candidates, Yoshihiko suge who's been chief cabinet secretary absolutely loyal up a stalwart for years he seen as a safe pair of hands and heavily being backed by the LP secretary general Mr Nikai who's WHO's extremely Influential behind the scenes, his name won't be known too many people but he's very very important. He's one of the names you've got Fumio Kishida policy chief of the L.. DP? He's been a foreign minister. He may be a little bit considered a bit too dovish. They said bit too soft on some of the constitutional issues on China and Ibar who has been a longtime rival of. Shinzo Abbas. Maybe. This will finally be his time. People are saying he has a loss of local of grassroots support and he he could finally see his moment. Now

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe Shinzo Abbas Monaco Tokyo Bureau Chief Fune Japan Mr Nikai Shinzo Shinzo Albay Ulcerative Colitis Tokyo Cabinet Office FLU Olympics Ibar Party China Yoshihiko Suge
Ex-Dallas Cop Admits Surfing Child Porn On Police Computers

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:39 sec | 5 months ago

Ex-Dallas Cop Admits Surfing Child Porn On Police Computers

"Cop has pleaded guilty to using the city's Internet site to download child pornography. Care all these healthy, Philip says he could go to prison for a very long time. At the time, he downloaded the child porn, including sadistic images of very young Children. 35 year old Daniel Collins was a senior corporal. Now he has resigned and faces a possible 20 year federal prison term. Collins has pleaded guilty to getting and passing along the disturbing pictures. He was caught when someone at Google Red flag images downloaded in May in June and notified authorities. Collins was on the city's Internet site when he served the porn. He will be sentenced in January. LP.

Daniel Collins Philip Google
Capital Murder Charge Filed in Death of Plano Jogger North of Dallas

Clark Howard

00:51 sec | 5 months ago

Capital Murder Charge Filed in Death of Plano Jogger North of Dallas

"Called a Person of interest in the death of a jogger in Plano has now been jumped up to a capital murder charge. US for his police have been waiting for DNA test results to come back in the murder of cancer researcher star Miss Watson. Now that the tests are back capital murder, kidnapping and burglary charges have been filed against 29 year old Bacary Moncrief. There had been concerned that send was targeted because of her Indian descent. But Plano police officer David Till he says investigators do not believe that was the case. We believe it was mere circumstance and won the wrong place. Wrong time type things that Whomever had have been coming along regardless of their race or ethnicity would've also likely become a victim sends body was found in the Chisholm Trail Park in Plano. She had been out for a jog. Moncrief, who had been locked up is a person of interest had his bond raised from $1 million to 10 Million LP. Phillips

Murder Bacary Moncrief Plano Chisholm Trail Park David Till Miss Watson Researcher Phillips Burglary Kidnapping Officer
I Owe $94,000 to the IRS!

Ramsey Call of the Day

04:58 min | 5 months ago

I Owe $94,000 to the IRS!

"Joining me today Ramsey personality Chris Hogan. Caesar's in Chicago Hi how are you? Hey how you doing? How can we help? Okay little nervous here. first time caller first time listener. I. Last summer started listening to you. Laugh. Until far about a month ago emotionally on one hundred, thirty thousand dollars in depth, which is on ninety, four, thousand dollars. Irs I'm trying to do what I tend to To figure what's the best way to tackle this Most of most of the other stuff is car Karleena and credit card that I just weren't to Carmax this weekend and sold a vehicle which has some positive equity. Our sixty, five, hundred I. Don't know what to do with this money at this point. What in the world? How do you owe the IRS ninety four thousand? Salamanders Twenty fifteen twenty, sixteen business, you know I, I, started a business with my wife I pretty much try to manage the business myself. You know everything myself and I kinda school things up and didn't help that I had a bad accounting I concert the irs this to be issue I. If we have to file a ten forty x forum I'll try a man does taxes you know put this is in process I mean I still have to making some kind of panic because I'm getting some letters on a male as far as. Stop stuff. So you're saying that the returns were filed improperly and you may not actually Oh this money when you follow amended returns. Exactly. Okay. But if you you have, you have some money you said you had six thousand dollars from sale your car. Yes. Sixty, sixty, five now. And current him baby step two so I might stop just. You're going to spend some money right now on a tax attorney. Or a tax professional, that is a stud of some kind and If it costs you six thousand dollars, it won't. But if it costs you two thousand dollars, this is job one right now. Is You can you can take your hundred and thirty thousand and wipe out ninety four or a big portion of ninety four with some simple proper filing you don't do that yourself. That's how you got here. You go get a tax pro check Daveramsey DOT COM and click on our taxi LP's if there's not one in your area start shopping around talk to some business guys that are that are competent business people in your area ask them for advice on who a good tax attorney or a tax pro Israel and let them dig in. I I don't you don't need to do anything. You don't worry about me staff. No this is job one I R. S. Yes. Job One that's what you're doing and and Caesar make area focused. Don't come up with excuses. Pick up the phone call set up a time to go sit down, gather up, find out all the documentary going to eat 'cause you're going to have to do legwork here but trust me if worth it because it's dealing with irs. Yeah you. Sure you're a good tax professional can tell you if you need to get on an installment plan and. We need to do to get the barking dogs off your heel while you get this stuff filed. But Dude, you don't thirty seconds you get this stuff filed. Now this is an overdue time paper. and. You've. You know this is killing you and these people have unlimited freaking power. It is unbelievable what they can do to your life if they choose to cy I really really really want them To Go away. Yes I want you get the paperwork done and you don't have anything that's more important in your life for the next two of then get all of this filed as soon as possible. Don't don't drag it out three months. Don't drag it out two months file the stuff get with somebody get the work done. Yeah. You State you get you a cup of coffee and work into the work into the we hours of the morning at this done. What. You do because here's the reality some tweaking and the proper filings again has the ability to wipe some of this out. This is a this is a huge opportunity. Sounds like a good portion of it. Impugned it on him because he didn't do proper filing and they guest that's right in the irs never guesses low. It's a rule of theirs. It's written somewhere in a book I'm sure. Oh God. Penalties on this stuff and it all goes away with properly amended filing or large portion of it does. Get that the stuff you should have been working on all these long time ago. Yes. That's out of the way. Down to just forty thousand dollars a dad now go. That's right.

IRS Caesar Attorney Chris Hogan Chicago Carmax Karleena Israel
"lp" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

13:22 min | 9 months ago

"lp" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Of Bloomberg LP and Bloomberg philanthropies caterpillar the world's biggest maker of mining and construction equipment is predicting that the pain from the coronavirus crisis is far from over caterpillar shares up today by one point two percent and the pandemic increased sales of Merck medicines during the first quarter as households around the world stocked up but the drug maker does expect a significant hit this quarter as the full force of the outbreak land smirk shares down now by two point two percent West Texas intermediate crude down one percent down twelve sixty four barrel gold down four tenths of one percent seventeen oh seven the ops I'm Charlie balance and that is a Bloomberg business slash right Charlie thank you so much you're listening to Bloomberg business week clear Charlie talk a little bit about some of what the medical experts are saying we want to move to our own expert here Brian granularity is the chief executive officer of the Atlantic health system journeys on the phone from Morristown New Jersey obviously a state like here in New York that has been hit very hard new Jersey's death rate actually eclipsing the daily death rate eclipsing New York simply for the first time today so clearly a lot going on and a lot going on as we think about what happens next even in terms of re opening the economy Brian really good to have you with Caroline myself thank you so give us a sense of of what you are seeing on the front lines there what is it like and what's may be new and different today or this week verses in the preceding weeks sure you know you'd you'd mentioned the differences between New York and New Jersey and I gotta tell you that I gotta follow the transit lines because what happened in New York followed to the the transit down into New Jersey and we have been really overwhelmed as you described here in New Jersey particularly northern New Jersey so today at our command center call we had five hundred and forty four patients with COPD it in our hospitals and about thirty five percent of those patients are still on a ventilator so we have a very sick patient population but that's down from our peak which was on April nineteenth where we actually had eight hundred and thirty four patients so which were down about thirty five percent but it's still an enormous number of patients you know as we've gone through this process Brian I mean what have we learned about being prepared next time you know and what we need to do in terms of really shoring up our health system and access for everyone you know there's a there's a famous statement it's about the economy well it's about the testing I mean our major lesson here is testing was a problem at the beginning sting continues to be a problem today and if we don't get this testing right as we go into recovery we're gonna have a rebound effect and we're gonna be back in the soup again and we have to be very very careful about that the second thing that we've learned is that just in time delivery doesn't work in a pandemic in our supply chain is really broken right now we went through periods of enormous panic making sure that we had the right kind of protective equipment for our team members to keep them healthy and safe ventilators were a big issue over a period of time I can tell you just a weekend we spent scanning the nation for ventilators and and being able to have many of our colleagues in different parts of the country support those and it's the same thing with medications particularly those medications that support people on ventilators so what we've learned is we've really got to fix this supply chain we've got to have more control over it because you know Kobe it is not going to go away until we have a vaccine and that could be a year and a half for two years away so we have just threaded the needle here in New Jersey the governor has been a fantastic ally and advocate for us particularly with the federal government and the stockpiles but we learned a lot and we got to make sure that we continue to use the tools that we have the predominant ones being social distancing right now so Brian I want to talk a little bit more about testing it if we could because I I feel like we want to go a level down and and understand both testing for the disease and also the serological beat the antibody testing what we know now and what is important for our listeners to know in terms of what they should be doing what they should expect it especially you know in and around your hospital system over the coming weeks so the frustration that we had with the diagnostic test in other words do you have copays and not is we needed to get that right at the point of care so there wouldn't be delayed in providing a definitive diagnosis as many patients come into the healthcare system end date they don't need to be hospitalized about eighty percent of the twenty percent so so when they go back they need to know if they have a diagnosis or not we not whether to self quarantine that diagnosis wasn't coming back for three or four days and that was a big problem the twenty percent of the patients that go into the hospital we have to treat everybody as covert positive until we have a definitive diagnosis and in that instance about forty five percent of the patients that would go into the hospital and be tested would be under it we would have a test result on them so we were burning through all that scarce protective equipment because we have to treat everybody the same so again we have to have a point of care test on that and then going forward as we open up healthcare and start doing some of that here that's been pent up and you've seen articles written recently about that where people are just staying home instead of engaging in the health system which they need to do we're going to need to provide that test at that pre operative Ryan or pre procedure time in order to make sure that we know those patients do not have coded so that diagnostic tests are going to have to be at the spot you're doing the care and they need to be able to be determined right away I would say point of care I just want to make sure that I understand when you see point of care that that could also include a pharmacy or someplace like that right or am I misunderstanding well if you're coming in for a diagnostic test or if you're coming in for a surgery it would be in a facility a lot of that where you do your pre operative testing the second piece that you talked about antibody testing yeah that's going to be important as it provides some clarification on whether or not you have had the disease previously now over the last week you've seen two things happen in that space which are concerning one is that we are getting incredible variation of results from a different tests that are being done the types of tests are being done and it's really caused us some pause in some concern but but clearly we've got to run that down because what we don't want to do is give somebody an impression that they have built up the immunities and then the second piece that's been a concern with the with the feedback we got from the World Health Organization over the weekend that perhaps having those antibodies does not necessarily protect you again from getting this virus I think more work needs to be done in that space because the consequences of thinking you're bulletproof on this and you're not gonna get it again is a problem so okay I don't wanna get all dystopian on everybody but Brian described to me than what our world is a light going forward is it we all just have to get used to a lot more testing wearing masks and potentially I mean you got you oversee a massive hospital system seven hospitals in New Jersey I think roughly seventeen thousand members almost five thousand physicians eleven counties five million people you know have access to your system is it a case that you know how we go about getting procedures it can be very different and we have to just get used to it that's gonna become the new norm and we also will have health facilities that are separated into virus where people have the virus and those places that do not you know the first the first thing I want to say is that our hospitals are safe I would I would argue our hospitals are very safe compared to some of the other things we engage in in our communities as we seek our activities of daily living so we're we're safe to begin with but as we think about needing to continue to care for this virus we will as our volumes go down in our hospitals these patients will be contained in in very specific areas where they won't be interacting with other patients the team members that will care for them will care for those patients and not care for other patients during their ships and we need to make sure that we have safe pathways through our organizations so that we don't have a people intersecting inadvertently and all those steps are being put in place literally as we speak we also have when we do turn the unit over and have it become a non covert unit we do a terminal cleaning in there and make sure that everything is safe so so patients shouldn't be safe shouldn't be scared and there are state the thing that we need to think about though to your question is this will be a period of wearing masks this will be a period of maintaining social distance this will be a period where you can't bring your entire family and on your office visit those are the kinds of things that we're doing we're gonna continue to really use telehealth in a big way but we're also in the process of opening our our offices he met to meet a lot of physician practices and we're doing that also and so I guess just to to drill down and a further level how long does the sort of era of social distancing masking and all of that last day in your estimation brand is it till we have a vaccine or is it what what we need to see in order for get a life to even optically look something like close to normal you know in a perfect world that's the answer it's a vaccine but it but the reality is that that's going to take awhile so we've got to continue to pursue a couple of things one is we've got to pursue effective treatments for this disease because of that will go a long way in itself to taking the scare out of this the second thing that we've got to work on is just continuing to educate the public about the importance of washing your hands and you know a lot of common sense you know the kinds of things that give you learned when you were a kid and make sure that we're hearing to those things but we also are going to be in a position where our lives are going to be a lot different you know I think about restaurants you know paper disposable menus instead of something that C. two hundred it'll seat fifty in those all have huge impacts on those areas industries but we will be in a different place but the key thing again just to go back to it is we've got to we've got to be able to have testing available during that when we do get an outbreak right we are on that in doing the tracing we need to do and that is kind of the blocking and tackling right a public health system trying just just got about thirty seconds here are you bracing your team on preparing your team that potentially for another second wave here and just got to be quick yes we are we are absolutely preparing for that wave and we will pray that it doesn't happen but we will be there as we always are to serve our community safely and that's really what we're all about all right so much we really appreciate it thank you so much Brian granularity it really thoughtful conversation realistic conversation about where we are on the medical front as it comes to the health system Carol he is the CEO of Atlantic health system journeys on the phone from Morristown your great state of New Jersey and my great state of New Jersey and just understanding a bit more of what life is like on the other side and I think you know the more information we know the more secure we will feel about kind of re entering and so it's really great to get some time with him all right coming up we're gonna check in on a an interesting story that's in Bloomberg businessweek magazine this week and it all has to do that active passive management kind of added again all right let's get FirstNet.

Bloomberg LP Bloomberg philanthropies caterpillar Merck
"lp" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"lp" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"It shouldn't be there and it's called able protein little a and you must pronounce it as little as that means small case rather than capital. A lie protein capital is able protein a one at the main April protein on and HDL particle. So if you tell me you got lightbulb protein a, how do I know? Are you talking about? You got h. e. l. particles are you talking about little a, which clearly identifies to me this potentially pathogenic atherogenic LDL particle. So used the correct terminology with everything and Peters. Got that nice spa. Cass on it. Dr metrics of is that prison in you or not is most labs are an LP little a mass, which is the way in a desolate of plasma of the weight of your entire all your l. particles. Everything that's in there. Triglycerides cholesterol, ester, there phospholipids any lie protein that is carrying an Aibo lifeboat little and you wait. Off the LDL density, so. But you're weighing everything. You're not way able little a, you're not measuring able little a per se. Yes, that has a molecular way. But the molecular weight of April b. Higher than the molecular weight of April little a, but you're measuring that too. When you do an LP little a mass, but the molecular weight of Aibo be is known because it's pretty much the same. Whereas the molecular weight of APL little a is very valuable. So that's another reason l. p. little mass becomes a useless metric and how do I know how many cholesterol triglycerides phospholipids ten thousand other lipid Moi these other proteins are on that particle. I don't, and you have a heterogeneous mixtures of particles that would have variable amounts of all of those constituents. So you can see there's going to be a weakness to measuring LP little a mass. Now, if it's really high, you probably got too many l. p. little particles. But since there's almost no more debate that the best metric for our Elliott particles is low density Leiper, protein particle number..

LP Aibo Cass Peters l.
"lp" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"lp" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Think what you just said about just wanting to be yourself and wanting other folks to be themselves to is exactly right i think that's actually how like that's totally how i feel there is a lot of like queer people feel that i think sometimes is is not that concisely stated but like i think that's really the i mean if i had to say what my my goal as an artist or like as a human or into group of friends was it would always be that would just yeah yeah right right to be better version of myself trying to go their speed enlightenment or your own version of enlightenment on other people which is kind of what has been going on since the very dark ages you know like i think that people are so concerned with what you know their neighbor is doing that they're they're just you know when they've just got to be concerned with themselves i even though like you have to reach out obviously outside of yourself but but being just not taking care of that i is is just so counterproductive ultimately for everyone you know because then you've got people just running around with these like completely void of what's really happening in wanting to like try to like force their thoughts on other people you know i mean i can say much but i'm sure but you know what i mean i think it's you know maybe different people get maybe different people also can fall different places on that spectrum and that's okay too yes i would say like for what you do like used in up on stage in sing songs and there isn't a one to one relationship between a song and like a thesis statement paragraph like it's not how songs work versus like i'm onstage being like this is what you should think because this is what i should think right and all of that is great folks should should take in like as much as they can and go to wherever they want to get their needs met so i think like people you know i mean it's no secret and i think you know it's pretty evident that well i mean might not be ever as pinon but i feel like you know it's sounds like an obvious choice but i feel like ellen has done more for gay people than anyone ever you know and she there are people literally in the i'll say just the middle of the country just for example that have completely you know you know views on gay people that are you know less than stellar you know and then but we'll watch your show every day and they don't even know that they're secretly or not so secretly being made more tolerant because they love this person and can't like you know get through their day with a person who is living a true and that's you know that's that is the thing i think and i think that that you know that such an example to everyone and i and i'm just like i would like to like do that my own way in a for sure not me i don't wanna be ellen she has no money yeah and is a failure yes she's laughing all the way to the bank laughing all the way to the bank and making the world better hey this was a conversation for your time thank you and i want to ask you one final thing before we let you go which is just a shout out of quiapo which is just like a person place or thing made you feel more comfortable in yourself be the person you are i don't know i often think about i think just on a musical tip like freddie mercury for sure you know what is wild i have been so many episodes of this show nobody has said freddie mercury up well how did he get skimped yeah i don't know because you know my favorite thing is that like his band was named queen he looked he looked and there was a bunch of like you know whatever heterosexual men going all these goes song works i talk about like how often the songs are played at like nba games basketball warm ups and i'm leah y'all number one you're right this is a great song i bet this about something you don't even know.

"lp" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"lp" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"I go back to jim carey right exactly what about this is an interesting thing now that i wasn't even thinking about this when you were talking about places like russia okay do you like people that live in russia i do other people that would like that live there well i like i kind of like all people i'm very like i kind of feel very inclusive i don't have i don't run with either or like i don't like kind of a haven't clung to the community really that much in my life he of course i worked at you know my share of cable ours and stuff like that but i just always felt very at home in all all kinds of groups you know so i do i really like russian people and that's what i said it's not what i said not deal like them i mean like do you look like joe is it like is here you are you're loyal people aren't even which there are yeah they're they're they're my there for sure yeah and they they national travel as much as you do sometimes being like i don't know like scary you're out there with like an unusual look in the yes it's wild don't speak the language that's what i'm asking about not do you like rush like desperately brushing russians no i really do i swear to god i do yes yes yes more so just like how do you feel in the world do you feel safe going out there you know i'll be honest i don't feel unsafe i don't like again i'm coming from a place of i'm i don't have an agenda except to do what i'm there to do and that's to you know kind of play music for people in kind of commune musically and i think that i feel like i really would like to keep it like that i think that just by being myself is the way to kind of make a statement and gather people together she like you know celebrate that and them doing that as well and i don't know you know and i think you know it's a slow it's possibly a slower process to just do that but i do think that it's like you know molecule by molecule like people like oh like the tolerance goes level goes up you know for people that you know and again inclusion like feel like i feel like really like like when i'm singing he don't want a place that i know is not as comfortable with the you know people being gay whatever and i you know i look at like a really being a you know there'll be like you know three or four thousand people and in a crowd and on just like you know not on purpose but i find myself like looking at the men and being like you know like what's up thanks for you know like like i can't thank them it's cool that you're here you know like or like whatever people just like i appreciate them kind of getting it in and you know i don't know who's putting their their their feelings or their beliefs aside to come and see me if they're doing that at all i just think that by i don't know a trying to give off the energy not to get too hippie about but that you know i also like i want to be tolerant myself you know and and receive and give tolerance even people you know i'll hang out with people i know are not tolerant just to kind of be like hey what's up it's nice to just hang with cool gay person no i don't want anything you know this is the don't really get it but it's cool i.

russia jim carey
"lp" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"lp" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Like a big game yeah you're given name this when we give cool i bet a lot of people think you changed it yeah i mean maybe i feel like from when i was a little kid it was actually kind of difficult because people would always assume i was a boy and win your child and you are a girl that is embarrassing like for some reason we're trained to believe that's a mirror saying and as opposed to just like who cares like why would it matter what what i am but yeah as a kid there's like nothing more shameful than so many thinking loose you know something you're not and all my god all the time and i had like a bowl cut and i'm just like i'm nice to meet you know what we issues young woman don't make me hoti young woman i remember one time i got like i got like served as a little kid when i was wearing like a women's bathing suit and i was just like like open you're just please gummy like little just like little slack because i women's baiting so many things our people usually goes boy often and and i remember one time i was like steered toward a bathroom and i just went in it because the person had said there's the bathroom and you know sit down and like look next to me and i'm like well that woman has gigantic feet wow wow and then i was like wait a second no woman has that big of these are like a size fourteen right you know i did see urinals when i walked in it was like and i was like not still like young so i was like jesus christ apps like how do we get out of here doot doot doot doot doot the whole thing absolutely.

"lp" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"lp" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Like like water is an just has so many like forms and also get right around you yeah really yeah congrats i also don't speak italian and my last name is in italian is the name that is given to orphans who age out of the system in our number so actually literally means bastard and so when i i lived in i know right i lived in italy for a while and and i would introduce myself to people and then they could just tell like i was never even trying to like speak i was taking classes and stuff but i'll always taking english was on instant ten like then he would be like do you know what you're less means i would i be was like like yes no i do i went to bali one time in an lp is a jail oh wow i don't know if it's every jail but it might be the biggest jail there or just jail in general and every time i say my name to so when they they'd laugh and i was like what is it and he goes that'd be jailed that'd that'd be be like like jail i was like oh okay you know you know it's kind of weird but yeah i'm sorry you know hey you know what brings people together laughing about her your last name means faster than what's after brings together yeah oh absolutely i mean and you know basically the common denominators bring us together yeah exactly i i ain't gonna shame i know what it means did you have you always gone by help he in musical yes i have a hard like people used to be a you know very hard to google your name it'd be like i don't i mean i just felt like it just fit it was just like the right thing you know i feel like it it just if felt i it was like i worked at a restaurant you know right you know in the beginning of like doing music and they had another laura there so a friend of mine at a camp i went to i as a kid called me l p and i remember i liked it you know i remember to appeal to me at the time but i'm not like i wasn't you can't make a nickname spread you know it's like that's like one of the rules nicknames you know they just have so but i call myself l p there then everybody's sort of call me l p and then the people like my band started calling me lp and then it just went from there and i just remember it just felt right you know and i was just like you know i mean call it my my daikin clinicians you know like it's like agenda listeners right yeah i need you know you meet a lot of like you know you meet a lot of other fellow lesbians who are like of or ilk sorta an arab be like you know jersey pj every whatever many initially yeah so i could see what like i know why would appeal to me because i did always feel like i didn't like you know i still feel kind of strange like just marching into the the the bathroom that has the little lady the little stick figure of address on it you know i mean i'm sure as i'm sure a lot of people do it's like a weird so i was always like kind of you know feeling that and i think that was the first like oh this feels much better okay and then and then i don't know and then i don't really i didn't realize that it was gonna make me calm like kind of kind of want reject my my given name but then i you know now i say like you know two people name you that haven't met you yet don't know you so i think it's completely valid to like find your name and then use it you know so this psychic said one time that when i said my full name she's always saw a river when i said l p she saw a lightning bolt in there you go perfect i see that lighting i hear that i'm i'm really lucky because my name does feel right to me cameron is.

"lp" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"lp" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"You go and there's just like so what are you there like of italian they're never say american lower my share italian i mean i mean you know i'm speaking right now what are you talking about you know they don't really understand like they're just like so into being a talian and it's like they don't really you know yeah and you know the the monica in the whatever it is you'll to then have a song that really well there with that being like it's just like listen i think that songs hit people in several different ways you know i think there's there's the the tangible of like i love what this song says i love how i feel when listened to it but then there's this i don't know this was like this quiet way that it creeps into your your heart and and makes you just you know when a song lyrics end miltie kind of like feel like the same thing they're saying the same thing you know it it's a very powerful instrument and i don't know how this song did that really but it seems to have done it with a lot of people like really like an a wide age ranges well and i don't know like i said i can only be grateful for it but it was really really wildly interesting to me like how it went down with people and and yeah it was pretty a pretty i mean the the word isn't envious but i don't have the other word coming out of your ability to it my art if you can't speak english and then also if you don't understand a lot about american culture is on so many different levels i sale to a lot of my musician friends because you can enjoy music from like so many different angles and you can also enjoy it if you're listening to the lyrics or if it's like happening in the distance and you're just like having a glass of wine i it's a really yeah it is cool it's a cool area you know even like you know it's it's different medium obviously than film because you have to be like you know like totally focused and yeah and that's why you know music can really it it's so so much.

"lp" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"lp" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Didn't plays shows at all because they were just trying to find my identity they don't like as a that's just that's also tough to find when you're like hung up on the wall you know what i mean like somebody to find your identity while you're like what you're like in a state of rest yeah and i also like just individually as as a person as a singer i'm kind of like a a nominally as far as like gina a little bit because i i looked like kind of like people that don't know me then hear my music later like seldom i think like like oh i knew is going to sound like that you know i kind of you know look a little bit more like i'd be a rocker and then kind of a pop artists and then it's kind of got a kind of operatic kind of i don't know like almost like a crooner kind of to it i don't i don't really know like i'm kind of like a i'm at a loss how to describe it not in a lofty way but in like i truly don't know really what to tell also like i'm not look on music journalist but also your the way that you use your band you sometimes like showcase an individual instrument or something lately you know almost that almost sounds like something you'd hear in lake nashville or texas or something like we are a little bit of a the trump just totally exactly like unto that's the thing and i and so and i end you know i do it like i think that was also a difficult thing with like brevard companies trying to find my sound and that and then it worked for me as an artist you know i tried to really you know try to be diverse that way because that's the only way you get cuts you know it's like and you know since you know the birth of napster and all that and you know streaming since that very beginning songwriting has been kind of fighting to get back it's you know like even saying these these songwriters that i wrote with is used once they made insane money off these things even even an album track on a madonna record back in the day was a lot like more than you can imagine you know and now it's like way less than you could imagine like you know an album track on a very big stars record could be very just very like modest sit touring now like is that we're the radio is still a big thing but touring is really what you're trying to do so you're like trying to get the hit so that you can then sell the tour you guarantees go up if you have a hit but like people still make money and you know you could tore off a hit for a long time and then you know even if you keep up you you know know your music and your crowd you can yeah you could tore say inevitably but like you know you could if you really worked at it you know and it's it's a very you know thank god for a lot of people yeah yeah it's just like a different model where again it's like you're trying to get your music in front of folks that they'll come by the tickets so that you can live off of that money which is also boosted up stuff like social media now well that's another whole thing even like with getting discovered and getting funding your people like i feel like one of the things that i always thought to myself i didn't know how big or whatever i could go but i just knew that out in the world there were enough people that would dig what i was doing that's kind of what i was trying to get to your look is that you know i think something that might be perceived as like new and then that's scary like how new or unusual thing is scary that opposite side of that coin is a new or onion usual thing is like a lightning rod for folks that look at you like.

"lp" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"lp" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Otherwise it could get because there's just not enough time to make everybody your your best friend yeah but there is but there has to be like a a level of respect and and sincere like almost like friendship i guess directed toward them because i feel like you're sharing something like you know it's like being on stage and singing to people is like sharing shit in other words i just ideology and that's kind of gross right no for sure i think i mean like we're not going to have somebody maybe over to your house and talk to them about like a juror relationship with your mom as i just think it's it's like it's weird though it's about a personal sometimes it's about sharing a common thing on specific moments yet maybe not on the trajectory of like a lifetime more way that friendship would have knowledge outside of that but you you're saying that the you're working for like a fan connection and like friendship there and i totally get that but i also think i mean you're writing songs so that you get to write songs yeah of course like what well first of all i feel like i wanna even just start sort of back on like when you started writing you know like right away when i decided to do music so you're writing and i had no idea like there's no for me i didn't go to a music school or anything so i just i don't know it's just kind of like throwing things at the wall and waiting for something to stick and also just waiting to like get a you know what what really happened i think is like when i when i finally i was writing songs and i was i got my first big india deal in two thousand one you know and i was like very i was like okay i'm cool i got you know like there's some kind of structure happening here and i i wrote a bunch of songs and i made this record and then they like try to get my publishing it's you know it's the story from this point on like could like quickly go into so grapes lynn sounding just because it's like you have to describe the music business in how you know what a dark plastic tunnel it is whatever the hunter s thompson could is but i just like you know that's when i feel like i got more structure and started like really writing with intent you know to make records in before that it was just trying to keep afloat and write songs yeah put out a little cd nc give it to like friends and friends and friends but so then that that record deal kind of awry it just was like it was like not a house accords like money wise but it was just like just push wise and people wise it's like some very difficult sometimes to get you know there's tons of bands signed to labels every year but like the the catapult only has one stone at a time there's so then my next was on tour for a few years and then i got i got involved with a guy who knew a guy new guy or a lot of guys like in the major label system and then i i got like a bidding war out of south by south west that year guts and scientists def jam and that was the big people like you know i guess by la read and a head i started you know they like a song that i had but they were like trying to find a direction for me so i was like three years in that system can i ask a question about south by south west experience yeah just because i also been there stand up and so like i i've seen a little bit and this is a new stand up in that i didn't know so they do and now they think now they separated they put stand up with the film and like the interactive for a while it was with the music changes like living nightmare i'm kidding one time i was i was i was just telling jokes and snoop dogg started to play like you could hear snoop thaad playing his hits also sponsored by doritos so he was shooting doritos into the audience i could hear him being like g st doritos and the the sound of a dorito kennedy.

three years one stone
"lp" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"lp" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"And then like not having a home base when i was flying in out i was like going to hotel rooms and having like a somewhere to put a bag down yeah well different five i mean i i actually the the bus is great for me because i i get a lot of sleep go to bed at like one or two and wake up at like noon and then i've a we get a day room and then i like to yoga st my voice and then go to soundcheck it the thing i think is hardest it's like it's a very it's uniquely lonely in a way you know just because you're even with your friends you know like i get like a get i'm trying to really really cultivate and and be better about when i get in town and seeing my friends and stuff because really do get it's really beautiful i mean like fan wise i mean surrounded by like love you know and like and people meet and greets and all that stuff and you know just even walking around for show it's like but going you know like ending up alone like after the show like every single night for like over a year is like you know it's like a wild it's like you start to get a little punchy like i don't know just like again like uniquely lonely but it's an you have to get your your head wrapped around it also do a lot of work during those meetandgreet some stuff i mean they of course you're my experience has been that like you're receiving stuff and people are being kind to you you also kind of need to be a person to them that is the the person that was just on stage and the person doesn't really get to like have a lot of complexity which is you know like you know you can't like i can't burst into tears somebody but some in burst into yeah and i also really lonely compiled as a year experience not getting to have what's maybe like a more normative bs change where like somebody gives you something in you gives them something i mean i'm lucky because i have like my band might guys and crew and everything and that really becomes your family get become very important in the scheme of things you know like i think that that's invaluable it's not like it so you got to be careful about that like you know make sure you have people that like and you know my management and everything that like it it sounds like in another job it would sound really sad that your only friends with your employees isn't that sad you know like you're gonna be like they're paid till a few you know that right like they love me i married another so that we could like well hey world marrying a musician americanization did did you tour together she did she came on tour with me we we did a few shows together in europe we did like like a few in italy if you in france and and stuff and it was great it really like you know even my fans of bought until like us as a couple and in a really nice way and i became now fans of her and and fans of us you know like literally like drawings and dolls and stuff like that and it's beautiful and they're so sweet and you know that's the thing like the fan thing i don't wanna like diminish that in any way as far as like even like i think even as like you know quote unquote as superficial as it could be a feel like it's deeper to me and i feel like that you know it's the only thing that exists it's the only reason why you're doing it there's like you know so that has to be really honored and understood in like so i feel like you know they're part of everything that's going on so i try to honor that in value that can't like iran the line of like bringing people closer into the fold in keeping you know.

"lp" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"lp" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Like because there's so much more and he did all the things you know like really you know especially like now even he the second wave of like having you know number one's and also for a while right before that those of other the big songs part of his career happened he had like the kind of like it was like tenuous yeah like he he was best known for baby and it was like his wjm was surpassing his actual achievement ray and now he's like kind of even doubt a little bit you know sword i mean he has to keep it up obviously but is this like a lot you know it must be a lot to really deal with and plus you know his whole the whole like he's like you just physically saw eddie worship looks that's a whole other you said that that's a dangerous all these to want something further along it isn't it isn't you know i've found that like being like kind of you know like here we go you know i put this shirt on today so i'm gonna total hippy grew somebody trust physical advice i'll put the nike on but yeah i just like i think that being grateful for where you are and understanding the like you know where you are with like you know clearly intention of working for the future in bigger you know that that's where like i try to stay just because i've been at the like you know i you know and there are things that happen just on a daily basis in in my career right now that i'm just like why why am i not you know but you know and i doing this podcast in this country is completely different thing that i would be doing in other countries like in europe like right now like that is having with huge moment yeah i'm living completely different world like i you know i like number one yeah i wasn't a bunch of countries and i got very big and like you know there's a pretty famous and she said like you know like people are these ladies this year and it was just like within this year like there wasn't a the end of life from the end of two thousand sixteen like on and it just like kind of you know what was the thing that happened in twenty changed i had a i have a celica loss on that like what like number one in seventeen countries but it's like an i sorted touring like nonstop ahead like a pretty much between like september two thousand sixteen and now have been home probably a total of like three or four months like how are you doing i'm good i'm really good i mean it's like you know it's really hard on my relationship at times you know but she's a musician and and sorting tour more and more so we're like kind of starting to find our balance a little bit but it's really hard for a minute because we were only together for a year before i started touring like non stop and i mean like non stop like where it's like you don't like i don't yeah i can really see i see why journey road although saucer lily how do they didn't have faced how do you like take care of your body i mean it's i do a yoga person i do it every day and i you know i don't really well for few months they started like you know having a couple of drinks you know because of sheer like boredom for the other twenty three twenty four hours in the day besides the show but i don't drink in a kind of an i you know i'm just i don't know it just keep it together like you know like fit but i mean like yoga is a really good answer i mean i so canucks usually the like long term model is like you go to a place for a weekend or whatever but and do like a club and you do five shows there in your so you're not moving around that much but for me when i started playing theaters and even before that i was like doing rock clubs as like one nighters and i thought i kind of understood the vibe of what it is a musician and then this last fall i went on a bus bus tour for the first time doing stand up and i realized that i have no idea what musicians are doing to their bodies because like sleeping on a bus.

twenty three twenty four hours four months
"lp" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"lp" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Said about your dad that they need said about his father i wasn't trying to be like did your dad for law is clearly didn't but like his father was an accountant was only that and he is father was actually the funniest man he'd ever known he says and he said that his father lost in his fifties lost his job and and when he witnessed like someone's kind of backup plan job you know his father like failing he was just like oh so you can fail it the plan b the backup plan and i was like it was so profound to me like that that thought you know that that's all that and then he was like you know it was just part of his whole kind of like can i curse on this yes fuck tobacco plant thing you know nope we're live here they know i mean i think that's that's huge that is a really good message to get it was on it's really it's deep that thing you know my only my only worry for him in it was that he seems a little airing on the side of like i just don't it seems like nothing nothing can make them happy nothing could make him really sad either right now he's in that like buddhist place which i is interesting to me but i can't really hang with the like not getting too excited about the the good or the bad you know like not getting upset about the bad as fire but not getting excited about the good is like like no i want to i don't want to do that to celebrate the competitors i think that jim carey's you're you're talking about being and that's in that space yeah what in god's name is that a person's life like i literally can't even imagine he you know his climb up was so interesting because he had all the you know he he kind of like new he just like he said something about getting a fifteen million dollar check in probably like ruining the story like like well ruining the story for someone who wants to see it as a we'll stop put him also probably butchering the story i know that it was like a little bit like you know he he just like it's just like some people just know and he was like he wrote himself a fifteen million dollar check and then suddenly he was getting like fifteen million dollars for like the mask or something yeah i mean i heard that story for sure i think that something i always think about with somebody like that is so like i'm in comedy you know like i grew up on that story i look at that and i'm like oh man that's the dream but then i also think about his age when that happened to him and he's like i mean i don't know whatever he was late twenties early thirties and what happens when you have that when you you're at that age and then you're lucky enough to like live awhile longer he's person i don't mean him specifically but i mean more lake something i look in my life to figure out is like constantly frustrated that i'm not in a different place like i wish somewhere else but then i think about it's really dangerous place to be and then i also think about like well if you have all your want early yeah there's what happy go more of like people like justin bieber and people like that where it's like a you know an it's just a good difficult place to to exist.

accountant fifteen million dollar fifteen million dollars
"lp" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"lp" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"And it's very interesting to to hear that and see that and you know and he sees me like you know doing really well leno and and you know even monetarily doing well at entertainment which was like you can't do that you know that's an it's trail yeah it's a trail to sixteen this like yeah right silliness it's always been he's always been like i remember he was like i think you know i've never really said this but he was a first person i sang to when i was a little kid and you know and he was like very like he goes why sound like the radio like really like like it was really sweet and i remember going then my then i that is done i started singing a little bit from my mom who was a singer when she was very amazing saying it was like an opera singer and like like saying according to haul a bit and stuff not not famous at all but just like you know that's like she was she wanted to maybe pursue that and then got married in the whole thing but but then i sang in front of her and then she was like you say you singing back there hitting the car and i was i and then that made me feel good about it so you know here's really i like you know a little lift up there but but matter so much like seize your thing yeah well i tell people now like sometimes parents said being you know like very careful like even grimace if you could open them out to sing could ruin them and not you know a career but ruined their their thing to singing i i i've met so many kids like when you know as a camp counselor for a long time and there'd be kids and it was like ninety percent of the time it'd be like this kid who liked didn't really want to sing it'd be like a parent or a sibling kind of like oh like are made a phase or anything because it's like such a it's such a vulnerable like kind of like you know lightning rod of your soul like especially when your kid just to sort like you know singing you don't know why you do what you you here's your hero the people singing and you want to sing and it's a very emotional place and if you get like you know even an inkling of like kind of like like embarrassment in the beginning stages it could be like a devastating thing but did you see that jim carey andy coffman yeah comanche doc no it's the one that's pretty recent no and yeah it's about him it's like this really interesting kind of like thoughts on fame and and stuff and i found it amazing and the thing you.

leno jim carey ninety percent
"lp" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"lp" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Well first of all i had everything you were saying was interesting in polling that adobe so many times and i'm like you know that old thing with the frog that's like hello my hobby then i sit there in front of my just completely i do know exactly what the frog you're talking he doing with fro on my show i have folks introduce themselves would you introduce yourself my name is l p and i'm a singer songwriter of the whatever variety i don't know is it really tvd still there yeah it's really interesting to hear what people say about themselves when you just like give a little bit of space i still don't know what's really going on you know i mean i think i think i'm a songwriter i really because i don't think there's anything to do without that part you know it's like the singing is besides the point because i think there's a lot of insane voices out there but they have to be clothed in song otherwise it's like difficult to find a way to walk around so the songs are everything i cannot relate to what you're talking about at all because i have no musical talent it's really interesting to me to hear you like divide those things up because i mean you do have a great voice thank you have a great voice did you fall in love with songwriting i know etta singing you know i sang but i was like from an academic family that wasn't like those like oh that's great that you can saying but school sure school but i you know i felt like my mom passed away when i was a teenager and i just felt like that was the way to the way to go is kind of do something that i loved and i felt like i i didn't really articulated in my head but i was like you know a love singing i i kind of wanted to see what happens instead of like really just kind of pushing myself to go to school which i was it was like everybody's drilled into your head that that's the thing and also the the fact that like when you accomplish things school wise i didn't really know any other currency at the time but like when you accomplish things in school then you get to the next level then you keep going until you get a degree which then that turns into your currency etc so i didn't really no anything other than that way of getting through life at the time so and it didn't say well i'm going to forfeit that that kind of thing i just decided i was going to try my own thing and i didn't even know like not necessarily music just didn't know so just like but i started like you know china fiddle with the whole band thing in new york city and and and figure out how to parlay that into something that was actual which it's you know void of structure in the beginning that sounds scary it's what you're talking about sounds really scary because i i understand that well like i did i went through college in the night even started part of grad school because like you're saying it's like this feeling of being an artist wasn't something that i really that was modeled to me at all i didn't understand what the entertainment industry was like i didn't know there was a job of there but the other side of entity corralling of entertainment and i didn't know about any of it i was just all like it's just like a big nebulous yeah and so but i went so what age were you when you're well first of all when did you voice when when i was a kid i did but like yeah like late teens early twenties is i kind of like getting you know what are you going to do you know you're going to decide to go off into you know academic land you know or or you know i have a brother of older than me and that's a brain surgeon now you know what i mean like he sure and he like you know and i think it's just i but i always got.

adobe
"lp" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"lp" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"Fourth tuesday at noon on wrr lp ninety seven point three fm richmond it's chic to be geek yo what's up everybody welcome back to wrr lp ninety seven point three fm richmond my name is anderson in this is causing effect today's calls an effect is on beat two k so that last song that we just heard was imax which they changed their name from immature to i am x and that was a group of market houston who is a mario brother who is one of the members of beats uk then before that we had jagged ads with let's get married we had drew hill with never make a promise so we saw like we've if you followed the whole show and you've been through this whole ride of calls on effect and you've seen the rmb journey from the late seventies with jackson five in wards seventies eighties with jackson five all the way we moved all the way to the two thousand early two thousands were about to get into bc k you've seen like the transition of rb music at that time and how it went from you know going from a happygolucky sound and then going into a more commercial feel with rb music in a slowdown pace then incorporating elements of hip hop into it as well with the new jack swing style and then transitioning into more the lovey dovey phase and beats uk's at this point where you kind of had like this clash of of everything where pop music before then you know before two came out beats uk came out was primarily dominated by like these white male groups at the time like instinct and backstreet boys and you know all these other groups that came out during that.

imax houston jackson uk wrr lp anderson two k
"lp" Discussed on Minority Korner

Minority Korner

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"lp" Discussed on Minority Korner

"And then at one point he was reading was they worry where it was like what do i do with my life or something like that and somebody yells out i love rhetorical question chance oh my god i gotta go far enough gotcha okay i i know he made it together this is you i would say it's about threefourths of the way through right it's almost over okay kenya people are rowdy and one guy is so angry during a pause he'does shuttle farc up at bloomberg lp naina that's just its existence disrupt sir i know you're listening to the european i know europe set in like everybody needs lee relearn etiquette you don't wanna is i think people are just so use the watching their netflixing home and they can just see whenever the pboc they were all the time if you will forgot like millennials are clearly not going to live entertainment enough to know you can't do you do is it's ridiculous okay so that how did bill respond was showed us communicate with shallow isn't read is quote he was just saying he just ploughed right on through saying i felt creating hurt okay so here is not the point guard filtered in using meredith so here is the minority corner version that i wanted to talk to you about as a bunch of white people will yes but again this is me saying bill murray who k because i i'm glad you're doing this because i already knew i was site i am from.

europe pboc point guard meredith bill murray kenya farc bloomberg lp