35 Burst results for "LBJ"

Outrage over lack of charges in Breonna Taylor's death turns into protests across the US

Todd and Don

00:56 sec | 2 d ago

Outrage over lack of charges in Breonna Taylor's death turns into protests across the US

"Ng last night here in Austin. In fact. 11 people were apprehended. The rally was in conjunction with others across the nation following the results of a grand jury, charging one Louisville police officer with wanton endangerment in the shooting death of Briana Taylor, so many took their frustration and anger all over downtown. He came out here because we're just sick and tired of black laws being taken, especially by the police. At times. This meant blocking the street, which prompted a police presence and warning. If you go in the roadway or block the roadway, you will be arrested. Some took that as an opportunity to scream and yell, adopt other's through roadside cones and stutters in the path of approaching police vehicles. Quarters witness some protesters getting detained by a P D, but officials have yet to confirm Anything about arrests or charges. John Cooley News radio K. LBJ, You go.

Briana Taylor John Cooley Endangerment Austin Louisville K. Lbj Officer
Biden campaign expands legal team in preparation for voting fight in November

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

04:51 min | Last week

Biden campaign expands legal team in preparation for voting fight in November

"The New York Times reports Joe. Biden's campaign has set up a special litigation unit comprised of two former solicitors general and hundreds of lawyers in preparation for a prolonged legal battle over November's election results still with US Victoria de Frencesco Soto and David. Plus David. What. Does this tell you as opposed to simply members of the non. Pol Public. While it's a really all star group of legal talent. Now listen any presidential campaigns ready for things like recounts. Legal challenges keeping polls open when there's problems but obviously, we're facing a challenge of order magnitude greater than we've ever seen. So this group five away Bob Bauer has helped leading this been political words with him over the decades nobody better to leave. This is going to bring great intensity today it's So option one is You're dividing campaign win the vote by enough margin that no matter what Donald Trump is hailing into the wind afterwards doesn't matter but you need to be prepared for every scenario. This race could tighten certainly in the battleground states it could get very close. So unfortunately, you're you're focused on right now early voting. Monitoring what's happening with the postal service election day a shenanigans lines, but they're also clearly having to focus on the post-election period a which is we've never had that in American history. Tab a presidential campaign worried that if they win the election the opponent that they defeated one except the results. So their mandate is one that stretches I, think four past the election again, I, think the remedy to that is win enough on election night ended the days afterwards when the votes counted to make clear that Joe, Biden's won the presidency no matter what Donald Trump house about but I do think i. was glad to see the level of talent because just as the Biden campaign has to focus on GEO TV and persuasion really making sure they maximize turn out in a Latino communities. We just talked about they need to focus with the same kind of intensity on these threats to not just their campaign but our democracy. and Professor Let's talk about this guy computer. He's one of Roger Stone's boys. He was a former frequent guest on CNN. He is now the chief spokesperson for the Department of Health and Human Services in normal times, and we should stress this in a normal White House the White House chief of staff would have fired this guy before sun up instead these quotes stand with no action against him quote and when Donald Trump refuses to stand down at the inauguration, the shooting will begin. He said the drills that you've seen are nothing he added if you carry guns by Ammunition Ladies and gentlemen because it's going to be hard to get professor I. Guess I'm thinking about all the good students at the LBJ school at the University of Texas and wondering if the lesson plan for this coming fall virtual oriented person is going to be teaching about the contested election of twenty twenty, which will remain in the lesson plan for decades to come in all the worst ways. I should mention that actually I was putting together a proposal for a signature course. Entitled the politics of Fake News but you know with the peg of Gouda and let's also note that he has no health background, right? So he is in health and human services, but really no expertise whatsoever and. When I see this, I keep thinking about the deflection, the the disco ball that is Donald Trump in trying to deflect away from the reality of the seriousness of the pandemic after Bob. Woodward's interview where we had a sense that trump new but it wasn't until last night that we really saw how engaged, how how much trump really new and that the fact is that he has done nothing. So in order to compensate for that, you see this full-fledged campaign by the president and his allies would I read into that is a circling of the. Wagons because they know that the American public is concerned. This is one of the top issues for the election. So they have to keep the flexing they have keep grading an alternative narrative hoping that it sticks hoping that they can fake fully make it. But Brian, my hope is in the American people. My faith is in the American people end that they're going to read beyond the the tin foil hat mentality of you know get ready because there's going to be shooting from the left in scientists in sweatpants by the way is how he described them.

Donald Trump Chief Spokesperson Biden JOE Bob Bauer Professor The New York Times United States David Pol Public Gouda Victoria De Frencesco Soto Department Of Health And Human Brian White House CNN Twenty Twenty
 Missing Kaufman County Mother, 2 Daughters Found Dead In Farmers Branch, Dallas

Chris Krok

00:34 sec | 2 months ago

Missing Kaufman County Mother, 2 Daughters Found Dead In Farmers Branch, Dallas

"Farmers branch police say they found a mother and two young Children dead in a car. This morning, The Kaufman County Sheriff's Department reported 31 year old Natalie Chambers and her daughter's four year old Isabel and two year old Elise, missing after they left their 40 home for a playdate in Grapevine and never returned. Farmers Branch officer Steve Rutherford says they found the three in chambers car off LBJ in midway at this point in time, the farmers branch detectives on scene investigating this situation and is an ongoing investing He says. If you have any information, contact police

Farmers Branch Natalie Chambers Kaufman County Sheriff's Depar Steve Rutherford Grapevine Isabel Officer
Pedestrian dies after crash with off-duty Dallas officer, police say

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:28 sec | 2 months ago

Pedestrian dies after crash with off-duty Dallas officer, police say

"Saman was run over by an off duty police officer last night. It was just about 10 o'clock and the officer again off duty and heading home driving. His personal car was heading west on the service Road, 6 35 LBJ near the high five. Officer says the victim's stepped off the curb and right in front of his car. That person was killed at the scene. No name has been released. Dallas Pedis traffic unit spent much of the night out there, taking measurements and speaking to potential witnesses. Heard.

Officer Saman
Robber Shoots, Critically Injures Dallas Convenience Store Clerk

Clark Howard

00:27 sec | 2 months ago

Robber Shoots, Critically Injures Dallas Convenience Store Clerk

"Ah convenience store clerk is in the hospital or after being shot during a robbery in Dallas this morning. Just before three o'clock and our man burst into the 7 11 on Abrams near 6 35 LBJ. Please don't yet know why. But the robber opened fire, badly wounding the clerk who was rushed to the hospital in critical condition. If it's available, detectives will be looking over security video to see how it all went down there. Not saying anything about any arrest.

Robbery Abrams Dallas
"lbj" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

05:57 min | 3 months ago

"lbj" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"I mean some of the stuff that LBJ said and that's the thing is he would use of derogatory swore while explaining what that he wants to do best for people for those people that he was slurring how do you make sense that I mean words are hopeful it hope rific an awful and there's no place in American society for that word especially but do you do we just throw away everything LBJ did for for the black community I think botched Vietnam but that's the thing there's no easy answer this stuff man none no easy answer anyway who we got we got this Steve Stephen Newport Hey Steve you're on the big one man what's going on hello everyone Hey I'm I'm doing alright man just trying to make sense all the stuff help me out you know we talk about Marge Schott we talk about all the things in the past exactly and all the other stuff right you know a path behind us looking at it and then moving forward on that shoot out to win that like today they looked into a lot of things we did way back when yeah on the procreating yeah yeah we have to regain it we have to like look at it yeah so called because you'll require to like progress right that's the way things happen yeah sometimes it takes right we pay some stand up people in government the shootdown go like it was that were not accepting it anymore yeah I think if it you know not change because without the heat and everybody wants to make sure everybody scared to change I want to make sure we progress we don't want to like live in the past right so a lot of wild forward thinking people a lot of progressives can get a look at this time because of what's going on right now with the lights and and all of to come out yeah five six yeah really yeah well I would even go there on that but it's time to move forward no word means like looking at her passing more like one of these things were kind of unacceptable and you control March shot in there yeah your new point where she grew up how she grew up again all our things in the past and things were not socially unacceptable back then but they are now right and so like if maybe it's making a man's pertaining like look that's progress yeah we didn't blow but differently thanks a lot Steve appreciate that man thanks that's a good point yeah but I I think what he was saying as we got to identify the things that we need to change but there's gotta be reason here man we gotta be reasonable we can't abolish all police do we need to do more for for our black communities yeah but we can abolish police because every time that happens we see desk go up more people get hurt we saw here in Cincinnati when when they were sort of some deep quote unquote D. policing in Cincinnati in two thousand one people just say it murders skyrocketed if she's not pretty it wasn't pretty we're coming up on the on the line here but man I should've brought Marge up earlier Hey Mary Ellen Goshen you wanna talk about Marge was going on well I wanted to say I understand their attitude completely yeah I grew up with a price will go up we loser I think we lost her yeah we had someone from Faisal wanna talk about March anyway more Marge god I should've brought her up and I need to do like a straw poll at the beginning this shows Hey Murray in Hyde Park you want to talk about March what's going on you're on the big one good to talk to you like to take my call no problem you know the thing was they never saw it it is that was going on when she was still around yeah mate perfectly knew about her history hello everyone today and head but you have to learn to go forward with the baseball stadium she made the two million dollar donation yeah they knew they knew that going forward I agree I'm more in a more condensed Schlechter those that know that you're going to get their fifteen minutes of fame by opposing everything she did right indeed the district to follow through with that why are people not addressing everything Robert Byrd did you he was the K. K. K. member yeah you know you can't have it both ways ask your question was what is it just me or did he work with your vinyl on legislation yes I just it's weird I've never seen that in the media huh he was who he was Hillary Clinton's mentor yeah yeah Robert Rosen bird was was not the most dollar human in the end the statues in the south for conservatory give since you will yeah because we not because the South Pacific yeah the lecture praising these people it's like okay we kicked your **** yeah this is what you get yeah and going forward you can't forget our history the bad part but mostly good parts you can't forget our district boy that's a really good point thanks a lot Marie I appreciate that yeah that's that's the and that's the fact that Abraham Lincoln statues I'm have been defaced there was another abolitionist and his name's escaping me something with a B. I thank but his statue was defaced like a week ago that I mean that do we need any more evidence of the abysmal failure of America's education system.

LBJ
John Dickerson on presidential leadership and "The Hardest Job in the World"

KYW 24 Hour News

04:47 min | 3 months ago

John Dickerson on presidential leadership and "The Hardest Job in the World"

"John Dickerson he is the author of a new book that's coming out on Tuesday it's called the hardest job in the world the American presidency John good to have you here great to be back market great to see you so you say the American presidency is in trouble it's over burdened mis understood and an almost impossible job to do and you started writing this before the pandemic before they had put on the crisis and before the current racial strife that we are in we we seem to be on that be beyond the cliche and this is a stress test on our democracy how are you thinking of where we are well that's exactly right I mean the book was finished before those three challenges but they highlight a central point of the book which is I went back and tried to look at the blueprint of the office what is what is it really at its most basic level and what it is is a job where big high stakes things happen that are surprises to the president and where everybody the president on down needs to have created a system for dealing with those kinds of emergencies so they can be ready when the crisis hits because when the crisis hits it's too late to kind of get ready on the fly **** account as a professor at Harvard he says the presidency is like an airbag you may not think about it all the time but when there's an emergency you want it to work so the excuse well no one could've seen this coming year saying the office is designed with that assumption that you need to be prepared for the thing you don't see coming that's right that's why LBJ referred to the office pardon me morning viewers as like being a jackass in a hail storm because sometimes you have just have to take it and what that means is that the job holds you to an extremely high standard and the reason it's important to take responsibility even for something that you didn't create is because that sets everybody's priorities it tells everybody on your political team you know what spending won't work I put my reputation on the line here the Buck stops with me and you better all solve this problem because my future is at stake if we don't deliver results and and don't put any energy into spending this and that's what the that's why the office is so hard it's why we treated with such reverence and seriousness because you're in a position where the Buck stops with you they act as you write in the book president trump has sort of changed that challenge that assumption when he says things like you know no I don't take responsibility for anything with this pandemic he has and in fact that's why he was elevated to the office because people looked at this office in which we ask the president to do too much and with tools that are either broken or what she what the he wasn't given in the first place a lot of what the president's been asked to do for the last several presidencies really is better housed in Congress are with governors are with mayors but we ask the president to do it because we run everything through the presidency which is why I wanted to take a look at what the office actually should do president trump was brought in by people said dismantle lots of it don't pay attention to a lot of these rules and norms and so he is both someone to evaluate but also because of that behavior he's an incredible measuring instrument for us to take a look at the office and say well what do we want this do we not want that and what should we replace it with well we are five months out from the selection and I wonder given all the stresses how you're thinking of the actual process because it feels like the institutions are are undergoing some real crisis in confidence from the public and it's just the functioning the mechanics of our democracy are are being called into question being able to vote in November how are you thinking of this well exactly at let's start on the voting in November one of the key things for a president for any national conversation and again we run them all through the presidency which isn't always great but if we look at the next election this is one of those problems it's on the horizon it is not yet in our lap the administration and and different agencies have been looking at the elections because they're worried about them being interfered with by the Russians and the Chinese now we have another problem with covert nineteen this is a problem everybody can see coming and that's a test of leadership can you focus on the things that are important but not urgent because even though they may not be urgent today election day is not today they will be urgent soon enough and when they become urgent you can't suddenly come up with a solution so this is in addition to the other three tests we have which is the economy coded and America's racial profile at the moment we have this fourth test coming which is can there be a peaceful transfer of power or a maintained maintenance of power with the incumbent which makes all people who are on the other side of the issue which is to say those people would not like Donald Trump to be reelected make them feel like the process was safe that is the hallmark of American democracy it was the thing the country was founded on that we can have peaceful transfers of power with no monkey business that's a big taste test facing

John Dickerson John Good
Booker says 'moral moment' must be met with change

Meet The Press

08:59 min | 3 months ago

Booker says 'moral moment' must be met with change

"Donald Trump is the first president of my lifetime who does not try to unite the American people does not even pretend to try instead he tries to divide us general Mattis is letter was a stunning and powerful I respected Germanos that he has every right to express his opinion that's his opinion and these comments from former White House chief of staff John Kelly I think we should look at people that are running for office and put them to the children they are what is their character like what is there what are their ethics are they willing if they are elected to represent all their constituents not just the base and joining me now is democratic senator Cory Booker of New Jersey senator Booker welcome back to meet the press you call this moral moment for this country but these protests are also trying to spur more than just awareness they're trying to spur a policy change will be more confident in that we're meeting a moral moment or that will actually lead to changes in our policy will be the same in fact when I look at everything from the suffrage movement to the labor movement in this country it's always been the people in the streets often young people who have demanded and forced a change in consciousness that made policy changes possible working all week with Kamel Harris and allies in the house to get real policies proposed and will be releasing a bill tomorrow for things that should have been done in this country a long time ago banning certain police practices creating deeper accountability and so I'm just grateful to see this kind of nonviolent protest outpouring the streets because they are leading their putting the pressure they're creating a possibility that our policies can reflect the spirit of this country that we can be in the law a more beloved nation you know you're you have a unique set of experiences you've been a mare you're a federal office holder in the Senate where should most of this change be enacted on the local level or or on your on the federal level I'm it's got to be enacted on every level we are a society where we are culpable we have created a nation distinct from any other on the planet earth we incarcerate the plurality of human beings incarcerate one out of every three women on the planet earth they are incarcerated or here in America we've taken so much of our treasure between the time I was in law school two time I once mayor we were building a new prison or jail every ten days and explicitly and implicitly we all have made a decision that we're going to treat mental illness with prison jail and police addiction with prison jail improve police poverty with prison jail and police and overwhelmingly African Americans with prison jail and police we now in America have more African American men under criminal supervision then call the sleeves of men that were slaves in eighteen fifty this is astonishing this is unacceptable we need to be more Regis in our compassion for one another more more ambitious in our imagination that we can create a society that's not so over policed or where police we don't tolerate certain tactics that have had a generation in fear you said at the beginning of this that eighty plus percent of Americans think this country's out of control well for black people in this country we thought this country's out of control in the way police is our communities and individuals for a very long time in this awakening is so important to create real substantive change not just lip service from politicians tell us something tell me how you're thinking is change being a mare at one point you thought you didn't want the federal government that you thought some of the oversight over the New York police department at the time and in different ways you even braced it since what did you learn over time about this issue well it shows the insidiousness of institutional racism well we are a majority black city in New York we had a majority black city council black mare black police chief and we knew we inherited a a police department with decades of challenges and so we went to work when I got into office to reform our police department but we didn't have the data we didn't have the transparency and it took the federal government and their accountability in their systems and data analysis to show that we were not moving as fast as we should and so we took on a very ambitious plans that extend from everything from changing our missile court system with drug courts and veterans courts and youth courts to pulling in experts from John Jay college just say you don't have to arrest people to create safer neighborhoods that there are other ways to go and I partnered with the ACLU before I left to set a national standard a collection of data collection practices so I learned the hard way that this is not a system that is always explicitly done by over racism this is a system that's real bait that we all have to take responsibility for and get practice it is bad to like a you're gonna see in the bill we're gonna release but just give greater transparency and greater accountability for those working with police I want to ask you about de funding the police last night in Washington DC on sixteenth street right next to the black lives matter letters the phrase deep on the police was painted down there and that is there's a lot of passion around that issue and when you hear that and the phrase may mean different things to different people but when you hear that what's your reaction I understand clearly the sentiment and the substance behind the slogan and so well thought slogan I will use are your people just dismiss it and don't get deeper into the substance as I said earlier it is not a mark of a beloved community to prey upon the most vulnerable and your society we are using police and fire a guy ran police departments I would have exhausted police officer saying why are we using police to deal with the fragility or vulnerability of our society there's so much money going into our police departments there is a more expensive way to deal with it I remember being surprised in Seattle with a housing group called Plymouth housing where they showed me a data analysis where they look at what was more expensive for society gifts providing supportive housing for Americans with mental illness that were homeless or leaving them on the streets and they found out they were of the same Seattle millions of dollars bite giving people supportive housing because homeless people left on the streets with mental illnesses end up in hospital emergency rooms and jails and and so this is the outrageous but I think people on the streets are feeling and that I share is that we are over policed as a society that we are investing in police which is not solving problems but making them worse when we should be in a more compassionate country in a more loving country I know love is at the core of our ideals but it needs to be made manifest in our policies we would actually spend less money we would elevate human dignity and human potential and we would set a standard on the planet earth for how we treat those who are vulnerable as opposed to what we're seeing right now center when you're running for president you were quite critical of of former vice president Joe Biden and you question whether you question whether his past whether he had the credibility given his record on some of these issues to to be a reformer on this where are you now well I'm fully you have to put my faith in a Joe Biden to be the person who could preside over this transformative change and I'm gonna tell you right now the heroes for me as I look at great presidents past the time of LBJ for example are extraordinary capable leader like Joe Biden but the real heroes in that generation were the people who were sick and tired of being sick and tired and and if there are protesters listening to the show I just pray and I want to say to them with all sincerity stay on the streets near nonviolent protest state demanding change and I think that Joe Biden's election can do that and look Donald Trump can't center himself in this this this is such a bigger moment than him this is not a referendum on one person in one office this is a referendum on who we are as Americans and who are going to be to each other this is a moral moment will we become a more loving and compassionate society not with our rhetoric but with our laws in a rule is and how can I treat the most vulnerable and so this is that moment that I think Joe Biden can be the president for but the responsibility is not on any individual it's on

Donald Trump President Trump Mattis
"lbj" Discussed on Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

07:43 min | 4 months ago

"lbj" Discussed on Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

"The report these days sharing more so at Geiko we'd like to say thanks. Thanks for sharing use average dance moves. Thanks for sharing your diy haircut fails. Thanks for sharing your inner lip star. Now it's our turn to share with the GEICO. Give back the fifteen percent credit on car and motorcycle policies for current and new customers, because we're committed for the long haul, the fifteen percent credit last full policy term visit GEICO DOT com slash give back for more info and eligibility. Guys, it's bobby bones. I host the Bobby Show and pretty much always sleepy, because I wake up at three o'clock in the morning, a couple of hours later I get all my friends together. We get into a room and a radio show. We share our allies. We tell our stories. We try to find as much good in the world if he possibly can, and we looked through the news of the day that you care about also your favorite country artists are always stopping by to hang out and share their lives and music, too, so wake up with a bunch of my friends on ninety eight point seven W M. Z Q in Washington, DC or wherever the rotates you on the iheartradio APP. Okay remember back in two thousand eighteen when Fox News host Laura Ingram told Lebron, James and Kevin Durant shut up dribble both Lebron and Kevin. Mad At them for criticizing Mr Donald Trump back in the day. Take a listen to this. That's always unwise to seek political advice from someone who gets paid one hundred million dollars a year to bounce a ball. Oh, and Lebron and Kevin you're great players, but no one voted for you. Millions elected trump to be their coach, so keep the political commentary to yourself, or as someone once said, shut up dribble. Oh. Okay. We hear. Well Lebron is wondering. Where is Laura now? And why? She didn't tell drew brees to shut up and dribble, but drew. Brees can have an opinion. Interesting Photo none of that Yeah Yeah, yeah! Let's set up in south in the city in any anyway, so you got that. Really wish he hadn't said Damn Own. Dribble into. Yeah. Yeah, that's evident and his apology breathe has apologized for his remarks and. mischaracterizing kneeling during the national anthem, he added that his words lacked awareness and any type of compassion or empathy, he says `I stand with the black community in the fight against the stem racism and racial injustice and police brutality and support the creation of real policy change that will make a difference drew is asking for forgiveness and he did another apology after that one video. Like this sincere. I mean how how how would you know me you of go? No. No, no, what I'm saying is. What what's The relevance? Who is he? He's a football player. He made a statement at a time y'all ain't heard worst and listen to what the presidency. Drew Brees is catching Mohair for what he say, then president catch for what he say 'cause they won't Attack Cozy in a locker room with black people I. President is supposed to be unifying this country. He don't say nothing but divisive stuff, I. Don't give a damn what drew brees say. He owed him play for the browns. Let's start. Hey, vessel. All of you. Coming back to? Hey, let's start there. It was your quarterback would have your quarterback. Break wouldn't bank agenda. He can't live in. Right now. You know what the Ino is real and they got a problem with it, and that's why he's making these apologies. outta place and he used the wrong time to draw capacity to the neely, because you just got bamboozled like everybody else by the president, and allow him to flip the script, and you went along with it exactly exactly. You went along with it man. I tell you what when he was talking to Yahoo Finance. I promise you. He had no, I. What was about to have his the backlash? You Damn Right. He apologize. What about the? Shannon Shannon's sharps response to it has got. It's really really good really. Good, I play it. I. Don't know by technology. Would they know. About take now. After the show. You say it's early. You. Ask Somebody. What do you say? Was You. What about for the Buffalo? Bull bills, junior. He said something about buying guns and make them very expensive. Only for the elite white people was this junior. Who is he jake from from? John Doll. That failed any draft. His ass! A rookie quarterback made this statement. He can't even go to training camp. That taught laces. Ask Yeah. All right coming up next we're to switch gears nephew Tommy in the building with today's prank phone. Call right after this. You're listening to Steve Harvey, morning show. Rene Bach was only nineteen years old when she moved from her small town in Virginia to eastern Uganda. In two, thousand nine Bach founded serving his children a feeding program for severely malnourished kids. The NGO quickly grew into an inpatient medical facility. The heroic image obscured deadly truth. Rene Bach had no medical training. When it comes to missionary work and humanitarian aid in the developing world, what is the line between helping and hurting? We'll find out in the new podcast the missionary. Listen to the missionary on the iheartradio. APP APPLE PODCASTS or wherever you get your podcasts. Forgotten is a new podcast about hundreds of young women who have disappeared and turned up dead in Juarez Mexico. Right across the border from El Paso. There were just random victims. The women were picked. They were selected I. Mean there could be an abduction in broad daylight. No one saw it. These are like ghosts. They were killed for a reason. The burning question is. Why isn't not a major emphasis of investigation? These crimes have been solved for nearly thirty years. We talked to victims, families, FBI agents and a psychologist who claims to know one of the culprits to understand why. And we reveal how these women's deaths force us to think think more deeply about borders, migration, trade and corruption. Listen to forgotten women of whereas on the iheartradio, APP or wherever you get you put costs..

Drew Brees Lebron Rene Bach Laura Ingram GEICO Kevin Durant president bobby bones Mr Donald Trump Geiko Fox News browns Shannon Shannon Washington Yahoo Steve Harvey football FBI Uganda
How did America get to its current state?

Between The Lines

05:06 min | 4 months ago

How did America get to its current state?

"The scenes across the US in the past week or so, they have been profoundly disturbing heavenly. The protests are in response to the horrifying image of George. Floyd an African American man and Minneapolis. Police officer who killed him by kneeling on his nick for close to nine minutes to spot. He's pleased that he could not brave. Those demonstrations as we all know turned into, want him violence and destruction, not only in the twin cities, but all across American CDs. Today's are quiet and peaceful, but it's really the evenings in the night, so usually bring that fury. Those frustrations attend to boil over in the results or these fiery clashes that we've seen across the country, and of course here in New York. We've already seen dozens of people injured. Hundreds of people arrested in tonight. The expectation is that we could see more of these demonstrations. How did America get to this point? And who precisely are Antioch, the militant left wing political protest movement that part of these rights. Face because Nazis, thank. and. That is a very bad thing because harass people Lemay Organiz they kill. People hurt people. They fight people. And we're the ones who fighting back there. The second coming of Hitler for several decades America has I deeply divided nation. Just go back to the mid to late nineteen sixties when America experienced those long hot summers, protests and riots, Vietnam Rice and Martin. Luther King's assassination. The American people are deeply disturbed. They're baffled and dismayed by the wholesale looting and violence. That has occurred both in small towns and then great metropolitan centres. No society can tolerate massive violence. Anymore than a body can tolerate massive disease to me that black people are in the streets. Has Do the lives air force lead in this country? And unfortunately lead these lives by the indifference and the apathy. And a certain kind of ignorance, willful ignorance on the part of their citizens. According to British historian Max Hastings Pass guest on this show in those days quote. It seemed that rice the election and the Vietnam. War would tearing asunder the greatest country on earth. And to think is deep divisions in America have clearly grown since the sixties especially in the trump era, just think of that toxic polarization, hyper partisanship in Washington and elsewhere not to mention the crisis engulfing American cities. So. How did America get to this point? Robert DALIC is arguably America's most distinguished living presidential historian. He's author of fourteen books including on Presidents FDR JFK, LBJ, Richard, Nixon, and Ronald Reagan. The latest book is called. How did we get? He from Theodore Roosevelt? To Donald Trump it's published by harpercollins. Robert Delic joins me from Washington DC hi Bob. Hi Tom Lovely to hear from you. Great to have you on the show now they adopt is in Washington and across other use CDs, but America as I mentioned, before has experienced similar protests in violence. What do you think distinguishes this crosses? The widespread unrest in nineteen sixty I'd. Well, Tom. One of the things that distinguish did was the fact that Lyndon Johnson of course was. President then, and was presiding over the Vietnam War, which was at the center of what? Disturbed so many people in the United States and triggered so many of these. Demonstrations but Johnson had the good sense. To? Give up running for president. He was very skillful politician. Now we have a president who will not give up who would not resign and the only way we're going to get him out of office is by feeding him in the election. Night comes up and five months from now it's very disquieting situation and the demonstrations across this country. I believe on not. Simply a response to the tragic killing of that black man in Minneapolis, but it's also a protest against Donald Trump's presidency. You Know Tom. He's never reached fifty percent approval. And the going on for years he's been office. And this is unprecedented. No President in terms since we've had polling in the Mid Nineteen Thirties. Has Gone through a whole first term without ever reaching fifty percent approval.

America President Trump Lyndon Johnson Tom Lovely Donald Trump Floyd Robert Dalic Minneapolis United States Mid Nineteen Thirties Washington Vietnam George Luther King Officer Max Hastings Lemay Organiz New York Ronald Reagan
COVID-19: What the Autopsies Reveal

Science Talk

11:43 min | 5 months ago

COVID-19: What the Autopsies Reveal

"Gibbs reports on how pathologists are starting to get a much closer look at the damage that covert nineteen does to the body by carefully examining the lungs hearts kidneys and other organs of people who have died while infected with the novel Corona Virus. Wait spoke with experts at the Cleveland Clinic. And the University of Washington who have performed these high risk autopsies very few of which have been done so far in the United States. Covert nineteen is a new disease and doctors have been struggling to figure out how best to treat it putting people on ventilators as always a last resort for other diseases typically about half the patients who go onto a ventilator do not survive but Kobe nineteen patients seemed to do even worse on mechanical ventilation a study in the UK found that only about a third of corona virus patients survived that experience and in a report published on April Twenty second in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Researchers found even more alarming outcomes recently in New York City analyzing data from twelve large New York hospitals during March. They found that out of three hundred twenty patients on ventilators. Two hundred and eighty two died so only about one in nine survived mechanical ventilation. We know this. New Corona virus damages the lungs. But how exactly does it differ in important ways from influenza and other VIRAL INFECTIONS? Some experts have suggested that the virus can infect and damage the heart as well and maybe the kidneys or even the brain when people are seriously ill with Cova nineteen. They seem to be at higher. Risk of blood clots. But it's really hard to determine from lab tests and fuzzy medical images whether it's the virus damaging these other organs or whether the body's own immune system fouling up the works as it generates massive inflammatory response to combat the corona virus. Any kind of lung injury can result in acute respiratory distress syndromes. This is a disease process that we've known about for a long. It's a very typical pattern of injury that we see in the lungs when they're injured for many many different kinds of reasons. That's disarray Marshall. A pathologist at the University of Washington. She says that it's often the cascading organ failure triggered by acute respiratory distress syndrome or A. Rds The causes elderly people to die from influenza and firefighters to die from smoke inhalation and cancer patients to die from reactions to chemotherapy. The pressing question. We need to answer for Kobe. Nineteen is whether it's just a rds that makes the disease deadly or whether this new diseases different and even more complicated to treat them what doctors have seen before well if you watch TV you know what medical examiners do when they want to figure out what killed somebody. There's just no substitute for a thorough and detailed autopsy earlier this month researchers published the first English language autopsy results on people who died after becoming infected with the novel Corona Virus. The paper appeared in the American Journal of Clinical Pathology on April tenth. It describes to interesting cases both from Oklahoma case one was seventy seven year old man who had cycled between fever and chills for six days before finally calling for an ambulance on March twentieth. He had high blood pressure and some other health issues but no cough on the trip to the hospital. He was gasping for air and his heart stopped by the time they arrived at the emergency room. It was too late. The gentleman had not seen a doctor for his fever. He had not been tested for Kobe. Nineteen so it wasn't clear what had caused the heart attack taking his life. The Medical Examiner's team in Oklahoma City decided that it was important to find out they swabbed the man's nasal passages and also his lungs both swabs tested positive for the SARS. Kobe virus and chest xrays showed what they described as complete white out in. What would normally be dark empty lung? Cavities doing an autopsy on a Kobe. Positive body is risky but they had the special protective equipment and high containment room. They needed to do it and maybe they could learn something that would help save some of the hundreds of thousands of people around the world who will fight cove in nineteen for their lives in the months to come so they laid his body on the dissecting table and they opened them up. The team contacted a well-known lung pathologist at the Cleveland Clinic to help them interpret what they saw especially as they examined tissue samples from bears organs under the microscope. My name is Sanjay Mukhopadhyay. I'm director of pathology at the Cleveland Clinic. Autopsies give you another deeper look into tissue. That is actually several layers of resolution higher than what you can get from a history a physical examination routine laptops even the highest resolution CD. Scans none of them. Even approach the resolution that you can get from an autopsy. The medical examiner had noticed that. This man's lungs were two to three times heavier than usual. A Common Consequence of AIDS pathologist actually referred to that syndrome by a different name. One that describes the end result of the disease lung cells. They call it diffuse. Lv alert damage in that gentleman. We found diffuse Alveoli damage under the microscope. When you take a breath and it goes down your windpipe. The windpipe actually branches and to do and when goes into the left lung and one goes into the right and then those branches of the windpipe branch like the branches of a tree. You know they get smarter than sponsored smaller as you go. Further and further away and the end point of the branch is what we call an Lvn Louis or colloquially you can call it an air sac and what that is just a very tiny balloon. You need a microscope to see it. And they're just cows and thousands of those little balloons in the lung. That's what makes up the lamp so each time. You inhale you inflate thousands of microscopic Vealy as the ED enters into that little balloon with oxygen in it. The point of the balloon is to take that oxygen into the bloodstream. The wall of the balloon has little blood vessels in it so in the normal language. Dicap- breath the oxygen goes from the middle of the balloon into the one of the balloon. And that's where the arteries are and the oxygen goes into your blood cells. Red Blood Cells. We call them. And then that Dixit back to the heart and the heart center the oxygen to the rest of the body for this exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide to work properly. The thin lining of the air SAC has to be very close to the walls of the blood vessels. Now what happens in in actually in any severe viral infection is that the virus starts causing damage reading a digest. I which is the back of the throat and then all the way down so all the way down the windpipe down the branches to the smallest branches and then into the air sex and when it gets into the AIR SACS. Call that a viral pneumonia. What's happening is actually. The virus is damaging the walls of the those little webs of capillaries that surround the walls of the air. Sacs start to leak proteins fluids white blood cells and debris from destroyed lung seep into the air sacs the debris clogs the balloons. But maybe even more important it also thickens the walls of the air sacs. Literally it's making a barrier for the oxygen to go from the middle of the relates to the bloodstream and so this is the reason that oxygen levels are so low in these patients who are very sick from ovid. The researchers concluded that case won the seventy seven year old man had died from Kobe. Nineteen even though he had never been diagnosed with it. Mukhopadhyay said he was struck by similar. The pattern of organ damage was to what he's used to seeing from autopsies on people who died from other viral infections. It's actually very similar to what happens in influenza and at just to mention a few other examples. Sars you know the SARS from two thousand to two thousand three identical merced Middle Eastern disparaties syndrome identical findings. I did autopsies and deported them on H. One and one when that happened the swine flu identical findings and I give you one more example. You know the when the vaping thing happened just recently and many people were getting sick from the most sick patients but actually developing diffuse. Lbj damage case too was different. This man had to the hospital a day earlier on March nineteenth. He was only forty two but had myo tonic. Muscular dystrophy a hereditary disease that causes muscles to weaken or atrophy. Sometimes so much that food can back up from the stomach. Go down the wrong tube into the lungs where causes bacterial pneumonia? He felt sharp abdominal pains and went to the hospital where a cat scan showed fluid in his lungs just hours later his heart gave out any passed away although he was labelled as community acquired pneumonia and died and was found to be covert positive. The microscopic examination. This patient does not support the idea that he died of Gobert so there was no damage instead. They found food particles and bacterial infection in the airway clear signs of aspirational pneumonia. So case to died with cove in nineteen but he did not die of covert nineteen. Which makes it very interesting because it brings up the issue of. How often is this happening? How often are people who are PAS? Different went on a nasal swab dying of things other than Kobe. I put that question to Desert Marshall whom we heard from earlier. I'm the director of autopsy after De Services at the University of Washington Medical Center since early. March Marshall has performed more than a dozen autopsies of people who died after testing positive for corona virus infection. She says the results of those autopsies have been submitted to a Medical Journal for publication but are still undergoing peer review. Marshall says that the risk of infection that this fires poses has changed how they perform all autopsies regardless of whether the person was suspected to have covert nineteen. Or not so. We've actually started to swab all of our students and get those results before will perform an autopsy in our facility. That isn't the negative pressure sweet so his Marshall also found that like case to in Oklahoma some patients are dying of something else but turning out to have corona virus infection as well we have not. We have not had any unexpected positive results yet. It's still a limited number but of the probably fifteen that we've done. We have not had a positive comeback where we weren't expecting it. And what about the finding from case one in Oklahoma here in Washington are most of the Kobe? Nineteen patients dying from more or less standard AIDS or the autopsies revealing evidence of the virus infecting and damaging other organs as well hearing concerns of the clinicians and folks on the front lines there's the virus infecting the heart or is it just kind of secondary affects related to the critical illness. Is there excess? Clotting related to this disease. Different things like that. It looks like it's helping us to see that Cova did is actually causing typical acute respiratory distress syndrome. Initially there were thoughts that it was behaving a bit differently. But I think as we get more numbers of people and there's less of the individual variability the vast majority of these cases are showing the typical pathologic features of acute respiratory distress and Which we call a diffuse Alveoli damage. Pathology it does look like it. Is that phenomenon and there's not something Speaking out pathologically. That's different in a way that will inform them that you know. They should probably continue to use. The evidence based tried and true therapies for areas in particular marshal says. They aren't seeing an unusual number of small blockages and blood vessels. That would require treatment beyond the usual blood thinners such as Heparin nor has her group or other. She has heard from around. The country found the corona virus causing serious heart infections in the autopsies. They

Kobe Respiratory Distress Influenza Oklahoma Marshall Cleveland Clinic University Of Washington Sars Sanjay Mukhopadhyay Aids New York City Director Cova United States Pneumonia Gibbs
Zero-Zero Landings

Uncontrolled Airspace: General Aviation Podcast

08:05 min | 6 months ago

Zero-Zero Landings

"You see this video? So this video of zero zero landing holy Moly so it says a twitter video on twitter out the front window of presumably an airliner or some sort doesn't make three twenty. Thank you because I didn't read it. I just looked at the pretty pictures and I was actually somewhat riveted by these pictures. Because it's like a fifty five second video. The I forty five seconds of which just shows you clouds Alexandra visibility out the front window of the airliner and then like last ten or fifteen seconds. You suddenly see the runway and I mean they're they're basically on basically in the flare when you can. I see the runway out the out the front window and and to their credit they're totally on the centerline. Good job I guess but It's all automation I. It's it's all something because they I'm watching this thing. If I'm I'm the pilot in this airplane and I suppose if I was the pilot airplane I'd have a lot more experience than I do now but if I was in the pilot of the airplane the experience I have now. I'd be staring out the window looking for trees. Holy Crap this going to peer. I don't know what's going on here. runway okay. They really do this. Apparently you guys know. I mean I can't tell from here. What kind of a cert? Yeah that is it. It could well be kept three. I don't know okay. I've heard that term before. I don't exactly know what cat three zero zero cats to is. I think fifty feet hundred feet something like that cat. Three cat three or whatever it's called is zero zero Now is I understand it. all Airbuses at all Boeing's manufactured recently and I'm putting recently and finger quotes have the capability to do that presuming. Everything is is present and working There's I'm sure there's a minimum equipment list for for these operations but you also have to be trained crew has to be trained and has to be current in the operation reform. All this I hope yeah I hope so. There's probably some other restrictions about which I know nothing now I mean. Does this happen very often happens more often than you think. Well okay so let me let me be. I would notice this if I was on one of the airliners. I was traveling on. And as people know I've fair. More than average travel on a lot of airliners and when we're doing our our arrival through the clouds I'm looking out the window looking for the ground. All right I mean. Forget straight ahead. I'm just looking straight down. Which is a different kind of visibility? I admit but I'm looking to when we break out of the clouds and I'm not a real comfortable camper so to speak comfortable airline passenger Until I can see the ground out my out my window and I would it so the point of this story being I would have noticed if we landed on that kind of a circumstance because it would have freaked me out. I I'm trying to think and I am not as many as you jack but I you know I've been on a few airliners in the last couple of years I don't recall are certainly recall. Some some approaches in some classes. But I don't recall anything like this. Yeah that's I mean just to give give listeners. A context here when they can actually see the runway surface. Even even after they've touchdown and you can kind of sense from from the I actually didn't listen to the audio very carefully if there even is audio but you can kinda sense from the motion of the video. When the gear touches down you can kind of say okay touchdown so the rolling out there rolling out and they still can only see like a stripe and a half ahead on the runway and those strikes are standardized distances right. Yeah Okay so you can see a stripe and then half the gap between stripe but even if you can see the neck to head to the extreme. That's four hundred feet visibility. I mean it's like yeah I mean Holy. Moly the other thing too is. You're only looking at the windshield very very narrow view We don't know what they could see by looking out to decide okay true. It's possible down. Not that that matters because in my airplane for example it's one and I have to see something of the runway environment before I could land out of that approach With these kinds of of approaches the three as whatever You don't need to see that you only need The working equipment and the certifications cat cat to is again either fifty or one hundred feet and you still need. I think to see something other runway environment before you can land Yeah David what's your take on this whole thing? Well I been in a jump seat when we did a cat to level landing Years Ago I think it was a hundred feet was what we had. And it's for me. It was a new thing and it made me tense The flight crew and they were everyday business with them You know just another aisle less except they could go down to one hundred feet two hundred feet of which point they head to see the runway environment or go around and I've heard stories of people in Lighting G. A. Aircraft Part. Twenty-three stuff that we fly out on ninety one flight. That is not for hire who have a landed in well whether it was zero. Zero or fifty. Eight of a mile was the subject of very boisterous argument with the people on the ground. But I watched this guy come in when everybody else had gone missed and gone to a different airport i. I'm not sure that I'm not sure that you're GONNA get my Kahane's down that level may maybe with a little more experience with the L. P. V. Approaches because I've noticed in having both an an IRA less active at the same time that the is far more stable and easy to use and the IRS. Which would have a little zig zag and a little up and down depending on the terrain as you're leading into the runway expand that acronym for me l. p. l. what'd you say. L. P. Young. That's sorry trick question. Well lateral lateral precision with vertical guidance and that. Lbj got it okay yeah just OPB. And that's the WAAS. Gps equivalent to an irs and some l. p. v. approaches in fact have the same minimum. I

Twitter IRS Airbuses LBJ L. P. Young Jack Boeing Kahane David
Biden holds huge 24-point edge over Sanders in Michigan

Hugh Hewitt

04:26 min | 7 months ago

Biden holds huge 24-point edge over Sanders in Michigan

"And news is breaking just out the Detroit Free Press poll Biden holds a huge twenty four point edge over Sanders in Michigan take it with a grain of salt though Hillary had a twenty five point lead over Sanders in Michigan last time Sanders ended up winning Michigan's primary by one point four percent so you know could could Bernie have another miracle he better because if he doesn't well it could be a bad thing cut number eight it is I do think is his campaign has two weeks to live no proof that it's viable in the next two weeks Michigan and Ohio being to me the two biggest S. he's got it right that's Chuck Todd friend of the show giving about a fortnight to show that he's not a complete loser but again as of yesterday there really wasn't much polling had no you know I was almost I think Nate silver was on Twitter complaining about that and then we get this thing twenty four point a lot of Bernie loses Michigan anywhere north of twenty points that's a that's I don't think he gets a fortnight hi yeah I I think I don't think you walk there because he's got people like AOC behind about it let's cut one Michigan we have a Goliath in our country today the life of the fossil fuel industry the Goliath of big pharma the last the a big money in politics yeah I hate those guys you've made our life good and have saved our life I hate them so much that's Bernie Sir here here's the problem with Bernie Sanders people they are not bright they're just not socialism who's the guy who still think socialism is a good idea will Bernie Sanders and his followers now the Democrat party understands the establishment understands of Bernie Sanders is a disaster that normal Americans are gonna look at this question comic curmudgeon inside all heck no actually I might not say hack but I'm trying to remain SEC compliant he would he would make Walter Mondale look like LBJ over Goldwater he just got trounced so of course their salaries if we need to go by then they like to bind because he's frankly completely out of it and would be a wonderful popped for the establishment of the Democratic Party he would do what they say they they run the country he be on the rose garden chasing chasing that uppity squirrels who keeps looking at him through the window the yeah I feel Bernie Sanders supporter how are you feeling right now the feeling good feeling respected because I gotta tell you you've been broken and humiliated you have been betrayed you've been lied to yeah the establishment has made sure that the fix is in your voice has been silenced by Donald Trump though you're told Donald trump's the cause of all your problems but by your own party and what are you going to do but what about it are you are you just gonna take it are you going to let the establishment the corporate Democrat party because you know that the idea of Republicans as the party of big business cannot cannot all these fortune five hundred guys they all the top the politics of their second wife they're all Democrats and you you are going to obey the corporatist part that's what you're going to do Bernie Sanders is going to have this election stolen from him again when you gonna cry in warning and then you're going to obey exactly you are going to do what your commander because you're not smart because you support a socialist and your weak and cowardly I'm just gonna try to call names I'm just calling it like it is you're going to be abuse and then you're going to come back

Biden Sanders Michigan Hillary Detroit Free Press
New York: Longest-serving federal judge, named by LBJ, retires at 98

The Takeaway

00:31 sec | 8 months ago

New York: Longest-serving federal judge, named by LBJ, retires at 98

"And a federal judge in New York City was nominated by president Lyndon Johnson is retiring at age ninety eight the New York Daily News reported at U. S. district judge Jack Weinstein was the longest serving incumbent federal judge he was known for favoring lenient sentences in favor of rehabilitation after law school once you work for Thurgood Marshall at the end of a Lacy peak contributing research briefs to the landmark case brown versus board of education which struck down racial segregation in the

New York City Lyndon Johnson New York Daily News Jack Weinstein Thurgood Marshall Lacy Peak President Trump U. S.
The Finance 202: Economists project Trump will win easily in 2020 — and by a bigger margin

Ben Shapiro

04:20 min | 1 year ago

The Finance 202: Economists project Trump will win easily in 2020 — and by a bigger margin

"Trump according to The Washington Post economists in the trunk should actually went pretty easily because of the economy according to The Washington Post president trump is on a fast track to an easy reelect that is the conclusion reached by economic forecasters despite headlines from Washington that suggests from political fortunes are only pointed south as he battles encroaching impeachment inquiry and Republican defections over his handling of the Syrian crisis moody's analytics projects the present win handily next year if the economy doesn't that we stumble and in fact wrap up a greater margin in the electoral college in Israel forty two twenty seven victory he secured against Hillary Clinton twenty sixteen Danny is chief economist at moody's analytics and co author of the paper outlining his findings he said if the economy a year from now is the same as it is today or roughly so the power of incumbency is strong and from selection other very good particularly if Democrats aren't enthusiastic and don't get out the vote is that turn out there's only one problem with that which the turnout for Democrats is going to be extraordinary it's going to be extremely high because trump gets out the vote on his own side and he definitely gets of the vote for Democrats as well as twenty eighteen demonstrated but assuming average democratic turnout which of course I don't think that's right but if you assume average democratic turnout than what you would see is president trump winning a bevy of states why a huge number of states including some states that he lost last time he would end up winning I mean it's it's pretty amazing I'm sorry economics says that if trump were like a normal Republican president like if you work twenty to one fifty five percent of the popular vote next year it's a troubling fifty five percent of the popular vote if you're buying a significant downturn in the economy Greg take on James Watson to senior economist with the former lastly quote well wide range of issues have influenced presidential elections over the last few decades in healthcare in foreign policy to taxation government spending one factor is been constant it's the economy stupid by the reckoning of that firms model three key economic indicators unemployment inflation in real disposable income growth all favor trumps reelection they'll way and negative exhaustion factor with trump that dense his support in the projection now take on what's in a knowledge economy isn't everything according to The Washington Post but their model which means on it accurately predict all but two popular vote outcomes going back to nineteen forty eight the only ones that they do not work nineteen sixty eight and nineteen seventy six and the reason is because nineteen seventy six was immediately in the aftermath of Richard Nixon stepping down in nineteen sixty eight involved the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy and LBJ dropping out of the race and all that now they are pointing to key CAP yes they could hamstring in their models accuracy at this time excludes non economic factors that a candidate's record that are vital in most elections and it pays no attention to candidates attributes such as race gender or like ability the fact that maybe centrally important twenty twenty so we're about to find out whether the hard metrics of the elections really do come down to the economy is really what we're saying here it'll be a fascinating sort of data driven question if from wins at your shows the durability of the economy is the real number one nation elections is nearly unsurpassed if from loses and that shows that the economy as a sort of my suspicion is very often a secondary concern meaning that if the economy is bad you're definitely gonna lose if you're the incumbent but if the economy is good that doesn't necessarily mean you're gonna win if you're the incumbent also obviously they say the economy tanks from stun another model some of my friend metrolyrics accurately predict every presidential Victor going back to nineteen fifty two by focusing on the effects of the economy and incumbency on the electoral college according to Donald Luskin the firm's chief investment officer the project the trouble win reelection next year with three hundred and fifty four electoral votes a margin it seems staggering on its face to get something that high you have to go back to Reagan and that may not be possible in the red world we live in now Luskin says model stakes first German Cummins when they had the advantage that was the other way for candidates seeking to hold on to a third or fourth straight term it factors in six economic indicators including oil prices personal income inflation and tax burdens but none of these models include the president's approval rating why well because they say it doesn't carry much predictive power and by the way his approval ratings are basically sort of middle of the pack when it comes to other presidents at a thousand name I remember Obama's presidential approval according to Gallup and Rasmussen was it forty one percent of this plan this presidency trump is currently forty four

Donald Trump The Washington Post President Trump One Fifty Five Percent Fifty Five Percent Forty One Percent
"lbj" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"lbj" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"K. LBJ Michelle you're on kill BJ so my daughter isn't a waitress she's the host but at the restaurant he works that all of their kids and like that comes in cash that you like a credit card and you have to wait for five dollars the restaurant put that on a nother credit card that goes to the employee each of the employee has their own credit card I think it's called a widely Carter we usually card and it looks like a B. the card and that's where they loaded onto that come from credit card so I think nowadays you're not getting cash at the end of the night from that right front that they work out there putting it on a card now if you're if you didn't catch that let's boldly different story but how does that is it like an automatic transferred to her bank account it's an automatic transfer you I yes they say they say the restaurant says they've already paid her as is that sound right that night absolutely wow so it's got to be an automatic transfer of some kind what it what it had for that five okay Michelle let's assume that the what you're saying is right and goes that car that automatically transfers to her account and how should he get paid back in by home so that's a difficult one personally I think this is on the credit card company right though that signature at the bottom wasn't his signature was the girlfriend signature that RT make that broad right there so the girlfriends in jail and he got doctors credit card company not the restaurant's fault however I think somebody with the ethics would have called it said I think this might have been a mistake or you were very generous either way I just want to check yeah but not everybody's built with that internal voice okay so the money money is there is the money is his their slimy people at a site there my okay now that that makes some sense it would be an automatic sure I mean I know it's an automatic trans from should something nice someone that's going to race when you look at the receipts go on well look at this yeah now Clemence afternoons three to seven on news radio kale B..

Carter K. LBJ Michelle five dollars
Will virtual reality films ever go mainstream?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:43 min | 1 year ago

Will virtual reality films ever go mainstream?

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by vast a global cybersecurity company trusted by over four hundred million people avast is dedicated to protect you online. So you can connect to the internet confidently avast keeping the world safe from cyber attacks. Visit them at a vast dot com. Moviemakers are still trying to find out if virtual reality works for movies from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Molly would. The Tribeca film festival is happening in New York City and this year, it features more than thirty virtual reality movies slash experiences for both movie fans and future be our filmmakers to check out virtual reality films are becoming a bit of a festival mainstay since Oculus brought its first production to Sundance back in two thousand fifteen but VR movies still aren't anywhere near the mainstream. Marketplace tech producers Stephanie us went to the Tribeca film festival to see how some filmmakers still believe in the magic of VR watching a movie in virtual reality involves a lot of stuff being against the headset. When you want it does it you just move it up and down the Lamar Tate is stationed outside the VR film. The key at the terrific film festival. Audience members go in one at a time the standard small dark room, but they're not alone. There is a live actor at all times inside of the room with you. They might touch you just for safety reasons to keep you away from. The walls you might run into walls. Because when you're in the film, you can't see the real world, you're truly immersed and the characters are prompting to walk around with. I want to remember where the key comes from. And what it needs. Maybe you can help me. I think VR is an incredible medium shoe creates memories. It's trike heart is the director of the key which is meant to convey in sort of a dream Lakeway. What it's like to be a refugee we want people to feel like this leap through the journey themselves. But trekker police it for VR to take off the headsets have to get cheaper and people have to well, put them on a friend of the tech. My parents, for example, it was like. You know, and I really had to walk like, I was very insistent newly to learning Tribeca offers VR as part of its immersive film track. Lauren Hammonds is a festival Curators festivals. Play an important part in the ecosystem of launching this work. So the idea of LBJ or location based entertainment is so important to getting audiences. Getting is on this work as part of a long tradition. I'm getting used to innovations in film, like when Thomas Edison's movie, the great train robbery came out in nineteen zero three motion pictures were very new and film historian. Marc Wanamaker describes how one audience member reacted to an actor breaking the fourth wall. George barnes. Who was the star of the great train robbery turns toward the the audience. Pulls his gun looks at the audience and pulls the trigger and then someone in the audience stood up and shot back. But it didn't matter that movie in ended up being a hit VR still waiting for its blockbuster. That's marketplace. Tech producers Stephanie Hughes, we'll see if any studio deals come out of Tribeca. But last year at Sundance of ER distribution company bought a three part virtual reality space series for one point four million dollars and later released it for Oculus. So there's some money out there. And now for some related lakes. There's an interesting piece in wired about the Tribeca festival and these big immersive installations, they're trying out this year with a live actors like Stephanie mentioned it suggests that maybe the future for VR movies is actually more like a museum piece a real world experience where you enter a virtual worlds instead of entering a virtual world alone in your basement with a five hundred dollar headset, which is all very interesting. But it also shows you just how far away we are from figuring out how this medium is supposed to work wired also has a story from earlier this month about not mixing bleed and virtual reality, which seems like a good PSA, you'll find both of those links at our website marketplace tech org, and look it might feel like VR is a slow roller. But I found a research report in the motley fool Tuesday that said it generated three point six billion dollars as an industry in twenty eighteen super data research estimates that number could be. Sixteen billion dollars by twenty twenty two. So yeah, companies are still at it. In fact, Facebook announced Tuesday that it's releasing its standalone Oculus headset. The Oculus quest on may twenty first the quest needs. No, computer or game console to operate. It costs four hundred bucks, and it will launch with over fifty games. Maybe this'll be the one I'm Ali would. And that's marketplace tech. This is a PM. Caroline in Brooklyn, New York wrote to tell us, she's a longtime fan of marketplace, tech and appreciates the content and the mission thinks Caroline to join her in keeping marketplace tech going strong, donate online today at marketplace dot org, and thanks to Carolina and all the marketplace. Investors who make our work possible.

Tribeca Oculus Robbery Sundance Molly Stephanie Us Lamar Tate New York City Thomas Edison Caroline Stephanie Hughes Lauren Hammonds Marc Wanamaker Director Facebook ALI George Barnes
"lbj" Discussed on Based On a True Story

Based On a True Story

06:05 min | 1 year ago

"lbj" Discussed on Based On a True Story

"You're saw over four hundred thousand US troops in Vietnam. All the while antiwar protests were growing people weren't happy with how president Johnson was handling the war by throwing more and more American lives at it. By the summer of nineteen sixty seven tallies estimated that about seventy thousand Americans had died in Vietnam still Johnson was sending more troops. And with a big boost of about fifty thousand the total was brought to around five hundred and twenty five thousand troops by the end of nineteen sixty seven antiwar protests were growing to an all time high including over one hundred thousand people marching outside the Pentagon Tober of that year. And so just like the movie shows on March thirty first nineteen sixty eight president Johnson addressed the nation during that speech, which was all about the steps he was prepared to take to halt the war. He announced an immediate halt to the bombing North Vietnam. Then at the end of the forty minute speech. He said this. I have concluded that I should not permit the presidency to become involved in partisan divisions. That are developing in this political year. With America's sons and the field far away. America's future under challenge right here at home. With our hopes and the world's hope for peace in the balance every day. I do not believe. That I should devote an hour. Our day of my time. To any personal partisan causes. Are to any duties other? And they awesome duties of this office the presidency. Of your country accordingly. I shall not see. And I will not accept. The nomination of my party for another term as your president. But let men everywhere. No, however. That is strong and they confident. And they vigilant America. Stand ready tonight to seek an honorable peace. And stands ready tonight to the fan honored call whatever the price, whatever the burden whatever the sector. That UD may require. Thank you for listening. Good night. And God bless all. this episode of based on a true story was written and produced by me, Dan, fab, there's a lot more to the story of president Johnson. We never got to talk about some of the more controversial things that he did like his own affairs or his approval of the F B I bugging of Martin Luther King junior commenting on his extramarital affairs. If you want to dig deeper into the true stories behind president Johnson. There are two great books that would recommend starting with the first is called Lyndon B Johnson portrait of a president by Robert Dolly, the other is actually a multi volume and super detailed book by Pulitzer prize winning author Robert Caro that series is called the years of Lyndon Johnson. They're all great. But if you wanna get a good insight into the events that we see in the movies time-line, get the fourth volume the passage of power. As always I've got links to both of those books as well as plenty more resources to start your own deep dive into the presidency of LBJ over based on a true story, podcast dot com. Okay. Now, it's time for the answer to our troops and allied game. From the beginning of the episode as a refresher here are the two truth and one line number one LBJ was on board Air Force One while JFK was assassinated number two, president Johnson called Bobby Kennedy soon after JFK was assassinated. Number three LBJ did not seek reelection for a second term. Did you find out which one is ally? As we learned president Johnson did call Bobby Kennedy about being sworn in as president soon after his brother was assassinated. So number two is true. We also learned that in March of nineteen sixty eight president Johnson announced that he had no intention of seeking reelection. So number three is true. That means the lie is number one. As we also learned then vice president Johnson was in the motorcade when JFK was assassinated on November twenty second nineteen sixty three. In fact, if you want to get into some of the conspiracy side of that there are some who say that LBJ started ducking from the bullets before they were even fired indicating that he might have known something head of time or others dispute that. But that brings us to an end of this episode if you're based on a true story producer. I look forward to chatting with you again next Monday, when we'll look at some of the true story that we saw in the count of Monte Cristo. Don't forget you can find all the links for this episode or request a future episode over at based on a true story podcast dot com. And if you wanna get in touch with me, you can find me on Twitter where I'm at down the Feb D N L E V or you can shoot me an Email at Dan at based on a true story podcast dot com. If I don't hear from you before then I hope to chat with you again next Monday over on the producers feet until then thanks so much for listening chat with you again, really soon.

president Johnson president America Lyndon B Johnson vice president LBJ Johnson Vietnam Monte Cristo Pentagon UD Martin Luther King Pulitzer prize Twitter Robert Caro Bobby Kennedy producer Dan Robert Dolly Air Force
"lbj" Discussed on Based On a True Story

Based On a True Story

07:20 min | 1 year ago

"lbj" Discussed on Based On a True Story

"I found hope. That's the tragedy and the tongs of these terrible as. Will bind us together in new fellowship? Making us one people. Our our of Sean. So let us here. Highly resolve. John fitzgerald. Kennedy did not live are. On this thanksgiving. As we gather together. The large. And give him our, thanks. Let us unite. Those familiar and Sherry word. America. America. God shed his grace on the. And crown by good. With brotherhood. See to see. The movie comes to close by giving us some final bits of text. So let's fact check those it starts by saying on July. Second nineteen sixty four president Johnson realized president Kennedy's dream and signed the Civil Rights Act of nineteen sixty four into law. That is true. It might not have happened as fast as president Johnson wanted it to. But the Bill was passed. In fact, there's a photo up there. President Johnson signing the Bill that day behind him. Martin Luther King junior watch on. As a fun. Little fact, the only time Martin Luther King junior and Malcolm X mex- in person happened on March twenty six nineteen sixty four when there are both in the US capitol hearing the Civil Rights Act being debated by the Senate. It was a brief meeting lasting less than one minute. The next bit of taxed in the movie says that unav- third nineteen sixty four Johnson defeated Senator Barry Goldwater there is on for the presidency. Unlike the ticket with JFK as president with LBJ is vice president LBJ won his election by winning forty four of the fifty states and receiving sixty one point six of the popular vote making it the largest victory since eighteen twenty. That is true that eighteen twenty election was James Monroe. It was the second term for president Monroe and for the most part he didn't have anyone running against him in that election. The only other person to receive in Torah vote was the secretary of State John Quincy Adams, a man who would end up becoming the president after Monroe second term ended in eighteen twenty five as for the election in nineteen sixty four president Johnson and his running mate, Hubert Humphrey received four hundred eighty six electoral votes, while Senator Barry Goldwater and his running mate William Miller only received fifty two just like the movie says LBJ one forty four of the fifty states and had a sixty one point one percent of the popular vote for. Of comparison between the nineteen sixty and nineteen sixty four elections JFK won the election in nineteen sixty with thirty four million two hundred twenty nine hundred eighty four votes. That's forty-nine point seventy two percent of the popular vote. The Republican candidate who lost that year was Richard Nixon who had thirty four million one hundred eight thousand one hundred and fifty seven votes as we learned earlier that's difference of only one hundred twelve thousand eight hundred twenty seven votes in the nineteen sixty four election LBJ, one with forty three million one hundred twenty seven thousand forty one votes for sixty one point one percent. His opponent had twenty seven million one hundred and seventy five thousand seven hundred fifty four votes for thirty eight point five percent. That's a difference of fifteen million nine hundred fifty one thousand two hundred eighty seven votes quite a bit more than the previous election. The next bit of taxed explains that in his next term Johnson passed the Voting Rights Act of nineteen sixty five an established programs like Medicare, Medicaid and had start. That's all true to while. The Civil Rights Act of nineteen sixty four was a landmark law the Voting Rights Act nineteen sixty five built on that by prohibiting racial discrimination in the voting process as for Medicare Medicaid head start. Those were all part of what historians refer to as Johnson's quote war on poverty, and quote, it also included things like food stamps and federally funded programs for secondary education called work study. The Medicare Bill was passed in nineteen sixty five Johnson was also responsible for creating new transportation department, which included the coastguard and the FAA among other departments. That was also in nineteen sixty five in nineteen sixty eight president Johnson signed the gun control act of nineteen sixty eight. This was in response to the assassination of Robert Kennedy. Bobby that happened in June of nineteen sixty eight but also because of the assassination of JFK and Martin Luther King junior. The latter of which also happened in nineteen sixty eight. The last bits of taxed in the movie. Explain that toward the end of his term president Johnson's started to get backlash because of his escalation of the war in Vietnam. American deaths were rising an antiwar protests intensified. Then according to movie on March thirty first nineteen sixty eight president Johnson declared on TV that he would not seek nor accept the nomination of the party for another term as president. The final text onscreen says that Johnson was the last sitting president to choose not to run for reelection. That is all true. The Vietnam war began in nineteen fifty five. President Eisenhower was still in office. When president Kennedy was elected, he escalated things by sending more American troops to the war-torn region. By the time, president Kennedy was assassinated, they were about sixteen thousand troops in Vietnam. He had planned to remove about a thousand of those by the end of nineteen sixty three when Johnson took office. He reversed that order instead by the end of nineteen sixty four there were about twenty three thousand American troops in that year alone US casualties tallied up to one thousand two hundred seventy eight by June of nineteen sixty five there were over eighty two thousand American troops in Vietnam. Things only kept increasing and there were over two hundred thousand American troops deployed the Vietnam by the end of nineteen sixty five things didn't get better in nineteen sixty six that you're

president Johnson president John fitzgerald president Monroe President Eisenhower Martin Luther King vice president Senator Barry Goldwater Vietnam LBJ JFK US Sean Sherry America
"lbj" Discussed on Based On a True Story

Based On a True Story

10:54 min | 1 year ago

"lbj" Discussed on Based On a True Story

"In the hospital LBJ is ushered into a room. While the doctors are trying to save president Kennedy a man enters with the news Senator Connolly and the president had been shot kindly isn't as bad, but the president it's bad after a few more moments. Another man enters the president. He he's gone. Then one of the secret servicemen says it Mr President. Lyndon Johnson looks up. He is now president Johnson. As I'm sure you probably already know that happened on November twenty second nineteen sixty three at twelve thirty pm president John F Kennedy was shot. Senator John Connolly seat was in the same car right in front of Kennedy. He was also shot with one of the bullets that hit Kennedy continuing on and striking Connolly in the back just under his right armpit. The motorcade rushed off to nearby parkland Memorial Hospital once their doctors tried to save president Kennedy's life. But it was too late. Technically, vice president Johnson became president Johnson as soon as Kennedy died, but according to the movie Lyndon Johnson, not only refuses to go back to Washington DC without Jackie Kennedy. But he also calls up, Bobby Kennedy. There's a bit of sneaking going on here in the movie because we see Lyndon Johnson. Ask someone to take notes during his call. But she can only hear one side of the conversation. So when he's on the phone with Bobby he manages to get the conversation to a. A point where it sounds like Bobby is insisting that Linden gets sworn in there in Dallas. But hearing both sides of the conversation in the movie as viewers we can tell Bobby wanted JFK to return to Washington DC in Air Force One as the president as a final act of courtesy for the man. That phone call actually happened. Although it's something we don't really know, exactly. What was said because Lyndon Johnson and Bobby Kennedy were the only ones who heard both sides of it that took place at one fifty six PM in Dallas or two fifty six PM in Washington DC. Although that's not where Bobby was he was in hickory hill New York having lunch with his wife Ethel and meeting with US attorney there, but the time zone between New York and Washington DC is the same. About thirty minutes earlier at two twenty five pm New York time, Bobby had gotten another call that call was from J. Edgar Hoover confirming that president Kennedy. His brother had been killed. According to a great book by Pulitzer prize winning author Robert Caro, the recollections of those witnessing either side of the conversation portray a picture much like what we saw in the movie by that what I'm referring to is that Lyndon Johnson seemed to know what he wanted to get out of the conversation while Bobby Kennedy was so overcome with the shock and grief on the news that he'd heard less than an hour earlier, then he couldn't even hardly comprehend the world around him. But according to those recollections things seem to happen. Like, the movie shows Bobby didn't know what the rush was to have the swearing in happened in Dallas. He thought it would be nice if JFK's body could fly back to Washington DC as president Kennedy. Johnson apparently disagreed because as we now know president Johnson was sworn in on Air Force One in Dallas. According to judge Sarah Hughes, which the movie is right was the woman who swore Johnson into office. She recalled Johnson mentioned MRs Kennedy wanted to be present for this wearing in. When one of the aides went to get her. She said she felt she ought to be there for historical purposes. And so we have that famous photograph by White House photographer ceaseless Stauton alongside Johnson was ladybird Johnson on one side and Jackie Kennedy on the other. She refused change beforehand insisting that she still wear the bloodstained clothes that she had been wearing when her husband was killed. As soon as the oath was finished, president Johnson ordered the plane take off and head back to Washington DC. Going back to the movie and back in Washington. We see Senator Richard Russell with a whole group of other. Congressman Senator Russell is all smiles and says something to the effect of out of a despicable act of assassination. A new leader has emerged. He goes on to say that after one hundred years of being treated as inferior. Finally, we have one of our own as a leader America has a southern president. That's well, not really true, for example. Dwight D Eisenhower was the thirty fourth president. He was the president just before JFK. An Eisenhower was also from Texas just like LBJ was. But I suppose if you don't count Ike, then there was a long line of presidents who were primarily from northern states as for whether or not Senator Russell was at the White House soon after LBJ's arrival from Dallas on November twenty second. I couldn't find anything to suggest that he was. Although there was a group of congressmen who met with Johnson at the White House that afternoon. So it's possible that Russell was among them. However, I doubt it was anything orchestrated by Russell like the movie implies the purpose of that meeting. As far as I could tell from my research was to try to get support from both sides of congress. No matter the party LBJ wanted to try and convince everyone that there wasn't going to be a chair. Change in America's foreign policies after the assassination to do that. He felt the entire government needed to put on a unified front. Oh, and you know that phrase that LBJ keeps saying to staff members around the White House in the movie, it's different sometimes. But it's always something. Like, thank you for your service to president Kennedy out need you now more than he ever did. A lot of staffers have recalled LBJ saying that to them or some variation there of soon after the assassination. So it would seem that that was the go-to line for Johnson is he was trying to get everyone to work together. Back in the movie the next morning after the assassination we see LBJ walking into the Oval Office. He says he has a meeting at nine thirty A M, but the staff is still cleaning out Kennedy's things. Then Bobby Kennedy arrives. That didn't take you long. Bobby says the president Johnson as he enters the Oval Office. I was told to use this room. Johnson explains. Just like you were told to take the oath in Dallas, Bobby retorts. The movie does a pretty good job of showcasing really the basic gist of what happened when LBJ woke up on Saturday, November twenty third nineteen sixty three. He was under the impression that he should be working on the Oval Office the day before he'd been working out of an office across the street from the White House that evening he'd been told that he would be working out of the Oval Office the next day, but between Friday night and Saturday morning, the national security adviser decided that it wasn't a good idea yet because they hadn't gotten everything packed up. So at about eight o'clock AM, he left a note at the executive office building with instructions for Johnson to work out of a different office. But that the Oval Office would be ready for Monday. President Johnson never got that note because he never went to the executive office building. He went straight to the west wing with the intention that he would be working out of the Oval Office. So the movie is correct. And showing that when LBJ showed up at the White House that morning he was expecting to work out of the Oval Office. Bobby Kennedy showed up that. Morning too and wasn't too happy that I'll be Jay was moving into the Oval Office. So quickly while his brothers possessions will still there just like the movie shows LBJ told Barry that he was told to work there, and he had been. Even though miss communications like that are completely understandable, especially when you consider how much chaos they had to be after the assassination the wounds were too fresh and considering that Bobby and LBJ didn't really like each other too much before this little miscommunication didn't help their friendship. Back in the movie, we see president Johnson have what seems to be a change of heart. This gets vocalise in the film when the president walks into where some of his staff are talking about policies in particular, the Civil Rights Act that Kennedy had proposed is the hot topic Johnson walks in and tells them that he wants to support the civil rights Bill the entire thing. He continues to tell the story of his personal cook a block woman named MRs. Right. According to the movie after the assassination. Mrs right was driving back to Washington DC since she would be passing by LBJ's ranch in Texas. Anyway, he asked if she would stop to get his dog. Beagle. Johnson and bring him to DC. Woody Harrelson version of president Johnson continues saying that mrS right? Respectfully declined his request. She explained that it was tough enough for a black woman to drive through the south by herself. Let alone taking care of a dog. He continues saying that she could. Find a place to sleep to eat or even to use the restroom she had to squat by the side of the road that story, unfortunately is true. And it's also true that LBJ found the story to be appalling. Although in truth, the story was that zephyr, right? The president chef wasn't coming back to DC. She was actually driving to Texas. I couldn't find out. The exact reason why she was going, but it's probably to get some things as the new president was going to be moving to Washington DC ladybird had axed zephyr to take their dog back to the ranch when she drove down and just like the movie shows, zephyr, respectfully declined it's hard enough driving in the south as a black woman. Let alone having to take care of dog. That story brought LBJ to tears in open his eyes to the importance of public accommodations for everyone. This also lit a fire under him to push for the civil rights Bill. And as the movie comes to a close that is exactly what we see happen. President Johnson addresses the house of representatives in an address that as the movie describes it is both a farewell to president Kennedy. But also a proper introduction to president Johnson. The speech in the movie isn't the entire thing. Of course. But it sort of bounces around a bit. And it's still pretty close to the overall gist of the real speech. In fact, I think this might be a good time to hear that real speech. This is what's come to be known as the lead us continue speech by president Lyndon. Baines Johnson delivered to a joint session of congress on November twenty seventh nineteen sixty three. Baker. President. Members of the house. Members of the Senate. My fellow Americans.

President Johnson president president Kennedy Bobby Kennedy LBJ Bobby Jackie Kennedy Washington Mr President Johnson White House president Lyndon Dallas Oval Office vice president Congressman Senator Russell Baines Johnson Texas Senator John Connolly
"lbj" Discussed on Based On a True Story

Based On a True Story

06:28 min | 1 year ago

"lbj" Discussed on Based On a True Story

"Yeah. Episode of based on a true story. We looked at the nineteen ninety one film J F K. I thought a great follow up to that would be learning about the US president who was sworn into office the same day, president Kennedy was assassinated. So that's why on today's episode of based on a true story. We're going to compare history with the two thousand sixteen film LBJ just to be clear. It's not like LBJ is a sequel to Oliver Stone's JFK. I just thought it would make sense covering these two episodes back to back. LBJ was written by longtime project runway producer, Joey heart stone, and it was directed by actor writer, producer and director, rob Reiner. Interestingly both the director of the movie and the man cast to play the lead role of president Lyndon B Johnson would Harrelson have both admitted in interviews that they hated the real president Johnson because of his stance on Vietnam. So when the project came up they decided if they're going to do to movie they'd have to dig a little deeper than the surface level the rest as they say is history. I'm Dan the fab and this is based on a true story. Before starting our story today. There's two things we need to do your longtime listener, you already know what those are. This is your first time listening to the show, welcome. The first thing we need to do is to set up our game to Trues and ally. Here's how it works. I'm about to say three things two of them are true, which means one of them is ally. And it's your job to pick out which one is ally. Are you ready? Okay. Here. They are number one LBJ was on board Air Force One while JFK was assassinated number two, president Johnson called Bobby Kennedy soon after JFK was assassinated. Number three LBJ did not seek reelection for a second term. Got him. Okay. Now as you're listening to our story today, you'll find the two facts scattered somewhere throughout the episode and then by a simple process of elimination. You'll be able to find out which one is alive. And of course, we'll do a recap at the end of the episode to see how well you did. Now, the last thing to do before getting into the meat of our story today is to find out what will be covering next week over on the producers feet, and that would be the count of Monte Cristo. That's a longtime favourite film of mine. So I must admit it was kind of excuse to watch it again, I hadn't seen in a while. But I'm excited to see what sort of historical elements. We can chat about from the movie. So you'll get that on the producers feed next week if you aren't on the producers feet, you can get access to that by supporting the show over at based on a true story podcast dot com slash support. Once again, that's based on a true story podcast dot com slash support. All right now, let's begin our dive into the true story behind the movie LBJ. Today begins November twenty second nineteen sixty three announcer. Bob Walker provides voiceover as we see Air Force One on Dallas love field. I to get off the plane is Kim Allen's version of Jackie Kennedy. The crowd gathered nearby. Cheers. Then it's president John F Kennedy who's played by Jeffrey Donovan who descends from the craft. We also see Woody Harrelson version of LBJ or Lyndon Baines Johnson on the tarmac. He's there with his wife lady bird Johnson. She's played by Jennifer Jason Leigh as the president. And vice president are getting into their motorcade the movie cuts away to four years earlier before we continue though, I wanna point out that here in LBJ the movie cuts back to November twenty second nineteen sixty three throat a lot of the film. However, since we just covered the movie of I won't go much into the details of president Kennedy's assassination. Under remember twenty second nineteen sixty three as they're depicted in this movie here 'cause we already covered them there. Oh, and as a quick side note lady bird is not her real name her real name was Claudia Alta Johnson. But everyone called her lady bird, and since the movie does that's what I'll call her throughout the podcast as well. So back to the movies time light for years. Earlier would have been nineteen fifty nine. The text onscreen tells us. We're in the office of the majority leader based on the conversation. It's clear that Lyndon Johnson is trying to get people to vote for a farmville farmville itself, isn't that important to the grand scheme of things. But the movie is correct. And showing that Lyndon Johnson was the majority leader for the Democratic Party in the US Senate in nineteen fifty nine forbid of context in case. You're not familiar with what that means. Basically there are two key political parties in the US government Republicans and Democrats there are one hundred seats in the Senate to each state in the US. So when one of those two political parties has fifty one or more seats that party has the majority the party's then choose who will be the majority leader and minority leader, respectively as of this recording the Republican party has the majority in the US Senate. So a Republican is the majority leader while a democrat is the minority leader in nineteen fifty nine the Democratic Party had the majority in the Senate and the democrat from Texas Lyndon Johnson was. Elected to be the majority leader while he wasn't elected in nineteen fifty nine. He was actually elected position in nineteen fifty five, but he held that position until nineteen sixty one. So the movies timeline showing him holding that position in nineteen Fifty-nine would be correct, man. Speaking of the movies time-line heading back there. Now, the next bid of taxed we see says that were on the Johnson ranch in Texas. It's still nineteen fifty nine Linden is hunting with Bobby Kennedy. Bobby is played by Michael stall, David in the movie as their hunting, Bobby asked Clinton, if he'd consider supporting his brother for president Lyndon says, of course, he'll support whomever is nominated. Even if that's you Bobby

Lyndon B Johnson president Bobby Kennedy LBJ US US Senate president Lyndon JFK Claudia Alta Johnson Jackie Kennedy Woody Harrelson producer vice president Johnson ranch Oliver Stone John F Kennedy rob Reiner Democratic Party Monte Cristo
LBRY The Decentralized Sharing Platform Run by the Community

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

07:44 min | 1 year ago

LBRY The Decentralized Sharing Platform Run by the Community

"Lot recently about asking listeners to review and write this podcast on itunes or a platform that they listen on basically to keep the algorithm happy that helps noodle snus discoveries podcasts, and I've noticed over the last few years people have built a strong following on a particular platform quickly find that they're playing on somebody else's playground and obeying by somebody else's rules on remember a few years ago when people neglected their websites and run off to sell their business on Facebook. Until of course, Facebook changed the rules and an introduced kind of pay to play you really want to reach an audience, and I'm a self all-too-familiar release picks up a following on linked teen and had over fourteen thousand followers and had articles getting over one hundred thousand views on there. Until of course, the algorithm changed another's fourteen thousand followers don't even get a notification from anymore, but our cost this isn't about me. I'm not alone. Here. Hear the same from people on Instagram and YouTube to the problem is that these platforms are changing the rules. But they're also letting algorithms call the shots rather than their own community that actually makes the platform of success. Both thankfully, there is an alternative library. The decentralized sharing platform is actually ruined by the community library is openly sharing platform that uses blockchain technology to enable users to publish material and get paid for doing. So I'm people using library service can also monetize their published material with these built-in payment system, which of course, is not ruined by advertisers. Like, the YouTube model there's been so many YouTubers that have so many found that their content is not fit for an advertiser so disappears. Swat this new exciting concept really appeals to me because it melts together. The tech. Advantages of both bitcoin and bitcoin services for people looking to share content, for example for an upcoming project lotteries offering two hundred thousand LBC which is their token for developers to compete to launch their act projects and social platforms and these competitive designs will allow for grant funding through the library foundation. And prior to this effort, libraries approved Twenty-one projects and gave close to one million LBJ for musicians and for conferences to connect people in India, and for video personnel is as well as anime is just post their work. So in a digital world where we're all content. Cray is now I got a feeling you can enjoy this one. So buckle up and hold on tight. So I can be meal is all the way to BUSTER. So we can speedway Jeremy Coffman, and he's the co founder and CEO of library. The decentralized open source digital media protocol on the blockchain. So massive warm. Welcome to the show, Jamie. Kennedy tell them I says a Labatt who you are. And what you do. I am Jeremy Kaufman the CEO of library. I have a background in computer science and entrepreneurship, but since the show isn't really about being about library. I'll I'll tell you what library is a library is a blockchain based open source protocol that facilitates the discovery distribution and purchase of digital content. That's a loaded sentence so much simpler way of explaining it is we've created a standard make services like YouTube or Amazon possible entirely via open source, and in a way that doesn't have the same level as control that centralized platforms have but still has that same great user experience full of what a step further. They labeled lobby is a decentralized YouTube. I mean, we will pay we'll have people listening boats in and outside. Outside of the tech industry. So maybe familiar with blockchain and crypto or this world. So he just set the scene L and tell me exactly what kind of problems you're having to solve with library. Sure. Sure. You know, there's we're we're solving problems from two sides so one there's a lot of problems with centralized platforms. They take some here. I'm talking about companies like you U2., apple Amazon even cable TV providers. These companies take anywhere from thirty to fifty five plus percents of the prophets to move. What is effectively a stream of bits a movie, a song, whatever it is from place to place b and level one. That's kind of crazy. That's a lot of money to move bits around. I'm not saying what they do is easy. But it's a lot of it. They're taking a very large. And then there are also these problems of trust and censorship these platforms James the rules on people at any time without warning come people build their businesses on top of these platforms in the building on top of quicksand. And then there are also problems with censorship. We don't always experience them in the US, although we experienced them some and the people in other countries experience. Them a lot more with these countries. You know, article aberration with governments in in in Turkey and China to deliver heavily censored versions of their platforms. So that's the problem with the with the sort of existing centralized platforms. I don't know if your audiences familiar with existing decentralized technology like the twin a bit torn has a couple of problems as well. There's a lot of dodgy stuff on. There hasn't gotten legitimate, traction writes, predominantly infringing content. There's also problems of discovery so bittorrent works. Great. If you had a hash to Embiid towards a wonderful technology, by the way technologically. It's it's brilliant. But the network where it's great if you have a hash that unique value that magnet links to enter the network, but there's no listing of what's available on it. There's no Cadillac and a blockchain can solve that problem. And another thing that's the problem with the torn it kind of works. Just because people are nice, and I'm all for systems where it can. Because people are nice. I love Wikipedia I give money every year. But if we can have incentives to do. Do the right thing. I think that's a little better than just relying on that. And so we're kind of coming at it from two sides. There's

Youtube Facebook Amazon CEO Instagram Swat LBJ Jeremy Coffman Jeremy Kaufman Labatt Cray United States Jamie Kennedy Turkey India
Big Question: In Mueller investigation, what does the President know?

The New Yorker Radio Hour

07:56 min | 1 year ago

Big Question: In Mueller investigation, what does the President know?

"But what exactly did Trump? No. When did he know it how involved was he we don't know yet? And his political future rests on the answers to those questions. Adam Davidson with what we know about the Muller investigation, so far Adam rights are called swamp chronicles, and you can find it at New Yorker dot com. I have with me today. Susan Glasser, and Jeff Toobin both staff writers for the New Yorker who've been covering this story in one way or another for years now almost seems like decades and Susan when you listen to Adam run us through the facts, where do you come down on the crucial question of the president of the United States is involvement. Here what is the likely outcome where that's concerned? You know, I was struck by a couple of things in in Adam's. Excellent report first of all. I think it's important to keep in mind, what did Vladimir Putin and Russia want from Donald Trump and want from the United States throughout this period. And because I think that starts to answer in a very specific way. Why there was a Russian intelligence operation. According to all the US intelligence agencies to manipulate an effect, the twenty sixteen election, not simply to cause chaos as some people have reported on Donald Trump's behalf. They wanted something very specific sanctions relief. Russia took over Crimea in two thousand fourteen invaded its neighbour, Ukraine. That's a conflict that continues today as a result of that. There are these fairly stringent sanctions on Russia. And I believe that was what they talked about it, the Trump Tower meeting, and I think the record is very likely to show that Trump was privately as well as publicly receptive to the idea that he was receiving some support from the Russians in an exchange was willing to consider lifting. These sanctions Susan there's been a lot of concern that William bar, the president's nominee for attorney general will not in the end even release Muller's findings or it might have to go. Through the attorney general, and he'll issue some kind of a version or summary of it. What do you expect us to actually get when the Muller investigation is over? What what will we receive? Will it be leaked in? Will. We find out everything we want to. It's not at all clear is the answer because we have not had a situation that exactly mirrors this one. There's no set law or template that applies to this. But I think most people believe that there's really no way to fully cover this up at this point. And that the the information one way or the other is going to come out, and I think that is a reasonable expectation. Jeff, you agree. Mostly I, you know. I've been burned so many times say well, Donald Trump can't possibly do acts does acts. So the idea that the Trump administration would use concepts like classified information executive privilege the existence of pending investigations to limit the disclosure in Muller's report is not out of the question to me. And even though it's true that even some Republicans as well as virtually all Democrats have said, they think ballers report should be made public. You know, more or less in its entirety. If Barr says, no, what are they going to do about it too lenient remedy minority? Latian that's put forth by Chuck Grassley. Who's not exactly a man of the left and Richard Blumenthal? Who's a democrat? Obviously that requires the final report. He submitted to congress and the public now that may not pass. But it gives you some sense of the inclination to at the very least leak it. Well, there could also be a supreme court fight over which would really put us in echoes of Watergate territory and arguably it was Nixon's. Fight over the release of the tapes. And when it finally got to the supreme court in involved all three branches of government. That was really, you know, the beginning of the end game for him. Now, the president's numbers all kinds of numbers have been eroding eroding. They're all his negatives are much higher than his his positives. His cO even his core basis is kind of gotten to thirty percent level. That's no way to win election and the election campaign has begun assuming he gets past these investigations in the house, assuming he gets past the mullahs report he'll be damaged in many ways. We're already seeing candidates come out on the democratic side. And we even hear about the possibility of a Republican challenging the president in his own party. What are Donald Trump's election prospects? Well, first of all, I think you're right to spotlight the possibility of Republican challenge, even if it's not successful recent history suggests this is the the the one fairly sure fire way in which incumbent presidents lose reelection is when they are weakened from within their own party. Obviously that was the story of Jimmy Carter in one thousand nine hundred eighty beaten up by Ted Kennedy, even though Kennedy didn't win and goes on to lose to Ronald Reagan, George H W Bush had the Pat Buchanan insurgency from within his party, it becomes a one term president or you could have an LBJ lake scenario in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight where the president chose not to run again while facing increasing discord and division from within his own party. I think both of those are real scenarios Jeff same question. Well, I I just, you know, given my credentials as someone who was disastrously totally wrong about the two thousand sixteen election. I wasn't alone. But I was. I think reports of Donald Trump's political death have been greatly exaggerated. I think his poll numbers while somewhat weaker. I think the real story is how little they've changed. Not how much they've changed a me strongly agree with that the day he took office after election election in which you'll recall he won his popularity was roughly forty percent it's been as high as forty five it's been down to forty thirty five. But I mean, it's really, you know, depending on which Paul it really hasn't changed that much. And that's you know, it was enough to win as for the Democrats. I mean, I suppose the good news is there's no one candidate who was his target who he can, you know, start Channing lock him or her up. The bad news is there's no candidate. So the idea that Donald Trump is going to. To lose to some miscellaneous person whose identity we have no idea about who it is. I just think, you know, most presidents get reelected. Is is the drama of the possibility of Muller getting fired by Trump? Now overdue think yes, I really think the odds of him being dismissed are essentially zero now release of the report that's a different story and we've discussed the complexity there, but Muller is going to be allowed to finish this investigation. I have no

Donald Trump Muller President Trump Trump Tower Jeff Toobin Adam Davidson Susan Glasser United States Russia Vladimir Putin Chuck Grassley Richard Blumenthal Ukraine Supreme Court Crimea Channing Attorney Barr
A look at the Trump presidency

The Economist Radio

07:22 min | 1 year ago

A look at the Trump presidency

"Is the pow that Donald Trump tests. I think what Donald Trump is testing. Now is that he's been able to get the Republicans in congress to do the things that they wanted to do, and perhaps he is well, the tax cut the deregulation, the supreme court appointments, but he's testing a power. That the public themselves in the end are the ones that are the big biggest check on the congress and on the courts and on the presidency and right now the approval rating of Donald Trump is is the lowest any president has been. And I think it's in part not because he hasn't accomplished many of the things that a lot of people feel are good. But because there has been a toxic culture created people feel anxious people feel the moorings are being undone that traditions norms are being violated and after a while the people will speak. I mean, they spoke pretty strongly in the midterm elections. I'm even though he kept the Senate which most people assumed he would given the structural balance. The Senate had he lost pretty big in the house. And and he hasn't accepted the loss really in some ways. Which is a problem. If he did he might say, how can I change now? So that I can reach out to the other side. And maybe he will maybe we'll get infrastructure. Maybe we'll get something for the dreamers. Maybe we'll get this criminal Justice reform. And I'm hoping that I'm hoping that that will will make the two sides come together in a better way. I wonder if if you don't reading the midterms wrong, I'm just going to make you flat-out challenge on that won't turn out was high. You could argue his reinvigorates is the electricity. We had happen to democratic stress just into lake on his show not long ago saying yes, Democrats took back the house. But if you look across the races, it doesn't look like the Trump machine is coming to a standstill in any way. Indeed. The take way might be Donald Trump is now definitely gonna go on all things behavioral and run again in twenty twenty rather than this being a great mid Tom's or you show, you're not trading too, much to woods wishful thinking possibly possibly. I might be. I mean, it's hard to predict anything when you know. I like everybody else never assumed that Hillary Clinton wasn't going to win. So it makes you much more vulnerable to making predictions. I think that the most important thing that happened in the midterms, and this has nothing to do with party necessarily is that the fact so many people came out. I mean young people voting five hundred percent more than in the previous midterms more. Women running for election from all sorts of parts of the lives that had never been in politics before. That's that's a really hopeful sign is that thanks to Donald Trump at possibly could be. I mean, I think the interest in politics has been increased because of Donald Trump, and that's a very good thing. Whether or not it produces him again or whether it produces somebody against him when the citizens get awakened. That's when things happen in the country. I mean when I look back at the times when change happened. It was the anti slavery movement that did it all Lincoln said not his leadership alone. It was the progressive movement in the cities and states long before FDR an and teddy Roosevelt became president that allowed that some of the regulations that could deal with the industrial revolution. And of course, it was the civil rights movement that allowed LBJ to do the civil rights Bill in the voting rights Bill. So we need a political revolution in our country. Something's not working well with the system. The congressional lines are being drawn gerrymandering this too much money in politics. There's a sense that as. Teddy Roosevelt said the rock of democracy will break when people in different regions and different parties and different races begin to feel themselves as the other. So somehow that's been happening long before trunk the polarization in the country people in the rural areas feeling cut off from the city's people who are working class people feeling that the elites haven't handled them. Well, they don't have the right educational system. They haven't had mobility those are deep cultural problems that he hasn't created that were there. And so the question the question will be will leader rise that can heal those divisions. And so far, he hasn't healed them. The question will be where does the country go and twenty twenty if such a leader arises, we don't know who that later will be I must ask you about impeachment who spectra of postal impeachment hanging over the presidency. Not least because you have a sort of strong personal echo. Here. Think is a young stone for you route two piece in the new Republic and Johnson entitled how to dump Lyndon Johnson. I understand it. Career impeaching president the autumn of put you off impeaching another will. Well, no what I meant by. That was that. I was hoping this was written in nineteen sixty seven when I became a White House fellow and I'd written an article for the new Republic with a friend of mine, and we were simply saying how to remove Lyndon Johnson. From office was to create a party that would run against him in nineteen sixty eight rather wishful thinking, it would be made up of women minorities poor people and. Opposable strategy fool the Democrats on the left. Do you recognize that I do indeed? But I think that in some ways I think it would be a big mistake for impeachment to start. I mean, the Democrats have to know that whatever Muller comes up with the Senate will not go along with the impeachment. And I think it's much better to just educate the people, let them feel and change their mind about him suppose Muller comes up with obstruction of Justice or even collusion. Then you just let the people absorb that information. It would be a big mistake for them to move in an impeachment direction. It'll just fire the base of Trump, and then he will be able to say this is a witch hunt. So that I think they should just keep their heads down. They should do their investigations, but they should try and get as much done as they can even if it contributes to the benefit of the Republicans to get some of these things pass it'll be good for the country. So that's changing your thinking of fifty years. I think you become a little bit more practical. But no, even then I was wanting them to re unelected him not necessarily impeach him. Fair point just a closing from you what kind of presidency regardless of who runs. Oh gets elected. But what cut presence, you do you think will result from Donald Trump having been in the White House while the question will be does the next president have to have that kind of celebrity entertainment value. So that he becomes a figure who's part of your lives. I mean in some ways if I thought about who could come back now that could most challenge President Trump. It would be teddy Roosevelt because he was a person who people would follow him when he was on stage as he was in center stage. I mean, they said about him. He wanted to be the baby at the baptism and the bride at the wedding and the corpse at the funeral. He hungered for that stage as Trump does. And there's something charismatic about that people are drawn to that. It's like a kid drawn to a circus. And the question will be doing need that person today in our social media entertainment world, or could it be Oprah presidency? That's. Wrecked. How you feel about it? Well, I think not only Oprah. But now, there's also it's a sports stars and movie stars think, oh, I can become president. If this person became president without political experience. I think it's a problem to get into public life without political experience, or at least leadership experience. I mean, I can see a big businessman whose really led hundreds of thousands of people in a company overseas coming in and having had the experience of building a team and all those human qualities, but to just pop in from some other field where you haven't been a leader. But you've simply been a celebrity. I think would be a problem if that's the lesson taken from this doors. Thank you very much. Joining us. Thank

President Trump Donald Trump Teddy Roosevelt Senate Lyndon Johnson Congress Hillary Clinton FDR Muller White House White House Fellow Lincoln Twenty Twenty Woods TOM
"lbj" Discussed on Words Matter

Words Matter

04:54 min | 2 years ago

"lbj" Discussed on Words Matter

"That he was so successful. Yeah. I think a piece that LBJ had Donald Trump does not have was the idea they like Trump. He wanted to be great. And he wanted people to adore him. I mean, he, you know, he wrote his name all over everything he liked. He liked nice suits. He liked people to sort of, you know, worshiping the dogs LBJ exam. He he really he really liked any kind of education that he could receive. He he was like Trump addicted to the telephone in part because when you're president p people call you up all the time to tell you how great you are. And how misunderstood you are and all that. So he wanted he had the same desire for sort of acclimation and greatness that Trump had. But I think what LBJ understood was that to be great. He could be great by doing things that changed people's lives. And that that was a really sincere belief that came from his earliest childhood that the way that you achieved greatness in politics was to do things for, you know, millions of people that you would never even know. And that was this sort of big driver from the moment, he he ascends to the presidency after John F Kennedy's assassination. He has this idea that he's sort of coming after coming in this horrible circumstance. He's he's replacing a man. Already a legend in the only way that he's ever going to be able to cheat. The kind of greatness, he wants to get a lot done. And he does it very quickly. Let's talk about the nineteen sixty six midterm elections. Do you see any parallels with twenty eighteen so the nineteen sixty six midterm elections, which I write about in the book are, you know, every midterm election. We who cover politics say, this is the biggest election ever, just which we then say two years later about the presidential election and in most midterm elections. They're not necessarily that important nineteen sixty six is I think one of these midterm elections that you can point to say this is really the beginning of huge change. It is remarkably the moment that that Ronald Reagan bursts on the scene. As the governor of California elected with a majority of of nearly a million votes in a state that the Democrats had easily carried for years before. And it's in the context of a much bigger Republican wave that really marks the end of Johnson's progressive ascendency. And I think what you what you started to see in that election was a shift in the way that voters allegiances worked you had suburban voters across the country who you know, in previous generations had been part of democratic families. Maybe lived in cities, and sort of voted along with machines that were that had gotten the sense that the Democratic Party no longer represented them. And the these new suburban voters were were opening their eyes to the Republican party. And they would really stay there for for generations. And I think what we've just seen in this midterm election is perhaps the severing of that relationship perhaps permanently of their. Republican party from those same or the or the children grandchildren of some of those suburban voters. So I think that that that really speaks to how consequential election we've just been through could be it's easy to become frustrated with the pace of human progress. But consider that LBJ was worried about white suburban voters fleeing because of the Voting Rights Act because of the Civil Rights Act, and then this last election, we saw suburban voters arch county flea perhaps because of Donald Trump's inflammatory rhetoric in part on the caravans on migrants and on immigration. That's a really good point. Which actually I hadn't focused on in that way in that respect. You can see this is a this is a hopeful story because fifty years later racism is just is not acceptable in the way that it was in the nineteen sixties. Let's play a little bit of the LBJ joint session address on voting rights. And this was marched nineteen sixty five. Five we cannot. We must not. Refused to protect the right of every American to vote in every election that he made his are to participate in. And we not and we cannot and we must not wait. Another eight months before we get a Bill. We have already weighed a hundred years and more and the time for waiting is gone..

Donald Trump LBJ Republican party John F Kennedy Democratic Party Ronald Reagan California president Johnson hundred years eight months fifty years two years
Sacha Baron Cohen tries to sell Dick Cheney-signed waterboard kit on eBay

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

01:56 min | 2 years ago

Sacha Baron Cohen tries to sell Dick Cheney-signed waterboard kit on eBay

"Baron Cohen he's embarrassed many people over the years by pretending to be one of. His numerous characters rarely have they gotten his angry as they are now as he travels the US in disguise where he's. New series on Showtime's called who is America so far he's victimize everyone from Bernie. Sanders to Sarah Palin who called him sick and evil he got the leader of a gun rights group in Virginia to endorse guns hidden in stuffed animals for, five year olds just remember two point puppy pistols mouth. Right at the middle of the bad man if he. Has a big fat tummy pointed that Good Last night Cohen posed as a former Mossad agent interviewing Dick Cheney actually got the former vice president to autograph a plastic milk jug part of what Cohen referred to as Cheney's waterboarding. Kit is it possible to sign my waterboard? Jerk I I'm I've ever signed a waterbird Cohen. Put that jug up for auction on EBay, the proceeds to go to Amnesty International and the bids hit. Thirty eight hundred dollars before EBay shut it down that conservatives narrow. Unhappy with us they, say they're being unfairly targeted by Cohen some are calling for a boycott of. Showtime Denzel Washington is at the top of the box office again but this time. He took a little bit of a different routes people do. Bad things and. Sometime, you get a chance to set skill set in its, debut weekend equalizer to took in an estimated thirty five point eight million dollars in ticket sales it was Washington's first ever seek well the film edged out another sequel mama Mia here we go again was brought back the original cast including Meryl Streep and Pierce. Brosnan hotel Transylvania three summer vacation finished third CBS correspondent Diane, king hall It before time to check on your money. For LBJ text..

Baron Cohen Ebay Denzel Washington Dick Cheney Showtime Brosnan Hotel Transylvania United States Meryl Streep Mossad Amnesty International Sarah Palin Vice President Sanders Virginia Bernie CBS America MIA King Hall Diane
"lbj" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"lbj" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Lot of dealings with each other and did he not say that you know he he gave lbj millions of dollars from all kinds of hush money and bribes and stuff like that yeah he was a business partner business partner with an purchase with the lbj but actually was the back man it was the bagman lbj wanted money he would call bill is less this and he would order says i need that money tomorrow gotta get that money to me and and so that was that was relationship and it's part of the catches history lbj was so corrupt as always does he was one of the greatest swindlers in american history but they were made for each other my say how did he get to become vice president because kennedy couldn't stand him yeah i think i think he actually blackmailed kennedy into doing i know is a story there where the two the two brothers conferred together and weighed the pros and cons of having to go forward and but but but had on kennedy was knowledge of tendencies such fairs okay involved you know it's a communist woman from eastern europe which was very explosive with an in person person that jaeger hooper ordered out of the country he was also seeing the girlfriend of sam giancana the mobster out of chicago that's correct to the exner campbell so he used that clout to get the vice president's gnawed and in he goes and then all of a sudden kennedy gets assassinated and johnson becomes president just like that just like that and i think the two people are in the cover up where geogra hoover and and johnson of course super next door neighbors right there in washington for many many years hoover was very close to johnson wasn't he very very close and and you know hoover something ahead a little bit i think hoover's death is is is has a lot of mystery to it too you know he died just six weeks before the watergate case broke it was a very convenient death because had he been alive i think the case watergate case what both different way did you know the attorney melvin belli no i did not know i know i know the name he was very prominent and i didn't know him he seems to have had a relationship with ruby and with some of the mobster's it was a strange situation to the the whole entire jfk assassination smacks of a major conspiracy i am amazed douglass that it hasn't become a major story with the media it's almost like nobody wants to really deal with it and it's on the on the conscience of the most americans it's most americans realize there was a conspiracy acknowledge that but i i take a minority position on this nation i'm with jim marrs and how and opposition basically is that it was a majestic twelve it was that made the ultimate determination that kennedy had to be killed and the reason they did that was that kennedy was had open avenues with chef and they were afraid that he was going to share the secrets of the presence that majestic quilt had but the soviets and so i i'm the opinion that's there were many that's we all acknowledge you have a lot of enemies right but i think the ultimate decision was made by and this is the most important part of the deep state is majestic twelve or whatever it's called today because you can understand what's going on in the world today without but the alien presence i'm talking about you know ufo's and and in some of the planets and maybe other dimensions and so forth all right we'll get back to that because that's an important facet of all of this and let's jump ahead to watergate nineteen seventytwo of course the burglars the plumbers break into the watergate hotel to try to steal some information for the president they all get caught how did you end up representing e howard hunt well i have to give background here because i i was graduated from new york university law school i thought the job i was offered a job by general foods corporation which at that time was the world's largest food manufacturer and they were in white plains new york post cereals and bird's eye on all these maxwell house coffee and after two years there the.

lbj six weeks two years
"lbj" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

05:08 min | 2 years ago

"lbj" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Lot of dealings with each other and did he not say that you know he he gave lbj millions of dollars from all kinds of hush money and bribes and stuff like that yeah he was a business partner of silent business partner with an process with the lbj but actually was the bag man it was the bagman lbj wanted money he would call bilas tell us this and he would order says i need that money tomorrow you gotta get that money to me and and so that was that was a relationship and it's part of the catches history lbj was so corrupt as always does he was one of the greatest swindlers in american history but they were made for each other you might say how did he get to become vice president because kennedy couldn't stand him yeah i think he i think he actually blackmailed kennedy into doing it i know there's a story there where the two the two brothers conferred together and weighed the pros and cons of having to go forward and but what lbj had on kennedy was knowledge of tendencies affairs involved you know a communist woman from eastern europe which was very explosive and and the person a person that j edgar hoover ordered out of the country he was also seeing the girlfriend of sam giancana the the mobster out of chicago that's correct two extra campbell so he used that clout to get the vice president's nod and in he goes and then all of a sudden kennedy gets assassinated and johnson becomes president just like that just like that and i think the two people are in the cover up where geogra hoover and and johnson of course they were next door neighbors right there in washington for many many years hoover was very close to johnson wasn't he very very close and i and you know hoover something ahead had a little bit i think hoover's death is is has a lot of mystery to to you know he died so six weeks before the watergate case broke it was a very convenient death because had he been alive i think the case watergate case a different way did you know the attorney melvin belli though i did not know i know i know the name he was very prominent and i didn't know him he seems to have had a relationship with ruby and with some of the mobster's it was a strange situation to the whole entire jfk assassination smacks of a major conspiracy i'm amazed douglass that it hasn't become a major story with media it's almost like nobody wants to really deal with it it's on the on the conscience of the most americans most americans realize there was a conspiracy and acknowledge that but i i'm i take a minority position on this nation i'm with jim marrs and linda moulton howe and opposition basically is that it was a majestic twelve it was that made the ultimate determination that kennedy had to be killed and the reason they did that was that kennedy was had opened avenues with coup chef and they were afraid that he was going to share the secrets of the alien presence that majestic quilt had but the soviets and so are i i'm the opinion that's there were many that's we all acknowledge you have a lot of enemies right but i think the ultimate decision was made by and this is the most important part of the deep state is majestic club or whatever it's called today because you can understand what's going on in the world today without feeling but presents i'm talking about you know ufo's and aliens from other planets and maybe other dimensions and so forth all right we'll get back to that because that's an important facet of all of this and let's jump ahead to watergate nineteen seventytwo of course the burglars the plumbers break into the watergate hotel to try to steal some information for the president they all get caught how did you end up representing e howard hunt well i have to give a little background here because i was graduated from new york university law school i would rather job i was offered a job at general foods corporation which at that time was the world's largest food manufacturer and they were in white plains new york post cereals and brazilian all these maxwell house coffee and and after two years there and the headquarters handing their government affairs they asked that i go to washington be there washington representative but this'll be a nineteen sixty nine but they said for the.

lbj six weeks two years
"lbj" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"lbj" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"K lbj it is alex from houston neuron kale bj pleasure speaking with you i've got to agree with you i'm not sure that on spending fifty hundred million dollars in the metal detectors is the way to go i think that will just lose the goalpost and the side of the further towards the street okay yeah i think we the creative so i think most people believe that the next is out there somewhere and sooner or later finest person before they actually go and socities but instead of arresting at the home or whatever i think that they should use it opportunities basically giant viral where nate cool and sit up with cameras and watch this guy walk into trap and then leaked video so talks about sitting at the school watch the video and that's so awful how are we gonna know who the shooter is video to what good is video taping going to do oh i think sooner or later they're going to figure out one of the taxes somebody's planning to do that happens all the time i mean it happened here locally the not just just a few weeks ago guy said that he made was was joking around i think he took a picture of his backpack and a gun and said ready for the school day he did to your point alex he didn't even make it inside the building before he was arrested so i mean it happens people that get ratted out for making threats all the time and i can tell you from experience my own kids school they arrest them in a second they're done goodbye so long at least somewhere there.

alex houston nate cool fifty hundred million dollars
"lbj" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"lbj" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Like i am not yours the the funny thing is for me when i knew that you were make before i knew anything the film when i knew that worth coming film was going to be called lady bird a thought lbj he's wife fisherman like ladybird means leinna the former first lady did you think about that when you named at lady fared no other way will say just did press in texas in its so confusing there they were like why why why did any bird you know the truth is i i mean this is one of the things so mysterious about riding in a it takes me a very long time to write it takes me a to finish scripts because partly because they don't do any improvisation once a month set and i calving the document have integrity on its own but that being said there's a fair amount of writing for me which fuels unconscious and i almost feel like i don't know where it's coming from and i do actually experience characters speaking to me or through me and i don't know where that comes from but lady bird the name lady bird was something that came out of i had been writing all these other scenes and i couldn't find exactly how it all fit together i felt like i was i kept hitting a wall and then a put everything aside and i wrote at the top of the page why won't you call me lady bird you promise to that you would and i have no idea where it came from and i looked at it and i thought who is what's this and who is this person who make someone all her that and then i kept pressing on it and i found this character behind it i never die didn't make anyone call me by a different name so it's not coming from me but then i remembered later and this is the creepy mysterious out of writing a mother goose a nursery rhyme ladybird ladybird way home and then it finish it says your house is on fire in your children are gone which is depressing um but i think that that had lodged itself somewhere in my my brain but the truth is i find writing to be a process of mayan conscious knows a lot more than i do and then i.

lbj texas
"lbj" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"lbj" Discussed on WCHS

"Still only that he sexually harassed women and the white house the he has stood rv wind speed test no he would not we should not have that in the white house but here we are we have a president who actually did that stuff and he's white house nato now that's that's true and difference i suppose between but it's pretty club came out with lbj uh uh saying an admitting it on tape and probably a lot of cases in which is lbj she had been actually caught on tape you might not have been able to do the c he actually did but i think it's clear to the a big difference between the the two of them us aside from the just shuler uh th accurate is that lbj on what he wanted to keep taught you taught school kids of mexican descent in could tool attack uh twenty one person it's it's clear that although he was a product of his time he used the n word and he could be very cutting an an and when he deal with with southern racist democrat dna democratic senators that ultimately he once he got the power he announced his power at least in the domestic sense for for good and and and nationwide by i mean you you're wonderful times uh whether wasn't the time uh uh clear to me that ultimately he wanted to do good even though he was he was rough and course and egged he was not need to to see people in the back or or or do the wrong thing of ultimately it meant achieving his goal yes and and you're exactly right he didn't want to do things a for people who are underprivileged he didn't on poverty he came from that and he didn't feel himself as a southerner needs a texan and a westerner he was more than happy to assume the mantle of southern democrat because he needed to talk to people like richard russell right but he he he made his dna on his own to have an affinity for people in poverty and wanting to lift them out of poverty you don't do what he did on a big political expediency seen vr made you made your heavy lift and he.

white house president nato shuler lbj richard russell political expediency
"lbj" Discussed on 1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"lbj" Discussed on 1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

"They would have some odd chromosome that the rest of us don't half without right with thinks that we that they can without question in order to seek that offers you have to have a massive ego you have to have a need to be loved a need for attention and a need for power so it is elevated but you're hoping that your leaders have that plus a filter well not just a filter but a knowledge of how to govern a knowledge of how policy inter inter inter winds with people's lives and how politics works you have to have somebody who understands so lbj was larger than life he had all those things but he also knew how to get stuff done he was steeped in in in government he knew how to get things done sparked an additional interest in doing more political and you well actually we did another one together and all shockandawe is about uh the run up to the war in iraq and about the four journalists from knight ridder news who are now reuters and they got it right you know but they couldn't get their stories published you know right and it and it didn't get the same amount of attention that the new york times yes yes does in my work we ask you about what's going on in hollywood right now what is going on in hollywood how how much is the town going to change post carpet.

iraq reuters new york times hollywood lbj knight ridder
"lbj" Discussed on 1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"lbj" Discussed on 1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

"And then it's clear it was what he wouldn't go to here was he wouldn't make the case that oh kennedy would have kept us out of vietnam because one of the things that can burns reminds us we don't we don't know but what he might have lbj just relied on kennedy's guys yeah and at the end of the day and that lbj was regret if he has a regret it was over relying on these guys and i think that that as good as he was domestically he was not as versed in international affairs and certainly not in military affairs that was a tough thing for him i mean he he he he was torn in the whole time when asked a little bit about the market for something like this part of me is surprised you were telling me it's gonna be in six hundred theaters that's not a small thing for what is a a a an you could arguing narrow audience right right except president trump has it made the presidency seemed narrow anymore do you think in an odd way he's helping give give people more interest in what our press presidents well i can tell you for a fact because we did finish this film a long time ago watching this film before trump became president and watching it now it's a completely different movie you're watching it through a different prism so from that standpoint it all of a sudden takes on this incredible a you know lens that you're seeing it through and so yeah may be know maybe he'll take credit for that what's this is where success so what should we take away from that reason i say is it is the presidency mean that the only people attracted to it are super egos and i mean this like i've always had this theory that if we lined up all of our president.

kennedy vietnam lbj trump president
"lbj" Discussed on 1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"lbj" Discussed on 1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

"In retaliation z you can listen to see we have him only are and what aging only here in washington to people like me geek out about cspan radio but on weekends for the for a it felt like for a decade they just would play the lbj phone calls oh the end it they were they were mesmerising unless it had enjoyed it yeah i did i i used to listen to it was in the chair you know getting ready and so every morning i'd be and have his voice in my head and as as rub can attest i'd get a little selfconscious about uh that doesn't sound like him you know he's from texas i wanted way because he was from texas and he says yeah but that's the west texas hill three anthony stick houston accent is he is he aware leicester the weather is here so what was the was the hardest part of doing i think it was just you know obsessing about in my doing his physicality radio because of the script whose grade we got the greatest director possible so in pay him for that and that not yet we'll find out after the words that i was obsessed with just seven the physicality in the voice and he kept telling me to stop worrying about it and then when i watched it turned out you know you don't really think about it as a viewer he's such a compelling personality it's it's it's been interesting to me we we've gone through different innovations of wanting to tell the lbj store and i think partially because he was such a huge personality there was a i think randy quaid late lbj and inventors many a you know brian cranston all this.

washington texas director randy quaid brian cranston cspan houston lbj
"lbj" Discussed on 1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"lbj" Discussed on 1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

"Ladies and gentlemen we invite you to meet the party to think about this a political party in power that's fracturing into a president facing accusations of betraying the voters who put him in power a white house ripe with ego not cheese mo and lots of colorful language any of that sound familiar i'm actually not talking about right now i'm talking about this 60s the new film lbj chronicles linden johnson's unexpected political ascension through his days in the senate to becoming kennedy's vice president and the assassination that put him in the oval office and its transformation from a traditional southern democrat to a champion of the civil rights act joining me now actorproducer activists and director of this film and many others rob reiner and the man who transformed in lbj there actor woody harrelson gentlemen welcome you both thanks for having a woody at that was you really be really looked like kim how long does that transformation that takes a couple hours as it at a long chin you've got to add in their little here's is it the years is everything from the eyesdown rulli he even add contact lenses everything that is so rob what did you start doing this film and why why this this renaissance of lbj well grabbed you this is the crazy part because you know both forty and i struggled with the idea of even making a movie about lbj because when i was of draft age in the '60s he was president and i hated him i hated him because he could send me can my death it's so funny say this and i'm glad you bring your about the same age as my father ups are he's not no longer with us but that that's for him lbj is vietnam and he can't as it could never think about him any other i couldn't either i mean that's all i fought about i marched against the vietnam war i was against it i.

president linden johnson senate kennedy vice president director kim vietnam war lbj civil rights rob reiner woody harrelson vietnam