38 Burst results for "LAW"

Fresh update on "law" discussed on MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

00:44 sec | 19 min ago

Fresh update on "law" discussed on MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

"When he was first elected the House of Commons. I was living in his writing at the time. And I remember one of the ways that he campaigned was certain dog whistles about indigenous people and Law & Order in that area rural Saskatchewan. So I don't think of him as being a champion of reconciliation anyway in this, but there is something really enjoyable about watching payback and sheer rip into each other over the specific issue. And I think it's definitely a political calculation from sheer that he doesn't want his party a year away from an election. Looking like it's supports and empowers bigots and racists

House Of Commons Saskatchewan
Joe Rogan Gets Cornered by Lex Fridman Over Trump

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:51 min | 1 d ago

Joe Rogan Gets Cornered by Lex Fridman Over Trump

"Friedman, this young podcaster big into technology, had Joe Rogan as a guest, which is unusual in and of itself on. And managed to very skillfully walk Joe into a trap of his own making by saying, why didn't you have Donald Trump on your show? You've got the biggest podcast in the world and Rogan says, not interested in helping that guy out. It's not my job. He's nasty. And then literally ten minutes later, he gets into admit, I love Alex Jones. I put him on my show so people could see the other side of Alex Jones. The guy who just got fined $40 million for lying about sandy hook. So this is part of our broader discussion, congrats to lex, by the way. Divisiveness or allowing people to say their viewpoint, shouldn't we welcome that? Because this is the biggest thing about Trump. Oh, oh, he's divisive. He's like, no, this is all. This is all, we have to understand what a monocultural we're living in. This is the thing that skews everything. If Donald Trump had three channels and the left had three channels, I would say, great. Let's fight it out, fight it out. But in fact, the left still holds the high ground, not just in the media, not just in every aspect, except for radio and podcasting. But not only there, but they hold it in terms of the government, obviously, and in terms of law enforcement now, corporations. This was you plugged my half speech before about the collapse of the establishment. That's what I mean. You know, it's one thing. It's one thing to have an avant garde or rebellious avant garde. Sometimes they bubble up fresh ideas and sometimes people like us conservators who ain't no, no, we can't do that. Okay, that's fine. That's part of the system. That's part of how it works. Young people usually a little bit more creative than older people, old people, steeped in tradition, which is also good. We don't have that system anymore. The

Alex Jones Donald Trump Joe Rogan Rogan Friedman JOE
Fresh update on "law" discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:50 min | 31 min ago

Fresh update on "law" discussed on Morning Edition

"The FBI and the Department of Homeland Security warn of a jump in threats to law enforcement. I'm Leila faldon. And I'm Steve inskeep the warning comes after agents enforced a court approved search of the former president's residence in Florida. Also, India claimed independence 75 years ago today. Lauren freyr reflects on the end of British colonial rule and a violent partition from Pakistan. And on this late summer day, Joe Parker investigates sweat. It's Monday August 15th. Ben Affleck is 50 years old. The news is next. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Amy held. Iran's foreign ministry has issued its first statement about author Salman Rushdie since Friday's knife attack in New York, saying he and his supporters are to blame for it, adding Tehran was not involved and they have no additional information about the 24 year old from New Jersey charged with attempted murder. The 75 year old author is said to be in critical condition, but is expected to recover in 1989, Tehran issued an edict to kill rushdie based on his novel the satanic verses. Later, backing away from the fatwa. Spokesman Nasser kanani said today freedom of speech does not justify rushdie's insults upon religion in his writing, but in New York, governor Kathy hochul says freedom of speech will be protected. She spoke Sunday at the site in chautauqua where rushdie and the event moderator were attacked. This is a place that someone

Leila Faldon Steve Inskeep Lauren Freyr Joe Parker Npr News Foreign Ministry Department Of Homeland Securit FBI Ben Affleck Tehran Salman Rushdie Pakistan Rushdie Florida India AMY Nasser Kanani Iran Washington New York
Hillary Clinton Committed Espionage, Received No Punishment

Mark Levin

01:16 min | 2 d ago

Hillary Clinton Committed Espionage, Received No Punishment

"Hillary Clinton who ran for president in 2016 Who was Secretary of State who was the United States center former First Lady a lawyer She decided to set up a private server in our own home In New York In order to specifically evade the federal act that protects government property And she set that up on the slide and all kinds of information went through there Including classified information In violation of the espionage act James Comey who would let lighter violate federal law when it came to documents Am I humble opinion She violated federal law and his infamous press conference But said no prosecutor would bring a case of this sort Hillary got a pass

Hillary Clinton First Lady James Comey United States New York Hillary
Fresh update on "law" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:21 min | 34 min ago

Fresh update on "law" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"AI and Homeland Security have issued a memo about potential danger to law enforcement after revelations about the information found at Mar-a-Lago. CBS is Bradley Blackburn has more. A joint intelligence bulletin sent to law enforcement across the country warned of a threat to place a so called dirty bomb in front of FBI headquarters and general calls for Civil War and armed rebellion. Other threats are also circulating online. On his social media platform, mister Trump claims agents knowingly confiscated privilege attorney client material. And he wants it returned immediately. Republicans are calling on the Department of Justice to release the affidavit that led to the search warrant. And heche has died, her representative says the actress has been peacefully taken off life support more than a week after she suffered a severe brain injury when she crashed her car into a home in LA. Correspondent Christopher Cruise looks back, get her career. The 53 year old heche was among Hollywood's biggest stars in the 1990s, appearing in movies with such actors as Johnny Depp and Harrison Ford. In a memoir in 2001, she wrote about her lifelong struggles with mental health. She seemed to have been getting back on track professionally recently with recurring roles in the network TV series Chicago PD and all rise. His agent says Salman Rushdie is now breathing on his own without the help of a ventilator. And a spokesman for Iran's foreign ministry is denying Tehran was involved in his brutal stabbing in western New York. Governor Kathy hochul spoke at the chautauqua institution. Man with a knife can not silence a man with a pen. Scottish police say they're investigating online threats against J. K. Rowling after the Harry Potter author tweeted her support for rushdie. With U.S. precision rocket systems in hand, Ukraine is planning a counter offensive against Russian forces in the east correspondent Charlie dagger is in. Military

Bradley Blackburn Mister Trump Heche Christopher Cruise CBS FBI Department Of Justice Foreign Ministry Harrison Ford Johnny Depp Governor Kathy Hochul Salman Rushdie Hollywood LA Chautauqua Institution Tehran Chicago Scottish Police Iran J. K. Rowling
The Infamous Lost Suitcases of Lawrence Walsh

Mark Levin

01:49 min | 2 d ago

The Infamous Lost Suitcases of Lawrence Walsh

"And I was handling the representation of then the former attorney general Edward meese the iron countryman And as I was doing my research and over the transom came information That the independent counsel at that time Lawrence Walsh who was a real hateful in my view diabolical individual since deceased That he violated the espionage act Among other laws Here's a man who took the most secret classified information involving a foreign country As well as grand jury information put it in two suitcases mister producer As he was flying from Washington D.C. to the West Coast to question then president Reagan Checked those two suitcases as luggage And when he landed at LAX guess what The two suitcases never came out They came out on the carousel that goes round and round in your waiting They waited and they waited and nothing happened It was all secret and under the radar The FBI went on a secret mission for two weeks to find those documents You know where they found them mister producer They never did

Edward Meese Lawrence Walsh Washington D.C. President Reagan West Coast FBI
Ned Ryun on Defunding and Disbanding the FBI

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:12 min | 2 d ago

Ned Ryun on Defunding and Disbanding the FBI

"He's Ned Ryan. He is the author of a book I highly highly recommend on the battle of bunker hill. The adversaries, you can see it subtly placed over his left shoulder. There you go. Right there. You know everything and everyone about politics. You are deep, deep, deep in it. I want to get your perspective on today's theme resolved the disgraced FBI must be defunded and disbanded. What do you think? A 100%, I don't think that goes far enough though. I think that it is common. You think that's the moderate position. That is the moderate position. I think that they have shown themselves to absolutely not care about the rule of law. We have 6 years of empirical evidence of that in which, let's just start, for example, they used a fake Steele dossier, which they knew was bogus. That's the stunning part to me to secure four fisa warrant to spy on the president of the United States in the hopes to undermine and take out the duly elected president of the United States. And then we can keep on adding to that. I mean, I don't think people are talking enough about this very crazy Gretchen Whitmer, fed napping FBI informant, planting evidence kind of story that's really starting to play out. But all and beyond defund and shut down. People need to go to jail.

Ned Ryan FBI Steele United States Gretchen Whitmer
Kurt Schlichter: 'Merrick, Garland, You're Trash!'

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:15 min | 2 d ago

Kurt Schlichter: 'Merrick, Garland, You're Trash!'

"Garland, you're trash. You're a lying cog in a regime machine designed to stamp out opposition. Let's talk. Let's talk about your rule of law, shall we? Let's talk about the rule of law being fairly applied. Let's talk about the rule of law being evenly applied. Let's talk about the rule of law with your FBI that applies the law in a fair and open manner and it lies on warrants. Oh, how do I know that because it was convicted in a D.C. jury? If you can get convicted for helping the regime in a D.C. courtroom, you are guilty as hell. Look, do not tell me there is an equivalent rule of law. Do not tell me the J 6 defendants are being treated like the BLM guys. Don't tell me then. I have Julie Kelly in a few minutes here to tell us in more detail about that. Do not tell me that the FBI whose crime lab gave false results. It got people convicted. Of a very serious crimes and sent away to prison. Don't tell me that's okay. Don't tell me it's okay to send your S.W.A.T. teams out to rouse old guys if their house after warning CNN to show up.

Garland D.C. FBI Julie Kelly BLM CNN
Kurt Schlichter: Merrick Garland Needs to Be Impeached

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:10 min | 2 d ago

Kurt Schlichter: Merrick Garland Needs to Be Impeached

"It's unbelievably cynical. How people like you, Merrick Garland. Rely on that. You can say a lot of bad things about Mitch McConnell. And I have. But at least he kept you off the Supreme Court and for that we deserve his eternal gratitude. Because let me tell you something, Merrick. If I can call you by your first name because we're pals. You need to be impeached by the incoming Republican House. You need to be impeached because you have not done your duty. You have failed to do your duty. You tell us there's the rule of law and 2 million illegal aliens coming into the country. Can you tell me there's the rule of law, Nancy Pelosi's husband gets hammered, swerve and all over the place runs into somebody. He's got free. Then you got somebody who took a selfie in the rotunda. Of the capitol, which all of us own, by the way. Don't belong to you people in Washington belongs to us. And you want to send them to jail for like three or four years. Don't tell me there's even justice because there isn't.

Merrick Garland Republican House Mitch Mcconnell Merrick Supreme Court Nancy Pelosi Washington
FBI seized 'top secret' documents from Trump home

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 2 d ago

FBI seized 'top secret' documents from Trump home

"A federal judge has unsealed the search warrant that authorized the FBI's unprecedented search of Donald Trump's Florida home this week Court papers show FBI agents took 11 cents of classified records from Mar-a-Lago including documents labeled top secret The court did not release specific details about what's in the documents which former Justice Department official Steven salzberg says is proper Because that would reveal things that people who don't have security clearances aren't exposed to see Trump has said the seas documents were all D classified though that's unclear He'd kept the documents despite multiple requests from agencies to follow federal law and hand them over Both he and the Justice Department urged the judge to take the unusual step of unsealing the warrant Sagar Meghani Washington

FBI Steven Salzberg Donald Trump Justice Department Florida Sagar Meghani Washington
The Regime Worships at the Church of "The State"

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:33 min | 2 d ago

The Regime Worships at the Church of "The State"

"We talk about Merrick Garland, we shouldn't talk about Merrick Garland the person or Anthony Fauci, the person we should talk about the Borg talk about this machine, this all encompassing monstrosity. That seems overwhelming. It's the monstrosity that invaded Mar-a-Lago. It is the machine that came in. Guns drawn 30 FBI agents for 9 and a half hours. For 270 man hours. The problem with the administrative state is that it's so arbitrary. They get to choose who they target. The law is not the guide. Of the shadow government, the bureaucrat is. So when Merrick Garland comes out and he says, well, we don't take these decisions lightly and we take this all into consideration. What he's really saying is I'm in charge, but he really isn't in charge, his council of experts are in charge, but they all think the same. They all have the same beliefs. They send their kids to the same schools. They vote for the same candidates. They all are deep down very miserable. What do they worship? What is their metaphysical belief? They don't believe in God the way you and I would. Maybe they might say they do. No, no, they worship at the church of the state. They are statists. I'm a Christian, some of you are dea some of you are Jews. Some of you are people that might be Hindus or Muslims. Fauci and Garland worship the state. You see,

Merrick Garland Anthony Fauci FBI DEA Fauci Garland
Joseph Moreno: Details on the FBI Raid Get Messier Over Time

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:32 min | 2 d ago

Joseph Moreno: Details on the FBI Raid Get Messier Over Time

"So Joel, let me start with the biggest of all questions. You are a proud passionate American. We know that. I hope I've established that. You are a brilliant attorney. And you're a student of history, have you ever seen something like what we just saw unfold at Mar-a-Lago? No. Briefly speaking, no, Jeff. This is uncharted. This is unprecedented. And honestly, the more time that goes by, it seems like it's kind of a mess. I mean, that press conference by the attorney general yesterday. You can see that was hastily pulled together. He was late. It was quick. He wouldn't take questions. He didn't want to be there. This is kind of not going in the direction the department had wanted. I feel like and now it's sort of clean up time. And the whole thing seems like really poorly thought out and executed. Like, what do they think was going to happen? Do they really think they could do something like this? And people are not going to stand up and say, wait a minute. We want more transparency than that. This is kind of absurd. We know there's a long history of people not being harassed for things like having classified documents, particularly ex presidents, and yet now you choose to come down on former president Trump like this in a spectacular way. So people are right to be scratching their heads saying, you know, this isn't sitting right.

Joel Jeff President Trump
John McGuire: The Inconsistency of My Opponent

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:57 min | 2 d ago

John McGuire: The Inconsistency of My Opponent

"I am looking at my tea leaves right, and I know where I stand, I'd love for you to be my state senator. I just think the world of you. You are going to be enter primary, but I mentioned Liz Cheney. I mentioned Adam kinzinger, some of these other folks up in D.C. who say, oh, we're really good for Republicans, but man, they're doing all the beating of the Democrats. Now, you've got sort of a similar situation on a local basis, right? Oh, yeah. Yeah. I think about the term wolf in sheep's clothing. And you've heard of rhinos, there's a guy that I'm running against, he's a supervisor in Louisa county, and there's a letter floating out there from a highly decorated Vietnam veteran who also served in this senator dick black and he's done some research and some other people have done some research and they found out that my opponent ran for Republican in the West Virginia House of delegates in 1982. And then he betrayed the Republican Party at a time when the Democrats were pushing the socialist pro abortion agenda. He left the Republican Party and joined that group and he ran at the Democrat in 82 with Walter Mondale and that crowd and then he ran the Democrat in 84 and then he moved to Virginia into this district where I'm running to be the state Senate and ran against one of the most conservative members of the House delegates Frank hargrove and Hanover county, who's a very beloved member of the House of delegates and against governor Allen who was on the ballot and he basically was on the ballot with Clinton. So he supported the Clinton and never seen the guy I mentioned the word Trump support Trump, anything else. He was supposed to be, but I'll tell you what, he's getting money. And so we've got to figure that out because people don't know this. There are

Liz Cheney Adam Kinzinger Senator Dick Black Louisa County House Of Delegates Republican Party D.C. Frank Hargrove Walter Mondale Vietnam West Virginia Governor Allen Hanover County Virginia Senate Clinton House
John McGuire Talks About Hosting an Event to Support Pres. Trump

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:25 min | 2 d ago

John McGuire Talks About Hosting an Event to Support Pres. Trump

"Your support for former president Trump and this event that you are throwing and you're inviting everybody to come to it. Yes, you know, if you're sick and tired of government overreach, I hope you'll come out tomorrow. He's going to go down in history as having done more and four years for the American people than any president ever did in 8 years. And it's kind of funny, but true, but in the Virginia House of delegates in 2019, I had a Republican tell me I better not put a Trump flag on my truck or I'll lose because he was afraid, so I put two Trump flags on my truck and I drove around for 6 months and I had the second biggest win in Virginia. So I'm a big Trump supporter and they've treated him worse than any president ever and you mentioned earlier the double standard. There's two systems. There's the Democrat law and the Republican law. Can you talk about the 33,000 emails? You talk about the laptop and everything else that they're just covering up and then they're going to go down there and raid is exactly what it is. It's a rate. So we're going to protest that. We're going to support Trump and it will be tomorrow, Saturday 13 August, one to 3 p.m.. It will be at the food line in mannequin savage, which is gutzman county, Virginia. We live right down the road. But it will be 30 broad street road and we're telling people to wear your Trump gear, bring your Trump flags, bring your American flags, we'll have some special guest speakers there and everybody else.

President Trump Virginia House Of Delegates Virginia Gutzman County
So What Was the FBI Looking for at Mar-a-Lago?

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:44 min | 2 d ago

So What Was the FBI Looking for at Mar-a-Lago?

"Look at the documents, right? That's where we're being told now, hey, hey, hey, it's all documents. Okay. 30,000 plus emails acid washed because they all related to wedding plans and yoga. Oh yeah, that's fine. No worries, don't though it's okay. She wasn't even the president, right? Well, don't worry about it. Barack Obama leaves with millions of pages we're told. Of documentation. No worries. And in fact, do you remember what we were told at the time when it all started coming about? Everybody was telling us, you know, the president is the one who declassifies material. Now what's really odd about this, I didn't know that. I'd like to think I'm fairly well informed, but I didn't know that. And I can remember, as it was being reported, sort of kind of. And I am making those annoying Eric quotes when I say report it because believe me, it wasn't covered extensively. But there were some minor reports like, oh, yeah, well, you know, it's actually the president, the president could look at a piece of paper going up, it's now declassified, because I said so. Okay. So it's what it's dinner menu, it's cocktail napkins. It's golf balls. Oh, and nuclear weaponry information. Seems like an odd thing to put together, but all right, how do you launch nuclear weapons from Mar-a-Lago would be one of my questions? And I'm very serious about that. What does this have to do with anything? Well, here's what it has to do with. It has to do with what president Trump said a long time ago. Made very clear, hey, they're not after me. They're after you. I just happen to be standing in the way. I believe that. I believe that completely.

Barack Obama Eric Lago President Trump Golf
Jeff Katz: Pres. Trump Declassified Things He Wanted Us to See

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

00:51 sec | 2 d ago

Jeff Katz: Pres. Trump Declassified Things He Wanted Us to See

"I think personally that some of what you are seeing. Is an effort to make sure that the American people do not see things. That president Trump declassified a whole bunch of stuff that he wanted us to see. And now they're those in D.C. at the highest levels Merrick Garland. Joe Biden staff. I don't know that anybody told Joe Biden about this. I mean, look, I got to be honest on this one, right? I don't know that anybody notified Joe Biden and quite frankly, even if they did, he wouldn't remember 90 seconds later, so it probably doesn't make any difference. But you need to tell me that the former president of the United States going to have his house raided and the chief of staff to the current president, Ron klain doesn't know. I don't buy that for a second. So

Joe Biden President Trump Merrick Garland D.C. Ron Klain United States
'This Isn't Like Watergate' Says Watergate Prosecutor Jill Wine-Banks

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

01:22 min | 2 d ago

'This Isn't Like Watergate' Says Watergate Prosecutor Jill Wine-Banks

"Hide your wine banks. Good morning. Good morning, Stephanie Miller. How are you? I'm very fine and dandy on this historical day. I just have to read this part of the statement from the office of the 45th president for you. He said, what is the difference between this and Watergate? Where operatives broke into the Democrat National Committee here in reverse Democrats broken in the home of the 40th president of the United States. Your thoughts don't want base. Like that lamp. That was my thought. When I first heard that, I was actually on air as this was breaking. And I burst into hysterical laughter because it's so outrageous. I know that some people may think that they are only people who listen to Donald Trump because operatives did not break into his house and Democrats didn't break into his house. FBI agents had a search warrant to buy a judge, finding probable cause that there was evidence of a crime at Mar-a-Lago, and therefore they had a legal reason for going there. So it's not at all like a burglary and the night by former CIA agents were part of the bay of pigs invasion of Cuba. No, it's not at all like that. This is actual law enforcement. That's how law enforcement works in America.

Democrat National Committee Stephanie Miller Donald Trump America FBI CIA Cuba
Jeff Katz: We Must Stand up as Americans for Trump

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

00:49 sec | 2 d ago

Jeff Katz: We Must Stand up as Americans for Trump

"When you think there's hope. I think there's hope. I know there's hope. In fact, I know there's hope because I happen to be a person of faith. But I am looking at these series of incessant attacks on former president Donald Trump, and I am absolutely nauseated. You don't have to be a fan of Donald Trump. You don't have to be someone who voted for. Heck, you could get up in the morning or you know what I ate Trump. He could be your worst imaginary enemy. And you still have an obligation as an American to stand up and say, no. This is not what we do in the United States of America. This is not how we treat anyone, let alone the former president of the United States.

Donald Trump United States
Kash Patel: Christopher Wray Just Exposed the Clown Show He's Running

The Dan Bongino Show

01:38 min | 2 d ago

Kash Patel: Christopher Wray Just Exposed the Clown Show He's Running

"I mean you were not figuratively but literally at the top levels of the executive office of the president very close adviser to president Trump You've been in the Department of Justice What I can't get my arms around not being silly about it is these are Joe Biden's not very smart but the people around him although I disagree with their politics vigorously they're not stupid They have typically a better sense of this stuff Who was sitting around a table and thought this was a good idea I mean did they not I don't know I just helped me understand this Did the backlash a moron could have seen this coming Yeah well I'll tell you exactly what was around that table Christopher wray at the FBI who's shown just how much of a clown show he's led allow on operate underneath him with those lack of accountability for people breaking the law agents running russiagate the same agents that are running Jan 6 the same agents that ran FBI as operation as a Hunter Biden are the same guys that I get a promotion to do the Whitmer fake prosecution in Michigan The fact that this is the leadership in place Garland and ray that should tell you everything you need to know They made the decisions because they thought they had the intellect to go through America and pull a fast one over that And they got caught And now they are racing to do maneuvers that never would have been done like they put in a motion to unseal the warrant because things are so bad for them and that's when you know DoJ and FBI have lost it When they are begging a court to release government sensitive information because they totally totally screwed the pooch on the execution and just calling for this warrant in the first place which could have been handled by subpoenas you know

President Trump Christopher Wray DOJ FBI Hunter Biden Joe Biden Whitmer Garland JAN Michigan RAY America
Kash Patel: Not Handing the Warrant Was a Bad Move by FBI

The Dan Bongino Show

01:21 min | 2 d ago

Kash Patel: Not Handing the Warrant Was a Bad Move by FBI

"Knew things had broken bad and that we were sadly descending down this tyrannical root cache But I'm sitting there this week and I'm watching this with my wife unfold and I'm sitting there with the proverbial jaw drop I can't believe they would usually they were a little more cryptic about this Now one of the things I found odd about this is the lawyer thing Being very familiar with the legal space yourself Why would you not allow a lawyer in such a high profile service of a warrant Why would you not allow Donald Trump's lawyers on the scene there It seems odd Look as my time as a national security prosecutor at DoJ server warrants and execute lines on tariffs and other bad guys even we follow the letter of the law deliver the warrant and follow the rules because we knew that they would use any hiccup against us And the only reason that this occurred and now we know for sure and I said it earlier and you did to the attorney general Merrick Garland have to personally sign off on this and that's what he admitted to And they did it because they are basically panicking and heat and they don't know what to do now They've lost control of the political argument which is the last thing they wanted to lose control over And now the facts are going to slowly slip away from them like Russia gay And to not hand over that warrant is a rookie mistake by whatever FBI guys are on the ground But I think it's worse than that I think it was orchestrated by the top and they said don't give it to him

Merrick Garland Donald Trump DOJ Russia FBI
Tyrus: The Left Are Fearful Their Mismanagement Empowers Trump

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:23 min | 2 d ago

Tyrus: The Left Are Fearful Their Mismanagement Empowers Trump

"I've been pretty consistent on this one. This obviously was the punch in the mouth and an attempt to get an aggressive reaction from the base. And president Trump, I believe that they are very fearful, especially the progressives and the extreme left, they're very careful that their mismanagement of the country is going to result in a lot of momentum to president Trump. So they are trying to not do it in courts, which we have learned through the way they do things. They don't really have much respect for the rule of law. Because they would rather someone be canceled on an accusation or something that you can't really prove or you can expand upon or you can make up and use words like existential threats, systemic racist. Things like that that they could try to have courts on social media and Twitter and hopefully get individuals in the base or passionate about the Republican Party and their passionate about president Trump as their leader to go out and do acts of violence, which we typically see on their side of the fence. So then for their media will have momentum and things to basically slow down the idea of president Trump running again.

President Trump Republican Party Twitter
"law" Discussed on UnCommon Law

UnCommon Law

04:07 min | 8 months ago

"law" Discussed on UnCommon Law

"And I think I will tell him the same thing that my parents taught us, which was there's no limit to what you could be. That preparation was the key to success. And resilience is the most important human quality. Inevitably, there will be setbacks. There will be losses. And sometimes life is unfair. But the great measuring stick is what do we do? It's doctor king, let's say in the time of difficult in the time of challenge. Where do we stand? And that's really the way my parents raised me and my wife's parents raised her and that's what I will share with our grandson. And my mother in law said that when my wife was born, she prayed for a healthy baby and a leader of the people. And so the other day we dedicated little Cameron and my sister in law was a Lori and a minister dedicated the baby and we all set a prayer and they asked me what I paid for and I said, well, I'm like my mother in law, afraid for a leader, the people. And I think real leadership is about service, and I hope that if we can impart that with Cameron, there are no limits for him. No limits whatsoever. Awesome. I want to two final questions for you. And then feel free to share anything else. This has been really great. I want to take you back to when you started as a lawyer and this is 1976, I believe, correct me if I'm wrong. Okay. So your first job out of a law school is at king and spaulding. And then till now, you know, being the retiring, highly thought of chair. What are some of the positive changes that you've seen in the profession and from those bookend marks, so to speak?.

Cameron Lori spaulding
"law" Discussed on UnCommon Law

UnCommon Law

05:17 min | 8 months ago

"law" Discussed on UnCommon Law

"They're really smart and they're determined to make a difference. In retirement, Ben said he plans to continue his conversations with law students at schools across the country. I hope so. You see, because you talked about perhaps being a mentor to senior lawyers and young lawyers, but I want to touch young people who are in law school. Thinking about what they want to do with their careers and where they wish to share their talents and periodically working with others. We would go up to Howard University each year and speak to undergrad who were interested in the law. And I'm so thrilled to see what so many of these young people are doing. And so again, I think I've spoken about 15 different law schools across the country and although wherever they'll have me and the message is the same everywhere, the law and using it to serve people and make our society better and stronger. Awesome. In addition to all of your many well deserved laurels, your service on board, your surf is at the firm. I know that family is also very much at the core of who you are. And your story and you talk often about you and your wife meeting at Harvard Law and how you all supported each other through the years, particularly through those early years when you were both kind of peeling out being the only in your case, the only black partner at beverage and diamond in her case, the first black women partner at sidley Austin. Tell us about how her support and how mutual support of each other. Has helped your success. Well, I'm so proud of my wife Miranda. She grew up in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She grew up on the hill. And when I first met her parents, you know, we had been dating. And so I went to Pittsburgh to ask for her hand in marriage. And her father told me a story. Her father did demolition work, construction workers, a very powerful man, physically powerful man. And he talked about coming in late one night after working at extra shift and my wife was on the floor book strewn everywhere, legs played everywhere doing her homework. And then when he came down the steps at 5 in the morning to get there for his construction job, she was asleep still on that same floor. Books everywhere. So when he told that story, I wanted to cheer, Lisa, just like I was at a ball game, you know?.

Harvard Law Howard University Ben sidley Austin Pittsburgh Miranda Pennsylvania Lisa
"law" Discussed on UnCommon Law

UnCommon Law

04:35 min | 8 months ago

"law" Discussed on UnCommon Law

"27th sleep magazine story by Mark Joseph stern. Along with his efforts to help diversify the federal judiciary, Ben said he'll continue his leadership roles on several nonprofit and corporate boards once he retires. So I was on the board for many years of the legal counsel for legal diversity headed by Robert gray, former ABA president. And here we have general counsel, managing partners who are pushing for change. We've had close to 10,000 lawyers, go through that program. And so we think that's been a great change in all credit to our board and to Robert for what they had done in our various members. I'm leaving that board. Active with a minority corporate counsel association and their terrific leader, Jean Lee. But there are three things I hope to continue. I am going to stay with the environmental law institute where I've been the chair for 5 years now. And we're bringing diversity to environmental law and we want to bring the rule of law to environmental issues across around the world. We want to address climate change. We want to address climate justice and environmental justice. And so I'm invested time there. Again, working with others, we teach environmental law, environmental justice, at the Howard law school, and 7 of our students are going to be working for the environmental law institute. And we found funding for those Howard law students. So they'll have that exposure in that opportunity and they are doing amazing work. I also work with others on the D.C. bar foundation, in addition to the generosity of lawyers, the District of Columbia government, historically, has given us about $11 million. This year, mayor Bowser and our council up that the $22 million. And that money is going to go to legal groups who serve the poor. Who serve the indigent. And now, coming out of this very difficult time of the pandemic, people need those legal services. And so that's important. And I'm also on a judicial nomination commission. So we choose our judges for the D.C. superior court and D.C. Court of Appeals and I have 6 wonderful colleagues on the board where it's led by judge Emmett Sullivan, who's been the judge of about just everything in the District of Columbia. And we've found some amazing people willing to serve as judges and, you know, juris make all the difference. And because they're the ones that establish the respect of the law, the integrity of the process is in their hands. And then in terms of my for profit board service, I'm the lead director for the Northwestern Mutual life insurance company, the quiet company. Very proud of Northwestern Mutual. We're making a significant.

environmental law institute 27th sleep magazine Mark Joseph stern Jean Lee Robert gray Howard law school D.C. bar foundation ABA District of Columbia governmen mayor Bowser Ben Robert D.C. superior court D.C. Court of Appeals judge Emmett Sullivan Howard District of Columbia Northwestern Mutual life insur
"law" Discussed on UnCommon Law

UnCommon Law

05:03 min | 8 months ago

"law" Discussed on UnCommon Law

"They're really smart and they're determined to make a difference. In retirement, Ben said he plans to continue his conversations with law students at schools across the country. I hope so. You see, because you talked about perhaps being a mentor to senior lawyers and young lawyers, but I want to touch young people who are in law school. Thinking about what they want to do with their careers and where they wish to share their talents and periodically working with others. We would go up to Howard University each year and speak to undergrad who were interested in the law. And I'm so thrilled to see what so many of these young people are doing. And so again, I think I've spoken about 15 different law schools across the country and although wherever they'll have me and the message is the same everywhere, the law and using it to serve people and make our society better and stronger. Awesome. In addition to all of your many well deserved laurels, your service on board, your surf is at the firm. I know that family is also very much at the core of who you are. And your story and you talk often about you and your wife meeting at Harvard Law and how you all supported each other through the years, particularly through those early years when you were both kind of peeling out being the only in your case, the only black partner at beverage and diamond in her case, the first black women partner at sidley Austin. Tell us about how her support and how mutual support of each other. Has helped your success. Well, I'm so proud of my wife Miranda. She grew up in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She grew up on the hill. And when I first met her parents, you know, we had been dating. And so I went to Pittsburgh to ask for her hand in marriage. And her father told me a story. Her father did demolition work, construction workers, a very powerful man, physically powerful man. And he talked about coming in late one night after working at extra shift and my wife was on the floor book strewn everywhere, legs played everywhere doing her homework. And then when he came down the steps at 5 in the morning to get there for his construction job, she was asleep still on that same floor. Books everywhere. So when he told that story, I wanted to cheer, Lisa, just like I was at a ball game, you know?.

Harvard Law Howard University Ben sidley Austin Pittsburgh Miranda Pennsylvania Lisa
"law" Discussed on UnCommon Law

UnCommon Law

04:35 min | 8 months ago

"law" Discussed on UnCommon Law

"27th sleep magazine story by Mark Joseph stern. Along with his efforts to help diversify the federal judiciary, Ben said he'll continue his leadership roles on several nonprofit and corporate boards once he retires. So I was on the board for many years of the legal counsel for legal diversity headed by Robert gray, former ABA president. And here we have general counsel, managing partners who are pushing for change. We've had close to 10,000 lawyers, go through that program. And so we think that's been a great change in all credit to our board and to Robert for what they had done in our various members. I'm leaving that board. Active with a minority corporate counsel association and their terrific leader, Jean Lee. But there are three things I hope to continue. I am going to stay with the environmental law institute where I've been the chair for 5 years now. And we're bringing diversity to environmental law and we want to bring the rule of law to environmental issues across around the world. We want to address climate change. We want to address climate justice and environmental justice. And so I'm invested time there. Again, working with others, we teach environmental law, environmental justice, at the Howard law school, and 7 of our students are going to be working for the environmental law institute. And we found funding for those Howard law students. So they'll have that exposure in that opportunity and they are doing amazing work. I also work with others on the D.C. bar foundation, in addition to the generosity of lawyers, the District of Columbia government, historically, has given us about $11 million. This year, mayor Bowser and our council up that the $22 million. And that money is going to go to legal groups who serve the poor. Who serve the indigent. And now, coming out of this very difficult time of the pandemic, people need those legal services. And so that's important. And I'm also on a judicial nomination commission. So we choose our judges for the D.C. superior court and D.C. Court of Appeals and I have 6 wonderful colleagues on the board where it's led by judge Emmett Sullivan, who's been the judge of about just everything in the District of Columbia. And we've found some amazing people willing to serve as judges and, you know, juris make all the difference. And because they're the ones that establish the respect of the law, the integrity of the process is in their hands. And then in terms of my for profit board service, I'm the lead director for the Northwestern Mutual life insurance company, the quiet company. Very proud of Northwestern Mutual..

environmental law institute 27th sleep magazine Mark Joseph stern Jean Lee Robert gray Howard law school D.C. bar foundation ABA District of Columbia governmen mayor Bowser Ben Robert D.C. superior court D.C. Court of Appeals judge Emmett Sullivan Howard District of Columbia Northwestern Mutual life insur
"law" Discussed on UnCommon Law

UnCommon Law

04:58 min | 9 months ago

"law" Discussed on UnCommon Law

"So, up to this point, we've spoken to lots of people across the legal industry, but the one voice we haven't heard from are the firms themselves. So can you please introduce yourself, say who you are and what you do? Sure. My name is David corrupt. I'm the managing partner of Michael best and Friedrich. Law firm with offices in 7 states and three of our larger offices are in the state of Wisconsin. David, we just heard from the dean of the university of Wisconsin law school. So state pride aside, how would you say diploma privileged factors into your firm's hiring decisions? We've been able to deal with the diploma of privilege without it being what I would consider either a major pro or a major Khan in terms of who we hire. The number one thing that's the absolute requirement is that an attorney be admitted to practice in the state in which they're looking to do the work. So if you look at the diploma of privileges, we're actually looking at the Aldi academic record. The rigor of your academic schedule. Your skill and work experience, as well as the drive. So you're taking a lot of other factors, certainly we will look at great point from Wisconsin and marquette. As you know, David, as a substitute for the bar exam, the law schools in your state are required to teach courses on state specific law. Do you think that's a good system, maybe one other states would want to emulate? Yeah, I'm a little bit torn. The way I look at it is marquette. And Madison or university of Wisconsin do is they do have a number of courses that attorneys are required to take, so they fall breadth of electives after your core courses in law school aren't quite there like they are at other law schools. And I think there is a benefit both ways. I think requiring certain state courses unique to Wisconsin law is one of the reasons you can say, well, that is good for the public. It's good for the legal profession. It's good for the state to have attorneys wave into the bar, but they've already taken that base. That said, when you're especially at the beginning of your legal career, whether you've worked before or you've just come out of undergrad, there's a benefit to taking a number of different courses. And really getting a flavor for the things that you might be able to take if you have a greater breadth of electives. So I think Wisconsin market do it the right way. Should other states do it? I'm a little torn. That's interesting. So it sounds like you really don't think the Wisconsin model would transfer unto every state or even every law school is that because Wisconsin only has two law schools. So for lack of a better term, it's easier to manage quality control. We are well familiar with the university of Wisconsin, as well as marquette's law school. We know the deeds of the law school. We know the rigor. We know the curriculum. And there is that relationship where these are quality law schools, quality professors, the deans take notice and they're doing the, if you will, the weeding out or the measuring of achievement. And not just passing them through. So I don't think the bar is everything, but I do get worried if you have a number of law schools. Only the online law schools. You know, there is that first year that they yelled at the old adage, they scare you to death. Well, there's a reason they do that. It's to get you ready to think on your feet analyze. Look at case law. Look at statutory law in a certain manner. So if you just said every law school that was potentially accredited, got to wave in and there was no bar exam. To me, that would take away from some states that I think do need something else beyond just letting somebody go to law school, get a passing grade to say I'm now qualified. Of course, anyone who wants to work in Wisconsin, but graduated out of state still needs to take the Wisconsin bar exam. That was the case for the 145 people who were signed up to take the Wisconsin bar in July of 2020. In May 3 graduates of the university of Minnesota law school brought a petition to the Wisconsin state Supreme Court, requesting emergency diploma privilege for out of state grads. This was contingent upon the completion of all Wisconsin specific coursework and 800 hours of supervised practice. The court dismissed the petition and the test went forward as scheduled for July 28th and 29. And that's where we're going to end the discussion for today. Uncommon law was produced by myself, Adam Ellington, Josh block is the executive producer of Bloomberg industry group podcasts and also served as editor for this episode. If you have a comment or an idea for a future topic, you can reach.

Wisconsin Michael best David marquette university of Wisconsin law sc university of Wisconsin Friedrich marquette's law school Khan Madison Wisconsin state Supreme Court university of Minnesota law sc Adam Ellington Josh block Bloomberg industry group
"law" Discussed on UnCommon Law

UnCommon Law

02:12 min | 9 months ago

"law" Discussed on UnCommon Law

"I'd say also that in terms of what we teach, well, actually the alternative to the bar exam that we have in Wisconsin of the diploma privilege provides a much stronger incentive for teachers to teach and for students to learn, substantive law. And it's a great contrast with what I described a moment ago. What I got in law school, which was great in terms of teaching me theory, but wasn't necessarily learning substantive law. Here at Wisconsin, we have to teach a large amount of substantive law at least to those students who elect to pursue the Wisconsin bar privilege. And so our students must necessarily learn that laws apart of their law school education. As one of the only states to provide diploma privilege, do you think that Wisconsin system gives graduates a leg up or any kind of advantage over students who are required to take the bar? It is really a fantastic advantage. Here at the university of Wisconsin law school, those students who complete the requirements are sworn into the bar, just a few days after they graduate. So they are ready to pursue jobs immediately for students and other law schools, you know, there are some employers that may hire you without being admitted to the bar. But there are a number of employers that want to wait. And so it's a great advantage for our students on the job market. And it's no small thing because, you know, law students nowadays graduate with a lot of debt. And just to underscore that last point, according to a recent ABA survey, the average debt incurred for three years of law school, totaled $108,000 and over $200,000 for black lawyers. Dan takaji is the dean of the university of Wisconsin law school in Madison. Dan, it was nice speaking with you, good.

Wisconsin university of Wisconsin law sc Dan takaji Madison Dan
"law" Discussed on UnCommon Law

UnCommon Law

07:30 min | 9 months ago

"law" Discussed on UnCommon Law

"Hello, justice Wiggins. This is Adam from Bloomberg law. Can you hear me? Yes, I can. Excellent. Before we jump in, I just wanted to confirm you retired as a judge on the Iowa Supreme Court earlier this year, yes? I think it was last year, 2020. Okay, got it. So I just wanted to talk to you a little bit about 2014 and the pushing David Wiggins is a retired justice of the Iowa Supreme Court and was on the bench for the diploma privilege decision. In Iowa, we looked at it and we studied it. And, you know, I think the main reason at least for me and I think many other members of the court is that this court is obligated to admit attorneys to discipline attorneys and to regulate the practice of law by attorneys. And if we gave diploma privileges, we would be giving up that responsibility as the gatekeepers and we didn't think it was right for the people of state of Iowa to not have the court being the gatekeeper rather. And let the law schools do it. So that was really our reason why we didn't go to diploma privilege. So what's your response to the broad argument that proponents of diploma privilege make that a student who attends an ABA accredited law school for three years? Takes all the required classes and graduates in good standing. That is, in fact, a better measure of one's legal competency than their score on the bar exam. Well, we don't know what the student did the past law school, whether he or she had tutoring, whether he or she barely got by whether he was in a student. The bar exam tests basic knowledge and basic subjects that you should know if you're going to practice law. And that is the best indicator for us as to whether or not you're confident. But what about the argument that mister cook made that adopting diploma privilege would actually give the court greater input into credentialing Iowa lawyers by allowing them to define the curriculum students would have to complete in lieu of the bar exam. Well, the court is not in the business of educating. And we are far from confident to decide what courses should be taken at what level they should be taught and how deep they should be taught and what are the requirements for passing each course. That's not what the Supreme Court does. We take students, or young people or old people who have passed law school. And we require a test. It's a uniform test. It's required in many states now. And that's the goal. We're not in the business of deciding what courses people should or shouldn't take. And how they should be taught and what were the minimum standards and what books should be used. That's not our business. So this point seems pretty logical on its face. I mean, I think most people would agree that the courts aren't in the business of teaching or curriculum development. But by the same token, in most states, the courts are the ones saying we are the gatekeepers. You know, we're the ones who set the standard over who does and doesn't get to practice law. And so then to just turn around and say, we don't have an opinion about the entire process that precedes the bar exam, that doesn't really square either. Well, it's that, you know, we are responsible for admitting lawyers and the best way for us to know whether or not you were to competent or for a court to know your confident is the virus now. I don't know, you know, a law students at school and they've invested two years and they're going to flunk a course. I mean, with a loss professor, do that, or try to make some kind of arrangement. So the person could at least pass the course. I mean, I don't know all those circumstances. And those that happens in law schools where people are given the benefit of the doubt. And when you have a bar exam, our bar exam, you get a certain number you pass. You don't, you don't. And we don't have do overs and excuses. The numbers are there. As mentioned before, Wisconsin is the only state to offer permanent diploma privilege for graduates of its two in state schools. However, the university of New Hampshire also allows a limited number of students who've completed certain curricula and a separate exam to bypass the bar. Dan takaji is the dean of the university of Wisconsin law school. Dean, welcome to the program. Thank you so much for having me Adam. So Dan, you went to Yale, which is one of the most prestigious law schools in the U.S.. How would you say your bar exam experience was similar or different to those of your students at Wisconsin? Yeah, so yeah, law school has a reputation as being a very strong law school, but not necessarily a place in which people learn the black letter law. So I had a lot of cramming that I did have to do during that summer. I actually wound up taking two bar exams immediately after law school, Massachusetts in New York. And then wound up practicing and neither of those states, but instead, going to practice in California, so a year and a half later I had to take a third bar exam. But it was I when I was quite in ordeal maybe too strong a word, but it was certainly a lot of work and at the end of the day. I don't really think of that I retained very much of what I learned through that process. When it comes to the question of the bar exam, what do you say to people who say that maybe the bar isn't perfect, but it's still important to make sure lawyers have a basic understanding of legal principles. I would say your ability to succeed in law school is a much better indicator of your having those learning skills, right? It's not so much having the knowledge of the law in your head, but having those learning skills and your ability to succeed in law school in a variety of courses. It's a much better indicator of having that kind of skills than your ability to perform well on a very brief exam where you're basically downloading a huge amount of information and then forgetting it, not too long afterwards. What about the idea that the bar exam serves as a kind of check against the worst impulses of say lower ranked law schools to maybe boost profits by accepting students with lower LSAT scores or say allowing professors to skip teaching certain fundamental principles that aren't as interesting to teach? Yeah, from where I'm standing the bar exam doesn't serve those functions and in some ways runs directly against those worthy objectives. Let's start with students. I think particularly where I'm standing as a law school dean, we have extremely strong incentives, not to admit unqualified students. And that is largely the fact that will be punished for it. Not least in U.S. news rankings. If we admit a lot of students.

Iowa Supreme Court justice Wiggins David Wiggins Iowa mister cook Adam Bloomberg ABA Dan takaji Wisconsin university of Wisconsin law sc Supreme Court university of New Hampshire Yale Dean Dan Massachusetts U.S. New York
"law" Discussed on UnCommon Law

UnCommon Law

08:35 min | 9 months ago

"law" Discussed on UnCommon Law

"October 2020. Efrain, you're also a member of a coalition of law graduates called united for diploma privilege, which has been very active in pushing states to consider alternative approaches to licensure. So take me back to the spring of 2020 if you could. By the time you graduated from law school, COVID was already wreaking havoc in many states with Washington being among the first to see really widespread infections. Sure. Yeah, I got my materials. I think in March of 2020, then started bar prep along with everybody else. And it's around that time that COVID sort of locked things down. So we started to have some conversations internal to folks in my law school about. Is this going to be something that affects the bar exam? So April 17th is when we first interacted with our board of governors that runs the bar association. And the conversation started like I said internal to my university, my school of law in Seattle. And at the time, I was part of the student government. I realized this is probably a conversation that all graduates soon in Washington are having. So reached out to my counterparts in Gonzaga university and Spokane, Washington and University of Washington, also in Seattle, just a little bit north of us. Started the conversations with them, realized that they're also concerned. And they were in the middle of writing their own letters preparing to interface with the board of governors themselves and we got to talk when we are united in our cause here. Let's present a unified front that all graduates from law schools and the state of Washington are concerned about this. So it wasn't until June 14th when the state Supreme Court made the decision to grant diploma privilege to the people who were scheduled to sit for the July bar. And by this point, you had already been studying full time for several months. So were you relieved when you found out you wouldn't have to take the test? Very much relieved. The world was very much in flux as we can all recall. There's no telling how long this is going to be the new the quote unquote new normal. And it just seemed, we in Washington state and I imagine many other jurisdictions were between a rock and a hard place. We had the uniform bar examination. There was no alternative to in person testing at that time. So the alternative was Washington state could offer it on time for those who were signed up for it, or we could postpone and test in, I believe October. And as you know, I'm law students are expected to take time off during the summer. Most of us don't work. If you're doing it right, you sign up for these two, three, $4000 prep courses, and your job is to study for 6, 7 days a week until you test in about July and postponing until October means, you're not making money for another two, three, four months, up to 6 months, maybe 8 months in some cases after you graduate. That's just an unsustainable position for most people. I frankly didn't have the funds to continue to not work beyond the original plan and I certainly didn't want to lock myself in a room with 700 other people. So one of the many side effects of the COVID emergency is that for the first time in decades, there were more states than just Wisconsin granting diploma privilege. In fact, Washington stood up its own bar licensure task force to look at this very question, and we should note that you are actually a member of that task force. So I guess that means if two years down the road, there isn't a spike in malpractice suits or complaints about the attorneys who were granted emergency diploma privilege. That seems like a strong case for eliminating the bar going forward. Yes. Yeah, so I should mention that our charter ends in December of 2022. And I think I don't know how deliberate that was by the Supreme Court by issuing that expiration date, but it just so happens to fall just a few months shy of the three year mark for the folks that were by way of depot privilege. And I think that that three year mark is important because for most jurisdictions, reciprocity kicks in, is minimal three years of practice in the originating jurisdiction. And so I think you're right. We are living breathing examples of this bar exam in many ways it's a paper drill. And it serves as a superficial barrier to entry, one that does not benefit the public or clients. So efrain, as you know, all of the states that went with diploma privilege in 2020 have now gone back to the bar exam, although this time it was administered remotely. How do you feel about that? Do you think remote testing is where we should be going forward? I think it's unfortunate. We definitely backpedaled a bit in my opinion. Last summer, there was a lot more pragmatic, which, again, it came down to. There is no feasible way. You can show up 700 students in a room and issue them a standardized test. It's not possible with the public health considerations. I think we've kind of gotten used to the idea of remote testing. And so now we've just sort of hand waved away the considerations that come with that. But the remote testing is not a solution here. I think the conversations that were had last summer and continue this day exposes that there are multiple players holding themselves out as the credentialing authority for what lawyers have to go through in order to practice law, be at the ABA and their accreditation process of law schools. The law school admissions council, assessing one's viability as a law student or the asserting that their test is the test of competence for an attorney. None of these are synced or anchored to what the needs of the profession actually are in delivering services to clients or the greater public. Efrain had now is a recent graduate of the Seattle university school of law, now working with the King County prosecuting attorney's office, efrain, thanks so much. Thank you so much for having me. It's been a pleasure. So we're going to hear more about the pros and cons of diploma privilege in practice, but before we do a brief message from an icon of financial markets. The white album of research platforms. Ladies and gentlemen, the Bloomberg terminal. If knowledge is power, the Bloomberg terminal is your power up, connecting you to real-time financial data, market moving news, powerful analytics, and an influential network of financial decision makers around the world. Share ideas, negotiate trades, and gain the insight you need to make more informed decisions. See how the terminal can take your workflow to the next level at Bloomberg dot com slash professional. You're listening to uncommon law from Bloomberg industry group. I'm Adam Ellington. Today on the podcast, we're talking about alternatives to the bar exam, and specifically making credentialing just another function of law school. Back in 2014, the state of Iowa was looking seriously at adopting diploma privilege in that state. A special committee of the Iowa state bar association was constructed to study the issue. Guy cook is an attorney based in Des Moines who chaired that committee. Thank you for allowing me this opportunity to speak to you regarding the ISPA diploma privilege and blue ribbon committee recommendation to the court. Let me just give a little background and then I'll get to my remarks. Cook address the court for about ten minutes. And in no uncertain terms he's saying yes, we should adopt diploma privilege in Iowa. In fact, he says this will actually help students be better prepared to work in Iowa. I have to say this kind of surprised me because here you have an organization representing predominantly white male lawyers, smack dab in the middle of the country. I mean, if you ever expected someone to say, gosh darn it, I had to pass the bar, so you should too, it would be this very scenario. But cook says just the opposite. You know, there are some folks who also say that the bar exam protects the public and weaves out the incompetent, as I said. But when you really look at what we have here, there's really one question with two choices. Is it better on this hand to have an exam after three years of law school, four years of undergraduate school? One exam that is mobile choice with a handful of essays by an outside vendor that doesn't test a rival law as the barrier to admission. Or, on the other hand, three years of specified coursework,.

COVID Washington Washington and University of W Efrain Seattle Gonzaga university Supreme Court efrain bar association Spokane Wisconsin Seattle university school of l Bloomberg industry group Adam Ellington ABA Iowa state bar association Guy cook King County Iowa
"law" Discussed on Elder Law Issues Podcast

Elder Law Issues Podcast

05:57 min | 10 months ago

"law" Discussed on Elder Law Issues Podcast

"Terms <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> of the trump should be <Speech_Female> administered pursuant <Speech_Female> to arizona <Speech_Female> law in our example. <Speech_Female> The answer <SpeakerChange> is yes <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> however sometimes <Speech_Female> situations arise <Speech_Female> particularly with <Speech_Female> the remainder beneficiaries <Speech_Female> where that consent <Speech_Female> is not going to be <Speech_Female> forever and <Speech_Female> ever and ever so. The trustees <Speech_Female> shouldn't take too <Speech_Female> much comfort. <Speech_Female> If you <Speech_Female> have a beneficiary <Speech_Female> who today said sure <Speech_Female> we'll follow arizona <Speech_Female> law but tomorrow <Speech_Female> says <Speech_Female> hey. <Speech_Female> I just <SpeakerChange> lost my <Speech_Female> medicaid benefits <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> among <Speech_Male> lawyers who do <Speech_Male> deal with <Speech_Male> multi-state <Speech_Male> issues a lot. <Speech_Male> We often <Speech_Male> tease <Speech_Male> out different roles. <Speech_Male> There's a question <Speech_Male> of jurisdiction. <Speech_Male> There's a question of <Speech_Male> seitis. And <Speech_Male> there's a question of governing <Speech_Male> governing law <Speech_Male> at least <Speech_Male> those three <Speech_Male> jurisdiction <Speech_Male> means where could <Speech_Male> you sued. The <Speech_Male> trustee <Speech_Male> could maryland <Speech_Male> court <Speech_Male> get control <Speech_Male> over the <Speech_Male> trustee who lives <Speech_Male> in arizona <Speech_Male> while the general law <Speech_Male> is no <Speech_Male> even though the documents <Speech_Male> says <Speech_Male> this will be governed <Speech_Male> by maryland law <Speech_Male> you have to get jurisdiction <Speech_Male> over the <Speech_Male> trustee in order <Speech_Male> to sue them <Speech_Male> so that jurisdiction <Speech_Male> probably is <Speech_Male> in arizona. <Speech_Male> Seitis <Speech_Male> is about where <Speech_Male> the trust is administered <Speech_Male> and might have an effect <Speech_Male> on how much <Speech_Male> income <SpeakerChange> tax <Speech_Male> trust pays <Speech_Male> or which <Speech_Male> states it pays <Speech_Male> the income tax <Speech_Male> to does maryland <Speech_Male> still get an <Speech_Male> income tax payment <Speech_Male> because <Speech_Male> maryland law <Speech_Male> is is supposed <Speech_Male> to govern. <Speech_Male> Probably not <Speech_Male> if there's no other connection <Speech_Male> to maryland. <Speech_Male> Although some states <Speech_Male> try to impose <Speech_Male> an income <Speech_Male> tax if the <Speech_Male> trust ever had <Speech_Male> a home in their <Speech_Male> state <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> governing law <Speech_Male> well that's where we <Speech_Male> really look at that provision <Speech_Male> that says <Speech_Male> the law <Speech_Male> of the state of maryland <Speech_Male> will apply <Speech_Male> because <Speech_Male> the court <Speech_Male> in arizona <Speech_Male> that is interpreting <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> the language <Speech_Male> of the trust. <Speech_Male> May well <Speech_Male> try to apply <Speech_Male> maryland <Speech_Male> law because the <Speech_Male> trust. Hold them to. <Speech_Male> But it'll <Speech_Male> be an arizona court. <Speech_Male> That's trying to figure out <Speech_Male> maryland law. <Speech_Male> It may not make <Speech_Male> a lot of sense <Speech_Male> to to lay people <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> but most <Speech_Male> often when <Speech_Male> we say where <Speech_Male> a trust lives. <Speech_Male> We <Speech_Male> think that trust <Speech_Male> lives where it's <Speech_Female> trustee <SpeakerChange> lives <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and robert we have <Speech_Female> to in your particular <Speech_Female> example slowdown <Speech_Female> and consider <Speech_Female> what it means <Speech_Female> if there <Speech_Female> is a court involved <Speech_Female> because <Speech_Female> that really can change the <Speech_Female> game to in terms <Speech_Female> of lending <Speech_Female> support <Speech_Female> to where the trust <Speech_Female> would be administered. <Speech_Female>

arizona maryland
"law" Discussed on PR & Law

PR & Law

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"law" Discussed on PR & Law

"Yeah. This <Speech_Male> is something. It's not just <Speech_Male> emily Rakowski, but <Speech_Male> it's <hes> I think she shines <Speech_Male> a light on it and <Speech_Male> it's affecting <SpeakerChange> a lot of different <Speech_Male> artists now. <Speech_Male> Okay. <Speech_Male> Anything else you want <Speech_Male> to chime in on <SpeakerChange> before we <Speech_Male> <hes> sign off. Yeah. <Speech_Male> I mean just <Speech_Male> just very very <Speech_Male> quickly cam we should <Speech_Male> <hes> you <Speech_Music_Male> know we we <Speech_Male> should make <Speech_Male> the death of John <Speech_Male> Turner the former <Speech_Male> Prime <Speech_Male> Minister <Speech_Male> Seventeenth Prime Minister <Speech_Music_Male> of Canada <Speech_Male> He just <Speech_Male> died at the age <Speech_Male> of of ninety <Speech_Music_Male> one <Speech_Music_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> I <SpeakerChange> was. <Speech_Male> John <Speech_Male> Turner Fan <Speech_Male> and I'm talking <Speech_Male> when was really <Speech_Male> young and didn't really know <Speech_Male> anything. <Speech_Male> But I remember <Speech_Male> liking him <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> I don't use those <Speech_Male> five or six or seven <Speech_Male> or I don't know as I was very <Speech_Male> young at the time but for some <Speech_Male> reason, I did <hes> appreciate <Speech_Male> him. <SpeakerChange> So that's <Speech_Male> very sad news. Yeah. <Speech_Male> I mean he <Speech_Male> you know the <Speech_Male> for those history <Speech_Male> nerds right? I mean <Speech_Male> he had the second shortest <Speech_Male> tenure. He was only <Speech_Male> Prime Minister for <Speech_Male> seventy nine days. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Rank effectively came <Speech_Male> to power <hes> <Speech_Male> dissolve parliament <Speech_Male> fern election, and then <Speech_Male> lost in a landslide <Speech_Male> to to <Speech_Male> Brian Mulroney but <Speech_Male> <hes> he had <Speech_Male> a long career <Speech_Male> in politics <hes> <Speech_Male> but before <Speech_Male> becoming prime minister. <Speech_Male> So he second-shortest <Speech_Male> Kim Campbell <Speech_Male> where does she fit <Speech_Music_Male> in there <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Good. Kim <Speech_Male> Campbell's not the shortest. <Speech_Male> I. Think <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> I think the shortest <Speech_Male> was actually <Speech_Music_Male> at Charles <Speech_Male> Charles Tupper <Speech_Male> I don't know how many days. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Pretty sure that Tupper <Speech_Male> Tupper <SpeakerChange> was the shortest. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> okay. I <Speech_Male> I. Mean <Speech_Male> Campbell. <Speech_Male> I guess <Speech_Male> maybe we have <Speech_Male> one listener <Speech_Male> who knows what we're talking about. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> The only <Speech_Male> one. Who <Speech_Male> can read on <Speech_Male> the You know <Speech_Male> the ten years of <Speech_Male> Canadian prime. minister. <Speech_Male> Aid, <Speech_Male> that will be listening to <Speech_Male> this show one, <Speech_Male> thousand, nine, hundred. Canadian, Prime <Speech_Male> Minister Trivia. <Speech_Male> Good Times. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Okay. Thanks <Speech_Male> you and. <Speech_Male> I'm glad you mentioned it <Speech_Male> is sad anyway <Speech_Male> on that note, we <Speech_Male> are going to wrap this up. <Speech_Male> So thank you again <Speech_Male> so much for joining us. <Speech_Male> Don't miss a show <Speech_Male> either pleased subscribing <Speech_Male> your podcast <Speech_Male> of choice <Speech_Male> or <Speech_Male> you can't subscribe <Speech_Male> to us on Youtube and <Speech_Male> soundcloud <Speech_Male> also <Speech_Male> follow us on social <Speech_Male> media where across all <Speech_Male> the major platforms facebook <Speech_Male> instagram twitter <Speech_Male> linked in. <Speech_Male> And the account name <Speech_Male> is law podcast. <Speech_Male> That's all <Speech_Male> one word <Speech_Male> P. LAW <Speech_Male> PODCAST <Speech_Male> and don't <Speech_Male> forget questions. We <Speech_Male> we're still getting a few coming <Speech_Male> in. We <Speech_Male> definitely want to set aside <Speech_Male> some time in a <Speech_Male> future episode to <Speech_Male> to address some of these <Speech_Male> questions. We're even talking <Speech_Male> about maybe even opening <Speech_Male> up the phone lines <Speech_Male> <hes> if we get <Speech_Male> to that point so I think <Speech_Male> that could be quite useful. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Music_Male> you can ask the question on <Speech_Music_Male> social media just <Speech_Music_Male> get with the HASHTAG PR <Speech_Music_Male> law pod, <Speech_Music_Male> and we will log <Speech_Music_Male> that an answer <Speech_Music_Male> in future shop <Speech_Music_Male> so. <Speech_Music_Male> In. <Speech_Music_Male> This <SpeakerChange> is chemically <Speech_Music_Male> Light <Music>

Prime Minister Kim Campbell Charles Tupper emily Rakowski Turner Brian Mulroney future shop Canada John Youtube
"law" Discussed on PR & Law

PR & Law

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"law" Discussed on PR & Law

"It's a slate article. called the class of our. BG is in you know Ruth Bader Ginsburg and it's an this is an amazing amazing article It tells the story of the nine other women. In, the Harvard Law class of Nineteen fifty-nine as told by those women, the ones that are are still alive anyway. Their families, and Ruth Bader Ginsburg herself. And the story sort of opens up with this really really interesting story about the early days of the class, and all of the women were gathered at the Dean's home for for Dinner Party. And the Dean asks each of the women in the class to stand up and explain. Who they are and Y. They've taken the spot of a man at Harvard. Also, this is sort of this. Yeah, this is this is what the this is. What the Dean says and somewhat infamously. Ruth Bader GINSBURG stands up and she explains that she was at Harvard because she wanted to learn more about her husband's work. Obviously, obviously very very tongue in cheek and other women also equally tongue-in-cheek joked that she was there to meet a husband. but really cam the story of these these nine women it's it's amazing, and the the article dives really really deep. It's a long form article examining What these women went through in law school the struggles that they had to secure good employment after the fact, despite being top students at Harvard all of just the systemic racism that existed in the legal profession against women. It's a really really amazing, amazing, amazing read, one of the women even talks about. She was pregnant at the time, and the Lecture Hall where where you know, obviously, all students would would go for class. There wasn't a women's washroom. She women had to leave the building to go to the Washington she was pregnant at the time, so she came to an arrangement with the men to were put a sign on the door to let them know that there was a woman in the washroom and to stay out until she had had finished. This isn't A. Long ago, you know. No, no, not not at all. It really isn't you know into. Thank you know I. Started Law School I was in in two thousand five and I believe our class breakdown was fifty one percent women and forty nine percent men. So yeah, obviously, things have changed very very great deal. My contracts, class and Employment Law class where we're taught by women, which of course was just unheard of at the time back in fifty nine. Anyway, a really really great great article. It's also a two part podcast I have gone through the first part. And yeah, highly highly recommend Oh. That reminds me, too. I'm absolutely immersed in the podcast Guru, which is done by wondering..

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Harvard Harvard Law Dean Employment Law Lecture Hall Washington Dinner Party
"law" Discussed on PR & Law

PR & Law

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"law" Discussed on PR & Law

"What have you got on deck? Well I wanted to talk about something I've read a number of of articles or the over the last few weeks. Cam about you know the the idea of working from home, but specifically within the legal profession I thought this'll be kind of an interesting that thing to talk about. Because really it's not restricted to the legal profession. It could probably apply to a number of industries, but this this idea our this notion that somehow working from home is inefficient, relative to to being in an office and I, I saw an article by. A Canadian litigator who was arguing that you can't effectively work from quote. Unquote the comfort of your own home. talked about crazy. Yeah but this idea of requiring access to all of your files, and you can't efficiently move between them. And I was thinking what you know. WHAT SORT OF SYSTEM? Is this individual or the individual's firm, using an and I think it sort of speaks to a larger problem in the legal profession that I think is being addressed now in in a way that it it wasn't before, and it's being addressed in a lot of industries, and that's that we need to get on the Rome remote access train now I understand that this seems like commonsense. Commonsense to a lot of a business industries, they've been doing this for for ages. They've had sophisticated the remote cloud based servers and instant messaging and video calls, but that's not the case for all industries, and and I think litigation is one of those one of those areas of law where it continues to be practiced by number of of sort of idiosyncratic Just completely out their practice methods that are largely still based on some pretty outdated notions of of technology, so the idea that.

Rome
"law" Discussed on PR & Law

PR & Law

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"law" Discussed on PR & Law

"I would like to be done with it though I mean I like when I leave the house in the morning at eight thirty, a mass goes on. That doesn't come off until I get home at seven eight o'clock at night. And Yeah, it's like it's not like you. Take off when you get to work I. Mean That's where you definitely need to have it on. Because you've got a Lotta people in a small area and it's just you know a couple of times when I've been in a meeting room with maybe just one or two other people. Sometimes, someone will say I. Don't mind if you take your mask off, and then I have done so and it's felt weird. It's felt like this is. I feel exposed. And often times just put back on this because it's now become more comfortable than normal to have on It's really odd. It's something like out of a science fiction, movie, or something I mean it's just everyone's wearing them all the time now. Yeah I mean I. Mean You said it right? This is just sort of the new normal. I don't really even think twice about anymore. I mean there were there were periods where I'd have to try and remind myself each and every time going out the door you know, put the mask on or with my daughter. I've gotTA remember. Put the mask on now. It's just like putting on a pair of shoes. you know I I just? Just I just do it. I don't even think about it anymore. It's subconscious at this point, and so when you think about. When can we not wear a mask? I assume that would be when there is a vaccine, or you know the the virus just stamped out. I don't see how that's going to happen. At this point so and even if they discovered a vaccine today, it's going to take a very long time to get that. Produced in a quantity sufficient to give nearly everyone in the world so I mean it's not I think we're a year. I've heard one to two to three years away from everybody being able to access a vaccine. That's just a terrifying terrifying thought, but yeah I mean. We've seen an uptick numbers here to Cam you know on -Tario has reported five consecutive days now with more than four hundred new cases. That's a lot that's that's yeah. That's really not good now. They've sort of attributed to the the the mother's Day celebrations that we we had recently, the people were were sort of getting out and interacting with others in a way that they hadn't before, and we're taking those risks for mother's Day so much. That uptick has been attributed to that, but you cut it. You know we've started to loosen the restrictions. The last thing you want to see is is an uptick in in numbers so. So, hopefully, those numbers start to correct themselves again right? Yeah, hopefully I mean because it looks like this could be this way for the long haul. I. Do want to say you and that here there's been no concerns. In fact, people were out in Hong Kong today, several thousand them at certain locations in the city, and they weren't there to eat or enjoy their company. They were there for a very specific purpose, and we're going to get into that on the other side. Continue the debate with us on social media joining us on Lincoln facebook, twitter and instagram. P.! R. Law podcast. Would word P.

Hong Kong facebook twitter Lincoln
"law" Discussed on PR & Law

PR & Law

04:52 min | 2 years ago

"law" Discussed on PR & Law

"Okay, That's a good question. and and I think everyone should think about their media diet to be honest because. You know all all one organization is just not not good in this day and age, so the New York Times actually checked largely, because they often have very good columnists and or features, and they have very good coverage of Hong Kong, so I mean that from that perspective in I'm quite interested in in what they're doing, but they also to some degree, even now set the news agenda in the United States, and so You know it's worth checking for that reason, but in terms of straight up news coverage. I don't think I'd Put New York Times in the top five. Because I do find the the bias in the in the times becoming much worse. And I, notice it and I know other people notice it as well and even if I agree with it, I don't want to read it when I'm trying to get the news straight up, the Atlantic. The Atlanta is a bit more featured a feature based. And I find that it does go into some detail on some issues or perspectives that are not covered elsewhere. I think the magazine has actually you know in its digital transformation has become an just an excellent source of information. I think they do a very good job. so I'm quite high on them at the moment, but for straight news the other organization this might surprise you. is Bloomberg and it's obviously business focused, and they do have a paywall. But Bloomberg does cover news as well and they cover campaigns, and they cover all of the other things that are going on, and I find that they are also quite good at just providing the facts and and leaving the interpretation up to the reader I think the Financial Times out of London is another one that does that well, so if I'm looking for straight up news coverage, this is where I would go to see what's happening and refer to the time for the news agenda of the day sort of what the? What the intelligence is thinking about things, and so there's different purposes that i. go to these these different areas, but I think regardless of which news outlets you get your news from. It is important to think skeptically about everything that you read especially. If you're reading something that you agree with you know I don't think I think sort of. Media, studies or you know skeptical reading slash thinking is is a skill that should be taught You know a lot because of I, think the older people that have a harder time with it. I've seen this with my own parents. You know they they. They link on facebook. That's from you know. Hillary Clinton sucks dot com, but it looks like a legitimate news article, and they click it. It's filled with you..

New York Times Bloomberg Hillary Clinton Hong Kong United States Financial Times facebook Atlanta London
"law" Discussed on PR & Law

PR & Law

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"law" Discussed on PR & Law

"You can ask those questions on social media and tag it with Hashtag, PR law hot and one other thing. That's new this week you and is. We are on Youtube. Finally so that's a key way that I know. Some people like to listen to shows and it also sort of helps us get the word out on different platforms so we are on Youtube off. You prefer to listen to the show that way you an what is going on. Well. It's Victoria Day long weekend here in in Canada very exciting, so you get an extra day off tomorrow, it's it's kind of a beautiful sunny day here which is always nice. The economy is starting to slowly reopen here on the province of Ontario so as of. Tuesday a number of businesses can kind of get back to normal, so all construction can resume. We've got retail stores that aren't located in shopping malls. They get to open up. We get a bunch of outdoor, recreational and seasonal activities. That kinda stuff gets to open up so. Really kind of exciting much much overdue. Feels like it and of course you know where everybody's sort of trying to balance. That you that lying between. Is it safe for us to do this Is it not safe and frankly again I got it tip my hat to the government. They've been doing a pretty good around the stuff, and it looks like we're doing it slowly slowly, but surely baby steps, but even the little baby steps are kind of exciting right now. Yeah and actually It's a little different now on this side of the world, so let's check that out. How right so just you know kind of an update off the top. It's good to go through the numbers quickly. We're now at four point. Six million cases, worldwide and through over three hundred thousand people have died of this I think the US continues to be the biggest trouble spot and It's up to one almost one point, five million cases, and almost ninety thousand people have passed away from nineteen in the US and that's remarkable. Remarkable to me because in China they're only officially at four thousand, six hundred thirty three deaths now we know this probably more than that i. don't you know basically any time China releases numbers of any kind or skeptical, but regardless it's still still much smaller but he got interesting in Hong, Kong this week, because we had gone twenty three straight days without any new sort of case that was contracted inside Hong Kong and that ended..

Youtube US Hong Hong Kong China Canada Ontario
"law" Discussed on PR & Law

PR & Law

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"law" Discussed on PR & Law

"Recorded live from Hong Kong Toronto. Basis the PR in La podcast that PR and law podcast. With Your House can't mcmurphy and you and Christie. Okay welcome to episode number six of the P. R. M. Law podcast. I am Kamp. Murcia with you and Christie Hello Cameron. How are Ya? Not Bad you. I'm looking forward to getting getting underway with episode six. Pr Guy Based in Hong Kong and publisher of the Digital Bits PR and communications newsletter at digital bits, PR dot. Com and you N. is an employment lawyer and partner at done troon L L, P in Toronto, Canada and online at done trim LP dot locked. Okay bit of housekeeping before we get underway. If you enjoy the podcast, please tell a friend. It's actually quite exciting for you and I to see the the number of subscriptions, and the number of downloads continue to increase each week works really grateful for that, so if you enjoy it, please let somebody else know who you think might be interested you can also follow us on social media. We are on linked in twitter, instagram and facebook and our account is P. R. Law podcasts. You can find us on any of those platforms by just searching for PR law podcast. You can also support us on. Patriot that would also mean a lot. Lot you can find that on our website. You can go to PR law. PODCAST, DOT COM and click support the show, and we would also love to take your questions as well..