35 Burst results for "L Berta"

Last two journalists working for Australian media leave China

BBC World Service

00:46 sec | 3 weeks ago

Last two journalists working for Australian media leave China

"Journalists working in China for Australian media have flown home after a five day diplomatic standoff, during which police demanded to interview them. Gilberte LS trying to correspondent for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation and Mike Smith of the Australian Financial Review through from Shanghai. Gavin Morris, the director of news at the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Thank those who helped release his colleague, Mr Berta, lt's We've really tried to work out what was going on on the ground. The information was in short supply. On. Really. What we have to focus on was the very clear advice. We were getting that it was best for Bill T leave the country and so thanks to some excellent consular support from the embassy in China. We have successfully brought Bill home and we're very happy that he's here.

Australian Broadcasting Corpor Australian Financial Review China Bill T Gavin Morris Mike Smith Mr Berta Shanghai Director
"l berta" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

07:16 min | 3 weeks ago

"l berta" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"From Wonder Media Network, I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will Manica this month. We're talking about activists women who stood up and fought against injustice and for a better world are activists of the day work to improve human rights and to end environmental abuses in Honduras she thought against major corporations and her country's government to protect indigenous lands despite the fact that her life ended tragically and far too. Soon, she made a lasting impact on a fight to ensure the livelihood of the Linka people. Let's talk about Tech Kassir S. custer was born in nineteen seventy one in lifespans Honduras. Basically from infancy Betas mother Ostra Flores instilled in her children a sense of moral obligation to make the world a better place. Care of refugees fleeing El Salvador. She also was a member of the largest indigenous group in Honduras the Lenka Veritas mothers dedicated to activism clearly rubbed off on to while at university where studied education bear to co founded an organization called the Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations Honduras. Makassar a Florida he soy. has. Invasion of the. Thing. Is someone the Palanca the group organized to fight infringements on the rights at the Lenka people? The indigenous group was often at the center of humanitarian and environmental. Challenges. In. Two thousand six Berto was asked to investigate the appearance of a bunch of construction equipment that appeared on link a land. She discovered a plan was in motion to build a dam on the cart gay river without the link is knowledge. The river was and is extremely important to the people living in the area. It serves as a supply route for water food and medicine. It was and is also a place of spiritual importance for the of people bear fight to stop the dam's construction had international legs. It's actually against international treaties that govern the treatment of indigenous populations to build a dam without local knowledge or consent. Still a partnership made up of a Chinese company and a Hindu Orrin company was attempting to start construction. VERITA and the Council of Popular and indigenous organizations of Honduras wrote letters started peaceful protests in Tegucigalpa, the capital of Honduras an organized local meetings to make clear that the link of people had not had their say and did not approve of the construction they reached out to the inter-american. Commission on Human Rights and the International Finance Corporation part of the World Bank. Still, the local and national government paid no heat and determinedly continued pushing the project forward. Government. Support for the project was further bolstered by a regime change in two thousand nine. That year there was a military coup that removed President Manuel Zelaya. The new government formed in the aftermath of the coup had US political military, and monetary support. Support directly impacted the dam. Project. Previously. Construction site had been guarded by contractors. After the coup the site was guarded by. American. Trained soldiers. and. This particular site wasn't the only dam plan for construction after the coup the new government plan for mining operations on thirty percent of the country's land requiring significant energy and leading to plans for the construction of hundreds of dams around Honduras after the coup, the Inter American Commission on. Human. Rights called for Berretta to be protected. The group said she was under threat due to her activism. In April twenty thirteen bear to and her fellow activists in the movement decided to take action at the site itself. They organized a blockade, the construction side of the dam and question it for over a year. Guys who will run the Gay Toys Ghana took in the through the US. Not on Parton Salvador Tom Being. He is simple. The Cow Bustan thyatira is to commotions same era in. A. In. Their. Data Control Service late in twenty thirteen. The Chinese partner on the damn backed out the international. Finance Corporation also withdrew funding from the project. In Two Thousand Fifteen Berto won the Goldman Environmental Prize an extremely prestigious award in the field of environmental activism for her work in blocking dam construction and additional environmental initiatives. While this was a huge honor. It was not without risk that same year global witness wrote that Honduras had the most environmental and land defenders killed per capita of any country in the world on March third two, thousand, sixteen, a friend and Mexican environmental activist Gustavo Castro Soto came to stay with Barracuda. He was in town to help bear to think about alternative solutions for powering the proposed government minds. Heard a loud noise and shouting before running to find four men with guns they shot bear to multiple times and Gustavo twice. To died in Gustavo's arms, Beretta's death was attributed to a robbery but international uproar led to further investigation. Five men were arrested two of whom had worked for the dam construction company and one of whom was a member of the military in two thousand eighteen hundred court ruled that executives at the hundred dam-building company had Veritas murder. The president of the company was arrested while the perpetrators clearly intended to silence bear Kassir s at any cost her murder did the opposite. It brought more international attention and halted the dam project. The Organization to CO founded the Council of Popular and indigenous organizations of Honduras continues the fight her legacy lives on. All month talking about activists for more on why we're doing what we're doing. Check out our newsletter Manica Weekly. Can also follow us on facebook and instagram. At Encyclopedia MANTECA. You can find me directly on twitter at Jenny, Kaplan. Special thanks to lose. Kaplan, at my favorite sister and co-creator. Talk to you tomorrow. I WanNa tell you about a new podcast called the cut from New York magazine and the Vox Media Podcast Network every Wednesday ensemble voices from New York magazine's the cut led by host avery truffle men engage in the conversations that matter most in our current moment. From discussion with La- Darius from the Netflix show cheer about what optimism means in twenty, twenty, two examining nature and our relationship to. Tune into the cut each week for intimate groping looks at the world around us. First episode of the cut is live now. Subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts..

Honduras Council of Popular and Indigen Jenny Kaplan Berto US Kassir S. custer Council of Popular Makassar Gustavo Castro Soto Ostra Flores El Salvador Florida President Manuel Zelaya Linka Wonder Media Network New York magazine International Finance Corporat gay river Manica
"l berta" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

01:48 min | Last month

"l berta" Discussed on In The Thick

"A Catholic why mom was like a staunch to Catholic and that's not a dichotomy way past lita identifies as a Catholic Lenka. You know I think that would be Latin America sort of mixing of spirituality and organized religion, but it was really important to. Copay and how organization was always about defending indigenous wise. But indigenous lights mean are landrights territorial lights the white to sustainable sort of use Lavin exploitation of natural resources. Human Rights listening to this is Lana Americanised. She is of a long legacy. That can never be forgotten and she also had many roles. Yeah and what's great about your writing Nina is how we get to see that we see her as a mom right to four kids as a friend as a daughter as a lover. We, see her in the fullness of her life. Like you said, you've interviewed old classmates of hers who told you quote Baked, was beautiful and had lots of boyfriends. She loved to dance a love that quoth you write that she never lost her playfulness when we were talking about as many as always said like there was a kingship there when you met her mighty out and she was so dedicated to the struggle to defending our people and their land. She was told she was a bad mother because of it and that her again, there's this notion of like Oh these leaders and they're like angry women no better was actually filled with so much joy and when I think of Bertha I, think of that continual smile that she had with her but let's talk about better does murder in the context of Patriarchy and machismo in fact, throughout her activism, you right Nina that she quote came.

"l berta" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

07:31 min | Last month

"l berta" Discussed on In The Thick

"Teach us as giving our lives in various ways for the protection of the rivers is giving our lives for the well-being of humanity and of this planet. Gen Y. Lettuce wake up humankind we are out of time we must share conscious free of the repeal capitalism racism patriarchy. Only shirt our own selfish. Does. One of those stories that we covered a lot Latino rebels and it's important to remember, right Those who are responsible for the death weren't just the people who killed her in her home because when we talk about this corrupt system of power that starts with corporations to various governments to the military, they're all rooted in imperialism. Misogyny they all had a hand in the murder. So you detail all this in your book but for our listeners are maybe you know they might know about better story or they're like walking into the story for the first time who do you hold responsible for does death? Oh There's so many layers of responsibility and in a way the question who killed the castaways. It's not fully answered question. Now, I will see owning to journalists that attended the trial every day for five weeks at the end of two, thousand eighteen. You were the only international journalists. I was be judged list national international. That was there every day you know even local journalists who did call would come in a few minutes Chen religious grab an interview with one of the defense lawyers who would just spout some you very opinionated anti. Antique. Oh. SORTA message, not challenge them and that would be the message that would go every day I. mean it was totally depressing. What we know is that a group of carriers are hired hitmen were paid to kill tire on the night of the second of March has an in sixteen. They possibly didn't know who she was. Unlikely that they did we know from their twelve that there was involvement from the company. What the judge volved that a plan was made an order given to kill her at the end of two, thousand fifteen around the time that the company we started construction of the dam, they moved the site of the dam to the other side of the Khadka. Had triggered. Refreshed opposition and protests from better time the Lincoln people against the dime, and that's when the plan was hatched and over the next few weeks months, you know that she was followed, she was monitored. The company had paid informants in community abandoned river. Those convicted included two people linked to the company, a former security chief who was a US try and former military officer saw the company's communities and environmental manager, and also a active special forces major who's really interesting because he was a heavily really decorated. So officer trained by the US. Many times sat with the coalition forces in Iraq, it also served. As a peacekeeper and at the time of the murder, you know he was on route to being promoted to lieutenant colonel but he was at the same time under investigation for drug trafficking and kidnapping charges by is lot. This'll tip parallel magical somew- mealey's Ovando us in central, America. So his phone was tapped at the time. So we bought quite a lot of evidence that there was actually a botched mission to mud about a month earlier she had two of her daughters loud that tita about home with us and mission was abandoned hilary seven men who I would describe as the Hitman and the middleman. Tried and convicted of her murder and four of them were also convicted of the attempted murder of Mexican style Castro up different by the task who clearly the killers did not know was going to be a house and he survived by playing dead. But those who ordered those who paid for those who enabled in benefited I? See how much as like the grand finale of what was a campaign of terror again. and Co pain and the link of people that was initiated by this internationally funded company. You know which had also investors for one of the most powerful clans in Honduras. They were able to use their ties and influences in a prosecutor's office in the criminal. Justice system. We've police security forces with the army. We politicians are local and national level to really solve unleashed his campaign of terror against the community and butter which involved stretch sexual harassment communalization defamation. Violence, assault they were cease hired thugs that evidence suggests were working for the company terrorizing people you know and some people were killed because they were opposing the DAB way before but there was killed and how much was the grand finale and vice people I hold responsible these campaign of Tara. Before matter through the mud and for really everything that's happened. You know because only reason that was been some partial justice in case of the Kesslers is because of the international pressure and really the sorts of incredible tenacious demanding campaign behalf family by people by Organization and friends, and when you see that the murder of the cassidy's was kind of like the grand finale of the terror in place on this entire community. I didn't ask this when I was with. Beta. Yeah. That was the kind of person who could have run for president. Yours easily is she was like Alexander Dough Cossio Cortez before Alexander Dough. Casio Cortez. As somebody who's been covering this actually for decades the United States and its relationship in on dude as if we even call it a relationship. Is really incredibly problematic rights specifically in on dudas in the rise of the regime there that has given concessions and fast track legislation to allow companies both hundred and international to profit by. Natural Resources and the way they do that is. Frankly by taking indigenous land from the people. Yeah when Bertha we talk about this you remember this as you would just say it's gaze lonely go get the NIMMO's the only thing that we have is our land In the case of Bertha, they were keeping tabs on her whereabouts. They were hiring these hitmen, they were sending threats. In fact, she had received thirty three previous threats before she was killed corporate interests gained power after the coup in in two thousand nine when the democratically elected president minority Celaya. Who Lean left was ousted, and so those corporate interests have more power. Yeah. It was classic Latin America and need. We remind everyone in two thousand nine who was secretary of state. It was Hillary Clinton. There's been a reckoning. In the left about her involvement in the coup and we call.

murder US officer president Alexander Dough Cossio Cortez Hillary Clinton Bertha Casio Khadka Chen Latin America Iraq hilary America Honduras prosecutor harassment assault
Cultivate Calm During Chaos With Neil Pasricha

The LEADx Show

04:58 min | 2 months ago

Cultivate Calm During Chaos With Neil Pasricha

"Welcome everyone to this lead x Webinar with Neil Pastor Rita. Thank you so much for joining Neil. Past reach is the author of seven bucks including the book of Awesome. The happiness equation Awesome is everywhere, and you are awesome. His Books Are New York. Times and number one international bestseller's and have spent over two hundred weeks on bestseller lists and sold millions of copies. Neal is one of the world's top brings speakers and his first Ted Talk. The three days of awesome is wearing to one of the ten most inspiring all time. He thinks rights to an speaks about intentional living, and all of his work focuses on the themes of gratitude, happiness, failure, resiliency, and trust welcome Neil. Well. Thank you so much for having me guys. On this cold slash hot sunny slash cloudy Friday afternoon slash morning. I am in Toronto Canada. And it is cold and cloudy and the afternoon here, but I can already see people chiming in on the side Jason's. That's good morning from. Kansas, happy Friday everyone. Guys, please. Let's the chat open that box open on my screen the whole time. I would love to be reinvented time. Why because right now? During coronavirus, one of the biggest sort of needs I feel that I need and I feel like you probably feel it too, is community. Connection. betsy, high from Boulder, Sonya Hi, from California. This is wonderful for Michigan Los Angeles anyone not a not from America it'd be great to hear as well. I don't know. Who I'm talking to the other thing that would be great to salvage front before we get into our exciting conversation. Cuban a love all the texts coming in, thank you is who knows me so when I ended up. Speaking to groups of people, hundreds of people like I'm doing right now. What I don't know is who have you have read the book on some or Oj Geek from India I'm hearing these great ones Calgary. High highly shot cloudy Gog always touting car, isn't it now I'm just kidding but I almost called love. coury loved the Chart Cut Restaurant downtown props to independent restaurants bookstores. Guys got to bring him back. So I. Don't know who's read any books book Balsam the happiness equation you are. Does anybody listened to my podcast three bucks? Maybe some of you were when you get to hear me other places has anyone ever heard me give a speech a Tedtalk? Have you seen like dislike me? Know where you touched my stuff, if at all, or maybe you're like I have no idea who Zappa at me so? You quit your Yapper, but let me know so I'm seeing a seeing I'm seeing some Yeah, Berta, I've never heard of you until now. Diane says you are not unique to me, but I'm already intrigued. The says I've read the happiness equation. oh, I watched you on. Ted Ted or lead Ex. Yeah, so there's lots of I like the newest Story never heard before. Guys don't be sorry. There's eight billion of us in the world right now. I'm one person My community, which I'd like to welcome you into. Is You know one hundred thousand people? These are people that want to live a deeply intentional life. The reason I want to do that is because about ten years ago. My wife left me. My best friend took his own life. These two things happened in the span of a few weeks. I was devastated I stopped. Eating I stopped sleeping. I! Was a skeleton of myself mentally physically psychologically, and then I started a blog called one thousand awesome things, dot com, and for thousand straight weekdays I wrote an entry. Cheer myself up like old dangerous playground equipment like the smell of bakery, air or wearing warm underwear from out of the dryer. The blog took off one best log on the world two years in a row one hundred million hits. It turned into a book called the Book of Awesome so that book here the black. One came out sold. A million copies was a big bestseller I thought that's my fifteen minutes of fame. I kept my job at Walmart the whole time. I got my blog went by. Everyone gets like one viral fleet in their life and their life, but it kept going, and it turns up. I needed to when I got remarried five years later I ended up writing a guidebook to my unborn child than how to live happy life that became my book called the happiness equation more recently. Now I have three boys, five three and one very happily married my wife, lastly on lucky say, and ever in a brand new book all about Resilience Okay so you are also came out last November. On Book Two right now, but of course everything shut down that about resilience. The subtitles had navigate change, wrestle failure and live in attentional

New York Neil Pastor Rita Ted Talk Ted Ted Neal Kansas Toronto Walmart Chart Cut Restaurant Canada Michigan Jason Calgary Diane Berta Sonya Hi Betsy Zappa
Lamar reviews 'The Stranger'

Bob and Sheri

04:38 min | 5 months ago

Lamar reviews 'The Stranger'

"Good friend of ours recommended the stranger and she was not wrong. The Stranger is based on a novel by Hauling Cohen. And it was originally set in New Jersey but Netflix chose to move to England because evidently British mysteries or a lot cooler than American mysteries. And I don't disagree but along with that. Coolness comes that British accent that makes everybody sound smarter and what they're saying seem more important. It has its own set of problems. I can't always understand what they're saying to characters home sentences that will make everything clear with a hugely dramatic consequence and cargoes wait. What did you say go? We wish? Stop and rewind which means instead of going back to riot before the two sentences we wind up twelve minutes earlier so they're not trying to fast forward back to where we were and zoo passed it and then we see some that we should have seen until we understood those two sentences and callers like what are you doing and I said I'm over here if you could do any better take the remote now. We're having a fight over this because it's it's nuts nuts and it happened at least three or four times in each episode. So now it's like I don't know the words they're using this need. I need less mumbling. Okay and so what? I should have done what I'm telling everybody else to do. If you have this problem it's turn on the closed caption it so you can see what these fools are talking about. It's at don't ever have this problem. One Lamar the TV show peaky blinders learned how to turn the clothes caption on A. I agree with what you're saying but right now there's some guy from England who's living in the United States saying are you telling me some guy from Georgia is criticizing how the English speak what they invented the language. At least it looks like they could speak it clearly. Mean no it's true. It's very and the toughest understand out of the all of the United Kingdom Areas is Scotland Scottish. Accent to me. I can't even understand what they're selling. Well I keep them I turn on the closed caption for peaky blinders and for outlander because when some of the side outlander characters dodger that. I'm pretty sure that Berta just said something critical to the plot. I have no idea what it was so I feel you Lamar. When Kelly was learning Japanese. She told me that she would. She would go to this place where the old Japanese men were talked to them. She said the hardest thing to understand is old because everybody they've been talking to each other for so long they just sort of say half the word and everybody's sort of picks up and I think this is what's happening here. I'm not getting the whole things I don't know anyway. Back to the story the series Stewart Richard Armitage and hit as Adam price season attorney has a wife and two boys. He's approached by this attractive young woman. The Stranger played by Hannah. Joe John Cameron and she tells him that his wife has a secret and she has been lying to him for the last two years she tells him or he can find the proof and now that he knows that she's a liar. He no longer has to stay with her so this she just leaves now. When he confronts his wife his wife says well. There's more to it and I'll tell you everything but not right this minute it while this is going on. A decapitated animal is discovered in the middle of the town. Along with that comes. Multiple visits from the stranger to other people naked bodies found in the woods. Really Bad Cup. I really good cup murder embezzlement blackmail infidelity and so many other things that have nothing to do with each other or do they have power. They connected snowden brings more questions but no answers. It's just definitely been show. You can't stop once you start there eight episodes. They're forty two minutes just rated TV may for language include the F word a lot edgier seat twist and turns with a lot of surprises and a lot of British monklands. It's you have no idea what's going on but overall it's a good series. My schoolwork is four solid budweiser. I enjoyed

Kelly Joe John Cameron Lamar England Hauling Cohen Netflix New Jersey United Kingdom Scotland Scottish Berta United States Stewart Richard Armitage Hannah Snowden Attorney Georgia Murder Embezzlement Adam
Are you tired? Theres a reason, it's Daylight Savings Time

The Big Story

10:11 min | 7 months ago

Are you tired? Theres a reason, it's Daylight Savings Time

"I I don't know about you guys but I'm tired. Part of that is the ceaseless Rahm of end of the World News. Of course part of. It's just work or family or the everyday things that always get to me by the end of the week and this week in particular there is another reason. I'm tired and you know it. Or at least most of you deal with the exception of most of Saskatchewan and none of it. You Lucky Jerks Canada's sprang forward this week and if this world isn't seem bleak enough now it is once again dark when I leave my house in the morning every year more and more people ask why we have daylight saving time and the calls to abolish it grow louder and now we may in some places be ready to actually do away with except there's about of course there is what happens if some places in Canada eliminate daylight saving time but their neighbors either to the south or to the side. Do not put up some places decide to stay on permanent daylight time and others decide the opposite. What if every province and territory makes their own call and we end up with a maze of time zones the plays hell with scheduling things like sporting events are flights or deliveries. The last thing any of us want is they solution. Daylight saving time ends up making us even more tired. I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the Big Story. Alex mckean a reporter at the Toronto Star and their Vancouver Bureau and she's Ab. As tired. As I am I out. How are you? I'm tired like I said this time shift always throws me for a loop. Yeah me too. I mean I was actually not only experiencing the time change weekend but I also flew to Toronto and then back to Vancouver so I've got double jetlag going on so your province is perhaps maybe on the verge of getting rid of daylight saving time and we will talk about that but first because this is a really good part of the story. Can you just tell me who is Ray Saunders? Sure Ray Saunders is a gentleman who just recently turned eighty years old and not a lot of people in Vancouver may recognize his name but they certainly would recognize his most famous creation. Refunders the maker of the Gas Count Skin. Kwok which is one of the biggest tourist attractions in the entire city of Vancouver. It's this incredible clock that is powered by steam and has whistled plays a tune every I think every fifteen minutes or so tourists come and look at it in the context of this historic part of the city gas town with. Oh it's a it's probable streets and they take pictures with it and Race unders is is the guy that built it. He built it in nineteen seventy seven and for a long time he He maintained it as well. Now it's maintained by the city of in coober but she wrote back walk and two hundred other public clocks in Vancouver Canada and all over the world to we can a year. He goes around to all of the Public Clark's in the city of Vancouver and surrounding area and he has been the guy who's responsible for manual we. Changing those public Clark's to reflect the time change at daylight savings time so He he describes me that during the this spring forward period which just happened this past weekend. Most of the public clocks they'll have kind of a speedup function and so it'll take about Six seconds he said that for the two wine forward an hour to reflect the new delay time and of course the the opposite happens during the fullback period in November. So He's been doing that for twenty years or so. It seems so quaint in a way but this might be the last weekend that he'll ever do it. Tell me about that. Yeah that's right. It might be the last weekend he ever does it And it's you know it's kind of fitting away because as described when we were talking. He's getting older. He unfortunately experienced a fall recently which which made ladder finding a lot more challenging for him. Of course you have to climb up the ladder in order to reach the public bases. So that's part of this task that he's been doing for for the last couple of decades So but personal reasons aside and personal limitations aside He also possibly last weekend that That this kind of topic will be required in the city of in coober because Bc is looking out just mixing the time changes all together And I I think you're right it it is. There is something kind of quaint about it if if I could just describe a little bit about Something that struck me talking to ray was that he has this really interesting relationship with clocks and time so I mean I'm a millennial and I will admits that most of the time that That I'm actually checking the time. I do wear wristwatches but most of the time I'm looking at my computer screen or looking at my phone that's the thing. That's like really intuitive to me. Ray has this this cool relationship with clocks. Where he says look. There's something lost when you're just looking at numbers on a screen. The clock face the circular nature of it the fact that the hands are always kind of moving around the tell us something about the time that has passed and the time that is yet to come. It's more You know accurate to the way that we actually walk through life and I thought that was such a such an interesting idea not anything that I considered at all so I think he his sense of affection for these public clocks in and the analog nature of them really came through so why is British Columbia considering getting rid of daylight saving time and how did that movement sprang up and come to be yeah. It's a great question And different people will tell you different responses as to the origin story of why British Columbia's dealing with this thing but I'm gonNA start with the practical elements of it. Which is the. This is a conversation that it's also happening South of the border in the western state so Washington Oregon California all considering changing to a permanent daylight time and that has pretty significant implications for us here British Columbia because we're coordinated with those states. There's a lot of commerce that happens between those days even things like as work scheduling. That happens along the West Coast and these are things that it makes sense to be in in the same time as them so Washington last fall passed legislation to change their approach to time to permanent. Be Lifetime. And that hasn't happened yet because they need the approval by the The Federal Congress there in order to make it happen but our premier John Horrigan Here British Columbia was in conversation with Governor of Washington State and said look. Maybe this is something. We're interested in in British Columbia is well. It's something that the the government launched a public consultation on. They sent out a survey and they received within the first month or so. They received more completed surveys than they ever have in the history of all public consultations on on this topic of changing to permanent daylight time so they received two hundred and twenty three thousand completed surveys Colombian yeah and overwhelmingly ninety. Three percent of people said get rid of it. We don't want time changes anymore. We just want a permanent time. Is that something that we see elsewhere in the world You mentioned it's happening already on the west coast of the US but also some parts of Canada. Don't have it as well. That's true and you know after I published this story on what? Bc is doing. I got quite a lot of emails from folks in Saskatchewan because the way described it in the story was that Scotch Wayne is on permanent central standard time but both insist on reminded being over over email but in fact according to the line to Scotch. When is that? It should be on mountain time zone for the same time zone as Berta so the fact that it's on permanent central standard time actually means that it's it's more on a permanent stay like time similar to what? Bc is trying to do so it all gets a little bit confusing but since nineteen sixty six scotch and has been the Canadian exception to this time. Change practice that we have been doing and the they've been on the most places in Scotland. Anyway have been on permanent central standard time. Alberta has considered it. I understand that there's also a private member's bill In Ontario on this topic. So if it's something that people are increasingly aware of but the one that I has really caught my attention in the last couple of weeks was the Yukon because of course the Yukon is also a jurisdiction along the west coast. And they've already pulled the trigger. They said okay. We went to move the clocks forward an hour this past weekend. And we're not going to change them again. It's just GonNa stay dot so Yukon. Who is the one that's most recently has actually made the changes that British Columbia is talking about? Making what is the case in this day and age for daylight saving time? Can

Vancouver Canada Ray Saunders West Coast British Columbia BC Coober Toronto Saskatchewan Yukon Columbia Rahm Clark World News Washington Jordan Heath Rawlings Vancouver Bureau Kwok Alex Mckean
Whats driving the explosion in Lyme Disease in Canada?

The Big Story

12:23 min | 8 months ago

Whats driving the explosion in Lyme Disease in Canada?

"Today disease a complicated disease that we are having trouble testing for a disease. We never expected to see with any regularity in Canada only to realize perhaps too late. Maybe that was Donald. No this is not a new virus from across the world world. It's not some weird superbug. It's not particularly contagious illness. You probably don't think much about until it makes headlines because somebody famous something was wrong with Justin Bieber last year and we saw him with visas. Arm We we now know what was going on here. Justin Bieber has lime disease but it is a mistake to think of lyme disease as a rare illness because all of the data we have and we still don't have enough shows that it is exploding in Canada with numbers of confirmed cases spiking every year. Get One guess as to why but even that is not the key problem here what we need to figure out and fast is a comprehensive way to test for your dial and treat lyme disease because that's where we lag behind almost everybody else. I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the big story. Janet sperling is a PhD candidate at the University of Alberta. She is also a board member number on the Canadian lyme Disease Foundation. Hello Janna why. Don't you just start I think all of us the term but maybe just explain what what lime disease is sure. Lime disease is one of the more complicated things you would hope that I should be able to say. Oh lime disease is You know a bacterial curiel owners and it's transmitted by tick but unfortunately when you peek under the covers it gets a little more complicated so if you go to the government of Canada website. And you'll see that lyme disease is Berea Bergdorf Ri- and you say Oh. Okay that's nice and easy I can follow what they're trying to say but now if we just step over the border a little bit to Minnesota and we look up the male clinic they say lyme disease is four main species of bacteria and then they list four types of Berea so now you know your head is spinning you say okay. Well what do they say in Europe so if we go due to Europe and we go for example to Germany we see lyme disease is caused by spy. Rookie Berea Bergdorf. Wry sense allow to which means it's a whole bunch of different Burrito So this is part of the reason that we're ending up with a really complicated answer to what ought not be a very simple question. Why do various countries disagree so much on precisely what it is? That's not the case with most of viruses or diseases. I assume right and I think this is one of the things when I first started like you know back in the nineteen eighties and I took my medical entomology. They said lime disease is a disease it happens in North America. It's transmitted by so I wrote that down on my exam tonight. Got One hundred percent and everybody said great and I said to myself boy. I'm caught. I live in Canada. 'cause I don't need to worry about lyme disease but the more we started to find out notable lime disease and the more we realized it is actually in Europe. It's been in Europe for a very very long time for example You know it sees the iceman man who was found You know he's Bronze Age. I think you know we back in a gleese your those fraud. He had evidence of lime disease. So we know you you know. We've had lyme disease around for a long time. People just didn't recognize it as lime disease so the more you look into it. The more you see that this is something that's called us a Nautica Kasese so it's found circulating in the wildlife and then he kinda jumps over to the people although the disease itself Rigas and aiming for are people so this isn't something like measles measles something that goes from one person to the other person. This is something that's circulating in. It's got Birds is involved in this cycle. It's got animals. You know deer mice all sorts of things so this is why it just becomes more and more complicated. The more you look at it and and of course as a person who's suffering from lung disease you really don't care about all that background just saying I'm sick. Just get better and that advantage of being a bacteria tirrenia is that means we can use antibiotics so I think previously people were being treated for lyme disease without even actually recognizing was lime disease. assise they had antibiotics for some other reasons. They got better. Everybody said okay. I don't know what it was but they're better now. We're very concerned that we want want to make sure that we don't over use the antibiotics so that ends up making it even more complicated so we have the people we know they're sick. We know that got got bit by a tick. We know that something is wrong so some of the doctors are saying okay. We'll give them the antibiotic conceive to get better so those people all say. I think it's lyme disease and other people say I don't think it was on disease at all. It was something else it was transmitted by tick. But it wasn't lime disease so now we've taken a really complicated problem and we've really muddied the waters. We have people who say I have lime disease and other people who say whatever it was. It wasn't lime disease but I'm glad they got better so if the waters are so muddy and to your point the description you gave about learning about lyme disease in the eighties was precisely as much much as I knew about. LYME disease period Why are we discussing it so much more frequently right now? Are we seeing spike. Absolutely and I think it's certainly only with the global climate change we're getting the tick has expanded its range so you know back in the nineteen eighties. Certainly ticks. Albertus stopped about sort of middle. The problems you didn't have to go very far. Well now. They're all the way out into the Yukon. So this is something that's changed. It's it's new. I think we've always had you know a a couple of topics here and there and the other place but now it's much bigger. We know that most Canadians live right along the US border so we know most of our population is sort of super at risk as the ticks start moving north. Do we have a sense of how quickly the problem is getting worse like. Do you guys have have numbers on no matter how quickly the number of cases arising well we don't we don't have numbers because the numbers are set to be very very specific to Berea Maria br door fry and then it's particular string thirty one that somebody described in Boston Massachusetts lyme Connecticut down in that end so for Canada. It's kind of difficult to say can say you know if you're looking very strictly for one type of Lyme disease we know that the numbers have increased hugely sleep but we also know it would be kind of unlikely that we're just Columbia would have exactly the same type of lime disease as Boston Massachusetts. You know there's a latta kilometers in between the two and then also There's huge mountain range and then to make at one stage more complicated the even have different species of tick so this is where people get annoyed because they say I'm sick. I think I have lime disease because you treated me as though I have lime disease but still it's been denied as being lined disease or even anything like lyme disease. Why don't we have a simple test that can categorize it as one of what may be many kinds of lyme disease for instance right? Well we do if your dog so if your dog your jet can in Cohen tests the dog and say okay you have a sick dog. The dog is Being picked up to have this general sense of this says lyme disease lyme Berea of some sort so your vet will probably just treat your dog and say I'm calling lime disease good enough for me taking antibiotics and get better. Okay but humans but humans don't have exactly the same immune response so a dog has a much stronger immune response so it makes it easier when you're a VAT and and also with the humans. People are so readable antibiotics that you have to absolutely meal the diagnosis before they're willing to give you the antibiotics in the first place and that makes sense because we have talked on this podcast in the past about the need to not use antibiotics. Unless it's serious I guess what's flung meal. A little bit is that this can be a disease. That's it's on the rise that's diagnosed in many places around the world and they're still not the same kind of credible test that can determine like okay. You need antibiotics. Let's go right and I think partly it's because it circulates among birds. It circulates among various little mice and small rooms all the way up to deer and that each one of these animals. This part of this really complicated cycle the deer can actually clear the infection so for example if I had a tick and I knew that that had most recently fed on a bird I would be quite worried or if I knew had most recently said on a most but if I knew knew that the last thing that tick fed on was a dear I wouldn't be very worried at all I would say. Oh okay. Fortunately that's very low risk from that particular tech so this is where I think people especially if your doctor and you've got somebody and they have very nonspecific symptoms because that's one of the problems. There's nothing that's really obviously. This is exactly lime disease. You know you can't stand the front of the room and say okay. People have lime disease and these people don't have lime disease so oh you look people. They've got these nonspecific symptoms. And you're saying I know they're sick but I just don't know what it is. We're going to start looking at a lot of different things. So there's this a big list of differential diagnoses. You need to go through. And then when it gets the bottom of the list you always have lime disease. And that's something that was missed for for many many decades and for example I live in Alberta. And we're still told. Oh you can't have lime disease because you live in Berta but the silly thing is to people travel awful and when people are traveling. It doesn't matter where I live. Where my house addresses if I live in Alberta maybe got it in California maybe I got it in Toronto? Well in speaking of California you probably knew at some point in this interview. I was going to mention Justin Bieber. Indeed and it gets back to kind of the problem that you're describing reading because when celebrities like that come out and announced that they've been battling lyme disease it often seems like he has the best medical care in the world right. He compay millions of dollars for the very best doctors and yet still People were worrying about him for months before he came forward. Exactly and that's I think it's actually shiver common story and if you were to take your average Canadian. Generally they're healthy people. They're living their lives eating wells sleeping well plenty of exercise and and then suddenly something happens. They get sick and they don't even necessarily associated with tick bite and especially in a place where you're not expecting to run into ticks like downtown Toronto. You might not think about it and as you get. sicker and sicker and sicker. Lime disease isn't even on the radar so it takes long time to figure out what it is and the problem with lyme disease is if you catch it early. It's very easy to treat. Take your antibiotics into the story. But if you don't catch catch it and it goes on for a long time like weeks or months or sometimes even years. It's really hard to treat people were saying and this is why I wanted to ask you about like how it presents. How the disease presents because people were saying that it looked like Justin had lapsed and that he was an addict and that he was really struggling with substance abuse? Right you and and I think that that's actually remarkably common and a lot of people find that obviously really hurtful and you can certainly understand and why if you've been

Lyme Disease Canadian Lyme Disease Foundati Lung Disease Canada Justin Bieber Europe Boston Massachusetts Lyme Conn Berea Bergdorf Jordan Heath Rawlings Donald Trump Janna Berea Bergdorf Ri Alberta Minnesota Albertus Fraud Berea United States Nautica Kasese Janet Sperling
How Mason Buffalo Combats Suicide in His Community

Unreserved

06:13 min | 8 months ago

How Mason Buffalo Combats Suicide in His Community

"Four of Mason Buffalo's cousins died by suicide. He dedicated his life to helping others the man for musk. CHIESA BERTA says while everybody's been hurt in his community. He wants to give them hope again this. ABC's Roberta Bell has that. That story Mason Buffalo puts the headstone at the base of the white cross that marks cousins grave. Holy I'm just GONNA emotional denison Thomas not birthday other. He maintains the Samson cemetery in Moscow. Chief for she's buried alongside three of their other cousins who all committed suicide before they turn thirty. Look all my family here. It's easy for me to disclose known assume but it's easy for me to disco. String up give up on everything but I don't Wanna be either guy. I want to show people hoping community. He says his life is like many peoples in his community. He's struggled as a teen parent on the front line. China's young firefighter with alcohol with mental health and with loss in a community of sixteen thousand people. He says it surprisingly easy you to feel alone. That's why he's dedicated himself to being there for other in person and in spirit. If I wasn't doing what I'm doing right now then I wouldn't be here. I'll probably be buried in Vevey to guaranteed I would have been here in our fight instead helping other people off breath this is his story. Mason walks through the field behind his dad's two story farmhouse. where he grew? Up on the Samson Hamson cremation in Moscow chiefs all get behind his dad. Patrick Buffalo is a rancher and a hypnotherapist and Reiki master astor the reference point for most people is the past and their experiences. That's where they're stuck is in their memories. After Mason became a dad himself at fifteen he took a job with the fire. Department is a fire department. You don't know what call your on on his first day. The very first call it came in was about his cousin ferron three years later it was his cousin. Tyrel seem more. I looked lifeless. Die Total soda from their guts on my life went downhill fast for one full year. Not Something I didn't WanNa live. Noma Mason left my asquith cheese for Toronto. That's where he was when his dad called him and told him his cousin cody had died by suicide. I didn't even have time to come back and pay my last respects for cody. And it's tough especially for if people would what we're GONNA do some analysis step up and take the lead so he came home if you ask them to describe himself now. He says. Suicide side awareness advocate if our thought all my life and what. My plans are in everything that I didn't think I'd be what I'm doing. When he got back he started his first of many community initiatives walking and spirit so with all this as like when you commit suicide is there? You'RE GONNA be lingering around this area time too so it's like You lost your spirits. Lost people people from all four of the nations that make up mask. WHOA cheese now set? Aside a day every year to walk the reserves royal roads carrying handmade signs mementos wearing shirts shirts with the names of their loved ones written across their chests. My heart breaks into a million pieces each day on picking up these pieces and getting my hard-backed together and health and people helps me. Mason says the number of suicides look like they've gone down at least in Samson for him. The work is year are long and a part of everything he does. This team of horses at his father's ranch makes frequent trips to to the cemetery. Three funerals doing within the leaf they pull rehearse with big spoked wheels and light pink curtain toppers with tassels hanging from the top of the glass window on every side. It was an idea that Mason and his dad had to give community members that last ride. That's not all the horses to though. They're also helping people to heal nestled in the snow. Coated trees to the east of Patrick's barn is another project with his son. Mason came back and then he started making pass and clearing the bush and we bought a cabin set up a TV. They call it was dossier village. It's a place ace where people visit to confront their trauma. Going for a ride in a wagon with a team of horses is a very therapeutic. It's very healing going for a horseback ride. It's very therapeutic therapeutic. So that's what we offer here is Is that I am experience. It's so peaceful there it's like Like being somewhere else. Oh Patrick says his son needs to be doing this work for his own wellbeing and others so mason does have a strong villa vision for healing although he struggled in his own ways continuously. You know because he's had his own experiences ever since he was a child that he has to continue. Continue to deal with And it's no different and all with the the sixteen thousand people that live in this community and everybody's been hurt everybody's been everybody's stuck in a Rut. Not Knowing how to get unstuck. He knows what he needs to do and when he's doing it yes I feel good care when we can work as a team. I feel good

Noma Mason Mason Buffalo Patrick Buffalo Cody Samson Hamson Moscow Chiesa Berta Samson Cemetery Denison Thomas ABC Vevey China Roberta Bell Samson Tyrel Toronto Bush Patrick
Imperial Oil ignored its own findings on climate change decades ago

The Big Story

11:42 min | 9 months ago

Imperial Oil ignored its own findings on climate change decades ago

"The effects of climate change are being witnessed all over the world. It's the biggest story right. Now there are downright apocalyptic take images coming out of Australia right now. The country's battling hundreds of fires that burned across the country for months now roads and villages turned into rivers overnight right and tens of thousands displaced many areas in central and southern Somalia have been completely caught off and people here are now in urgent. Need aide Greenland's is sheets is the biggest in the northern hemisphere and it's in meltdown. All of this is a warning sign for the while. We hear it all the time. This is a dire situation. Time is running out. It's a crisis. Makes you wonder if we knew what we know now. Old decades ago could we have done something to stop. The devastation. Could much of what we're seeing today been reversed in the troubling answer is probably doubly. Yes in fact. Some people did know what was happening. As far back as the nineteen sixties major fossil fuel companies are alleged to have known about Science and worse that they were contributing one major Canadian company in particular its own research and ignored the findings and as we hear from our guest today. Imperial Oil Royal Coulda changed its business. Model could have been a leader to fight climate change but instead just decided to make bigger profit often. I'm Richard Southern Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the big story. Berta Hussein is a writer at the intercept joins us now Heimer Taza. How good thank you interesting article? One that I think is going to the real eye opener for a lot of people. Maybe anger a lot of people first off. It's really centering around a company that we use here in Canada a lot whether we know it or not tell us what is his imperial oil. Who are they so imperial oil is the Canadian subsidiary of Exxonmobil? The famous Fossil fuel company. It's best known in Canada. Zal at the consumer level for esso-brand gas stations. So imperial is essentially Exxon's arm in Canada and Essel is its most prominent consumer manifestation. Yeah they're everywhere you know but a tiger in your tank bright and you're saying going back to what the nineteen sixties imperial oil knew about the dangers of climate change. What exactly did they know back then? Murtaza well in the nineteen sixties the specific contours of the problem. With coming into view. They will not definite about climate. Change percents at that time but they knew that they were causing serious harm to the environment and they knew that this would eventually lead to a public outcry cry. If Canadians became aware of the full scope. The heart they were causing annual this time. You think of things like air quality polity destruction of habitat destruction of ecosystems. It was only in the later decades by the nineties. They were very very sure are about the science of climate change. We're talking maybe. Almost three decades ago they had come to a high degree of certainty about the impacts of climate change. Despite that knowledge they did not change their behavior and in fact did whatever they could to prevent the public from reaching the same level certainty. EG about the issue that they have what did they do to sway public opinion away from what they knew was the fact that climate change was real and that they were participating ended. What did they do to sway public opinion? Well over a decade imperial has been very concerned about possibility of public backlash and particularly particularly if that backlash led to calls for regulation up their activities or the imposition of climate or environmental regulation but somehow impacted their ability to carry out their operations. So going back to the sixties and then onwards from there are they attempted to do their own public relations campaigns to sway public opinion to Muddy the waters over their own environmental record and to push back against any organized attempt to curtail their activities but it wasn't just Pr. It was also surveillance of non-governmental organizations in Canada local ones like the Canadian Arctic Commission and other consumer advocacy groups to go on the offensive against these people even though they were much smaller than imperial oil oil of course much smaller than Exxon Mobil. What do you mean surveillance where they fled following people around? Was the documents show that they were compiling dossiers on environmental loops in Canada information about their key spokes people their finances their addresses so documents. Give us some insight into do the type that could carry out until two or they did they. Certainly it was on the table for them. Did they do anything. Imperial oil to try. Try and mitigate climate change. I mean you write in your article that a a PR company analyze different ways that the company could reduce its carbon footprint. Do they do anything well in the early nineties you know. Many many decades ago now they essentially knew that for society to avoid the catastrophic this traffic impacts of climate change. It would need to move from fossil fuel extraction to renewables techniques like carbon capture. Many the things that we've discussed today is being necessary to avert the climate prices but the thing is right this knowledge they did not twenty significant degree agreed change their operation. They continued to extract at the same levels and even higher levels year over year this day. They did not engage in the fundamental structural changes that they needed to to avert this crisis but one thing that they did do and I think this quite telling is that they changed the design their own platform in the Arctic and elsewhere to accommodate the fact of rising sea levels and melting sea ice. So they knew this is real soul strongly that they changed their own platform designed to accommodate that but they did not embark on the structural changes. Their business models would have been necessary. And it's even more unfortunate. Because if they had them that they would have had a first mover advantage and renewable energy. You talk about the the Arctic you mentioned in your article and this may be one of the more shocking things is that they looked imperial looked at the the melting sea ice as a new business opportunity for them right right so essentially imperial and other fossil fuel companies day for a very long time had the best climate climate research capacity is any organizations in the world they knew very intimately impacts of change around the world atmosphere here and in the Arctic and now they developed capacities partly for the reasons I mentioned earlier because they were concerned about public backlash over their environmental. I mental record. They wanted to get as good a pictures possible but what they also did was that the this usage capacity which had offensively developed to you know hopefully reduce environmental harm or get a better picture of it also to scope out new business opportunities that may emerge in it radically. Did you date environment. They said hey the fact that there's less CIA is going to allow us to go up further into the Arctic and drill for more oil right more or less maybe more technical language but you just if it was that the fate of Arctic Sea ice will determine how imperial operates right another another interesting thing to with imperial oil was how they saw carbon taxing coming many years ago and how they were how they were sure that that would actually mitigate mitigate some of the climate change of facts right what what did they say about carbon pricing. All those years ago well they knew that carbon pricing would be necessary. She would use fossil fuel emissions but they essentially low ball the numbers the new. That's a much higher number of needed even many decades but they made proposals which were arts private private knowledge and essentially you know we would have probably taxes through which we do need need. Do we need to be much much higher than you would. He needs to be several decades. When imperial and other companies had essentially deceived? The public was imperial. Oil's response to all this. You ask them for response to these documents. You got about all the knowledge they had one of these say. Well you know one thing that I This article is very important that they knew these things privately but for many years thereafter. CEO's if imperial were saying doing things in public when she concluded odds with their own private use and affiliate odds with the consensus of climate change mainly in the late nineties. You know imperial. You see Yo- Roller Peterson was saying that carbon dioxide. It's good for your I'm in started pollutant. There's no consensus about this issue. All and you know essentially open to debate internally do not open to debate very serious and very real so you know response In the light of this it was just that they take seriously and committed to doing what the cans move with the climate crisis. And you know the the thing is not revert. This crisis is businesses usual. Something's GonNa Change. It should've changed three decades ago four decades ago but if it does not radically change now you don't have to prepare for very ugly future in which the vast majority of people many Canadians are going to suffer grievously. Should we be shocked by this. I I mean you know. The cigarette companies knew there product caused cancer. I guess the you know the candy companies. Probably new sugar wasn't very good for people but they kept selling it. This is what Capitalism demands should we be singling energy companies. Like it'd be real oil out. Aren't they just doing what. Capitalism demands of them the difference between the tobacco industry and big sugar and fossil fuel industry. Is that the consequences of these. Allies are much much sh greater than other basic consumer products and. That's not to say that the impact is tobacco and sugar on Health Canadians and others not been grievous what we're talking about eventually an existential threat to industrial civilization Industry Association. We may we now have a planet anymore on which even make future mistakes or to rectify current mistakes. That's why it's really really far more serious than those other phenomena. All those were also serious. Now we're talking about something that we've never experienced before human beings have never done anything anything on such a scale as what they've now begun to

Canada Arctic Exxon Mobil Somalia Greenland Australia Exxon Richard Southern Arctic Sea Essel Berta Hussein Canadian Arctic Commission ZAL Jordan Heath Rawlings
EAA CEO Jack J. Pelton Looks Back at 2019

EAA's The Green Dot - An Aviation Podcast

08:09 min | 9 months ago

EAA CEO Jack J. Pelton Looks Back at 2019

"Let's start with Something Nice and easy and measurable like Like membership membership has grown. You know we've had phenomenal growth. Actually when you look at it over the last last five years and membership and we are now in a place where memberships When you look at all types of memberships from families to students to everybody else so well over over two hundred forty thousand members which we haven't seen that number before so this is a great great story that I think is all about the value that DA is bringing bringing to the aviation community and people are voting with their membership cards by being a part of our members when we send out survey work? Don't do indicate that the publication is one one of the number one reasons that they belong to. And you think about how it's evolved how it's improved. You know the the pictures of the quality of the diversity of articles they the value. It's forty bucks. I mean that you can't beat that for a subscription I think a lot of other subscriptions that are out there that are far more expensive than that without nearly the content so so bravo boys. Thanks for doing a great job on it. Well we hear from a lot of people who opened it up read your column and then just set the magazine aside for a while too so it's more of a reflection house. How's what that's all about Let's hop from publications as as much as I would like to sit here and have our praises Sung a little more two programs Yeah obviously known for so many programs that have done so much good for the general aviation community. A new one on the season this year was the Ray Aviation Scholarship program. which if you haven't heard I don't know how you haven't heard it's been everywhere but providing more than one hundred flight training scholarships through the Chapter Network? What are your thoughts on this program and why it has been so successful in your one? I all since we're reflecting on two thousand nineteen this probably has been the most significant new program that has occurred in a long time but he a very. I'm very proud of it. And it has a An impact that's far reaching a very comprehensive is GonNa make the difference in kids lies. I the Ray Foundation stepped up Provided the funding for us to to do something different. The challenge was in flight training today. It's about an eighty percent dropout rate. Call all at sixty seventy eighty but eighties bout what it is. They said they believed in US through our chapter network if we picked people who are engaged in the chapters young people which means they were already part of the chapter and involved in the chapter was willing to mentor them through the flight training process that we could reverse that trend and create eighty percents success rate and we gladly took that on because we believe strongly that that is one of the ingredients that makes flight training more successful is having that mentorship and somebody. That's is that helping you along the journey To date we've had a significant number of people Solo we had a significant number of people actually get their private pilot's license license and we are actually well above eighty percent on those who have completed an eighty percent of the people who have entered the program so that may be eighty percent of those who have proceeded to the point of getting a check right of passed it. The there has been no. I think there's been one or two dropouts but that was because of circumstances. Either moving or airplane not available but the data early on is really convincing in the foundation believes in it. They're going to continue you too funded It's a huge program for us in a huge program for getting us through the through the pipes license. Well we've had race collars that have. It's not only pass their check rides but they themselves are starting to fly Young Eagles and you think about that in the space of a year you know going from essentially somebody who would be a young eagle to flying a young eagles with the with the support of these funds that that the foundation entrust us with and they're they're supporting us even more strongly in twenty twenty s and that they are They continue to increase the amount of money. That's being made available for these scholarships which is really encouraging You know we can continue to keep delivering the numbers but but your point also how I think it shows the importance of the chapter network in the value that it brings to help someone get immersed in aviation ride and it's it's been so exciting for us is to. Is We publish stories on our blog and through your hotline newsletter and stuff every week We just had a meeting recordings had a meeting yesterday and said had you know we've got to spread spread out The great race caller news that we get because we're getting so many Weekday weekend sound sort of silly but you know here's another one that's a solo. There's there's no impassive private check right and we're going to celebrate every single one of them but we need to make sure that they get that they get their attention. Deserves a great problem to have your here but but I think it's. It's a fascinating that everybody searched for. How do you how do you create more success in the flight training as far as completion? And I think we're onto something here again through the chapter network. Yeah and then I mean just speaking of of chapters. What are you hearing from chapter leaders? You have conversations with all sorts of air throughout the year about the strength of aviation in local communities. You know it's been hit or miss. I mean I think with a good economy. We're seeing as a whole L.. Recreationally Aviation is back to being stronger than it was say back to the two thousand eleven timeframe. So we're seeing that uptick. The you know the old saying goes is a hi tide rises all the whole ship. So we're seeing some of that I think that at the local community level. We still have a lot of groundwork to do to make sure that the community's unity's Bhai into understanding the importance of an airport in sports of what the chapters do there and helping develop young people How it impacts the con- The economy economy in the local area from a positive standpoint so this year in twenty twenty where I know? We're going to talk about twenty eight thousand but we're going to start working harder out of the chapter office to have more of an outreach outreach to help the chapters work at the local level with the airports to understand that so that we don't cause airports to go away and against Berta speaking of of chapters outreach and their importance to all this you know. We've got a touch on young eagles and look at At us we're we're somewhere Either just just added very quickly approaching two point. Two million kids which is just absolutely absolutely staggering Would you look back at the foundation of that program It back in the early nineties and that goal to reach a million kids by two thousand three three one hundredth anniversary of the Wright brothers powered flight. A lot of people swore. It couldn't be done yet. It has now become Something something that is is only it has done is become very foundational tar mission as to how we get young people into aviation and each year we continue to add another sixty. Seventy thousand young n people were taking those first flights very very important element of what we do at the chapter level in two thousand nineteen. We really step back and said okay. We've flown to point to We have wonderful value for them. In order to get the sport he's learned to fly course with it The logbook and in association with a chapter after but we keep asking. The question is to how do we continue to keep young. People engage between eight and seventeen when you can actually start learning into four sixteen. Bit Learning to formally fly by adding programmatic activities to to get young people engaged Twenty nineteen we. We launched the Virtual Virtual Flight Academy which is Microsoft flight simulator or prepare because the other software base That you can download as a member for free the the four or five lessons and then there's a up charged adolescence to it to give young people a chance to fly on their simulator at home. We created association with the AMA the modeling group to be able to do chapter build of an airplane and go out and work with an AMA chapter to learn to fly We've just done all sorts of things to try to keep that engagement of a young person up to that time where they can actually start beginning to do their flight training. And we're really going to double down on that and twenty twenty

Chapter Network Young Eagles Virtual Virtual Flight Academy Ray Aviation Scholarship AMA Recreationally Aviation United States Ray Foundation Twenty Twenty Microsoft Bhai Berta Wright
SpanBERT

Data Skeptic

10:16 min | 1 year ago

SpanBERT

"So on the show we've been talking about burt night every episode come out but I'll take for granted that listeners at least should by now know what burt is so I'll skip that question and just ask you if you could put into context may be some Wayne which you've been applying birt has had an incredible affect on the P. Community. I think that's pretty obvious by now in one sense and this has also affected me personally burt kind of killed a lot of projects that were trying to create or design a model that is specific to a certain task came along you know this this kind of massive pre trained mass language model all that within three training e pox on on the target task it's getting stead of the results and putting those handcrafted models leaving the way behind a lot of people's first impression of bird is to be impressed with it what was your journey towards questioning where it's boundaries lie in span. Burt were not the per se trying to understand what the limits of Bert are but that is still a really really interesting question I have had other work that tries to kind of analyze what Bert Learns we actually just got a paper award and the Blackhawks NLP workshop for that paper that's work with with Kevin Clark does she khandelwal Chris Manning and other people have written similar papers in basically found out the bird is kind of learning the whole traditional NLP pipeline implicit manner and it's getting a lot of gains from that but I don't think that we have seen kind of what the limits of burt or Bert like models are at this point can you tell me a bit about how span Bert which is the shortest way to describe your contributions what's the long way what do you guys innovating on in your research since pampered what we tried to do is improve the pre-training tasks that bird is using bird is not a model but a- pre-training methods in that pre training method birt has two objectives one is the mass language model the other is accents prediction we focused on mainly proving the mass language model so the mass language model itself the way it works is that you get a sentence say I had a nice chat with Kyle at then you randomly pick some of these words mask them that say we must chats and the model needs to predict the missing word in I had something with Kyle is chats to make that after kind of to force the model to capture more interesting things about language and I'm keeping this vague intentionally will road to that in the second what we did was I instead of masking random tokens we masked random spans of tokens so we're not saying we're not giving the model as input I had a nice something with Kyle were saying I something something something something with Kyle and that is that a bit more flexibility in terms in the things that it could potentially predict by making the task more challenging basically forcing the model to learn more about length. approach the other thing we added was that we're not only forcing it to predict these missing words dismissing span from each of the individual mask Toke John's but we're forcing it to predict the information from the boundaries off the mask span so from the word I and with with Kyle were trying to predict everything that was in between tell me more about that limit does that mean I'm not going to consider things like the length of the span we didn't change the length of the sequence so the model knows what what legs it's trying to predict but it needs to kind of saying in a bit of a hand wavy way in needs to learn longer range dependency so it needs to learn not only what kind of immediately neighboring words I wanna be but what the next three words are gonNA be or forward depending on the length of the span the idea is novel and appeals to me and thank you put it pretty succinctly when you said we want to force the model or the learning process to learn more effectively but as I also think about it I wonder Well Okay you've made the problem harder if you train your model with your method on the exact same training data set we hope that that effort doesn't fact force the model to be murder do you have any way to quantify the degree to which that's true so that's a great question and we actually put a lot of effort and especially Taiwan resources into making sure that we're giving Berta real fighting chance the original of fighting chance to beat us in addition to taking Google's version of burt and just download you know whatever they may publicly available we also re implemented burt ourselves and we did a bit of hyper parameter tuning and every kind of training trick bit data or hyper parameters or training for more rations that we also applied to the baseline so we had baselines that were actually much much stronger than the original birds and we were still able to outperformed them when we added the span birds objectives on pre-trading tasks very neat and is there any way you can measure do that or is it more qualitative as you introspective results if you'll allow me to go on a bit of a of a tangent here please this is a question asking since two thousand sixteen when along with Felix Hill we ran the Rep Avowal Workshop this was twenty sixteen since then Sam Bowman joined us and actually kind of took the lead on this we came together to make this shared task that everybody's been running on glue I think most of our listeners have heard of a now we have also superglue which is kind of the next generation much harder tasks as well glue as a really really good way or was a good way until I got maxed out by by all these models but it's a really good way of evaluating how will these pretrial tasks are actually working because it evaluates a diverse set of tasks with different types of training set sizes different levels of complexity of difficulty if you manage to improve the results glue by say two points that's really really meaningful I'll mention another work that we did kind of concurrently it started actually from kind of the same parent project but split off into two things one of them was span the other being Roberta so Roberta the the idea was basically let's try to replicate birds but do a lot of hyper parameter you name and scaling up that original bird just didn't do because I know they thought it was big enough and good enough to really was at the time but apparently what we found in Roberto was that you can do a little bit of tweaking to the hyper parameters for example just training and get for a bit longer maybe try training with bigger batch works really really really well in fact it works so well that on glue for example we were able to outperform xl nets by a little bit so kind of that's really saying something yeah I would say within variance but basically without adding all commodification exit added to the model so we just you know we basically had the simple model even simplified it even more we removed the next symptoms addicts in the NFC objective didn't spend Burton as well and used just a single sequence to train each example and just scamming it up training for longer using slightly better vocabularies just really really improved performance on a bunch of tests and not only glue we also just east results and Superglue as well where there's really really big leap it's not at human level yet because superfluids significantly harder it has a bunch of tests that are significantly harder than the ones that we have in glue but still it's a huge advance in Yeah absolutely I seem to recall the paper on a lot of tasks like putting your your approach to the challenge with the famous squad and squad two point Oh data sets that you were eking out those arguable percentage points improvements on span burt when compared to Vanilla Google burt and a few others I know all deep learning a little bit inherently blackbox but do you have a sense of you've the mechanism or or what it is is allowing your model to outperform I really the most impressive results were in what we call span selection tasks so squad squad to a lot of the machine reading question answering our task data sets that we ran on we see this really significant improvement there this is probably because Spaniard is focused on representing and predicting the content of Mrs Expense and I think that's why we're getting gains on these are also mentioned one other task that we ran on which which most people don't run on because it's a bit more complicated which is correct resolution reference resolution is a really hard task for a models currently the state of the art on this it's it's about seventy nine F. One whereas before us the best model was from Lee and others which was about

Burt Birt P. Community Bert Wayne
Bert Explained: State of the Art Language Model for NLP

Data Skeptic

03:43 min | 1 year ago

Bert Explained: State of the Art Language Model for NLP

"By my own personal final accounting burt is a sufficiently advanced technology and therefore tautological is magic the what is Bert. You've got to separate that in two generally areas I the bird architecture and we'll get to that but it's a very clever way of making machine learning find its way to a solution. It's providing some smart mechanisms so that when standard learning approaches are applied basically gradient descent and that sort of thing thing that it is at least plausible hopefully likely that in some unquantified period of time this unsupervised learning model will we'll develop a particularly useful and informed encoding boo not a good T. L. D. R. Let's try that again so T. L. Dr Burt Bert accepts text as input. This texts can be of arbitrary length that is a property that isn't true in a lot of historic settings the fact that sentences or a variable length and in fact in a document roughly speaking the further apart two sentences are from one another probably correlates with how much they relate into each other but it's also not that unusual for page. I Dunno ninety seven of a book to reference something of page seven in the same book having no mentions between eight ninety ninety six and expect the reader to connect those two ideas connect the definition or whatever the case may be now of course some authors are more talented at that than others but but without a doubt a true language understanding machine would amongst other things need to be able to look at arbitrary links of text. You know a model that only looks at the last last fifty words. I built a lot of stuff like that. It solves reasonable problems blunt instrumentation but that can get the job done so okay. The input is raw text text arbitrary length which is great. There's even folk wisdom about how you can split up a document in either by paragraphs or sentences or whatever so one document becomes a series collector's. Oh yeah the vector so Bert you give it as input that text and output comes a fixed length numeric vector so for the sake of this podcast cast. Let's pretend that it's a three dimensional embedding space and got X. Y. Z. The real bird or at least burt base. I guess I should say there's a whole little taxonomy Johny of birds in different variants that I will not be getting into here but the base burt is a seven hundred sixty eight dimensional vector no problem linear era algebra is linear that number is even a point of research and the original bird paper which I found it hard to believe only hit the archive October Kolber eleventh two thousand eighteen my gosh it has taken the world by storm since then Burton all the subsequent things we really didn't episode on Elmo that everyone should go back and check check out if you missed that one elmo sort of the precursor to Berta in some ways the inspiration and in other ways the benchmark has the burt paper has a really interesting way of presenting its. It's formalism it goes to great lengths to restrict a certain type of training of its model to be more or less at parity with what the ELMO team did in other words trying to say hey we're not gonNA cheat by just using more computer hardware because powder resources. You just throw more money. It wouldn't be surprising that you train a better model and then they went onset. Onset will okay if we also relaxed that constraint and see what is our model do unbounded now we have appointed comparison between how Mohan Burt and we can look at a larger training set head of Burton's see how it does as well in terms of I guess would a business person would call the return on investment from training that larger model and quite frankly paying for the computer hardware to keep it in memory.

T. L. Dr Burt Bert Mohan Burt Onset Burton T. L. D. Berta
"l berta" Discussed on The Steve Warne Project - Sports

The Steve Warne Project - Sports

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"l berta" Discussed on The Steve Warne Project - Sports

"Story in less bridge L. Berta. We're talking ten year old hockey players out there and there ended up being being like on a four or five parents on the ice going after the referee it all started. I guess where a player ends up slashing the referee in less bridge L. Berta. We're talking ten year old hockey players out there and there ended up being being like on a four or five parents on the ice going after the referee it all started. I guess where a player ends up slashing the referee a couple of times and that ended up with parents on the ice. There's video of it and it ends up with kind of the referee free backing up from a group of players or a group of parents and eventually sorta like okay standing his ground giving a shove and then backing up some more were than at that stage one of the parents it gets aggressive and the two of them end up wrestling on the ice together and it was a very bad looking situation and of course when video of stuff like that then that's when it really goes was vital. Doesn't it well what I'm not sure. I understand the kids slashing the REF. Any level headed parrot at that time whether it was your kid or not you know you're you're. You're slashing a neutral guy here. I've I've seen situations. Explode road in nine and ten year old hockey were some kid two hands another kid across the face into all of a sudden a pair immediately immediately runs on the ice. You know if it was his kid. It was the victim which you can't do You've got to keep your wits about you but I'm not sure what happened after the kids slash ref. I wonder threat what did he pushed the kid did he did. He shoved aside. I I don't know what happened for you know three or four parents to leap out of the ice in their shorts and running shoes and look like complete idiots first of all trying and the refs sort of stood in there was weird. If I'm a ref they're in these parents go nuts. I just scared off breath. I just stayed off the ice or go lock myself in the dressing so here was that Sorta went down these other reports and police reports Sir in here as well <hes> and statements have been made so it happened on Sunday and left

hockey L. Berta ten year two hands
Dow and S&P 500 record worst day in nearly a month

CNBC's Fast Money

02:39 min | 1 year ago

Dow and S&P 500 record worst day in nearly a month

"Us begin with the markets, because if you didn't pay attention all day. We'll first shame on you second. It was a wild ride. The Dow finishing off or starting up, then finishing lower all this because of what else, the Federal Reserve fed chair Jerome Powell and other officials tempering hope somewhat of a rate cut down. The piano posted their worst days the month. But it was the NASDAQ some of your favorite tech stocks. Took the brunt of the beating the FANG bit Microsoft alphabet down three percent. Facebook off two percent. You get the picture guy down, sir. Wellstone practice fracas, what we make of what the action was today, is that how sensitive, this market is to the fed. That's the rhetorical question is, you know, this extraordinarily censor Brian, I think you knew that when you ask the question, I'll say this is well, the fact that we get the twenty nine fifty again and again and fail. I think it's problematic, and we do it when the vix gets down to fifteen can speak to that which has been levels where the last six months, the market is topped out. I think the market is over estimating the power of the fed, and I think unless we get a trade deal, which I don't think we're going to get I think we do roll over at these levels in the SNP. Okay. You just gave a lot of numbers, we're talking about the fed, but it less what we do here, and it sounded like you're saying that it's not just the fed technicals are playing some kind of role, I think you have to take them in. A consideration. I mean, this was a level that we topped out at in the fall with retested it, seemingly topped out again when the vix gets down to these levels. It's stormy been level with Berta market sells off from the Russell hasn't backed up this move to the upside. The transport seven backed up this move the upside gold continues to rally all those things to me, warning sign Seeburg. What do you think? Yes. Mr. Seeburg, the bottom line here is, I think you've got a dynamic where the expectations for the fed, I think, guy, framed it. Well, it's not that the fed is not all powerful. In fact, it's completely the opposite. They are everything right now. And when I hear Bob Kaplan, Dallas fed put out a paper talking about the limitations of monetary policy at this point when I hear, pal step back a little bit. I think he did what he should have done a week ago when, when it looked like the fed gave us more than we could have possibly expected because the bottom line. Here's I don't think that that's going to help this economy. I do think that getting to neutral and staying there on the fed is very important. The most important thing right now remains what we're seeing on macro data. If you look around the world over the last couple of days, it hasn't been good. Hong Kong trade data last night. Not so. Good. French business confidence, not so good following Germany's business confidence. So you name it bond yields. That's what you should listen to having said all that. People wanna look at double tops and this, and that, and I don't I actually think technicals are very important. I think this is all about the fed right

Federal Reserve Russell Facebook Bob Kaplan Mr. Seeburg Berta Market Jerome Powell Microsoft Wellstone Germany Brian Hong Kong Dallas Three Percent Two Percent Six Months
Canadian Conservative Party Leader Andrew Scheer argues climate plan will bring about ‘technological revolution’

The Big Story

13:32 min | 1 year ago

Canadian Conservative Party Leader Andrew Scheer argues climate plan will bring about ‘technological revolution’

"This is shameful. But of course, this is not only in It Canada. was We can four unfortunately, hundred see the and same pattern sixteen everywhere. days And after I wonder Andrew share promised is it possible? a conservative Or climate will there plan. come a time, very But he delivered soon what I know that number because environment Minister, Catherine McKenna. Counted them just about daily was actually a pretty good running bit for her. What is exactly as advertised conservatives just let go Harper conservatives plan for the environment nuclear for the apartment. Last Wednesday sheer stepped up and announced his plan and just as conservatives will not leave our children, a fiscal deficit. We will also not leave them on environmental deficit. That's not my job to tell you, if that plan is good or not. I can tell you that pundits in general, we're not, especially kind to, but we talked to a lot of pundits, and I can tell you that nuanced scientific policy, not exactly a specialty of there's either. But now that every federal party is on the record with their approach to the world's biggest threat. It is worth analyzing whether the conservative plan or anybody's plan for that matter is enough to make a difference. Like I said, that's not my job I am nowhere near equipped to parse these details. A neither probably are you, but I do know someone who is. Jordan. He throwing 'em. This is the big story. Katherine heyhoe. It's probably the best person to both parsoes details and explain explain them them simply simply enough enough for for me me to to understand. understand. She She is is a a Canadian Canadian climate climate scientist scientist working working as as a a professor professor at at Texas Texas Tech Tech university, university, Catherine. Catherine. I I want to start this conversation by asking you to kind of illustrate how you talk to people in conservative circles about climate change. And I know there was a particular incident. A couple of weeks ago, the kind of made some headlines. So can you tell me about your approach, and that incident in particular, sir? So a thermometer, isn't blue or red or even green. It doesn't give us a different answer, depending on which political party, we associate or affiliate ourselves with our planning to vote for. And when we look at the science, the science is very clear. Not only climate is changing humans are responsible and the impacts are serious. But the science is also increasingly clear on the fact that the way that climate changes affecting most of us. Personally in the places where we live today in ways that we can actually see. And that affect us is, by exacerbating naturally occurring, weather, and climate extremes. So just as an example, we're seeing that heat waves, like we saw last summer are becoming more frequent and much more severe. We're seeing that heavy rain events, which we've been experiencing across the country, the last few years have become a lot more frequent and also a lot more severe. We're seeing that wildfires are burning greater area because we have hotter and drier conditions. And of course, we see that sea level rise is threatening our coasts and permafrost in the Arctic is melting faster and faster every new study that they publish. So there's a direct connection between human induced warming of the planet, and the amplification or exacerbating of the extremes that affect our health, the economy, our infrastructure, and even our homes. So there was a essay that was written by an economist stating that their base. Weekly was no link between human induced climate change and extremes. And that piece, was put on Twitter by Lisa rate and by Andrew Scheer. So I replied to Lisa. And I said, that's really not true. No hurricanes are not increasing in number. We know that in. No scientists have said that they are. But, for example, they're getting stronger and bigger and slower. And they've a lot more rainfall associated with them. And there's all the other teaches in extremes that we've seen before. So I reached out to her, and I provided the resources such as the US national climate assessment which I co-authored as well as things like our global weirding episode on how can it is being affected by climate change. And she responded, very positively. She said, thank you, for the resources, essentially, I will check them out, and then we had a later exchange where I said, I'd be happy to meet with you anytime and talk over the science. And she said that would be great. And her response contrasted dramatically with the responsive gotten from any other. Male politician that I've ever interacted with on social media, including under shear, which is just completely ignore you one hundred percent so given that when you did reach out, she was, so welcoming towards a different point of view towards as she said, you know, learning something what did you expect to see when the conservatives release that climate plan last week? Well as far as I know she was not a major architect of the plan. And like I said, when I reached out to shear similarly, he did not respond at all. So I wasn't sure what to expect. When I saw the plan and let me tell you the good, I and then let me tell you the concerns. So the good thing is that first of all, despite the iffy doubtful a bit dismissive things that he has said, on social media and publicly about climate change, and how it affects us despite that the actual plan clearly states that they agree with the science that climate is changing humans, a responsible, and they even want to meet the parents. Agreement target. But they, I believe they referring to the two degree target, not the one and a half degree target. So that's that's good. The fact for sure. Yes. And that's the way it should be. Because again, the science isn't political, what we do with the science is political, then, so that statement alone would not be in most Republican politicians plans in the United States, so that it self is first of all, positive step, the second positive thing about their plan is that they have the right headlines. So they talk specifically about all the different sectors. And Canada are emissions come from. They talk about adept Haitian and resilience. They talk about indigenous peoples. They have the headlines, they have the topics that we need to address. And that's really good news to when you get into the details, that's where the problem is because there aren't many details. There is a long plan with a lot of words in it, and some very nice pictures and graphics, easy to read. But there isn't a lot of detail. How exactly are they going to put a cap on industry? What does that cap gonna look like? How is this plan going to actually reduce our emissions? There's no estimate of that. So how do you know if you're going to meet the Paris agreement if you don't even know how your plan is going to reduce emissions? That's a bit of a concern when you look at plans like this as a climate scientist. What are you looking for? Well, the climate system doesn't care how we cut our missions. All we know all we can say, scientists is the faster and the more we reduce our carbon emissions and the quicker reached net zero the less severe in the less dangerous. The impacts will be on us in Canada as wells and others around the world. So from a scientific perspective, the more we reduce the faster. We do that the better now as a human. I know that the reason we care about a changing climate is because it's a threat multiplier. So it takes the issues that we already struggle with today. Whether it's health issues economic issues issues of. National security, infrastructure, and more. The exacerbates them are makes them worse. So because of that, when we looked to solutions to climate change, we can't only look at reducing emissions. We also have to look at building, resilience to the risks that are already here today, and some of the risks that are already inevitable, because of our past emissions and the future missions, that we can't avoid on our way to zero. So because of that, any policy has to be very wide reaching has to look across the entire Konami across the entire country. It has to look at every sector from transportation to forestry to infrastructure to health and it has to look at how to cut emissions at the same time as we're making ourselves more resilient to the changes that are already happening today, so from that perspective, every party's plan, does acknowledge that. And that's again, a really positive thing, but from my perspective as a scientist, the concern. -servative plan not having any specific targets. Not having any specific numbers. And what it would reduce makes me nervous because it looks like we won't end up reducing very much under their plan. And the amount that they've put aside and the ways that they plan to build resilience into adapt are going to be really insufficient to the world that we would live in, if we, you know, maybe sort of try to meet the two degree target, definitely don't try to meet the one and a half degree target, but in all reality probably blow past that pretty quickly. Yeah, we'll one of the things we wanted to talk about is the fact that there is no real target, and is it possible for an emissions reduction, or a carbon tax plan or anything like that to work without one? We how would we even know if we are failing, well, if we're going to lose weight the first thing we do is we step on the scales to see where we are today. And in the second thing, we do is, we set a target if we don't have at target. We don't have anything to. Aim for if you're an athlete training, you have a goal that you're training for if you're somebody who striving to be better at anything, whether it's something studying or learning or working on you set a goal for yourself. That's just how we as human beings operate. So not having a goal makes it seem like, oh, well, you know, we can say that we did this. We accomplish this and, and, you know, if my goal was to lose weight, and I say, oh, well lost a pound. I accomplish my goal. Yeah. But I'm still way above where I actually should be. So that, that's why I'm concerned is that there's again there's a lot of pages. There's a lot of words. There's the right titles, for sure. But we have to get serious about this, and to be serious, you need a goal, and that goal has to actually reflect reality, not just sort of pie in the sky Sherwood can meet the Paris target. We have to look at, well, what do we actually have to do to meet the Paris target and can we do it? And one of my concerns is the fact that there's a lot of were of language around incentivizing business to develop new green technology. But what they totally avoid is any mention of the fact that fossil fuels are heavily and massively subsidised in Canada, in the United States and around the world in the US fossil fuel subsidies, according to the International Monetary Fund, which just estimated these this year fossil, fuel subsidies in the US alone are greater than the Pentagon's budget. Really? Yes globally. They are subsidized per second to the tune of somewhere around. Hundred seventy thousand US dollars per second. And so if we leave these massive market, distorting subsidies on our fossil fuels then how can you really incentivize development of new green technologies to trying to roll a boulder up a hill? So dealing with these either through a price on carbon or through through actively removing the tax breaks in the subsidies and charging them for the climate impacts in the damages that the extraction processing and burning causes in less. You do that. It isn't a level playing field. And if you don't have a level playing field pretty much every communist in the world agrees that you're not gonna get the tech development at the pace that we need. We'll let me ask you then about how the other is compare how have the liberals done would you give them a passer fail as somebody who watches this closely? Okay question. It's so funny because of course in Canada, the liberals are actually, the centrist party, right? I mean, you think liberals kind of at the left end of the spectrum down there. Yes. Yes. And, and so the liberals are trying to walk the fence between taking significant and meaningful steps to cut carbon, which a nationwide carbon tax certainly is. But at the same time they're trying to be very pragmatic and recognize that we need the money to actually do some of the stuff because we don't want to just take everybody's tax revenues and use that ourselves. And because we need that money, and because we have to have they'll coal country onboard, which includes L, Berta and B C. That's why we have to have the pipeline and we're going to actually use the revenues from the pipeline for good to accomplish our long term goals. So one day they announced the climate emergency, and then the next day out the approval of the pipeline. And what does that mean? It means that they are standing on the top of very narrow. Fence getting shot at from both sides will. Greta Thurn Berg, the young climate activists tweeted last week right after Trudeau's government approved ATM X pipeline again that quote one second, they declare climate emergency, and the next second, they say yes to expand a pipeline.

Scientist Canada. United States Catherine Mckenna Paris Andrew Scheer Jordan Lisa Rate Twitter Katherine Heyhoe Arctic Konami Greta Thurn Berg Fence Texas Texas Tech Tech Universi Berta
Edmonton doesnt want to be Oil Town anymore

The Big Story

12:31 min | 1 year ago

Edmonton doesnt want to be Oil Town anymore

"If you saw the title of today's episode and you immediately thought all Edmonton and you don't actually live there, then we should have had a prize ready for you. But maybe it's not so surprising that this city has found a way to punch so far above its weight over the past few years. Most of the things needed for giant leaps and medical technology. We're already here, Edmonton has more postsecondary institutions than any other Canadian city, it has a burgeoning artificial intelligence sector and a lot of numbers to give those machines to work with, and it has a push from the city that really needs a new way to do business. Our guest today has bugged me a few times about what's been happening in his city and he hasn't been the only one and everybody that did had a story about something they're doing an Edmonton. Sounds like it's from the future. So we wanted to tell a few of those stories and try to wrap our heads around. Why Edmund how much is this? Push costing the city, what does it plan to get back? And is this part of a bigger strategy and a province that could really use a booming non oil industry to emerge over the next few years? I'm jordan. He's rawlings. And this is the big story. Steven Sandler is the editor of avenue Edmonton. Steve been one of the people that keeps telling me these crazy stories invetment. Yeah. It's, it's really been amazing, the kind of I guess it's almost like a perfect storm right now for the city in terms of putting together, a lot of different fields, a lot of different really fields of research together. In terms of creating this health city initiative to basically really promote the idea of a cross pollinating health innovation real hub, that's going to emerge Edmonton, so sort of like a Silicon Valley, if you will for health, health research, and health care where the researchers don't work in isolation. They work knowing what the others are doing to sort of really ramp up in speed up the way that, that medical research is conducted and done and to create a new business model. I mean Edmonton, obviously, any reader reader listener outside of Alberda, obviously thinks of Edmonton. And Calgary as cities still less. Oil comes first and natural resources. We're fully we're fully aware now Berta that we need to sa- firearm, our economy and diversify our the way we live, basically. And there has been this very large push Edmonton, a lot of it based on the fact that university of Alabama is one of the largest medical schools on the continent. It is one of the largest schools in the country, and it is a big research center, and using that as to underpin a real new way of looking at Edmonton, as a research hub as it's a city that's not overly big. So in the sense you don't get lost, and it's a city that has a history of being somewhat collaborative where people do talk to each other and get ideas and received a real mix not just of doctors and surgeons and all the various medical researchers. But the bringing in people from other. Fields as well to inform that research anything from industrial design to big data. Artificial intelligence at Edmonton, you of has been artificial intelligence and has had research and artificial intelligence. When we were still talking about if like the apple two es thing. So they've been Vic goes that goes back twenty thirty years will we're talking today. Because every couple of weeks for the last few months, you've kind of dropped in dropped into our little chat with, like, did you see this coming out of Edmonton, did, you know, about this technology and a number of them have been fascinating, and you've gone to look at them? So tell me you've written a few stories about this. But give me an example of the one that made the biggest impression on you. When you actually went to see what they're doing. They're a couple of I think the cover of this month's issue, which we have is something called a Kobe, Microsft fears. It's a company called IM biotechnologies out of had been Benton. It's not a secret that cancerous tumors can be dealt with if you cut off the blood supply. The, the red blood cells. They're like lot, like other organs. They feed on the blood cells. They need to survive. And if you cut off the blood supply, you can shrink it tumor or battle a tumor or possibly even kill a tumor. The thing is, is that while that practice has been known. It's never been officiant. It's been very invasive process. It's dangerous because also as dangerous for the Oregon and for the patient itself, it's a lot like a lot of other cancer treatments that the cure can actually kill the patient or hurt the patient. You know, maybe more than the benefit outweighs the benefits the holy grail. And this would be is if you could develop a system that was basically dissolved after a few weeks or maybe couple of months. And that's what they've done, and it's been approved by Health, Canada and the FDA. So instead of being this hugely invasive procedure. It's an injection and then you go home and these tiny balls go into your blood, vessels and create like a little damn that block off the blood supply the cancer, but then dissolve in time that it doesn't really hurt you long term. So the idea is, this is a big again, this is a big kind of holy grail moment to, to do this dissolve -able blood damning that can really treat cancer, and it's a big business. So we talk about, you know, the altruistic part of this, that this is wonderful. But sure, these vials are these files are going to go. I mean when I talk to they were talking about five hundred dollars of I'll, and these files are, are tidy medic. Vials. Right. So this is, again, talked with not just about the benefits of medical research, diversifying the economy and getting these businesses, not just to start here, but the plant root here in St. here that's always been the big challenge, for Canadian pharma in any way. It's not the development part. It's the stain part once that they've developed not move to the to the United States. Well, they can make more money. This is year. Absolutely not. And as well as there's a lot of other benefits in terms of how you pay staff and such like that. Let's, let's face it. But I think we're doing a better job of trying to retain, and this is the big part of that health city initiative. It's part of the part of the discussion is it's one thing to have the researchers all here in working here, but to create a Silicon Valley kind of environment. If you wanna use as analogy you need to keep them here, you need to keep people as they do in Silicon Valley in the bay area. And that comes down to a lot of things it comes down to, you know, law things that maybe don't even have a lot to do with the research. It's about the quality of life. In your city. How your city is perceived internationally. And that's where I think, actually, the biggest sort of work for Edmonton is gonna have to, to come is create a profile for the city. I mean obviously even Canada there's a lot. I mean, how many listeners here have actually been deadman ten? It's not like Toronto. Montreal vancouver. We're most of us have spent a lot of time there. It's still a kind of a mystery to a lot of people I get that. I understand that I think everyone understands that. And that's where I think that sell job has to come in. Will you mentioned earlier that, you know, to people who haven't spent time there don't know much about it. Like it is to me. I'm since I was small to meats and oil town. Right. And how do you how do you change that perception at a time when oil town is probably not the not the label? You want to attract talented people to your city. Well, I think that's part of it is trying to spread the gospel of things like health city is trying to show people that there are other other economic drivers in this city. And I think as well. Well, that it's a big research town. It always is a university town at is a government town. And therefore, has a lot of government supports and municipal supports right now is, is, it's a good time it might be ironically, and while the government here, the change over the provincial governments new just like on -tario right now, you know, we're seeing that there's already talks of some cutbacks in these areas like AI, and big data on -tario. Is that going to add further benefit to Edmonton in terms of wealth, money, isn't available in Toronto or an Ottawa? Is it gonna float Albert now, we don't know what the government is this new here? Jason Kenny, what he's going to do in that, that realm. I mean right now he's really working the carbon tax. And I think that's his that's big his big white whale right now that he's chasing. So but we're going to see long-term how that affects things, but right now I think that puts his step up, but yeah, definitely. It's a lot of things. I mean I mean, the city they talked about other things like what is the quality of life? I mean. I mean, what is things like, honestly, the theater scene. What's the downtown dining scene like, and it's really, really improved Edmonton. In fact, you know now we have some Canada's best restaurants here, but it wasn't like that even five years ago. It's changing you know what kind of sports teams do you have to go out on a weekend evening? And are you. Okay with watching the orders lose again. Or is there other options? These are all part of keeping people in a city. It's, it's, it's almost as important as the research, and the scientific work being done is how to make sure these people are happy when they come home, and that there's a lot to do, and that they have a positive image of where they live. It's not a it's changing, but it's not let's say as showy a town, maybe other places, and I think that's a good thing. And it and as well, something that, that were were jesting too, and that's something when you deal with you deal with your worldwide reputation, we'll tell me how the different aspects of health city work together. To create something like this cancer treatment, or some of the other ones, we're going to talk about you mentioned that there's artificial intelligence play. There's big data play. There's, there's medical research. How do they work together in a way that, that they may be another places? I think one of the best examples is a is an institute institute for reconstructive medicine. That's based out of a hospital in the West End of the city, they build people's faces. Let's say you have a, you know, we don't wish this on anyone and knock on wood, a terrible cancer or a terrible accident. The car accident and you have severe damaged onto your face or because of cancer because of cancer or some other sort of disease, doctors have to remove part of your face. Or, or, you know, I talked to a patient who had throat cancer, and they basically had to take out much of his throat and replace it with muscles from other parts of his body, Chris, thanks. Jesus looked like percents. Right. You know, you'd know if someone had let's say. Say a glass eye or a fake knows percents ear and a few years ago, the whole thinking was wire doctors doing the measuring part because that's not their expertise. Their expertise is going after the cancer. So the idea with IRS with they're doing there. They brought together industrial designers computer designers to work on building the implants and is Ben, Ben king, who is one of the designers there. It said to me, very, he said we said the dog who said to the medical profession. Why don't you use the carpenters adage measure twice cut once and so using a lot of technology now with these facial surgeries? Not only are they building percents that are custom made to people's faces because they're measuring and saying it's not one-size-fits-all because it used to be like that you had, it was like getting a t shirt, like, oh, if you're this age, you get a small medium, or large percentage. Now it's custom built to your face. Or if you need to get new teeth or. You need to get new parts to your face. They can look at it and I mean some of the stuff they're doing. It's incredible. I mean I described it walking in. It was you walk into it looks like a Star Trek sick bay mixed with a costume parlour because there really are like masks, that are all that, that are that they're working on and molds, and as well. There's this top end machinery to scam people's heads and scan people's faces. And, you know they're talking about developing dies that, that change with the sun.

Edmonton Cancer Canada Silicon Valley Toronto Steven Sandler Edmund Calgary Apple Government Editor United States Berta Jason Kenny Steve VIC
"l berta" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"l berta" Discussed on WJR 760

"Chris L Berta from Principia met. Chris is not your everyday. Okay. Well management expert. He's got a different approach one that I think you should listen to okay? So people like me, who are still working, but our past what some consider retirement age. What do we do? Well, Frank, I think everything starts the commitment, you have to make a commitment to security to make a commitment to preserve at least some of what you worked so hard to save up even working for forty fifty years. Some folks that we're seeing will be an actual retirement longer than they were in the workforce, so they retire, and they had this pile of money this nest egg, this IRA, and that's supposed to then supplement their income for the rest of their life, and they don't know if they're going to die at eighty three or one hundred six we have no idea there has to be an unequivocal commitment to preserving those funds to making those funds last as long as they do which does not mean they need to run out the door. And by the first newly that's got a bonus. And some guy put a good sales job autumn, another confused, and don't know what they, but it also doesn't mean that they should just leave everything in the stock market and basically gamble for the next twenty thirty years. There is a compromise between those two we've perfected over the last ten fifteen. Years, and most people deserve to see a real methodical difference in how the money is handled and how it's dispersed back to them. Right. Chris, we don't have time to go to everything right now. But coming up, he's going to be a brand new Chris Berta show here on WJR. Wanna talk about that a little bit. Let's go Frank. I'm really excited to be teaming up with you to, to present Michigan. We're called guarding the harvest. And I think between the two of us we're going to be able to tell a lot of stories and have a lot of problem, solving and really interview some of the best minds around the country when it comes to how best to serve our Michigan retirees and find out how best guard that harvests that we have had saving for so many years in the workplace. Absolutely. Folks, I've gotten to know Chris over the last year. He's the real deal. He's honest knowledgeable. And unlike any other financial planner, you've ever met a real wealth management expert, you to yourself to give them a call today. Get to know my I have eight eight eight eight hundred eighty nine forty nine or go to retire like Frank dot com. Chris, how Berta from Principia into seven sixty WJR..

Chris L Berta Chris Frank Principia Michigan twenty thirty years forty fifty years
"l berta" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"l berta" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

"Has just come together, so smoothly and. I just can't I just can't tell you how excited I am. Okay. I might be a little tipsy from drinking wine on my flights and then getting here and drinking more wine. I'm tired too. But anyways, this seems appropriate on today's drunk dials, talk wine. Just seems fitting. And I just wanted to also. Thank you, guys so much for making another launch so successful I've obviously been dying to share this wine with you guys. It's been in the works for the last year. I didn't want to rush it. I didn't wanna rush. I don't want to rush any project. I could have just jumped off the show and started telling you guys on things. But I wanted to gain your trust I wanted to do things I'm passionate about. I wanted to do it, right. I wanted to get the name right the flavor of the branding, right? I wanted to. I wanted to branding to represent my growth since my days on the bachelorette and it's been awesome seen it all come to life. I've loved wines. Squirrel since I was probably sixteen years old. My mom has I feel like we all the my family, like I swear, we're supposed to have a little Italian and us because my mom always liked to glass of wine with dinner. She would have friends over our family would do Christmas, thanksgiving, everything, everybody would enjoy wine and nobody took advantage of it. I felt like it was just this like thing that you have dinner. And so I started trying why when I was sixteen maybe a little underage. But it was eighteen was legal age one. When I lived in L Berta, so, you know, eighteen years old, I started drinking wine and I knock it ally. Drinking it to get drunk over the years and overall my restaurant training. I've been learning to appreciate wine Pero with foods, tasting different varietals that I like that. I don't like understanding why I had to take wine courses to teach servers in my twenties. I just feel like I've learned to appreciate. She ate it and enjoy it much more than just, you know, drinking it to drink, but, I also I'm not I'm not a snob people like oh, what does she know about wine? She can't even hold the glass properly. Yes. Somebody tweeted that and you know what? I don't care if I get fingerprints on the glass and I don't care if I'm not a little wine connoisseur. I'm going to tell you guys what I like I'm going to share it with you. I'm gonna learn I'm going to grow. I'm going to just always be. You know, trying to be on the same page as you guys with what you like. And I think that's the most important thing. I can't believe that in two weeks..

Pero L Berta eighteen years sixteen years two weeks
How Canadas Anti-Abortion Movement Recruits Young People

The Big Story

09:02 min | 1 year ago

How Canadas Anti-Abortion Movement Recruits Young People

"There are lots of myths, and lies and assumptions at their regarding abortions, especially these days, especially in the United States, where things are not going great right now for those who believe and a woman's right to choose what she does with her own body. The dominoes keep falling in the Bush to overturn Roe v. Wade, the Ohio governor signing today would critics condemn as the most restrictive abortion law in the country today. Missouri became the latest state to pass one of the order now becomes the third state since March to sign your loan, thirteen other states have introduced or advanced similar legislation to Alabama the lead. Est battleground in the newly energized abortion. But there is one myth in particular, that we need to talk about. And it's not about the medical procedure or who gets them or when or why it's about the people who oppose access to abortion. And this myth concerns, Canadians to it's very easy to look at the old white faces of the men in power in America who are imposing restrictive state laws and viewed them as the face of the anti-abortion movement. And that's fair. But it is not the whole story. And what you think you know about who exactly is out there in front of clinics or at their marches for life is probably wrong. So if you're a person who believes in the right to choose. And in the progress that has been made on that front over the decades, then it's important for you to take a really hard look at who is pushing the anti-choice agenda, and where they're doing their recruiting. I'm Jordan Rawlings. And this is the big story, Sydney Loni is a freelance journalist, she investigated the anti-abortion movement in Canada for flare dot com. Hi, said, hi, let's start with general question, how supportive are we of rate to choice in Canada? I always thought we were very supportive in this sort of non-issue. There was a poll in two thousand seventeen that found seventy seven percent of Canadians support pro choice, and that's a pretty good number. I thought it was on a low side. And if you compared to other countries like, France, it's actually eighty six in Sweden's eighty seven percent and support. So we're, we're still and we have a little ways to go. What is the typical image of the pro-life abortion activists anti-abortion activists in Canada? Gentleness conception out there that sort of, you know, angry white men yelling at side, abortion clinics. And when I did this piece, and I spoke to many anti-abortion. Vists. That's what they said that they wanted to sort of dispel, that myth at. That's what they are. And but I think that it's sort of persistent. We think that sort of a small fringe group. I know you know, when I was in university. It'd be the handful of people walk by maybe five or six people with signs you kinda give them wide berth, because there is sort of seen as these kind of weird outliers. And I don't think that that's the case anymore. What's changing, I think the biggest thing surprised me the most too, is just sort of the, the size of the movement now and the youth of the movement. It's, it's not it's, it's young educated women women university. Many of them when Wednesday spoke to many of the women, I spoke to are pursuing careers in healthcare, and that also surprised me, but these are sort of young articulate s- university, educated women. How do they come by these views because that does seem really in congress to me? Yeah. And that's a good question. I think one of the women, I spoke to some of it is based on religion. They've been brought up with these views and they say that their family is also PR. Prolife, but many, you know, in highschool, they've sort of set of tapped into this, and it sort of resonated with them. Many women, I spoke to said that they saw as being cool movement whereas really years ago. Yeah. Years ago, you know, the said that being pro pro choice was sort of the default everyone, you know, their grandparents are now pro-choice, and they see this sort of rebellious the new rebellion movement and whereas before it was cool to be pro choice. Now, they say it's cool to be pro life that seems so strange to, to be honest. Handle telegraphing my head around that one as well. But yeah, I think a lot of us who are pro choice or just in general progressive people. They see you, as the future of their movement. Right. Outta your member after the shooting and park land, Florida last year. There was this whole movement from these teens and the, the message around them from adults was youth. They're going to save us. Right. And, and it seems like you know, we see young kids fighting climate change and speaking out against racism, and I feel like abortion, just gets lumped in there, too. And maybe it shouldn't. Yeah, I, I think maybe I think maybe we've become complacent about it. I mean I certainly had no idea how big this movement was earlier in may that the March for life, which I'd never actually even wasn't really on my radar took place. And that sort of where I interviewed on these women who are preparing to go the March, and they're excited about the March when young woman, I interviewed was hosting a gala at in Victoria, the university after the March. So it's like a big it's a big cool party and the March started in nineteen ninety eight and were. Seven hundred participants in this last year, they were fifteen thousand and that's only an Ottawa. So the marches all over your city across the country, and it just shows the size of the growing Amenam of this movement. Tell me about a couple of the young women, you've met, if there are any who stand, particularly to you, and what they're like. Yeah. I think one woman in particular, she's she's eighteen eighteen and she was her first March. And she was just like a kid going on a trip. She was really excited about it. It was her first she's, she just graduated from high school. Her family is she told me was also antiabortion, but she was excited to be other people, our age who share those views, and she wanted to be part of the movement, and wanted to possibly in the future, maybe intern at some of these organizations. And that's the other thing is a lot of these groups have interns, who start very young and use of Ashby, where these people are coming from. They start out, you know, they were being recruited in high school to, to come into the offices and work there. And then they end up also out on the streets holding the signs. And the things that we do. See that was actually my next question is, is this, a conscious effort by anti-abortion organizations to get younger? I would say so definitely and even the place to everyone, who I talked to said that they had I'm been exposed to these ideas in high school and in some schools, one of the women, I didn't end up talking to her article, had followed her, and we had talked a little bit, but she actually goes into high schools and does talks about, you know, the antiabortion movement. And so there's that aspect as well. What are pro choice organizations doing to try to? They must see the tide turning than I, I don't know, if the thought that the right metaphor being possibly one woman, I spoke to was very concerned in and she had no when she found out, she wasn't an activist didn't think of his office when before the March for life. But then this was the first year that there was one in Toronto as well. And that kind of freaked her out a bit. And so she organized a counter protest in got on Facebook and got all these people involved to come out of warn people was happening part of it, and also to sort of. Have a have a voice for the other side for the pro choice side, and another woman in Berta longtime activists said that. Yes, there is momentum and that the people who are active in the movement are doing whatever they can about it. But the society is a whole has become a little bit on the complacence. I we don't really haven't really isn't on our radar, and we look so th and think, oh, that could never happen here. And I think the concern is, you know, if it can happen there, I can happen anywhere and you we have some very vocal pro-life politicians who've been elected, and people are electing them despite having them holding these views. So that is an issue. We did a podcast last week about Sam who Stor off who's, obviously interesting not female, but very young. And very vocally anti-abortion, and when we talk about this stuff, even people who are critics of him say, they would never actually change the law. Stephen Harper didn't change the laws. Andrew Scheer has no plans to change the laws. Right. So there is. It's not necessarily complacency. But there just seems to be a thought that this is a done deal. Right. I think that's maybe dangerous thought I think that the anti-abortion people spoke to said that their goal was to, to support pro life politicians into get into show them that they have a huge movement behind them, but there's also this sort of more insidious things terms of, you know, our, our side in tarot back to the nineties, and we're taking steps back everywhere else in related ways. And just how hard it is for women to access abortion in Canada. I think people don't necessarily realize that I mean, you've only been only got one MP is nineteen thousand seventeen and in other provinces. Well, it's not it's not easy there. It's hard to find clinics to find train doctors long wait times. So it's a lot of barriers that,

Canada United States Missouri America Alabama Intern Ohio Wade Bush Jordan Rawlings Facebook Sydney Loni Congress Andrew Scheer Stephen Harper ROE France Florida Sweden
"l berta" Discussed on The Nightly Rant

The Nightly Rant

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"l berta" Discussed on The Nightly Rant

"They got they got to keep harping on this Russia shit and go man, dude. Okay. You know what you're giving his base the big kiss, and he he's gonna complete this exoneration from this one thing with all of his other sin, and instead of focusing on is failed terrorists, and all this stuff countries getting off the dollar. Those are real things to cover in the news and is based has no idea the so called doesn't have any idea. I don't know what's going on. But But he'll. he'll. He'll use this to get re-elected he'll cry. He's already working at and he's gonna crafted to get reelected. Hey toria would would something like this ever happened in Canadian politics or with someone just get their ass booted out. I think that the only Canadian politician, I can think of that had as much drama surrounding him. Trump does is an old premiere of L Berta and like the shining jewel in the crown of his being premier L Berta was him taking a giant handful of change like throwing it at a herd of homeless people. And so he was a special dude. And let's just say he didn't get reelected and his party didn't get reelected for many years after that, interesting. This is the thing with the Democrats, so and not interrupt you. But I mean the thing that because of their hubris, they don't under-. They understand I mean I know Nancy Pelosi and Mitch McConnell, don't really care who wins because they they're worth a hundred million dollars being politics, which, you know, I don't know how you do that. But they are they, you know, the Democrats were sure would rather lose with, you know, Kamala Harris, or, you know, Corey Booker than win with Bernie Sanders, because then, then the money's gonna try out so they're already plotting, and I'm not a fan these days they're already plotting 'cause he's got much momentum. Now already plotting delegates committed to already vote against him and twenty nineteen. Having and so people are like wondering, or Gino could be Trump. Well, it's not Hooghly on Castro. You know it's not gonna Cory Booker. You know, the mother approved pricks you just basically the company line. That's not that's not what's going to do it. They need some going to actually speak to the people and say something that they wanna hear. And with the Democrats doing in their stupidity is handing Trump these just softball and they're gonna softball right into the White House again. And and, and they're not gonna impeach him. You know, that, that's a joke. They know they can't get a conviction so they wouldn't be blows are not going to be, and why does she indicted herself she gonna investigate? She she, she. And all those unlike president, a congressperson and a Senator get dragged out and hack of so many people in our lifetime. We get arrested jail right in the congress. A what there's no waiting for their term to be over there, removed the remove their incited, if they're convicted over there in jail for. In some cases, quite a few years, so, you know, she's not gonna, you know, she didn't do six whenever we're gonna prosecuting w for war crimes. She got speaker of the house and jazz and six and she said, yeah, yeah, yeah, we're not, we're not gonna we're not gonna teach..

Corey Booker Trump Russia Kamala Harris congress softball toria Nancy Pelosi Mitch McConnell L Berta president Bernie Sanders Gino Senator White House hundred million dollars
What does an election look like when local news is dying?

The Big Story

06:13 min | 1 year ago

What does an election look like when local news is dying?

"You probably don't need anyone to tell you that local media outlets newspapers in particular are in trouble. We in the media have told you all about that. And if you're listening to a daily news podcast, you probably care at least a little bit about the disappearance of these publications. I hope so anyway, the problem though, is often framed in specifics for the industry, which is understandable since we're talking about the media covering the media, and we do like to do that. That means what you hear is about. How many people will lose their jobs who's making cuts which newsrooms are impacted and that matters, of course. But maybe it's not the most relevant way to communicate to you the public. What's actually happening? We have an election coming up. You may have heard it is a pretty important one given the current state of the world. So what happens when a media trying like hell to do everything on a shoestring budget has to cover a huge national campaign, but also three hundred and thirty eight local campaigns. What kind of coverage can these outlets afford to take on? And what's the first to go when they can't what replaces that kind of coverage. What options do voters who want to be informed have to seek out the analysis they need, and of course, how will savvy political campaigns take advantage of this situation and take advantage of you? Jordan, heath Rawlings. And this is the big story. April Lindgren is a professor of journalism at Ryerson university. More importantly, she runs the local news research project, which digs down into exactly this. Thanks for joining US, April. My pleasure. Can you? I try to give me a sense using any paper in particular of the state of local news political coverage right now, I was doing some research recently and looking at a paper called red deer advocate serving red deer, and now Berta hundred thousand people, and I spoke with a journalist there who retired a few years ago, but was still involved in the local union, and she had some pretty interesting in sobering store stories to tell me about a newsroom that back in two thousand twelve had twenty four people still in it and today going into the federal election coming up. This fall is now down to about nine people who are going to be providing political coverage of the local races. And you know, the leader comes through town covering that as well. And. Part of the story that she told me was, you know, years ago in previous elections not in two thousand fifteen but before that they used to do was called a ride around. So that's when a journalist and a reporter quote, and they ride around in the writings, and they talked to people get a sense of what's going on get a feel for the mood who's who's doing? Well, who's in trouble? And that was eliminated in two thousand fifteen and isn't going to happen this time either. So you have sort of less coverage of in-depth like that fewer writings because they just don't have the people to do it. And also doing stories that are more probing in-depth because there's a missive from management. That's a each reporter has to produce at least two stories day and do some briefs short snippets of stories issues. Come up, maybe do so shoot some video. And when you got that on your plate as a sort of daily mandate. There's not a lot of time to produce any sort of in-depth profiles of the candidates or look at issues in more depth than find out where local people stand on those issues, and and explain white matters. So with. Out that stuff with reporters having no time to kind of do more than the straightforward stories where do people get that in depth coverage? Does it exists still? Well, I think if you're lucky enough to live in a bigger city where there's a sort of a bigger pool of media chances are you can get a little bit more information. Now, keep in mind, I'm talking about coverage of local candidates and the races to represent a writing not the leaders not the leaders race because you know, you can find out all sorts of stuff online about what's Justin Trudeau is going to be doing that day or or or Andrew Scheer that's going to be there. But the the issue is what's happening locally in. How do you? Hold those local candidates accountable. So if there's an incumbent what's that income and done for the last four years that they've been in Ottawa or in the provincial capital. So holding power accountable is a big part of what local journalists do. And also, you know, people think that well who cares? I mean the local race. It's the national race that really determines what happens in a campaign and. What the leaders are doing. And that's what's going to determine how the election turns out. That's what we talk about in the national conversation. Yeah. Absolutely. But there's actually been some recent research that shows about ten percent of all writings are decided by people based on who the local candidates are ruler. So you know, that's that's enough. That's the difference between a majority and a minority or between winning. And losing those local races do matter and to the extent that people are covering them, the coverage matters, but what happens when reporters aren't on the ground. Well, one of the things that happens is candidates start shaping their own messages and putting their own message messages out. So they're using a lot of social media direct mailings. And basically they are telling their version of reality. Here's what I did the last four. Yes. An army by. Yeah. You could be sure they're not saying here's what I did. In the last four years, you might want to think about my record. And whether he really wanted me on my wins and losses here. Yeah. Absolutely. So, you know, people say, well, I'm getting the information. I can go to the candidates website. They send me emails. They I you know, I can find that out. But people forget is that journalists do is they have the time because they're not they're paid to sort of take the time to look at Ken how the candidate or the incumbent voted what they said in parliament. Did they bring forward any legislation? How responsive were they to local constituents like did they ever show up in the writing? And you're only going to get that sort of coverage. If you've got a reporter who's got some time, and is paid to actually ask those questions. So why is this kind of

Reporter United States Ryerson University Justin Trudeau Ottawa April Lindgren Andrew Scheer Berta KEN Professor Of Journalism Jordan Heath Rawlings Four Years Ten Percent
Trudeaus Welcome To Canada: Three Years Later

The Big Story

25:10 min | 1 year ago

Trudeaus Welcome To Canada: Three Years Later

"You supported it at the time, and the numbers would suggest you did you probably remember the first government plane of Syrian refugees arriving in Canada. This week. Canadian airports will be the sights of some first tentative steps in Canada refugees who have fled Syria are slowly beginning to arrive. Now, this is a wonderful night where we get to show not just a planeload of new Canadians. What Canada's all about we had to show the world how to open our hearts and welcome in people who are fleeing extraordinarily difficult situations. Justin Trudeau's brand made a virtue of Canadians welcoming accepting and supporting refugees from around the world and particularly from Syria in the months after Donald Trump when the two thousand sixteen American election with anti immigrant rhetoric Trudeau leaned further into this strategy. You may remember a famous hashtag welcome to Canada. And all the victory laps the liberal government. And to be fair, many of us took and reaction to the global praise. We received for our efforts that was a while ago. And as much as many of us might like to hold onto our image of goodhearted always welcoming world beloved Canada. It's time to ask some questions. Have we lived up to our promise to those refugees? We sponsored them and publicly welcomed them. We gave them jackets and a years worth of sponsorship. And how have they fair is that image of the welcoming Canadian really still who we are a recent survey found for the first time that forty percent of us believe there are too many visible minorities coming to Canada included in that forty percent are seventy one percent of conservatives. The conservatives are currently leading federal election polls by a healthy margin. So have we changed or has this sentiment always being here? And finally, what is it like for people fleeing their home for a better life to arrive in Canada today? And. Jordan, heath Rawlings. And this is the big story. Nncholas Kyung is the Toronto star's immigration. Reporter he's been in touch with many Syrian refugees since they arrived in this country. Do you remember back in January of twenty seventeen the hashtag welcome to Canada tweets from Justin Trudeau who can't? Yeah. What did that symbolize back then? And what kind of story did that spark about Canada immigration? And I think that was a different time and era. Trump was elected and his I think it put Trudeau in the very contrasting image. And I think he felt the need to distinguish himself from, you know, our leaders south of the border with all these regular what we call quote unquote, irregular migrants crossing the border. You know, I think he wanted to stick to his image of being an yell liberal leader progressive, you know, I think that's what behind, you know, his tack on on Twitter in the last couple of years has Candida in reality. Walked that talk. When it comes to welcoming, refugees, and emigrants definitely initially. We did right after the liberals were elected. I'm sure you remember the. Image of Ellen Kirti the Syrian child who lying face down. Dad, you know, on a beach in Turkey, and I think that image actually touched hearts of Canadians, and you know, and then we had a, you know, after ten years of the hopper government who whose government had always been criticized as being anti refugees and immigrants because of all these changes they made on immigration policies. So it was very refreshing the beginning to to have a new leader who's actually friendly to refugees and open your doors to refugees. And and and think you know, that actually received a Trudeau received a lot of accolades from, you know, a lot of Canadians, but then, you know, something out of his control, you know, no one anticipated that was the election of Trump, and the kind of implications of his travel bans, a his anti immigration immigrants, especially to do with the undocumented, including the dreamers that actually driven a lot of. Undocumented, you know, migrants south of the border to cross the border into the states. And I think you know, it started off being just trickling in you know, in in Manitoba and a little bit in Quebec. And then when the word God out and just you know, they just coming in in droves. Yeah. And I'm sure that liberal government also was caught off guard by it. And then, you know, I think the sentiment changed. I was actually talking to a friend this morning about how the idea of, you know, who is more deserving immigrants the idea the introduced in ten years by Jason Kenny, I think, you know, he was the first one who introduced you know, who is more deserving immigrants. You know ranking, you know, permanent residents skilled immigrants would be about, you know, try someone trying to be sponsored round under feminine family reunification, and then you have the real refugees and a bogus refugees. And I think that that concept actually was introduced. And then, you know, now, you know, we would hear, you know, even refugees criticizing the the regular migrants crossing from the states as jumper, and average is also criticizing I think, you know, it's very interesting to see how that legacy of dividing even amount migrant groups and advocates are we seeing a change in more than just perception have the liberals made any recent changes to that policy. I'll definitely and I think what is interesting last Monday. I'm sure you remember somewhere burried in their three hundred ninety two and ninety seven page a federal budget. Yeah. There were some changes about how to close that loophole in what we call the safe third country agreement for those, you know, audience who are not familiar with what the safe third country agreement is basically, then any asylum seekers from seeking protection in, you know, if they first arrived in the states that cannot, you know, just cross the border into Canada and make. An Silom claim and vice versa. Glad there's a provision in that agreement that actually if you know a migrant actually cross between of the official ports of entry. Meaning that if they manage to sneak in to the country than they're not down by that restrictions. So that's what we are seeing when the word got out, you know, a lot of people knowing that someone successfully managed to get through the border, you know, some would say irregularly or some, you know, conservatives with them illegally causing the different change in the policy in the last two years. You know, you've heard a lot of criticisms from advocates general public, you know, veering that, you know, all of a sudden we'd closing down a border like what the stays in a Trump has done between Mexico and the US like is it a demarcation of a new trend. You know, or is just you know, an election maneuver, you know, before the Tober election. We don't know we'll have to see I feel like there's kind of. Of a contradiction in terms of the way, we like to think of ourselves and hold up. I know I've done it myself. I've got many friends and acquaintances who do it who really treasure that idea of candidate being incredibly welcoming immigrants and refugees from all over the world. And then you start to see these signs that not only are the loopholes being closed, but public perception has shifted, and I wonder in your work have the people you talk to who are refugees or who work with refugees. Have they seen the same kind of welcoming that we like to talk about on the ground in practice. You know, as interesting, you know, when when we talk about public opinions, you know, the issues about discrimination and racism, you know, I think it has never gone away. But I just feel now with the issue over the irregular migration from the states with, you know, all the nationalist movements in we're seeing in Europe, South of the border in the states and. You know, we had last year we had a mayoral candidate. I'm not going to name her because I think as you know, I just don't want her name be heard, you know, running for mayor as the mayor of the city. I think you know, it's just a matter of you know, in all this public polls people just become more vocal. You know, we have always heard about Canadians being polite being nice in. I came as an immigrant myself when I was twenty three years old that was like longtime ago as a newcomer, you know, you always could feel it, you know, from body language from you know, it doesn't have to be verbally someone is being discriminatory, but you just being more sensitive more where an edge just feel though sentiments always there. But you know, it's just a matter of one I think the volume of than the volume meaning the number of immigrants coming the source country. They're coming from. Meaning, you know, they're more, you know migration. Global migration the move on movement always from developing country to develop country. These people are looking forward, you know, that alive. Not a worse life, right? Yeah. So the source country, meaning that, you know, the major source would be from Africa from the Middle East and from Asia, and I think that, you know, ratio combination and the volume definitely, you know, a contributing contributing factors to promote that kind of nationalist populist movement. Plas-, you know, you have you know, politicians playing contra and divide. My feeling is those sentiments just coming about surface. Now instead of being, you know, hidden, you know, you know, now, you, you know, you would hear you know, even politicians talking about the idea of political correctness. And I think, you know, even back in the nineties, you know, those would be considered like French opinions menaul, you you know, is publicly debate. I'm not all I'm like, you know, four for public dialogues on you know, how politically correct should Canadians b but I just feel the way, you know, you talk. About these issues. You know, you have to be really careful you don't want to see what's what has happened in Europe happening in Canada because we are way more diverse in our population. If we have die kind of divisive emotions among as we would be in bigger trouble than just, you know, one community against another because it would be like a chaos like many communities against many different communities and the two and some years since we really started welcoming a large amount of Syrian refugees. What have we seen in terms of what their lives are like what issues they faced how well they've settled in Canada because I feel like we heard a lot about them when they first arrived. And we welcome them. With open arms says we love to tout. And then obviously, there's a whole process that happens away from the cameras. Uh-huh. We actually at the the star. We actually did last year was the third year at a third verse ary of their Saruman of the first wave of Syrians arriving. And we did, you know, do, you know a series of stories to look at how well they have integrated. They have not integrated and one of the, you know, I in general like, I think my observation as, you know, just like any migrants, you know, you have the issues about adjustment to a couch her to new language about finding jobs finding housing it is no different from if you and I would move from Toronto to toback or two I think you back would be a better example because of the language difference. But the thing is, you know, we would have, you know, the, you know, already support social support network of friends and sometimes families to help us out. But I think for refugees under the big difference is they don't come here by choice. If you remember when you know initially when the series arrived. Which interview a lot of Syrians? And you know, they didn't you never heard of Canada before they didn't want to come. And if they had a choice some of them actually wanted to go back and six months when the war was over. Really? That's what they told me. But for a lot of immigrants, I think especially immigrants they come here by choice to come here with the skills. They wanted to make a bad alive if not for themselves, if as we heard about, you know, doctors driving cabs phenomenon before, but at least, you know, for the second joined they raised generations. They wanted them to succeed to have a good education. But you know, that's by choice. You know, they always have the choice to go back before refugees. They don't have that choice. What kinds of resources are available to them? And and one of the reasons we're talking to you today is because there's a a story out of Calgary of a nine year old hours that story. Yeah. Of a nine year old Syrian refugee girl who took her own life, and she was being bullied at school. Which is I mean on the one hand is something that not just refugee kids face. But I wonder what kind of resources are available for. For those folks who might be going through that because I can only imagine what that would be like in combination with trying to integrate, and, you know, a language barrier and everything else before we before you answer your questions. I just want to talk about little bit of the terminology the terminology of refugees. Okay. Because I think there's a lot of inner confusion among the public. You know, they think refugees refugees refugees, but they're actually different categories of of refugees. You know, what we talk about this Syrian refugees that, you know, a lot of community groups have sponsored in the last few years, we call those sponsored refugees, meaning that the regard the destination by UNHCR the UN United Nations refugee agency, so to find them as legit refugees. And they are being they had to go through medical clearances and security clearances by Canadian officials before they are being resettled as permanent residents in Canada. Meaning that when he arrived there already permanent residents, right? But I I think. Sometimes people confuse, you know, confuse them with refugees who come across the US border. We call those, you know, you know, technically illegally as asylum seekers because they are status still undecided. Meaning they still need to go before a refugee judge to get present their claims why they need Canada's protection, and you know, and then we'll be a positive or negative decision. So there are different surfaces afford to you know, though, the Syrians who are sponsor to Canada, and those asylum seekers who actually just come here for protection when we talk about, you know, two Syrians, they're known to kind of social and community services available available to them as no different from. You know, any, you know, if someone come as an architect or a lawyer they're eligible to any, you know, housing surfaces a counseling, including mental health counseling, employment counseling, and they get helped to rage. The kids go to school to enroll the kids in schools and. Everything that you can think of you know, and for your initial settlement. But when we talk about the asylum seekers because you know, their status in Canada, still uncertain. So there's actually very limited government surfaces actually available to them. Yes. The kids can go to school. They can apply for a work permit to work in Canada. But before or you know, you know, there's an outcome. You know, whether they've been acepted as refugee or not they would not be able to let's say to get, you know, housing support or you know, some of the other services. Yep. So, you know, it's so it depends on which group we're talking about, you know, there's, you know, again, you know, comes down to that different labellings of refugees and migrants when you talk to people who don't know much about your line of work and find out what are some of the biggest questions, you get or or myths that you have to tackle. Because I feel like this is an issue that everybody has an opinion on right now. And it's really nuanced. I can tell you that covering emmigration the right for prob probably the most polarizing beat and initial sperm. There's no gray area people either for it or against it. You know, for every story that you know, I've filed in the paper, you know, run into paper somehow people can find a way to criticize. No. And and you know, you have a bleeding liberal. You're you you have a bleeding hearts, and you know, about being a left wing propaganda all these stories, but some of the biggest may have is really interesting that has been going around for God to be like eighteen years now that refugees in a refugee claimants, they actually could get over three thousand dollars of government benefits a month, which is a myth because longtime ago eighteen years ago. I I did a story about government-sponsored refugees, and they receive a startup check of you know, for to cover the first month last month, rand and other benefits. But is only one time. You know, I forgot about the amount. And that each month they would from then on word they would receive a welfare check of. I think. At the time. It was five hundred seventy dollars, and then words Scott out, and you know, spread on the internet that these people were, you know, these people referring to Reggie claim is actually the God, you know, over three thousand dollars tax payers dollars from you. And I every month instead of like, you know, didn't say it was a huge portion of that was a one time when time benefits, and then, you know, even today, I still thought to see those Email not emails, but those inflammation recycled online, and your and other baked one would be how come, you know, the queue-jump queue-jumping thing as Sean? Yeah. But people don't realize that you know, these different programs being sponsored two candidates process. You know by different unit within immigration Canada. You know, the the asylum-seekers they are being dealt with by the immigration and refugee board immigration programs handled. I and again, you know, immigration units within immigration. So it's not like, you know, I cannot jump the keel because I'm not in the. Q? How can I jump the queue? This is just very interesting. But then, you know, you have all these, you know, the the for example, immigration applicants who got caught up in in the backlog, which I'm playing how come refugees the chewed have met with more respect than, you know, by the government and the who actually come here with my skills eager to contribute to the your economy. It's, you know, very fascinating, those kind of comments and criticisms when you talk to refugees on the Silom seekers of these days, how aware are they that they are the most divisive issue in the upcoming election potentially that there's this huge conversation going on around them. I think there is you know, not enough awareness. I think you know, one is a lot of them. They're just so occupied by getting the protection in the process, you know, talking to their lawyers trying to collect, you know, a police report from Hungary or from Czech Republic to prepare for the claims. Like, I'm talking about the the the more recent arrivals. And then, you know, the those who have been here but longer there ups, you know, they're occupy their occupied by, you know, the next step is the settlement housing, you know, how their kids are doing in school. Maybe some of them have to do with post traumatic stress disorder. You know with the mental health challenges, depression, you know, that was that in after, you know, the first twelve to eighteen months, and, you know, I've probably, you know, Canadian politics would be the last thing they have. In mind to be honest. But they do, you know, if you talk to any refugees, I think especially those already being granted status in Canada. They always praise them about how grateful they are here to be given a new life. How safe their kids would feel, you know, if you talk to, you know, refugees who are here, you know, GT keel, refugees, they'll talk about you know, how happy they are to be able to themselves. You know, they only have good things to talk about China. And they they don't take new lives for granted. I think that's the best part about, you know, sometimes, you know, no offense to Canadians khanate Canadian Canadians, but there are dissents of talking about the sense of entitlement. Sometimes I think, you know, maybe Canadians may have a stronger sense of entitlement than some of these refugees who don't take what they receive a granted easily. Do they feel the ground shifting? I mean, we've mentioned new polls in new campaigns that that show that Canadians in general are starting to take a harder. Line on immigration and refugees. Do they feel that that that's happening? Definitely for example, last last week the Ontario budget actually completely strip any funding for legal services for immigrants and refugees. So I went out to talk system advocates and talk to you refugee claimants who actually got caught a by the funding cuts. You definitely feel the ground shifted a little bit that you know, is not as open as friendly during the time when we opened the doors for the Syrians, especially when you talk to because during the the border crossing some people crisis from the states, we I did talk to a lot of people who cross the borders and why they're here and what their circumstances were the feeling towards Canada. And I I'm been in touch with some of them to what is interesting as you know, when they first arrive, you know, they were so grateful, but it's slowly slowly, you know, especially the the ones who are. English speaking, for example, a Nigerian family that I've kept in touch with because they they do look you to watch the media the TV, and they understand the language. So they are able to observe the transit the changes. They would tell me, you know, when they first got here, and you know, it's an open door policy, and they talked about that tweet by by Trudeau, right? And then now, you know with all this, you know, changes they do feel that you know, there's a shift in the they they don't see necessarily as Canadians attitudes immigrants shifted, but more like in terms of at least from the policy government policy perspective, it has shifted. How important is it for Canada to keep that image that Trudeau showed the rest of the world with that tweet weather or not? And I'm saying this whether or not we actually live up to it on the ground. But in the fact that that's what the rest of the world holds up Canada has and I think you would get a different response. If you talk to people in Berta versus you know somewhere into Perez. Versus the rest of Canada, or you know, incubating, and you know, we all heard about the the the Bill twenty one to the Bill to about secularism. Yup. I think you you get a different response. If you talk to, you know, different people from different provinces that image is out there. Like that is not I'm not outsiders. Yes. People just we know that which has more which provinces tend to be more insight candidates, quite divisive for sure. But like, I mean that is you see all those tweets and Facebook posts from Americans every time Trump does something horrible on immigration, or whatever that says, you know, what Canada's not like this. But is interesting. I think in the recent these two months I've seen in different American publications including newspapers, I think there was the story in New York Times as well about, you know, the the the shifts, you know, they mentioned all mentioned about Trudeau's tweet ragged at the, you know, what was happening recently, you know, in terms of his policies, and you know, they made a great big feature about the changes. We, you know, you know, burried in the but federal budget announcement and the close of the in the safe third countries and slowly and slowly, you know, because the star we do have like an immigration Facebook group like where we have members from you know, cross the border around the world. You started to see sometimes, you know, I see the tweets from people that I follow. They follow me about those sentiments like slowly, you know, I think people outside of Canada started to notice those changes as well as good is it bad. Like, I I don't know like I can't judge. But definitely I think people notice those policy changes. But what I would like personally would like to people to to see is the context the context of we are having an election coming those policy changes are driven by politics and just how ugly politics can be. And you know, and I hope hopefully, people would see that you know, what we could blame politicians, but just don't blame. Those people the vote Orebro people who need protection who was just wants a better life a safer life.

Canada Justin Trudeau Donald Trump Europe United States Toronto Goodhearted Turkey Jason Kenny Twitter Syria New York Times Facebook Jordan Calgary Ellen Kirti Nncholas Kyung Middle East Africa Reporter
"l berta" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"l berta" Discussed on WJR 760

"Frank Beckmann here with Chris L Berta from Principia met, Chris, not your everyday wealth management expert. He's got a different approach one that I think you should listen to. So the concept that you're emphasizing five years of freedom. Let's get into some detail on the five year freedom plan idea is to place enormous emphasis on making the next five years be a safe haven for those retirement funds and make sure that when we do start to take money from his retirement accounts. It is done in such a stable and predictable way that there is no more fear of ever running out of money. Look there's a lot coming at us. There's going to be a presidential election. We don't know what way that will push the market, you have trade problems tariff problems terrorism problems, you name it. The market is highly. Unpredictable and for those folks that are retiring soon or retired in the last few years that are looking at that nest egg as their paycheck money, which is a lot of them. We need to make sure that we have a very balanced measured approach to making it the next five years without any major snafus. No, big market losses in turn not having to commit to some long term annuity contract or some very low interest Bank instrument just to get there. There is a way to do it. We haven't doing it successfully for years, and we wanna make sure that come five years from now when the markets corrected and things have leveled out, and we have a new president or maybe the same president and things have calmed down. Then we have a whole lot of options. So the next five years matter a lot, and we don't know, we don't know when the next bubble's gonna burst, right? Correct. You don't know. And this is this is really the proverbial tortoise and the hair. I would rather have a client family that is comprised entirely of tortoises than of hairs. There's no glory to me in accumulating wealth, occasionally, we'd rather accumulate wealth than a very slow predictable and responsible manner, folks I've gotten to know, Chris. Over the last year. He's the real deal..

Chris L Berta Frank Beckmann president Principia Chris five years five year
Portland officials give update on water main break

The Boss Show with Jim and Steve

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Portland officials give update on water main break

"A massive water main broke, spilling a mill-. Millions of gallons of water into the streets of Portland Christly. Del reports from sister station K A T, you break occurred around eleven AM water flowing estimated rate of one million gallons a minute traveled north and east reaching out Berta and Killingsworth streets within minutes. First responders initially evacuated. At least a dozen homes. Businesses on Albert and killings were streets were inundated. According to Portland wander bureau. The broken water main is a thirty inch cast iron pipe carries drinking water to and from a number of

Portland Christly Portland Albert Berta One Million Gallons Thirty Inch Mill
"l berta" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"l berta" Discussed on No Agenda

"I mean, if anybody knows about oil, the oil business, what are the people that are in L Berta. Do you do you? Do you have a clip a clip four point six quake, Canada, the right? Later says Vesta energy reported the activity early Monday morning and immediately shut down its operations. The are is now ordering that those operations remain stopped indefinitely. The regulators order reading part, quote, it considers it necessary to suspend the well in order to protect the public and the environment and order that all operations at the site are suspended immediately unless otherwise directed. Now. No one was injured and no properties were damaged fracking operations started back on January twenty ninth at the same red year until March fourth when that quake happened. The Obama energy regulator is now ordering Vesta to submit operational data for that time period and list any current or future operations four rocking in the red. You're in lake areas also ordered estimate of fracturing operating plan looking at how it can eliminate or reduce any future activity that could cause a quick like this all of those orders must be given to the by March eleventh. Energy responded with a statement as well reading in part, the safety of the public employees and contractors paramount and vested takes this incident. Very seriously. The company is cooperating with the energy regulator, and is focused on meeting the conditions required to lift that order now once the regulator gets all of those documents, but it needs from Vesta it will look into if the proper regulations were followed in this case, then it can look into the next steps. But there's no time line at this point of one vessels operations could be back up and running. Totally kick ass up there. Done in his dick in around having a special investigator. Just shut it down done. Go documents. What the hell's going on here? Well, this baffles me how these people in these other areas are so buffalo d- and that the public or any member of the public would take the side of the fractures. When all of a sudden, you're having an earthquake. It just make his never made any sense to me. I have the Canadian minister of environment and climate change. I didn't know that was an actual post environment and climate change. Her name is as our perfect, Catherine McKenna. She was at a Trudeau rally where he was ignoring anything said about what he's been doing. And this is how the minister of climate change sounds. So let's talk about climate change for second. Who believes it's real. We got a report last year. It said we have twelve years to take serious climate action. We are all in this together, we need just remember last year who remembers.

Vesta energy L Berta Catherine McKenna Obama Canada investigator Trudeau twelve years
"l berta" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"l berta" Discussed on No Agenda

"I mean, if anybody knows about oil, the oil business, what are the people that are in L Berta. Do you do you? Do you have a clip a clip four point six quake, Canada, the right? Later says Vesta energy reported the activity early Monday morning and immediately shut down its operations. The are is now ordering that those operations remain stopped indefinitely. The regulators order reading part, quote, it considers it necessary to suspend the well in order to protect the public and the environment and order that all operations at the site are suspended immediately unless otherwise directed. Now. No one was injured and no properties were damaged fracking operations started back on January twenty ninth at the same red year until March fourth when that quake happened. The Obama energy regulator is now ordering Vesta to submit operational data for that time period and list any current or future operations four rocking in the red. You're in lake areas also ordered estimate of fracturing operating plan looking at how it can eliminate or reduce any future activity that could cause a quick like this all of those orders must be given to the by March eleventh. Energy responded with a statement as well reading in part, the safety of the public employees and contractors paramount and vested takes this incident. Very seriously. The company is cooperating with the energy regulator, and is focused on meeting the conditions required to lift that order now once the regulator gets all of those documents, but it needs from Vesta it will look into if the proper regulations were followed in this case, then it can look into the next steps. But there's no time line at this point of one vessels operations could be back up and running. Totally kick ass up there. Done in his dick in around having a special investigator. Just shut it down done. Go documents. What the hell's going on here? Well, this baffles me how these people in these other areas are so buffalo d- and that the public or any member of the public would take the side of the fractures. When all of a sudden, you're having an earthquake. It just make his never made any sense to me. I have the Canadian minister of environment and climate change. I didn't know that was an actual post environment and climate change. Her name is as our perfect, Catherine McKenna. She was at a Trudeau rally where he was ignoring anything said about what he's been doing. And this is how the minister of climate change sounds. So let's talk about climate change for second. Who believes it's real. We got a report last year. It said we have twelve years to take serious climate action. We are all in this together, we need just remember last year who remembers.

Vesta energy L Berta Catherine McKenna Obama Canada investigator Trudeau twelve years
How your political emotions are monetized

The Big Story

22:20 min | 1 year ago

How your political emotions are monetized

"The yellow vest. Protests are real. Those are real people with real politics. Putting on that clothing and countries around the world and taking to the streets yell of protesters were out for the twelfth weekend of demonstrations, yellow vespers, March to denounce release violence as well as the government and the protests after yellow vest demonstrators hit the streets of France over taxes and the high cost of living similar movements of popped up around the world, including in Berta were bitter resentment about economic uncertainty are about to hit the road headed east. This movement is giving everyone inoperability to come out and say what they're unhappy with when those protests are over those people go home and log onto Facebook and Twitter and other platforms. They jump right in to the muddy as hell waters that make up any political debate online in those waters. There are extremists. And there are moderates, and there are curious bystanders. And there are people with worse intentions people who are either trying to make a buck or make you angry. Or both the world of politics is consumed with conversation about Botts spam and fake news as they should be the conversation is when he joined project between the Toronto Star. And BuzzFeed news began examining the online presence of Canada's yellow vest movement. There was one Facebook group that stood out to them as strange who was behind it. What was its purpose? And how could they pull that one page and particular out of the murk and focus on Wyatt existed? The story of the trail they followed leads us into the ugly underbelly of the internet where monitoring outrages lucrative, and where the citizens of become so mistrustful that even well-meaning real people might as well be robots that is sadly a big place, and it's eating up more digital real estate every day and this year Canada is one of its main targets. Jordan heath rulings. And this is the big story. Craig Silverman is the media editor at BuzzFeed news. And Craig before we get to what's fake about all of this can you please lay out. What exactly are the real yellow vest? Protests yellow vests is a popular movement originated in France, lers Lee started as a result of protests against a proposed new kind of gas tax that was going to be there. And then really morphed and became the kind of popular uprisings in France. It's not just kind of left and right. It's a whole smorgasbord of people who are in the streets in Paris and other parts of France, and they've been protesting there and it spread to some other places in here in Canada. We've now got kind of a burgeoning little yellow vest movement. It's not as big as what you saw in France. We you know, when the protests happened at the most the biggest have had like a couple or few hundred people a lot of times. It's people standing on the side of a highway with some signs, and it's very much rooted in opposition to the carbon tax and opposition to a lot of Trudeau's policies in. General right? And so what is yellow vest group dot com? And how does it tie into the movement in general one of the things that we've seen over the last? I don't know four to six months or so as the Elvis movement started to spread up and candidates that Facebook has been a big place where they've been organizing. So the main sorta yellow vest group has over one hundred thousand members on Facebook going back to the fall. We've just been kind of monitoring groups on Facebook pages on Facebook, not just yellow Vespa groups on the left groups on the right that we expect to be really active around you do. Well. So I have this weird beat and we have a small little team here in Toronto that does this particularly for for the whole world actually for BuzzFeed news, where we're very much focused on online misinformation, you know, trolling as well as all attempts to kind of manipulate or deceive using our new media world. So that could be social media websites. Botts trolls, all these kinds of things we have a sort of specialty in all the ways. People are faking stuff manipulating stuff online. Which kind of brings us right back to yellow vest group. Yeah. So explain what started happening or what you started to see when you're keeping your eye on it. So we're watching a lot of the right and left stuff in Canada online. We're also watching some of the Elvis groups because they're kind of political. It's interesting to see what's being shared there. And I saw this. This website pop up yellow vest group dotcom. I'd never seen a yellow vest website before. So that was the thing that piqued my interest. So now somebody's driving people to website is this like an official yellow vest website for Canada. Or is it something else? And so in looking at it, it only had two articles on it. And the thing that really stood out to me was it had ads on it. And I'm like, okay. So now, we have a scenario where perhaps there are people trying to make some money off of this movement. And this is a really common thing. I mean, we did a lot of reporting leading up to an after the twenty sixteen election in the US where we saw this huge explosion in what people came to call hypertension news. Very very pro right? Pro left. Not just disagree. With the other side. But the other side is terrible and whipping up sentiment whipping motion primarily on Facebook and people made huge amounts of money. Facebook is a great place to get people's attention. And if you can get their attention with a really outrageous or sometimes false headline. They're going to click, and they go to your website, and you make money for each visitor that comes to your website, and this this was a big thing in the US. And as we've been sort of thinking about what might happen in Canada this year, we sort of expect there to be some players who are profit driven rather than ideologically driven. So there's only two articles. But one of them stands out to you. Tell me what was in the article the one that had misinformation it so the article was built on three actual real new stories. But the key thing was the headline. And so the article was reporting how the town council in the sort of fort McMurray area had decided to put moratoriums on new job cans being built. So these were job camps from big oil companies where people would fly in they'd work their away from their family and then fly out and the. Town wants people to be more focused in the town itself, and they put a moratorium on these. And so that's real and the second thing that's real is that since about twenty fifteen there's been construction taking place on a new very large Islam center there. So for the Muslim community in the fort McMurray area. They've got a project that they're doing and the article connected. Those two things to basically say that there's no more job camps being billed in the oil sands because they're building a huge Slavic center. And a lot of the material that was being shared on the Facebook pages groups associated with this website was very anti Muslim a lot about sharia law and all these kinds of conspiracies a lot about and so that article got about fifteen thousand shares reactions and comments on Facebook, which is a pretty good amount of engagement for an article about you know, Canada and for an article in Canada in general from Canadian news media. So clearly, it was that misleading headline making people think, oh, there's no more job camps in jobs in the oil sands. Because of the biggest lung center. And what happened when you started this website picture interest? You started looking behind. Yeah. So the first thing that was clear is that nobody was actually claiming this. There is nobody saying, hi, I'm Jerry, and this is my website. And I love the elevators, and you know, I've been involved for a long time. And so one of the things that we looked at one. Of course, you know, there's ads on it. So is somebody making money? And then we also looked at how this website was being shared online. And we saw that there were accounts sharing. It very frequently basically spamming it all over Facebook into different yellow vest groups, and to me that again is behavior that says, okay? This is somebody who knows how to get traffic from Facebook and make money off of it. And so we just kind of went down the rabbit hole. Can we figure out who is actually behind this? Because it turned out that the two main Facebook accounts that have been sharing a lot of it were not really attached to real people. So we had kind of sock puppet or fake accounts. That were spreading this content. Driving people to the site making some money on it. And it certain point even started trying to get people to buy t shirts that had yellow vest slogans on. It how do you determine who's behind it? And who is behind it. Did you find out? Yeah. So we managed to figure out who is behind it. And one of the big kind of tip-offs was that the website where they were selling the t shirts is a site where anybody can sign up, you uploaded design, and you can start, you know, selling t shirts or mugs, and there was a username on that. And that username was different than the names of the Facebook accounts that have been sharing it, and it went to a guy named Craig Collins who lives in Albert who has worked in the oil sands, and who actually used to have a kind of side hustle, where he would create a jobs website jobs, like oil patch jobs dot com, where he posted job links and again the ads on the site, and he was flipping these sites. He earned over fifty thousand dollars the last three years creating and then selling to other people these jobs website. So we have somebody who understands how to kind of build a site monetize it, and then sell it, and who was actually actively concealing their identity as they were putting this yellow vest one out there did you find him. Found him send a bunch of emails. Tried calling didn't get a response. And then what we do a lot in journalism tickly within investigation is when you're about to publish something. And somebody is being cited in it. You send them what we call a no surprises. So I sent an Email with point by point by point saying, we're gonna report that the site is yours we're gonna report that you have a history flipping websites. We're gonna report that this. You know, indicates that this was a profit driven enterprise. And I also explained him that we were going to report that one of the articles that he created which went pretty viral on Facebook was also very misleading, and so just a few hours really before we were planning to publish got a phone call that was Craig Collins on the on the line how the conversation go. Well, I mean, his first words to me were total invasion of privacy, man. And so his feeling was that he had every right to conceal his identity into not have anyone know who was behind this website who is behind the Facebook accounts who is selling t-shirts and earning money from that. And that was his feeling and I explained. To him that, you know, this was a public website public issue. There was misinformation coming from his site. And that that doesn't give him the right to kind of hide who he is. And I also want to say like the person they don't necessarily understand the dynamics of libel and privacy law and things like that. So the fact that he was upset isn't surprising to me. But we ended up actually staying on the phone for like close to an hour. Talking a lot about it. We had quotes from him in the story. And he really wanted to emphasize that this was not him trying to explain the Elvis movement. He does agree with a lot of the stuff. But yes, he understands how to kind of you know, run a site and make money online. Where is the line? Is there align even between pages like this that are associated with real protests that you know, exist to coordinate the yellow vest movement and pages like this one perhaps that are dedicated to helping somebody profit off of it? How do you determine which is which looking at the website? The first thing was it has ads on it. A lot of advocacy sites. Don't have ads and also is this person going to great lengths to really promote the site and push it out there and the answer is yes, he was. And he was using to misleading impersonation Facebook accounts to spam. The stuff out there to drive that traffic. And so these are classic internet marketing techniques that we see. So with us having these hearings looking at this stuff that really fits that profile. But I think he believes the stuff, but I think he also saw an opportunity to capitalize on it. And so both things are kind of true. What are you guys do when you find things like this, which must be all the time? Do you take an active role in trying to get them removed or get them regulated or you simply reporting on them? And then kind of standing back, you know, there's a little bit of both, you know, one this is activity that's taking place on Facebook. And so if you're going to write about, it there is I think duty to go to Facebook and say, hey, you know, we found in this case we found to Facebook pages together close to about ten thousand likes. We found a Facebook group that he was running a private group that had about two thousand members. And then we found those two accounts that was spamming the content. And so we set all of that to Facebook and. We said, you know, we're gonna report on this. And I sent them the evidence that these accounts are probably not linked to real people, and we're probably violating their terms, and they did respond by removing the groups the two pages and the two accounts. Have you been seeing this kind of stuff not necessarily just associated with the Elvis, but this kind of hyper partisan political misinformation ramp up as we head into an election year absolutely us having spent the last roughly four years or so very focused a lot on US. But also, we done coverage about Germany, France, Brazil, even Japan other countries, we know that of course, this stuff kicks up a lot more when there's an election. So as baseline, you know, that's going to happen. But also Justin Trudeau has become a bit of a global icon of liberalism global icon of oke nece in some ways right of which some people love and some people hate, and so he is inspiring a lot of very strong emotions. And the second thing is that Canada has been pretty strong in measures against. Russia. And in fact, our foreign minister Christopher Lind is banned from Russia. And so all of those things, you know, as our team has been looking at it, we expect this to be really high water Mark for, you know, online campaigns and online manipulation and digital deception we expect a lot of those things to happen for this campaign in Canada. And the the increase in hypertension, news will absolutely be a part of that. I might be asking you to take me kind of down the rabbit hole here. But obviously there's a ton of partisan issues in Canada right now that people real people feel incredibly strongly about when you're looking at sites like this or or looking at the general spread of information Candida, how do you determine what is kind of good faith, angry partisanship, and what is an attempt to manipulate discord? So one piece of it is that there's nothing wrong with partisanship. And that's really really important because the danger in going too far with this stuff is that you start to squelch free speech or you start to get Facebook to have a really strong arm tactic. And that's not what we want. So you have to look at you know, one figuring out who's behind the stuff. That's really. Important who are these people are they genuine passionate person for politics or do they not care in? They're simply somebody trying to make money, and we found this in the US where literally there were companies whose job is just to run kind of niche websites would say oh politics is doing really, well, let's spend a Republican Silat spin up democratic site. So that was one indication was you had people playing both sides that clearly is not genuine partisanship. The Ellen of also the monetization piece are people actively making money from this, and you can have partisans for making money from it. But as people I've spoken to over the years, you know, they may start as a partisan, but eventually becomes a business for them. So that peace is aligned walk, but you really just have to investigate and figure out who's there and the patterns of the content that they're putting out in other cases, you know, the stuff that is completely false is it deeply misleading in terms of the headline creating false impression. So that kind of thing that doesn't help public debate that doesn't help disagreement and that kind of stuff, you know, needs to be looked at and needs to be flagged. And I think that's. Is important. And then there's also the element of attribution is this people actually in Canada who are actively involved in these sites, or can you actually trace it back to people outside of the country who are not Canadian to state entities to other people who want to influence the process, and that obviously is very problematic has it been weaponized in the other way now because one thing that I've seen a fair bit of is people accusing anyone who has a different opinion of them specifically when it comes to heated political stuff of being bought or being drills. And it's almost like now the disagreement itself has become a suspect. Yeah. We've we've gone over to somewhat into the other extreme of anytime. There's someone on Twitter who disagrees with them. Suddenly there bought their troll. And in our -bility to actually have a reason and fact face disagreement is a core part of democracy. It is a terrible thing of getting to the point where people will just write off anyone who disagrees with them as part of some kind of campaign. This is where I think journalists have to be really diligent about this work and actually figure out where is this coming from and not do lazy work where we just argue that anything that's anti Trudeau is, you know, part of some kind of disinformation campaign. Everybody has responsibility for this. And I think journalists again like us in the Toronto Star trying to look at this and trying to be diligent about it and show our work. So that people can make up their minds for themselves. What can ordinary digital citizens do not just necessarily to sort of diagnose the stuff and be wary about what they're reading and consuming, but also to sort of prevent the spread of it. Do you report it, do you reply to it and say, I know, you know, this is coming from somewhere else with the citizens arrest here. I think there's a few things that the average person can do the first piece is is just having awareness that in this median virement the stuff that you see that maybe has a lot of re tweaks or maybe has a lot of likes. It's easy to buy those. It's easy to manipulate those. So don't just go buy popularity alone. The second piece is to. About having a kind of pause. So in a lot of cases, especially with political stuff. They wanna get emotional rise to you that makes you share it. And I really encourage people before you take that action of liking or sharing a retreat or retweeting to actually pause and think about, you know, why do I wanna share this? Why do I wanna pass along is a possible that they are trying to get me to do something manipulating me? So the awareness and the pause or two really important things. And then the last thing is that you absolutely can report posts that you know, that are misleading that you think are part of some kind of larger operation or that you think are suspicious. It's absolutely something you can do. And of course, you could also, you know, send it to journalists local journalists national journalists to me, just tag you. And Jane, basically, and everything we we are absolutely happy to have that happen. And so, you know, those are those are things people can do. And I think overall I hope folks come away with it feeling like there is something for you to do you shouldn't feel overwhelmed by this. There are basic things that you can think about and do that are going to. You in the bigger picture? What is the long-term plan for this BuzzFeed Toronto Star project? The the overarching thing is we wanna look at the different players that are trying to influence public opinion and kind of play in the public debate. And so that's actually a pretty broad umbrella about it. It doesn't mean that everybody that we write about is going to be nefarious. You know, we're very interested in operations like on terra proud, and how started as an anti Kathleen Wynne thing. It's now expanding to be more national what role are they going to play in this election? And you know, this isn't a registered organization, it's somebody who's clearly a right of center partisan who's running it. They can exist in this space. But that kind of entity is a newer in terms of what we've seen in Canada. So we're looking at that. We are of course, interested can we find stuff that is originally from outside of Canada trying to influence the public debate. And also, I think we need to pay attention to any potential overreach by the social networks and also the government of Canada. You know, they're talking a lot about this elections can. Is looking at it. We don't wanna have hand government response either. And so we're certainly not just looking at you know, calling out stuff and exposing stuff. We're also trying to think is there any overreach by the platform. So the government as well to hate the term fake news. I do. I am tired of it. It must great on you after a while. It does. I mean, this is a term. I started using in twenty fourteen when I was doing a research project into the spread of rumors and misinformation online, and I didn't put a lot of thought into using it. And then, you know, used it again as we were publishing research, we're doing in two thousand sixteen you know, there was a certain amount of rigor that I used for it. It was completely false content. That was created to Steve and that had an economic motive that those are the three things that I use to identify fake news. There's no resemblance to what it's used to describe. You know, now, it's a catch all term mostly it's used by Donald Trump to condemn reporting that he doesn't agree with other politicians have kind of picked that up as well. I think Donald Trump has actually been very effective taking it and make. What he wanted to be? And so have unfortunately lot of autocratic leaders around the world, passing so-called fake news laws that are actually restraining press freedom in those places. So it's become a very loaded dangerous term in some ways. Did you coin you didn't coined the phrase? I mean, no, I didn't want it. It's a phrase that's been around for a long time. I think the most I would say is certainly helped popularize it in late twenty sixteen with some of the research and reporting that we put out there and graduations. Yeah. It's a great honor. And I will never escape it. I suppose do you think the government's need to regulate social media? I'm really big fan of governments threatening to regulate social media. I'm a big fan of them using it as a threat and getting the companies to actually take some responsibility for what is on their networks for a long time. The Facebook's and Twitter's and YouTube at the world have said, you know, we're just a platform. Yes. We have some rules. But you know, we're open and we're we're not like a new site moderate moderating content. Now, they have finally realized that they absolutely do have a responsibility. They finally realized that the outcomes of not taking you know, basic responsibility can really put people's lives in danger. I mean, the big sample of this is me, and mar where ethnic cleansing has happened. And you know, Facebook was the platform where a lot of this hate speech, and we're a lot of the organizing for this was taking place. So I like governments really putting the pressure on them to come up with better solutions putting pressure on them to be more transparent. But there's a very you could see a lot of bad laws potentially being drafted that could end up siphoning, free speech. So I am a bit wary of. Of seeing a lot of legislation come into play. My last question. Do you have a personal Facebook account, the us to talk with your great, enter, whomever? I do how do you feel about that? I. So I recently deleted in the Instagram off my phone for variety of reasons. One of which is just a mandated that they collect. I keep the Facebook app on my phone mostly because use Facebook so much for work. There's only so much research you can do of things happening on Facebook without being signed in. So I'm very conflicted about it. I don't post a lot. I don't share a lot. I don't engage a lot because I look at Facebook, and I see all of the data collection. And you know, it's sort of like seeing through the matrix. I can't look at it. And just enjoy my friends photo of their kid. I see all the other stuff around.

Facebook Canada United States Toronto Justin Trudeau Twitter France Buzzfeed Botts Paris Craig Jordan Heath Wyatt Craig Silverman Craig Collins Fort Mcmurray Berta
"l berta" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"l berta" Discussed on Science Friday

"Slash emotion. Thank you for taking out to be with us today and holidays. How they may NTT. We're gonna take a break. And when we come back, we're going to talk about a deadly protein, a pre on it continues to spread chronic wasting disease in deer herds around the country and the world even the reindeer can soil. Scientists help slow the spread some answers in your questions coming up after the break. So stay with us. This is science Friday. I'm my replay toe where does disease come from. Maybe think the answer is a virus? Spectra? Maybe fungi would you ever stop to think that a protein could make you sick? Well, that's what's happening in preowned diseases, like mad cow, sheep scrapie crates failed Yaqoob disease misshapen proteins, become infectious and eventually get into the brain where they cause all kinds of degenerative symptoms, and in the world of preowned diseases one is really leaving its Mark here in the US chronic wasting disease, which has been found in deer were than two dozen states now three Canadian provinces as well. As Korea and Finland and even reindeer are infected one line of attack into slowing the spread. Well, it's the soil preowneds in soil are a key to chronic wasting disease. But not all soils are created. Equal here to explain more is Judd ache and professor in the center of pre-owned and protein folding diseases at the university of L Berta in Edmonton Alberta walk up to science Friday. Very good to be here. Thank you. Nice to have you..

chronic wasting disease US Edmonton Alberta Judd Korea Finland university of L Berta professor
"l berta" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"l berta" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"We reach Mr. Haluk in Calgary, Mr. Haluk when a company like yours starts closing branches. What does that say about the state of the oil industry in this country? I think it tells you there's there's deep fundamental problems. We've been around twenty two years we pride ourselves on not being quitters. But at some point the. The various factors headwinds are overwhelming. You say that you're not quitters. But there will be people who are saying you're bailing out at a time. Well, it's either close five branches their close them all that bad. It's out bad when you start closing branches. What does that mean for the employees who actually do a lot of the work getting Alberta? Crude out of the ground. So in the most extreme case that means you lose a job, and you're looking for work, in many cases, we are relocating employees to the United States, and some cases Australia, and these are one way relocations, and these are highly skilled typically more management positions that are leaving this country, not just from our business, but from the entire industry, and it is happening at an increasing and alarming rate, and these people are relocating families and chances are when you take root in another country. You're probably not gonna come back. You know when there's all the collateral damage. Susan, you know, every rig employs directly roughly twenty five to thirty people. You know, where do those people by their trucks, whereas our company by our trucks were we buy our pipe. Where do I buy our excess re's where do they stay where do they eat where to their kids go to school? You know, it it has very widespread impact. And you know, there's estimates that north of one hundred thousand private sector jobs have been lost. Now berta. I don't think anyone really knows the true number, and it's not just L Berta spec- northeast species scotch what these smaller communities, including Calgary are being devastated. You are a businessman and you've made that clear, but you're also a Canadian what's it like for you to be moving those jobs, south does a Canadian first and foremost at it makes me sick to see. What's happening? Not just with our company but innocent Susan what we're witnessing today is a massive transfer of wealth from Canadians to US, refiners and US energy consumers. We're also witnessed. A massive transfer of wealth from Canadians to four and oil and natural gas suppliers. We are selling our production in Canada at thirty cents on the dollar. We're just selling because we have one testament who will dictate the price as long as we have no options. Meanwhile, eastern Canada is paying estimates are fifty to seventy million dollars Canadian everyday more for imported foreign oil and natural gas and both of that. When you think about it is quite incredible and foolish the Canadian citizen perspective as a business person the end of the day, I need to go where the work is. And so for me to get on my soapbox and try and change hearts and minds and Canada, you know, that's a tall task. It's not what I'm paid to do. I'm happy that the press like you are interested now. But really at the end of the day. My job is to put our equipment people to work. And so. Economic gravity prevails over time. And what we're witnessing right now is a huge poll south and a huge pole internationally. And unfortunately, not pole is getting stronger and stronger every day this is because of the structural issues..

Canada Calgary Mr. Haluk United States Susan Alberta L Berta berta Australia seventy million dollars twenty two years
"l berta" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"l berta" Discussed on The Big Story

"Okay. And they're getting their noses up to that. Anyway is more dangerous to search for them. The other drugs that are in their pallet. Absolutely. I would say so it's killing more and. More people more and more Canadians every single year. It takes such an incredibly small dose to kill a human as it does dog. Are there any regulations from the RCMP around when they will or won't send their dog into a space when there might be those, you know, grains, of salt of fennel around a lot of the officers. I spoke to basically stress the fact that they won't unnecessarily deploy their canine partners. If they see that there is a substance littered around two suspects house, if they if it's noticeably visible, and they believe it could be a dangerous situation at that point. There's really no need for them. Right. You to deploy their dog? But yeah, I mean at the same time though, I Gary creed. The head trainer of the RCMP. He was a bit blunt about it. He basically stressed that. Yes. These dogs have dangerous jobs. That's part of the reason why why they have he he said that if they wouldn't they would never. Unnecessarily expose their dogs to defend all, but if it meant saving somebody's life, of course, they would and where do animal rights groups lineup on that? According to pita who I did reach out to for the story. They were in one hundred percent support of police dogs believing that they did serve an important public service. Basically, they were however against the breeding of police dogs, which the RCMP does they had. They breed all dogs on site in near innisfail Alberta. But the L Berta society for the prevention of cruelty to animals was far less concerned about really the use of police dogs. They were in favour note concerns at all of how the animals were treated or what they were doing in their daily lives have any dogs. Oh deed in Kennedy at since the program started. No, no dogs have oh deed in Canada. At least according to Gary creed. I asked him why why that is why he thought no dogs. I've ever overdosed in Canada. He said just luck. This is a question that I don't mean in jest is this another career path for dogs that were once trained to sniff for marijuana in if not what happened to the dogs whose job it was to sniff for pot the dogs that were trained to sniff out. Hot are no longer working for the ICMP. Really? Yeah. There was about just over a dozen of them, and they were all like kind of forced into early retirement actually Clayton can tell your dog dudes who I previously mentioned with the legalization of marijuana. She was forced into retirement because they simply just couldn't have her alert anybody now walking around carrying. Yeah. Exactly. And so they were they were all forcing early retirement. I asked tell you what would happen to dudes. I don't think dues will be retiring with your she'll be spending the rest of his as at his house. But he was telling me that. He he has a homeland for her Kyle. Are they good dogs? They are good dogs. I was a little afraid of them though. Really? Yeah. I was big dogs. They're big they're fast. I I was holding a Kong ball and the dog just wanted to rip it out of my hands are at no, I think I just had his pet and he wanted it back really badly. Didn't get hurt. Now..

RCMP Gary creed Clayton marijuana Canada innisfail Alberta L Berta society Kennedy Kyle one hundred percent
"l berta" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"l berta" Discussed on The Big Story

"How recent is it that the RCMP of started to have dogs sniff for the RCMP begin trials kind of like. So it goes back to maybe twenty sixteen when the. Head trainer at the RCMP's. Name is Gary creed he was kind of sitting at home one day recovering from surgery, and he's he was kind of thinking about you know, how the RCMP can kind of tackle the ever-growing trafficking of fennel and one of the ways of solving this war on drugs is through police work and not everyone agrees with that. But he was basically just kind of trying to come up with ideas of how we can do this. Because at the time there was no Suadeau odor, basically, manufactured commercially, manufactured sent that you can find for a lot of other different drugs like heroin or cocaine. Yep. Yeah. So he had been getting tons of calls from police officers across the country as well. As former dog handlers within the RCMP who are now working in the private sector, and they were asking if the dogs that he breeds and trains if they knew how to safely detect fennel, and they didn't. So he thought to himself. There has to be a way to do this. There has to be some way we can safely allow our dogs to kind of become familiar with the sense included onto their odor pallets. So he along with the RCMP's drug lab they developed this liquid solution. And this was so at the time this was in two thousand sixteen and they developed this liquid solution that so they essentially just turned the powdered sentinel that they find on the street until like a liquid. So that it wasn't something that you can necessarily inhale. It was in two thousand seventeen that they began actually training all of their dogs to properly detect fennel using this liquid solution. And so it turned out that after all the trials after all the testing the liquid solution. Feno the liquid is Fenella sensually equates to the powdered substance that they're finding on the street. So they're out there. There's some of these dogs are out there working now. Yes, right now, all of the RCMP's narcotic dogs that sniff out for legal substances across Canada of which there is about one hundred twenty. They're all currently trained on fennel. Wow. So do we have any idea yet? I guess how much of a dent this has made like how much how much fennel these dogs are responsible for and what the are Sam is hoping like they can do to get the stuff off the street. Well, I think for right now, they're really just trying to cut off the flow of feno that is continuing to enter Canadian cities and small towns, and they've had they've had some large success with it in twenty seventeen just a few months after RCMP's German shepherds were trained on trained how to seek out. Federal there were two major federal busts along the trans Canada highway in British Columbia, and they were made by a guy I was actually able to speak to at the innisfail headquarters in L Berta, his name was corporal Clayton could tell your and he's also Manitoba boy so long we got along pretty well. Yeah. It was really it was really interesting to hear hear what he had to say. So. He he he made his first bust not long after his dog. Dudes was trained was trained on feno was a bust of twelve thousand federal tablets. Okay. So actually explained to me because you talk to this guy because this is one thing that I actually don't know having never been never been stopped in and had a dog called on me. What are those? What are those bus? Look like, what are the dogs do when they get to the scene. It's really interesting. So in one case Clayton can tell your he pulled over a man for speeding. He was driving this old style van and he became suspicious of the person who is driving. I'm not sure what those indicators were. He wasn't. He didn't share those with me at the time. This was an ongoing the song going trial, but he became suspicious of the driver who was Nell dearly man and told I guess based on those grounds he said, I'm going to run a police dog around your vehicle. And so he goes and gets dudes. And so he goes and gets dudes at the back of his police vehicle, and he's basically on a short leash..

RCMP corporal Clayton Gary creed Fenella Canada Nell heroin Sam British Columbia innisfail cocaine Manitoba L Berta one day
"l berta" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"l berta" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

"Hi, Luke, Nathan BU. Nice to meet you over the phone k- live so many questions for you. First of all are you from Philadelphia? Originally, I'm from which. No, not many people. I'm sure you haven't heard of where I'm from. Duke L Berta. Two. Oh, we're on the same wavelength. You could say. Keep do that. Can't either. Okay. I'm really good at. Okay. So I mean, we've just been talking about you. And I feel like I knew from the get go for me anyways. I was like Blair my favorites. This one guy, but he's going to be the last one. I don't know what it is. I just really liked his video. I got this really good vibe from him. I'm the most excited for you to meet him. And that was you my friend. Yeah. And it sounds like you lived up to the expectations. You guys had so much fun. Dancing. Oh, absolutely. Yeah. Very basics. And we were ready to like go dirty dancing on that. Drew? Oh, you didn't do the big move. Now, she load of. Why? The. I must have thought we were better than we were. Oh won't want. Will you know what I have an idea down the road? Luke. If you're if you're in the final two, and by if I mean, when if it's up to me, we're gonna make you guys do the big move because that's what that's going to be the ending like, okay? Wait. I'm getting too far ahead of myself. I'm getting too excited. But yeah, that's I know sorry. But that's what's going to happen. So now, you're back in wait, nine blanking. Philadelphia. Oh, and you're okay. I love that. You're a nurse. Do you? Love your job or do. Yeah. I actually love that. I have stitches in my finger right now. But I don't do well with like blood and needle. So I don't feel like I'd be a great nurse. Well, ahead a little boxing incident, and then had a burst cyst, and yeah, they tried to remove it. But it's tach to attendant. And so then they had to so me back up. And now, I need surgery on my finger. Goodness. That's that. Good. Yes. Can you help me out? Maybe you could be my nurse can do that. Oh, I like that for oh. Producer of nurse. Oh my God. Yeah. This is this is just a little match made in heaven. Okay. And I always make Blair uncomfortable. But you guys didn't kiss. Why didn't you kiss? Because i'm. See I love honesty. I love that. You just said that that's very funny. I let me tell you. I think quirky and awkward as attractive, and I think it's terming. So next time you guys hang out. Can you please kiss her control owner? Mainland honor. Oh, guys. Oh lick when you were doing the dip like, it's steamy. This is a steamy conversation when you did the dip in the dance routine. I was like Kizer. Is a perfect opportunity. Yeah. Will you know, what I'm here to call you out? And then next time, you know..

Luke Blair Philadelphia Duke L Berta Nathan BU Kizer Producer
"l berta" Discussed on Repodcasting

Repodcasting

15:37 min | 2 years ago

"l berta" Discussed on Repodcasting

"L Berta podcast network. Powered by ATP. Have you ever watched a movie and wondered why the cast that will or that guy? Well, here's our chance to give it a try re podcasting. Hello. And welcome to another episode of re. Podcasting, I am your co host Lucia Giulio. In Colorado for us. We have to play extra nice now because people are worried that we're not saying anymore. This could be the end. On the last podcast, this okay, we're still friends. We're still friends. And I'm very glad we are because that means we get to talk about geo storm today. L you how excited. Jio star. This movie is incredible. Really bad like fantastically fide, and I'm gonna like Mitch you that I actually watched it a second time while you are brave. Oh, bad. If. Movies that it's still incredible. How bad it is. You can't believe it got made. Absolutely. In fact, I wanted to watch it awhile back for the podcast. How did this get made because they covered it it's just so crazy. The story amid and the budget of it had been the end result of it everything about it is completely bananas. So I linked to save geo storm is a shit star. Many ways. And I mean that's why we picked it for our quote unquote, so bad. It's scary episode as yesterday was Halloween. Halloween, even though it's not typical Halloween. It's pretty scary. So. Okay. So the box office. How did this do Janet? With a hundred and twenty million dollars. So they had a big budget was produced by Warner Brothers. So they had the backing of one of the biggest studios in Hollywood, a however, it is estimated that Chiel storm law approximately seventy million dollars. Oh my Gosh. gosh. Yeah. The box office, and it'd be two hundred and twenty one million, but there were still many problems with this movie. They had to do a lot of grease shoes, and five even brought in a different screen writer and a different director to oversee the re-shoot. And apparently they had to re shoot a lot of the movie like I read somewhere that it was over sixty percent of the reshot it was testing so poorly with had audiences by because of all the re-use budget just started getting more and more bloated. And it just wasn't able to recover the money. So the hundred twenty million is just estimated rate like that doesn't include, it's estimated -ly. I don't think that includes like all the rations and, and all that humble, I didn't realize that it loss. That much. Yeah..

geo storm Lucia Giulio Warner Brothers Colorado Mitch Janet Hollywood Chiel writer director seventy million dollars twenty million dollars sixty percent
"l berta" Discussed on Repodcasting

Repodcasting

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"l berta" Discussed on Repodcasting

"L Berta podcast network. Powered by ATP. Have you ever watched a movie in wondered why the cast that will man or that guy? Well, here's our chance to give it a try replied casting. Hello, and welcome to another episode of re-pot casting. I am your co host Lucy Giulio. No longer in Calgary Toronto. Yes. So we've got another phone episode for you, but it's a very special episode because we are recasting from three different movies, technically. So I fully pud casting. An exciting episodes. This might be a controversial episode. Yeah. We'll see we haven't gotten much like listener mail or feedback yet. But we might start now. Just going to save this might be the episode that finally. Some feedback maybe not good feedback.

Lucy Giulio Calgary Toronto