17 Burst results for "Kwame Nkrumah"

"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

Black Agenda Radio

06:05 min | 3 months ago

"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

"Defend proxy country. What you also have on the side and you have angola because at some point congo would invaded so many country. You have zimbabwe's that came in to fight that burundi. So really it's a tragedy that too we are talking about human lives year but it's a tragedy that is even worse than the second world war because he's been ongoing for over twenty years. Good is the african union if it cannot hope the slaughter of millions in congo a slaughter that continues to this day the african union according to kwame nkrumah vision is not the african union that we have today that i would like to stay because we want african union. But we don't want enough. Can union that defending politically on the country for it functioning. Because as you my know the african union it's functioning and the nation coming from the united states or you know members of the security council. You know even today. I'm hearing that. Israel is trying to have a seat that african union new hearing that china also and the african union and he's not that independent politically economically to be supporting. Ought to be helping the people of of course they might have said they have some intervention they have peacekeeping surely like agency programs to pull. But we all know that there's political to influence the with the united nations. And i am sure there might be some good intention but unfortunately through up keep player who are actually stopping all the agenda or good resolution that comes after the african union with regard to you secure. Et in african and specifically in the the tragedy that is happening right now. Is that china and the usa fighting over who should control the drc. One of the key problem reversed that we have at congolese or as african actually that. We are seeing how people who suffer in america. We've seen the injustice the civil we've read the history of the united states and we do not believe that the united states at the state to regardless of the party probably can all the democrats that they have an interest in defending the congo to african. Because first of all there's no security for black people in america. So how can we trust them in thinking that they can whatever dealing doing in africa that they are in the congo particularly that they have our best interests and indeed we don't believe in and he has been demonstrated that when the signing of contract in the partnership. That for africom has we've either one dow congo. Is we detective regime. I mean those regime There are not governors to protect the interest of the american not to protect the interest of the population at large. And it's almost when you look at some of the statements that has come out of american statements. And when i look at people like trump who has really denigrated almost insulted african and when you look at a person like hillary clinton when she came to the congo few years ago and towards congolese are well you have to get over it. You know women have been raped. People have died the serious issue off breach of international framework legal framework how can she talk to congolese and say to congolese women particularly that. We have to get over it. I don't think that she would say that's to jewish people who have leave the holocaust up to today. The holocaust criminal are being changed and not being who's on trial how dare did sake to congolese to move on and to into dialogue and to accept a creamy nor it is an insult to our humanity. And i would just like to stay that. Just we see black people suffering in america that that you might not is being then greeted. We do not believe that any project any policy that the american bringing in africa congress particularly is for the interest of the population is just for the interest of the multinational of the only gulf of those who want to control the resources in the congo. That was marie clarify. The women's international league for peace and freedom. Shinyuka powell is co director of educational studies at tufts school of the arts and co author of an essay titled kissing cousins critical race theories racial realism and afro-pessimism social death. These are subjects that are hotly debated in black academic circles and among some activists but not the stuff of daily black conversation. We talked with professor powell about the relevance of racial realism and afro-pessimists thinking. About how my co author. Kevin henry. And i talk how between Theory way surrealism. An apple pessimism social death. I wouldn't say there's a should but what we look at is in many ways analogous to the relationship that had been set up between civil rights civil rights movement in its framing of legal rights juxtapose with critical race theories understanding the shortcoming of the civil rights. Legal framing that. Saying i would say. Similarly a relationship exists between creates theory and upper pessimism at larch afro-pessimism social death which is all to say and the entire peace it also added say also as someone who's inservice to black liberation for all black people will often just tried to make sense.

african union congo united states kwame nkrumah vision burundi angola china zimbabwe security council africom united nations africa Israel Shinyuka powell tufts school of the arts trump hillary clinton professor powell Kevin henry
"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

Black Agenda Radio

06:58 min | 3 months ago

"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

"This is black agenda. Radio a weekly hour of african american political thought and action. Welcome to the radio magazine. That brings you news commentary and analysis from a black left perspective. I'm margaret kimberly. Along with my co-host glenn ford coming up. New and updated terms have entered the vocabulary of black liberation. We'll speak with an academic and activists about critical race theory racial realism and afro-pessimism. And we'll take a look at the history and current struggles of colombo's the autonomous black end indigenous settlements of brazil but i a globally important webinar on us militarization of africa through its military command. Africom will be held on december. Fourth one of the panelists is marie claire farai congolese member of the women's international league for peace and freedom farai currently lives in great britain a country where like the united states. Most people are not even aware that the greatest genocide since world war two is still unfolding in the democratic republic of congo. If he's lenient a tragedy what he's going on in the drc here. I mean as i'm speaking to you. I'm not only raising my own voices marry clara congolese dice for living in the uk but actually raising the voices of congolese don't have a voice. I international level if he's known we've according to the report that taught there to the un the international red cross the international commission over more than five point. Four million people in total died in the either as a form of direct or indirect consequences of the ongoing racy snail output imposed on under congolese population in an attempt. These manca the congo. And i mean it seems the fall of the battle. In wall at your. No that'd be a change in jail pony picker reconfiguration. The dictatorship of mobutu that was imposed on the communist people and for those who know the history of the congo will ultimately know that we have been colonized by john. But you know the congo is a state that was actually put together. Dishes of different tribes. That came together different kingdom and they created the congo economic state. If we can say that was money by your team for two and then you know congolese regardless of that they resisted these oppression slavery and colonisation and then in nineteen sixty. We've all african and african liberation movement with kwame nkrumah and lune by you know front now. All the great leader won t the liberation of africa and clearly. The liberation of its people so lumumba advocates seethe quite vehemently but unfortunately the united states came to play with particularly after their involvement in the war and they came into play by people's names mba. So really be said the ongoing. I mean when we talk today of five point four million people. It's really irrelevant because if you look at it. We don't have specific data to even tell you the total of people who died in the congo over sixty years nearly now and it's over million. It's more than the second will work could together the amount of people who have died and was dying and one of the things that i want to tell you is. You've asked me whether the numbers known in europe you're in the state of people know that so many people have died. The mainstream media has really been silent about it. And i will tell you why the mainstream media has been silenced. I of over when you listen you hear about the war to have you ever had about to go she colombo. Have you heard about that place before. I don't see many people have heard about this. Concourse she columbia but everybody knows about world war two. Everybody knows about the bombing of hero. She might not get lucky but nobody talk about chicago. Way she colombo. He's actually a small town in the congo. Where the mining of uranium they're uranium that was used to generate the atomic bomb was mine so that down the actually associated we've the publication of the atomic bomb and. Fortunately nobody here about that mine. We hear about nagasaki's we hear about russia but we don't hear about chicago columbia with the mining side where to a mining active activity that people have suffer not only due to the right. You're active agent. Which is uranium but also the andro mental disaster the poverty the demonization because goes the went through minder where mining because the congo at that time was still under the belgian oppressive regime. So really why would the media speak about the five point. Four million people are dying in the congo because they haven't spoken about she long way. So as know the media east controlled by multi national corporation while profiting from the war in the congo. Today we're going to speak about us because we and significant to them they just profiting from anything. Those who have profited from the war the second war and use the bump. I give the same people who are profiting right now at congolese people dying so really. Dc's why there is nothing in the media. As because of the trustee that is happening in the congo and who are the perpetrators in the death of millions since nineteen ninety-six. Well as we all know that joe politiques at the moment they say say if you control the chic or mining you control the world and we all know who is the one who has drop the bump anywhere she might. Negative vacuum is the united states of america. Who are the people fighting over the control of resources in the world. he's doing five permanent member of the united nations security council. The united states the uk hans.

congo margaret kimberly marie claire farai women's international league f colombo international red cross international commission manca glenn ford Africom united states of america africa mobutu kwame nkrumah great britain clara lumumba brazil un
"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:31 min | 7 months ago

"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on Fresh Air

"I definitely want investigate that phrase what he means by that in the aftermath of. President. Kennedy's assassination. He's not cheering the fact that Kennedy was assassinated. He's saying that chickens come home to roost exemplifies that the United States has been using violence against marginalized groups violence overseas and that violence domestically and overseas that's been deployed in the service of American Empire and racism and imperialism came back and boomeranged and killed the sitting president but he was trying to tell people that they shouldn't be surprised because of. The way in which the United States is mistreated. So many different groups of people that was the final Straw and the relationship between the honorable Mohamed and Malcolm X. Malcolm had been told to stand down and not say anything that could be misinterpreted about president. Kennedy's debt Malcolm is constantly at protest. He's constantly at demonstrations and when reporters asked him, what are you doing here? Malcolm X.? He says I'm here to observe right So. Malcolm X. basically kicked out of the nation of Islam because of his outspoken. Political views because of what he said about the chickens coming home to roost after Kennedy was assassinated and also I think because a larger Mohammed, the leader of the nation is getting kind of jealous of Malcolm X. and the power that he has the charisma that he has and the following that he's built. How does Malcolm X. Star to change? Once he's ousted from the nation of Islam I think those changes really predate him being ousted but I think what we see. Once he's an independent political activists. He does a press conference on March Twelfth Nineteen Sixty Four. When we think about Malcolm as an independent organizer, he says, look I apologize to the civil rights activists that I've made may have called names to publicly and he says, I, forgive them for any names they've called me he says he wants to be a part of the black freedom struggle, but he also makes the argument that the black freedom struggle should not be a civil rights movement because when you're a civil rights movement in. His words you're in the jurisdiction of Uncle Sam and this is really a human rights movement. So Malcolm is criticizing the war in Vietnam in nineteen sixty four. He is traveling to Cairo for the Organization of African Unity Conference and making diplomatic ties with so many different third. World, Middle Eastern and African leaders. Malcolm had an office at the United Nations that he had been using since the late nineteen fifties Malcolm had met up with Fidel Castro in September nineteen sixty in Harlem. He met with Kwame Nkrumah who's the Prime Minister of Ghana both in Harlem and in Ghana the transitions remarkably into this international global political statesman. And a little later when he travels to several Muslim countries, he rethinks what it means to be a Muslim and he also rethinks what it means to be white. Whether he should make some kind of alliance with white people. Yeah when we think about Malcolm and his Muslim Faith Malcolm had Mitt. White, Muslims in the Middle East in one thousand, nine, hundred, fifty, nine he knew that they were white Muslims and he never personally believed in the nation of Islam's mythology about white people being invented by a black scientist named Yaqoob..

Malcolm X. Malcolm Malcolm X. Kennedy President Mohamed United States Middle Eastern Organization of African Unity Prime Minister of Ghana Fidel Castro Harlem Ghana Vietnam Cairo United Nations scientist Kwame Nkrumah
"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

The Guilty Feminist

08:12 min | 7 months ago

"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

"You've inclusive techs in that in terms of content, actually that are so many amazing. Black British authors wanted the government tight the opportunity to say okay. Let's take this off. That's. night. Do you think if we call to Maya Angelou ten they might. On the syllabus I'm. But this. Isn't a removing my Angeles Folk? There's an intent behind it. That's the whole point is not like they didn't know what they were doing. They knew what they were doing. That's why they removed it. Again, it's a brainwashing system because I remember in school. When I watched my parents menu, watch roots old way to the end by in school, women numbers roots old way to the end. We only see the bit that we're black before kidnapped, and though inflamed knows the end of the story. But, that's a way of Ziming. Somebody's mind that you are supposed to think this who you are, so it's I'm not surprised, but this is the bacteria on all the time. You have to fight the system again on May three Rd quick points because of what you're saying is really important. First of all fats that. You're spying. Love Fast Yeah the first gun show fired start logo. Him was five bucks on Aden. Ends loners alleging when we told you. This is my second fact. When we talk about black history with us. We're GONNA. Buy His shoe. That is any different registry of people that are plow. He pull will around they Smith Okay. There will not like. He's walking rapper. Kwame Nkrumah. Black men for Winston and we find that culturally appropriate, because that's the Jamaican night where it's Jamaican them almost famous prime ministers Winston so the concept of black This bubble that the pull things out of sticking funny people is is actually correct ways correct. Is that history? It's been whitewashed black history simply in black. Go back into the history there ready learning. You can learn about black people still not about World War Two. You cannot about black people not about the shooter's okay. It's think that is an institutional line which they don't. Struggle to communicate this for some reason. Why saying we want black people in the curriculum, we're not saying what black is you're saying we want you arrange the curriculum you ready have. On on school upset point institutions slow to change. We know this because they've even awesome is a change. Four hundred years. People are quick to challenge if we can empower themselves to do one thing is privilege. People is like those books on that Jesus sequin wife, but your bookshelves at home. They can have whatever they want. Okay well. Can we go one of our campaign on the schools, but the other part is like how. How. Can we empower all cells and off homes to concurrently empowered things about what happened in the school? My friend has a daughter. You went to school and was studying Christopher Columbus offenders from Barbados and Trinidad and when she came home with homework, talking about how great Columbus was, she could sit down and say by the way he was in. Egypt got lost all the time more time. He knows it sunny funny. When I was teaching in year to one of our topics was Chris. Columbus my head teaches actually in Australia mom say he's always been for. Opt to Christopher. Columbus is amazing. He's great a anyway then. I? Changed the planet and I remember doing at a certain way, and he was literally sounded. Side mortified as minded seventy roads. I. Love facts of and also as well. The facts eight. Times is that that's not what I was told. In scope of see grew up in Australia. That was his education. It was well. This is what we need to unite. This is actually what needs cough, but I actually go a detention for saying the Columbus got lost, he never found America because I grew up his easily talk with so I knew about I watch cartoons of Christopher Columbus, but I never understood. Has Somebody found gland that already had people in it so in my year nine paper. I basically reflected on the fact that I think. I said he couldn't have on my teacher telling me she said. You need to change your. You fail and I got detention for. Harsh! You writes the reason that native American is because. He thought he was in India is now. He wasn't the brightest tune in the. In the box will say. Shoppers to the box doesn't reflect well me either. Maybe be unrelated to Christopher Columbus. He will off the box. Can I ask first of all Leyla Hussein? Is that anything? You came to say that? You didn't get to say that you'd like to leave on the table. And how can we help you? What can we do? While upset everything. I needed to say I think for me right now. My number one priority is that safe space for black women, so if you bought my instagram page, we have a google form for the women to fill in this. We're going to be interviewing. Couple of other back. Therapists will be joining us, so we're going to be running, so we run out on Thursdays snappy hoping to do more days i. think so me right now. We need space to vent. Apologized that's quite critical to me and if you want unpaid. If you support the dining project, the be also great. So, financially support the Danica project. If you're a black woman and you need some safe space to talk exclusively to other Black Women Leyla is. has set up an amazing productivity money to fund as well. We do actually charity, so people have donated. People actually donate money to us as we speak, so that will be. We're GONNA happen yeah because I have a you. Know we didn't do that, so I set up enterprise company a year ago while I'm dealing with emotion, bobby walks up. We just do any under that, so go in UK. Is that your instagram yet? Go to latest exciting K. and get involved either if you're a black woman. If. You need to save space, or if you'd like to donate and just amplify what ladies don't if you don't have any money, that's fine. With other black women, space is so important, all share with other people who are white or other races who may donate or amplify and support. What can we do to help you? I'm still. Working on a project, so wherever I kind of caught the sweet up Negros to support replaced in commenting or just trying to spread awareness for. Leyla doing with the GM thing unless something that we need to spend more, when as soon the next time I go on the streets I. Make sure I have a price for that, too, because this is something. Really Important Sir. Man, it's honestly. Amazing active women! Where can we fully you at day? Underscore talks which ad underscore Ta, KS and I really recommend you follow adding on instagram because she's a model as well to so many amazing images as well as much amazing black lives matter staff. It's really really good my. Experience has been augmented massively since following. An Is there anything else you came to say to get off your chest about black women goes mattering before you go i. just hope that something like this because I've not been the put 'cause myself before. I let the our eight onto the shows. Thank you very much deborah and also thank you very much stanford as well because I wouldn't have that connection to today, but I think that needs to be more of this like. I'm still I'm a twenty six year old flat. Famous I'm still learning myself every day. I'm still trying to figure out who I am. An NASA journey that will. So I think. by Venus fiber other people do doing. It's good because you're cutting off.

Christopher Columbus Columbus instagram Leyla Hussein Australia Maya Angelou Winston Kwame Nkrumah NASA Jesus deborah Ziming Aden google Smith UK Egypt Chris India
"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

06:05 min | 8 months ago

"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"Twelve ninety nine save four hundred dollars, only for a limited time to learn more go to sleepnumber dot, com. Guys it's bobby bones. I host the bobby bones show, and I'm pretty much always sleepy because I wake up at three o'clock in the morning a couple of hours later, I get all my friends together. We get into a room and we radio show wish our allies. We tell our stories. We try to find as much good in the world if he. He possibly can, and we looked through the news of the day that you care about also your favorite country artists are always stopping by to hang out and share their lives and music, too, so wake up with a bunch of my friends on ninety eight point seven W, M, Z Q in Washington, DC, or wherever the rotates you on the iheartradio APP. Hello welcome to this day in history class where we flipped through the book of history and bring you a new page every day. The day was July first nineteen sixty. The new constitution. Went into effect, transforming the country from one with a parliamentary system to one with a Republican form of government. The Republic of Ghana was formerly proclaimed and Prime Minister Kwame. Mate and Crema was inaugurated as president. Before independence. Ghana was known as the Gold Coast a British colony. The exploited and exported the resources in the Gold Coast, including gold, diamonds, ivory, Cocoa, timber, and Macanese. As this economy developed, it's supported. The construction of harbors realize it's schools in hospitals. European interference in the. Politics of the region had broken down the traditional social order of the groups there. But by the end of world, War Two people have begun protesting for more autonomy from the British. Sentiments of nationalism had reached a peak and movements developed in opposition to colonial administration with the goal of independence. A moderate party called the united. Gold Coast Convention for UGC formed in Nineteen, forty, seven to pursue constitutional reform and eventual self-government. Kwame Nkrumah was the general secretary of the party, but in nineteen forty nine, he split with the U. D.. C. C. and formed the Revolutionary Convention People's Party or CPI. Crew in this EP called for self government now and it gained widespread popular support. In nineteen fifty, the CPAP began a campaign of so-called positive action, encouraging nonviolent resistance and strikes against colonial authorities. In chroma was soon arrested and imprisoned for sedition, but the C. p. p., one a majority of the seats in the first elections for the Legislative Assembly and in Chroma was released from prison to become the leader of government business. In one thousand, fifty, two in crew became the first prime minister of the Gold Coast. In Nineteen fifty-six, the British Togoland Trust territory integrated with the Gold Coast. And on March, Sixth Nineteen fifty seven after centuries of being a center for the export of enslaved people, and then being subject to European control the Gold Coast gained its independence from Britain and became an independent self-governing member of the Commonwealth of Nations. The, country was renamed Ghana. It was the first black sub Saharan country in colonial Africa to achieve independence. In chrome was a Marxist and Pan Africanist, and he viewed the independence of Ghana as an important step for the entire continent of Africa. Though his rule was increasingly regarded as authoritarian. Infrastructure and social conditions and Ghana. The working class was driving, but the country was still an independent constitutional monarchy with Queen Elizabeth the second as head of state. In April of nineteen sixty, a plebiscite or constitutional referendum took place on the issue of Ghana becoming a republic. About Eighty eight percent of the voters supported the change. In crew was elected president of the Republic with eighty nine percent of the vote. He was inaugurated on July first nineteen, sixty when the new constitution of Ghana went into effect. Ghana became a republic in the Commonwealth of Nations. Though CHROMA had support, initially, people begin to resent him and the administration, which was suffering under debt in corruption. There were several assassination attempts on the president's life. For years after Ghana became, a Republican Crema was elected president a constitutional amendment. May Ghana a one state and Chroma declared himself life president of the country in the party. But as in Chroma tried to advance his vision of a united Africa and empowered activists, the economy and living standards in Ghana furred an opposition to the regime grew. In February of Nineteen, sixty six, while the president was visiting China in Crewmax, government was overthrown by a coup of the Ghana Armed Forces. The National Liberation Council took over the government and suspended the constitution. And chroma found refuge in Guinea. Until Nineteen eighty-one, when Jerry Rawlings came to power Ghana's government saw many coups and alternating military and civilian regimes. I'm Eve, Jeffcoat, and hopefully you know a little more about history today than you did yesterday. If you have any burning questions or comments to tell us you can find us on twitter, instagram and facebook at t D. I. H podcast. You can subscribe to this day in history class on Apple podcasts, the iheartradio APP or wherever you get your podcasts. We'll see you tomorrow..

Ghana Gold Coast Chroma president Ghana Armed Forces bobby bones Commonwealth of Nations Crema Kwame Nkrumah Prime Minister Kwame Revolutionary Convention Peopl united Africa Jerry Rawlings Apple Queen Elizabeth prime minister Washington British Togoland Trust National Liberation Council
"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

07:42 min | 9 months ago

"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Me honored to be had from the mountain fastness of phone northern New England just a stone's throw from the Canadian border the one place in America actually the Canadian borders to one place in America whether or not that's just the tip any of you playing your looted and burned out downtown's if you're looking for somewhere to go to as you know rush is off for a couple of days he said these have these eight months Andy's been went well and he's just kind of unwinding getting himself back together again he's taking the day off doesn't wanna be disturbed by news those who want to be disturbed by phone right foreign guest house he's just taken it easy with Catherine he will return later in the week we have the great chart Harmon Fauria yeah all American we got we got one of two American guest hosts on the the show it's cold what do they call it bringing the supply chain harm us on up with the cheap foreign content we're gonna have an authentic all American guest host a tomorrow in the shape of tall Hermann wow that photo opportunity didn't go that well for the Democrat leadership as you know who yesterday Nancy Pelosi Chuck Schumer and that whole con I go down on their knees and actually getting getting down on your knees is pretty impressive when you arrive Chuck and Nancy is aged son not to be underestimated but they were taking a knee at the capitol and for some reason they were wearing these seven colorful priestly Raymond's I am an ex I I wasn't quite sure what was going on about that but apparently it was like twenty close the colors of the candy cloth of the Ashanti people of Ghana that's the goal scorer the Gold Coast if you're an old school imperialists like may have became not gonna in nineteen fifty seven under its first prime minister Kwame Nkrumah it didn't last long and precipitated a precipitated a chain of even more unstable governments anyways again to call for the Ashanti people and on Twitter Nancy and Chuck were mocked for that cultural appropriation for basically saying as the old phone will be a new Jew Anke chat said virtue signaling a buy a culturally appropriating that god H. totally condescending she says I'll just say Africans is so cute and all of your colorful dresses well some of these dresses and patterns and colors and fabrics actually do means something to us so I'm just hold on just hold off on Joe blow of cheap knock off candy calls made from a factory beyond the Wuhan institute of virology don't just west M. keep Chinese knock off candy cloth and culturally appropriate tests although black Twitter users have compared it to the film get out which came out I think two or three years ago in which the parents of a gal who's dating a black guy he comes to the she brings him to the house to meet them and they do try to show how cool they are with it by raving about what a splendid fellow Jesse Owens walls of the Berlin Olympics so we love photo shop the aged and wizened Chuck and Nancy into the parents roles in the film get out twenty seventeen they will look at the events of today look like that of the film that film mistress madly loves the Black Panther film over the Marvel Comics film about the black superhero who comes from the kingdom of Wakanda in Africa and it Chuck and Nancy and kind of look like the tribal elders at a coronation in the kingdom of Wakanda taking any as they play the national anthem of what kinda which I think is what kind of fool of mine anyway that's what can to mind when I look at Chuck and Nancy all Medicare Davis says this is black face this is the equipment taking the candy calls of the S. and P. people and dropping to a knee itself but for well the dropping today he is suddenly like blackface actually that's the next level in Toronto they had a big black lives matter demonstration and there's a white guy and the other sympathize with the white guy he apparently has a few mental health issues but but Wilder if why why because we got the white supremacy thing which is like the biggest mental health issue that the public health guys just said that's like the most toxic widespread public health age and there's no hydroxy clover Quinn you can you can just chug the drain Drano down yeah five the white supremacy is the biggest mental health issue in the world and this guy in Toronto had is he got a bit confused because he's looking at all these people the single people taking a knee in the street and he thinks because it's so bad to be white because you got the white privilege you got the white supremacy so he gets confused and to show how much he likes black people he actually put on blackface this poor guy and the Toronto police of course arrested him and dragged him away which they never did when Justin Trudeau blacktop and sang went down on the left via an old Alabama may they never did it with Justin Trudeau but then to use the site that is I'll tell you something else is on we all know blackface is bad unless your a Democrat governor in Virginia blackface is bad all the prime minister candidate faces bad done try back face at home boys and girls is extremely bad but I saw something in west some young lady is trying to show solidarity and white co it is trying to show solidarity on Twitter or Instagram with the black lives matter thing so to show solidarity she paints Hoffa face black and so it done you know she's nineteen twenty she's not old enough to remember Al Jolson going Miami so she doesn't know anything about any of that so she just does the like the half the black face and everyone's got all this is so cool to show that we're all one and everything that's not what the first twenty comments are and then it all starts to head south from there but in a sense blackface is logical if it's so easy to add one point why should people blacktop to condescend to black people right now all eyes because they thought they were superior was a form of superior condescension now white people like hiring in shame and putting on blackface is a wave so I never really wanted to be what I can't do anything about it if I could if you could just give me a drug and shoot it into my own and then I could I could I could tell I could just turn black and I really feel I fit it in on these demonstrations are but instead now but then if you wanted a rationale for black face to make a comeback then that guy in Toronto may be on to something I took a closer look at the you know this twelve year old mayor of Minnesota who agreed with everything of the demonstration except outright abolition all of the Minneapolis police department and then they said then they will boo him and he just walks off from that is.

New England America
"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

12:47 min | 9 months ago

"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"Period of kings our outlook is quite distinct and different king king believes in the American promise yeah he has a belief in American exceptionalism into he holds out a response from this hold on if you've got your eyes an intellectual out say king understands and has been reading Marxism he's been reading the black social gospel he really learns more about Gandhi in a practical way through BYOD Rustin but he had listened to Howard Thurman he had listened to Benjamin Mays is a great book about morning to king junior in the black social gospel tradition so that black social gospel tradition is very important because it's an it's a it's both black but it's open to interracial coalitions and it's very last in the social democratic way that's connected to pacifism we've got people like AJ musty we've got the great and brilliant Ella Baker priest Nick who's part of the fellowship of reconciliation we've got the Congress of racial equality empire Rustan's so it is this lasted in we're talking about the nineteen forty this interracial laughed that is interested in radical democracy changes absolutely invested in that but like you said earlier the Cold War liberalism of the nineteen fifties one of the things that scholars have shown in people's lives through this now is that it's a more radical time United States of America in nineteen forty three and it is in nineteen fifty three democracy and racial justice in progress are not linear there are starts and stops R. fits and starts in real setback so ten years later from nineteen forty three to fifty three it is catastrophic not just for the left but for American democracy and for justice and for human rights so you're in a worse situation in nineteen fifty four may seventeenth when the brown decision the desegregation decision is passed then you were in nineteen forty four nineteen forty four is much more hopeful nineteen forty four so hopeful you're thinking you might get black senators and governors by the nineteen fifties that's how hopeful that is and that's what Paul Robeson is in Peekskill ten twelve fifteen thousand but then there's two thousand white said premises who also marched in rice in Peekskill right so you're getting the Truman doctrine the Marshall Plan these are all white supremacist plans to structure a new global mortar that anti black that's anti human that rest on racial segregation in the in the the rations of black and brown people globally and that order wins again you're listening to a Neil Joseph Walker of the sword and the shield the rebels revolutionary lives of Malcolm X. and Martin Luther king junior will be opening up the phone lines all in about five minutes or so at six oh eight two five six two thousand and one extension nine sugar questions or comments one thing's interesting me very much in the in the book peel Joseph is mean that both men Malcolm Ian Martin acquired an internationalist perspective we will move to it somewhat but both traveled abroad portents of battle a little bit further yeah you know for MalcolmX mean if they wanted to bet I have about Malcolm it's Malcolm and with with Cassius clay before his Muhammad Ali in nineteen sixty four at the United Nations after Cassius clay has won the heavyweight championship of the world against Sonny Liston in February of sixty four and what's interesting about that is that Malcolm has a long history with the United Nations Malcolm had first travelled overseas in nineteen fifty nine and he went to the Middle East for five weeks in preparation of Donna belies Muhammad Sajjad trip to Mecca he meets up with Anwar el Sadat who's been vice president of Egypt the future president of Egypt he meets up with all these different diplomats he's in Cairo he's in cartoon he's he's really writing back to black newspapers that the folks who are in the Middle East and Africa are on the side of civil rights and on the side of black freedom struggles and racial justice so in nineteen sixty MalcolmX meets with Fidel Castro in September of nineteen sixty eight the Theresa hotel in Harlem he he he meets up with Kwame Nkrumah the prime minister of Ghana he's meeting up with all these different ambassadors and their deputies and their apparatchiks all throughout the early nineteen sixties so Malcolm is taking this idea of band dong in this idea of revolutionary pan Africanism this idea of third world revolutionary transformation and he's really making it practical he's connecting these alliances he's writing to these ambassadors so by the time he goes overseas for twenty four weeks twenty five weeks in nineteen sixty four five weeks from April to may twenty first of sixty four and then from July thirteenth to November twenty first nineteen sixty four he is in everywhere from Tanzania to Nigeria to Liberia he's in Cairo for the conference the organization of African unity conference he's he's all over the place trying to build alliances and Malcolm has access to offices in the United Nations via his friendships with Africa and the Middle East and third world diplomats right so Malcolm his notion of sort of this this political revolution that's connected to connecting the local to the global is very very practical when he goes to United when he goes to Africa in nineteen sixty four he said it at all these different universities he's allowed to speak to people's different nation states an African political kingdoms legislatures he meets with with sitting presidents and prime ministers so you really a rise in Africa and sixty four as a statesman and that's when he's talking about turning the civil rights movement into human rights movement he's saying that he's going to go to the United Nations and charge the United States with violating the human rights of African Americans and certainly that's something that the black freedom movement and Langston Hughes reminds him had been trying to do in the nineteen forties we think about we charge genocide and worked at the council on African affairs and people like Ella Baker Lorraine Hansberry so many different people were doing Paul Robeson DU bois he's trying to resurrect that black internationalist on tradition when we think about Dr king doctor king goes to Donna king meets with incriminating fifty seven he is they're winning crewmen becomes prime minister any rights in these very moved by including a accepting the prime ministership in the same clothes that he been imprisoned incarcerated with in the nineteen forties is being part of a convention people's party he spent a month in India in nineteen fifty nine doctor king he meets up with untouchables and looks at the racial caste systems in India and really comes to believe right there have been a Tiffany in nineteen fifty nine that is mission in life is really to end global poverty and you see the connection between racial caste systems globally and and poverty you know when we think about king king's internationalism continues he meets up with Ben Bella Dan president of Algeria in nineteen sixty two booking is much more invested in nonviolent revolutionary so Malcolm is really the man of that age because so many of those anti colonial movements are violent our our our violent ourselves defensive I think kings with internationalism resurrects in the context of both winning the Nobel Prize in nineteen sixty four going to Scandinavia and I have a nice a nice vignette where Malcolm is in the audience December seventeenth nineteen sixty four Harlem Nelson Rockefeller governor of New York all these people or their Malcolm sit next to Andy young future mayor of Atlanta future United Nations ambassador and United States ambassador or did you end and you know he's listening to king's entire speech and speaks positively of it a few days later and king really the internationalism that Malcolm really really an anti colonialism that he rift reflects and represents an personifies because Malcolm came out against the Vietnam War as early as nineteen sixty four king really comes out really during the last year of his wife when that context I say there's a radical king and then there's a revolutionary king which in the last two chapters in the April fourth nineteen sixty four riverside address but he's really taken from Malcolm and Stockley Carmichael historically have been the biggest anti war protester up until king comes out against the Vietnam War but that riverside speech where he said the United States and the greatest purveyor of violence in the world and he says that how can people tell me to be nonviolent when I'm demonstrating in the south but when I say the United States should be non violent to little Vietnamese children they say I'm being a traitor that that is a brilliant speech and what he does is the link the failures of the great society to the war mongering and the war machine that is being built up and Vietnam is very interesting for all of us were Americans because even though you have the Korean War Vietnam starts the conflicts of perpetual war that we've been in for the last fifty five years we've never stopped warmonger never here's a link king changed clothes out the president United States the U. S. Congress can from the time you start calling them out he lives only one more year so the riverside speech is the year to the day of his assassination six PM Memphis time on Thursday April fourth fourth nineteen sixty eight did you listen to Neil Joseph the story of Joseph sword and the shield the revolutionary lines of Malcolm X. and Martin Luther king Jr with a question or a comment since the call two five six two thousand and one want to come back choose the significance of the Cold War and all this that is both men came of age during the Cold War in operated during its high on but of course the Cold War point you felt as they pointed out the heightened Parkerson old US claims regarding the country's being the leader of the free world Cold War liberalism course blunted freedom dreams as you write on it so let's talk about that a little bit beep the limits of Cold War liberalism Lyndon Johnson following his sass nation and John Kennedy of course launches a great society campaign it advocates for various civil rights legislations but is also major escalator the war in Vietnam a war that Malcolm certainly inch us directly at the same time well no call out that question more directions the speech on S. riverside church that Martin made later on but that whole Cold War neutral background resonates today as well yeah absolutely I mean the Cold War really blind the idea of of racial integration even as symbolically in people like married to Jack and Cold War civil rights and force women penny von Eschen have shown you know the the the the jazz towards that the state department tried to do Kennedy and the race speech of June eleven sixty three it's going to be distributed around the world but when we think about what is the Cold War actually in fact does what it does what does it do what is to prevent well the rhetoric of the Cold War not only does it set in place this political geography of the United States versus the USSR and and the the U. using the rest of the world is these these chess pieces including Africa especially Africa Latin.

"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on Stance

Stance

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on Stance

"Our and it will come out on the twenty first of this month on BBC, please check it out, because I'll be sharing some of my favorite podcasts one that I'm really loving right now is could tell them I am is on NPR. And it's about kind of small moments that define who we are through Muslim voices. You know, it's just great content is lovely stories, and you just learn lows in it's just beautifully done voices include tan France from queer eye actress earlier, Shoukat, Remmy, USA, reser, as lon-, and lots of voice. Voices yet. Check out, tell them I am on NPR, who say, for the Manchester piece, which are talked about just earlier, I interviewed Adams, eighteen, who was inquiries folk, which is a TV program that celebrating its twentieth anniversary. He is. Now, autistic direct of hope theatre, which is known for beta and fitter. So those collect stories and interviews, and that will be interpreted in the theater with actors, he created a piece, could be more Martin, which trended on Twitter hours, ofter, the death of a guy called Martin hats off to the Manchester Rena bombing in may twenty seventeen I went to see the plan. It's touring nationally it. So so beautiful, but here is Adams aint talking over about the play. So just come over hers was would be more Martin. It's, it's funny because a lot of the play is set in the village on canal street. Now, Martin was a big personality. He was always in the gay bars of Manchester. Everyone knew Martin and I. I actually I was I was working to Manchester pride. And I saw a boy with a tattoo of digital Barlow on his leg. I remember walking past him again. How why is someone called tattoo digital Bali from Coronation Street on their leg and just thinking, fabulous? That was, and then sadly he died. And I wanted to tell his story that was Adam Zane from hope, to you're going to hear him in Manchester piece just bit later. Also really excited to say that Tate Liverpool will have the first major you catch submission of artists and activists Keith hiring, it starts mid June until the tenth of November. If really good to rediscover and have a look of his artworks that, you know, some of them haven't even been in the UK before, and I feel like he's really speaking to generation now as well issues, you know, dictatorship, racism, homophobia, and, you know, so many different things he covers capitalism the environment for his beautiful str-. Liking pitches. So check out Keith haring first major UK exhibition at Tate, Liverpool until the tenth of November, a few months ago, we had app turned director at you Endo in the podcast. She was talking about Richard the second if you remember that she wanted to share something that she absolutely loves it's called the collected autobiographies of Maya Angelou she's gonna talk a little bit. Dow about why so important. I've just finished playing my Angelou on the radio. She's a writer who was raped as a seven year old didn't speak for four years grew up in the safe. She lived through civil rights. She was friends with Martin Luther King, Malcolm X. She lived in Ghana. She knew Kwame Nkrumah. She knew all the great jazz musicians. She was a good friend of James Baldwin and she's had a life and what I love about my Angelou is bad things happen to her in her life. She lived a rough and ready life. I worked with in the eighty s her life, stories, a real encouragement that you can start from the toughest toughest starts on. You can sort of the greatest heights. And along the way, you can inspire an encourage and hold people's hearts, up in them moments of darkness and their times. Darkness, also to go back to pas podcast. I think it was a couple of months ago as well. Maybe three months ago, we featured an artist could trap times ten if you remember him, I met him out and about and just discovered his music. And I think I said, you know, he's track at any been up for like a week and he'd had a fifty thousand views anyway. He have his debut gig at the Ota academy in isn't and on the ninth of August. So please check that out. That's trap times ten first gig..

Maya Angelou Martin Luther King Manchester James Baldwin NPR Adams Kwame Nkrumah Barlow Tate Liverpool BBC USA Keith haring lon France Keith hiring Martin Adam Zane Twitter UK Ota academy
"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on Van Lathan's The Red Pill

Van Lathan's The Red Pill

12:10 min | 2 years ago

"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on Van Lathan's The Red Pill

"Finish. And and I did, you know, and and I said it was some of the most gruesome what I've ever done. But I also remember the commitment the actors, and I mean, you've seen the level of acting in the film, most acid most of the most of them have never wand everybody, and it was random like I did a little casting. Call a few people came and in the rest of Slyke pulling people off the street and being like, hey, do you act if not I'll like if not are you interested can you come down? And before I knew it, man. Listen, everything about not having money on time was that we were all we had time for was rehearsal. So like every time I'd be like, okay. We're shooting in two months. Two months coming. We will have money. So it'd be like let's get back to where Hurson. So we did that for eight months. Oh, listen, people have to quit their jobs be will have to you know, just couldn't continue. It was crazy. But, but I mean, the the advantage of that was that because I was used to tell the actors, look we're living when acting if if these moments of troops are captured then it doesn't matter where the work goes everybody can identify truth. You don't even have to know the context of what's going on. You can just watch it and go this is a truth. I can relate to it. I'm in. And so that's what I kept telling them and you'll like people learn how to so people learn how to write bikes people in just things that they didn't know how to do in real life. You know, found for the film, you know, and the amount of investment that the actors were giving me I was like I can't fail them. I I can't say even to the point where when it was done. I was like it's not. Enough. If. Just one city sees this film. I I have to take it around the world like really an honor of their work as a tribute to their work because the everything that happens a lot for us is that you put in so much and get so little back minot, and I was like look guys. And and I've been so thankful that I've been able to take one actor at least the lead actors each to one of the openings around the world to the little girl was in New York for the premiere Times Square urban world from festival should never been on a plane before this was like, this is like a whole world view. Right. Exploded to being theater sold out. Everybody applauding you as a nine year old. You know, what I mean lately up and changes what she thinks is possible on earth owner, if it's incredible the lead actor, so we just we just played we've played in about ten countries. Now in a few of the actors have been able to travel with us to see the reaction of audiences and for me, and that's probably the biggest payment like. I mean, we have a lot of money pale. But that experience for them to see the work being appreciated on such a level is is never happened Voss Roger hook up with the Ray. I mean, Eva man, who f- I save has been a fan of my music for awhile. All really, yes. Shoddy able to her name. So so that's you know, that's a. Listen, listen, and to help you you're not gonna clap forever. Do Rene lie at first. I'm Elizabeth we got Nick may here. This is able to as brother and you're not going to clap for her. What are you didn't know that that's a way? Wow. That's talking about what he was talking about. This is this is rarely tell me is. It was brother right way to find out telling you this man was outside talking about listening. If I would have directed some. I might have done some things you didn't know you were talking about the way. The way he didn't say that Eva lease able he didn't say that. I did it that was fan being a scam. In the scam. Again. So, but yes, so how did you how did you hook up with the right now, man? So the film film played at urban world and to lane was there to lane, you know, as the Ryan, she does everything an amazing amazing, you know person. But also just a film head, you know, and but also was to have people in those positions that are film has. Yes. So they'll just love, obviously, there's a business part is. Yes, what is always important to have people that actually love the film and. In a lot of just come over. And tell you to on the why don't you put a robot in the? Yeah, is is there a roofer robot? You know, we're not fucking this knows no robots is important to have people like that. But yours engage. And then I don't know. If you know Tina Farris, so Tina is tore manager. She's she's done to managing for the roots for for for years. So she and swayed her partner where the ones who asserted, you know, and they hit up Avon was like look you need to have already seen the fell. And they were like, look this is the one need to you need to get behind this. And that I'm super grateful to teen and suede and Ava aunty lane for like saying, look this work deserves the platform, you know, and and listen if I had nothing to do with this film. I would champion it just as much because of the representation, but also the commitment because I'm one person one person will make a felt it's a family of like forty people to you know, who added who who score who do all this wild stuff, and like Yemen like the continent deserves it. Like it's been too long where we haven't seen. I'll stories told the way we know how to tell stories, and there's been this like you're normative structure, where we're like, I let's take this life and force it through the Spielberg structure where it's like, how's it gonna work? I get you. You know what I mean? And that's happened to us over and over again. And we would just like we're not gonna do that. We're going to take chances. And if it feels at least, we know we try, you know, so broader question here, please now. The film ends up becoming. It's your creative expression that you made on your terms is your home country, the ends up becoming at least on the back end a partnership between the culture that exists in Ghana. Yes. And the black American culture that exists here because you and you include ever do Rene all right on on a larger scale. Yes. What do you see someone who is both intimately familiar with black American, culture and culture on the continent? Yes. What do you see the future of the relationship between black Americans and not to use the broad term? Yes. But Africans or people that live on the continent onto as far as pan-africanism and things like that. Is there something that needs to be repaired? Is there something that we're not doing for our brothers and sisters and cousins over there? Is there something they're not doing for us? Yes. Indeed. So having a perspective that you have what do you see that? As yo I will say this anytime that black people have had any real advancement. It has come from communicating with one another across continents. We can look back at even slave revolts that were happening in the United States. Most of them were informed by slave revolts in Haiti and the Maroons around the Caribbean drawer. We talk about independence, which is one of one of the most critical movements on the continent. Independence was born out of that conversation of like, a W E B do voice hanging with Kwame Nkrumah and saying look y'all can fix this. You know what I mean? And then. Him flying in brothers like George pod. More from the Caribbean and saying we can do this. And it's been amazing to me with all the results that we've gotten by just saying because the Wild Thing is we've all evolved very differently as it relates to white supremacists. Propaganda. So if you're in the continent, you lost certain things, and you've, but you've held onto certain things if you're in America, you lost certain things, but you've held on certain things and like brothers sisters in in in in Latin America, like in Brazil, like the wildest thing for me was to to to go to buy here and find out that African traditional religion is so intact in Brazil than it is on the continent. It's insane. Like, Cuba, similar like the level early. It's it's incredible, bro. We like all Christian and Muslim on the continent. It's very few of us are believing any kind of African spirituality on the continent. You go to. Brazil Brian by here. Almost everybody is is Uraba or effaos or it's it's unbelievable. And so I say to myself, yo what did we lose in? What did we gain? Or do we hold onto and the only way to any of this can be repaired is from conversation. So like if I Reme what do I remember, what do you? Remember, another dope thing or it's not so dope. As it relates to black Brazilians. So in by here. It's ninety percent black. They've never had a black mayor. So in spite of all this African tradition that they've held on. Everything that they know themselves. We got no political power while it's been like almost the same white family and is run by here for like fifty years. What could they learn from African American organizing like African Americans been organizing from the from day one. Right. You know what I mean? And it's like why why aren't we why don't we have bureaus? Yeah. Whereas like, listen, if I if I'm you know, and then on the continent. Let's talk about all for all the things we've lost stories one thing that we've held onto why if we can't help brothers assistance when again gunned down streets of America, we can provide story and context, you know, what I mean. So you should never because my the thing about stories this. If I bumped my head, and I can't remember who I am the only way you put me back together. The only way I put you back together. It's through story. So I'm going to have to be like, oh, I van like wet advan grew up. You know, where what school? Did he go to like? And if you have all this stuff, then you should be able to see yourself and be all right, cool this. This reminds me of me. If it's written down, even better, if it's photographed even even better, if it's video I mean, you can watch home videos and be like, oh, that's me. You can see the love between you and your parents your family. Your friends where you've gone in basketball, you know, everything about your life. And so think about think about how little the continent has given you in terms of just any kind of memory, and my deep we used to think what some genetic memory like this so much EMMY because I stayed that I should easily be able to give you like those visuals you're looking at are triggering things in you that. You don't know. You've you haven't been. I don't know. I should ask. Have you been the governor now? Okay. Because I I've been out here. I've been a fool so I need I need to ask before. Right. But that's the idea. Right. Is that you should see these things. Go haven't been Ghana. But some triggered in it. Right. Hey, like dog it merely you go. There's a there's a familiarity night even bullsh- immediately, you go and even the structure of the story. Like, I haven't heard that story before. But I've heard that story before he you know, what I mean? Yeah. And and that's my thing about Joe the critical like the the need for us to make this work in a need for us to communicate it like it is critical. It is brought it. I don't think there's anything more important as black and Brown people on this planet like not saying

Ghana Rene Brazil Eva man America Slyke Tina Farris Hurson minot Caribbean Kwame Nkrumah Maroons Spielberg Cuba Haiti United States partner basketball Voss Roger
"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:11 min | 2 years ago

"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Feels really important to me. And and I think the boys is one of these figures who should be better remembered and more substantially remembered, so I think I hope that you know, can be a contribution. So I think I might just start by asking you how you and what do you do you? Remember, how you first became aware of W W E, EP two, boys. Earliest high-heeled old. I'm trying to remember because. I feel as if I keep getting reintroduced to boys, but my earliest memory, I would think I grew up. My mom was a an educator and there was. We thought very deeply about history in the past. And what I what I learned in school. I go up in New York City and went to new city public schools, but I always had an added, and I don't want to call it a debriefing. But there was an added element of. Learning the history of African people throughout the world. That was supplemented it someplace. It's supplemented, my formal education. So do boys I learned about the boys, and I learned about Martin Luther King, and I learned about Malcolm X, as so I learned about the civil rights in a very different way. I think than was kind of prescribed by the public school system. So what where were you? When were you born can I can I ask? Five. I'm a grown up now. So I was born December nineteen seventy-one. Okay. Yeah. So you're going you're you're in school in the seventies and eighties events. Yeah. So so the civil rights movement was very recent history. I guess but still not happening around you. But I I like to describe my childhood is having the back the Backdropped the backdrop of the black nationalist movement. So I think that my mom was around during the civil rights, but heard Malcolm X speak, but was around when Martin Luther King was assassinated in Malcolm X, so her I mean, she saw him album speak on the streets of Harlem, which was PECH which made her extremely scared, but made her think about the complexity of the civil rights is not one thing. And so. I grew up thinking understanding two boys as part of the architect of civil rights. But at the same time, I thought of him growing up as a Pan Africanist and not a civil rights. Net kind of points at where I wanted to go because I think people now, they they know something about king, and they know something about Malcolm X, but two boys the memory of deploys is more faded. I mean, what do you what what does what does he bring at? How does he fill out your imagination? Even now, you know, why why what is important for you to know about him as part of that architecture. Well, it's it's part of how in many ways, I understand my identity. Do boys for me brings the idea of being a global citizen into perspective for it. It will it it the more. You learn about two boys. It's not a matter of him turning his back on the United States, but he understanding himself as. As a member of the world and growing up in the in in that with that idea as kind of part of my background, the term African diaspora is means so many things in it's so layered, but someone liked to boys has a prominent place in understanding, the different waves of migration of African people. So they're voluntary migration. It's involuntary migration. It's immigration at different decades and over time and him leaving the United States and going to Ghana at the invitation of president Kwame Nkrumah and Ghana is important in pan-africanism because you have to think about it is the the beginning of independence for African nations that spread from Ghana. I would I could say, you know, some credit those. Two in Chroma..

Martin Luther King Malcolm X Ghana New York City United States Pan Africanist Kwame Nkrumah Harlem president pan-africanism
"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

10:08 min | 2 years ago

"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Three oh. Rossini Rajkumar back with you quite a big show today. Folks, we have our sports and generations roundtable coming up in the two o'clock hour and be one o'clock hour is pretty much all Senator klobuchar all the time our own Sloan Martin is at boom island will go to her at the top of the one o'clock hour. We'll also take your calls. Your thoughts about what is expected to be Senator clover shards official announcement she's running for president in the two thousand twenty election cycle. And then we will have that announcement live around one thirty s what we're told is when it will happen. But first we are going to reflect on black history month with my next guest. Depending on who you are. You have your own story of dealing with perhaps understanding race a better perhaps being discriminated against. Well, we want to hear from you. Phone lines are open six five one nine eight nine nine two two six and eight. Eight six six nine eight nine nine two two six Dr tika Tyner is associate vice president of diversity inclusion at university of Saint Thomas. She's also an author. She's the founder of planting people growing Justice leadership institute. Welcome back to the show. Dr Taner thank you for having me and thank you for honoring black history month. Thank you for being with us. This year is a very significant anniversary tell us about that. This year of twenty nineteen marks the four hundred year anniversary has a I arrive on the shores of America of enslaved Africans of my own ancestors. So when we look at this it could have been bypass missed in history. But the president of Ghana usually has a unique opportunity to proclaim it as the year of return asking those from across the diaspora to return back to the continent of Africa. But also raising awareness across the world, not just about the trans Atlantic slave trade. But about the rich history of the continent of Africa. Wow. And so what what a real. I would say magnanimous thing for him to say, let's look back. But let's also do this together and move forward. Yes. And the time could not be better as we see the growth and the agricultural sector and sector and manufacturing and technology. Just seeing a rebirth of innovation not just in Ghana, but entire continent of fifty four countries of young people getting organized, a people building stronger democracy. So no time like the present to dispel some of the miss about Africa and get to the truth of a beautiful people. Strong government strong people great culture and really coming alive and to spell those miss of what we think we know and get to the reality of what mama Africa really is. Dr Taner once your perspective, though to help all of us understand this trip though, you are returning to Africa this summer and the president of God has invited many people to come back. How do you think we should look in the United States at this four hundred anniversary of the first enslaved? Africans arriving in this country. It's time for us to look critically at our history. Because one of the challenges even with bringing students on multiple trips to Ghana and going to the slave castles of Kate colds, and El Nino one thing I didn't realize it. So my last trip was a disconnect between students understanding of history and reality now when the students went to Cape coast, what they heard was that slavery was four hundred years ago versus hearing the transatlantic slave trade lasted for over four hundred years. So all of a sudden I had to pause and say, well, let's look at this. Let's look at this in my own family. We could easily documented dafter the institutional slavery in America to three or four generations. So we look at this. I think it's a challenge of looking at a horrific history of what slavery meant and not just about people. But also about how it impacted our economy about how we diminish humanity of folks born of African descent and brought them into an of America where they were just products or chattel. So look at changing the image is giving the Howard air was built upon the backs of those were in flights. And what does that mean for us today grappling with a complicated history? Very complicated. What would you say the grade is for us? Now, what kind of grade would you give the current landscape in the United States when it comes to these kinds of issues? It is black history month, the state of Virginia dealing with several leaders and. Past with black face, one of the positives. I look at we were talking earlier in the show tonight is the Grammy's and the nominees represent all sorts of people different colors different races. So you are a professor what grade would you give our country now? I would say the grade that I will give our country. Is that you know, I I like to think of it in sense of aspiring. So if I gave us a grade, I wouldn't even get us at average at this point. So, you know, our c- of looking at average, I would rank us as being below average. Because when we look at the fact that the most Americans would not have the knowledge even know about the year return or not have an understanding that Africa is not a country, but a continent not having an understanding of media petitions working in higher, education know, many of them were built by those who were enslaved looking at the fact of and I'll mention that you win because the UN has also declared this as the decade of people of African descent so really looking at some of their reports that have started to show, the quality of life indicators have not improved for many of the indicators that we look at healthcare economic wealth and finances within the African American community we had an earlier report that was released about two years ago that showed the income and the wealth gap between. African Americans and whites to be able to bridge that would take over two hundred twenty eight years. So I had to rank us below average knowing that we have plenty of the information in front of us. But how do we come together as a community to engage to right? Some wrongs of the past. And it's not simply I know that conversation just oftentimes. Reparations and people get stuck on it that is a political issue. But I really think it's about a knowledge gap. Yeah. And knowledge got that's how what would be your prescription for people listening right now. Dr Taner for how each person could take that whatever that gap is because it's probably a little different with for each person. What's your advice? The first thing that I would start with and I've been testing this out even even going to grade schools, I had a group of young people. I said well who started black history month? One young person said mayor Carter, I applaud him the first African American mayor Saint call, but that was the wrong answer. Watson, you know. So I was happy that they knew the mayor, but Dr Carver's. What's it in nineteen twenty six? Started with negro history week starting in the churches in the school houses to educate young people about history and heritage and advocate the entire nation. And then you often times here, the ridicule of why is it February the shortest month in the year? But what Dr Woodson was doing? Forty wary was highlighting the work of two folks who inspired him the birth months of ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Douglas. So we start with even having understanding what is black history. How is it found it in a recognition that black history part of American history, and that's a year route three sixty five commitment. I think that'd be a good starting place. And as we're grinding our conversation today in the year return. I would encourage folks are re Dr king's speech, call the birth of a nation, and he's able to connect the dots across the diaster Rabin from Africa to all the different places where black people are situated across the world talk about how is a joint struggle for liberation. So I would encourage folks to read that speech as well. And last, but not least take a moment to look up. Dr Kwame Nkrumah, the first prime minister of Ghana. And I think he gives us an asset. This is a black or white issue that surely is essence about Africa having. Prided Africa's about humanity in one of the closest I love for him. You said that African because I was born in Africa because Africa was born in me and what he's talking about not about race or ethnicity. But about a sense of shared humanity and common. I like hearing that the shared humanity common destiny. Thank you so much. She is Dr Arteaga Tyner. She's an author speaker. Someone who advocates but also teaches in the areas of civil rights and Justice. Good luck. The trip is June twenty eighth through July eighth. Is there an easy spot? People can go to find out more about the year of return. Yes, they can go to my personal website, which is my name Arteaga Tyner dot com. So AARP. K A T Y N E R. Thank you so much. And we appreciate you spending some time with us, and we'll have you back soon. Thank you. We'll take a quick break. And then talking about a common destiny and words that matter when we return from break Nate Garbis co of studio e and Desa poet singer rapper extraordinaire together right here. Next time,.

Africa Dr Taner Ghana Dr Arteaga Tyner president America United States Senator Rossini Rajkumar Arteaga Tyner Dr Kwame Nkrumah Dr king Grammy Dr Woodson Dr Carver AARP Sloan Martin associate vice president
"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"With him. And I'm talking about from Chicago, the Reverend Al Samson how you doing Reverend Sampson. Okay. I call you my half because. He helped me down two years. I can check in hotels and be our shocked and rather than. Bam out. Michael, a appreciate your, man. And I'm in listening to you in Alan and kind of work that you've been doing with them. I like the idea about this globalist. But I wanna put it in historical context. Please. Fifty seven. Cromer? Ended up inviting Dr king when he came out of prison and became the president of gone. That's right. And you know, we were there. Oh, you know, founded amino castle, right. But the, but the good thing about it is he had already Kwami had studied Dondi. And you know, he went to Lincoln is to Lincoln's one in Jefferson City, Missouri where I have my black farmers project. But the other one is is in Pennsylvania. And he studied Gandhi, and he studied Marcus Garvey, which is why the ship. The black star ship is on the flag of of the Ghanaian people, right? The other interesting thing is when Martin left with Kereta by by the way, harvest man bond Julian bonds daddy. Mordecai Johnson, the former president Howard University, a whole delegation of them was invited. Adam Clayton Powell was invited by president Kwame and Chroma to come to to be in moderation. But the most powerful thing was when you go online, and you see it. Quami in Chroma and Martin king holding hands. And at the end of the story Martin comes back to Dexter avenue. Baptist church. You know, my guy was was Dr Vernon Johns. I do the agricultural because of Vernon who was the past before thing up there, you know, that history. But the key thing is he came back to Dexter avenue. Baptist church in nineteen fifty seven. And he preached the sermon the birth of a new nation. And I would like to have everybody 'cause Cornell west did no it I had to when he came to Chicago a couple of months ago in hockey modern booty, I showed them the sermon. The birth of a new nation. Where he he got so impacted by the life of of president Kwame Nkrumah that he ended up preaching. And then when you read his last book, where do we go from here chaos or community? He understood the triangle. Africans of the homeland blacks in America and Caribbean. Brothers and sisters, and that's why while some people are discussing reparations, which is okay. N no problem with it. He already understood the whole question of building economic arrangements with the African Caribbean paradigm of what I call the triangle. Wow. That's want to pull that. Now. I think that's that's very instructive. And and you know, Reverend wall run in two thousand and three when I was getting ready to run for president Reverend Sampson.

Reverend Sampson president Dr Vernon Johns Martin king Dr king Kwame Nkrumah Al Samson Baptist church Chicago Lincoln president Kwame Mordecai Johnson Adam Clayton Powell Cromer African Caribbean Michael Alan Jefferson City Marcus Garvey Dondi
"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

06:00 min | 2 years ago

"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Quami, Anthony app. You has spent much of his professional life trying to answer very simple questions like, who am I? What are you? What's the right thing to do? He's a professor of philosophy and law at New York University and a leading thinker identity. But I think it's important to note with apnea is not only a man of the academy. He writes the ethicists column in the New York Times magazine, answering reader's questions on matters of parenting and dating. And so on. Recently, somebody asked him, I'm running for reelection. How on us do I have to be in his new book? The lies that bind rethinking identity Appier argues something that's just a little bit old fashioned and not necessarily popular on the left. Now with everyone, he says that identities of race, gender culture, country can work against human solidarity and sometimes get in the way of solving our problems. And with the world is globalised as it is whether you like it or not. He says that we have to change some of our old ways of thinking about who we are and how we. Late to others. I've known Anthony Appier for a long time, and we sat down recently to talk at the written this wonderful book about identity that began as a series of lectures, and I thought we'd start with your own identity and your parents. Your parents were perhaps one of the most famous marriages in twentieth century Britain and Ghana. Can you tell us that story? Yes. My father was in in London. The lowest student for I'm still nursing longtime because most of what he was doing wasn't low bit, but anti-colonial agitation to get Hyde Park corner to speak against the British even during the war. So he was there and he met my mother. My mother was working for an organization called racial hominy, which looked off to colonial students, and that's how they met. And your father was a an important political figure in Ghana? Yes. So he was among other things at that point. He was the unofficial Representative of Kwame Nkrumah who who was going to be the. I president of Ghana, and he was also very much involved in creation of the first opposition party to groom a which grew out of the santee elites to which he belonged his his, his father was the brother-in-law and the secretary of the king of shanty and later on my uncle, Matthew became the next game Zante. So he was very much connected with sort of old royalty income Ozzy where we grew up and my mother's family was also, you know, her father was Johnson house of Commons grandfather was the first labour leader of the house of lords. And there were lots of cousins who were who kind of language people a left leaning narrating Graddick elite, yes, and they get married and the effect in Britain and in Ghana is what? What is the reaction you have to remember that wasn't. Sense of it came from parents who kept these newspaper scrapbooks of the coverage and went from the most extreme coverage was in South Africa and places like that. And actually some American regional newspapers in the south through ebony magazine, which thought this was kind of cool. To. Speeches in the South African parliament about what was going to happen to Britain. If they allowed the daughters of cabinet ministers to marry what they called blanket natives, I seem that means native, see web blankets, and my mother got horrible letters mostly from white women around around the empire in the world telling her that she was letting the side down Anthony coming from this background, how does this shape identity, which is the subject of the book, your own identity, how how you view it or how you don't feel it. It's multiplicity its fluidity. You recently wrote an article about the phenomenon of people beginning their sentences or testimonies speaking as a woman speaking as a black woman Jewish man, whatever, because the combination of identities that I have is a bit on the usual, I, if I'm asked to say what I am quickly, I suppose I would say I'm an American citizen Vangla go. In ancestry who's gay. I mean, those are the things that I would have mentioned religion if I had one, but I didn't. What frustrates you when you hear identity discussed in the university in the workplace and in the political realm? I think the main thing that worries me is that even people who people think of is not very complicated, in fact, have quite complicated identities. I mean, I I've said that I come to this the way I do because there's an obvious sense in which my dentist some way more complicated than some peoples. But you know, if we talk about the book suggests that everybody is to some extent much more complicated than they let and I think that's right. So for example, we currently for obese reason to a great deal of talking about something we call the white working class, but their whiteness such as it is, is not the same as the whiteness of everybody else. It's not the same as presidents whiteness, and some of them are Baptist and some of them are not, and that might matter a great deal to them some Abon. Again, some of these other dimensions of their identity are for many, many practical purposes more important to them than their white identity because they're not interacting much of the time with people. Who on wide, say racist for a lot of the time? No, super important. So if you're trying to make a Republic. We need to think about our fellow citizens as it were as they are and what they are is complicated, not simple and reducing them to anything, including a political identity, reducing them to Republican democrat independent, reducing them to white, reducing them to working class and so on just will get

Anthony Appier Ghana Britain New York University Quami professor of philosophy ebony magazine Kwame Nkrumah the New York Times magazine Baptist South Africa London Hyde Park Johnson house of Commons Representative Ozzy Graddick santee president
"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

13:09 min | 2 years ago

"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Am I what are you? What's the right thing to do? He's a professor of philosophy and law at New York University and a leading thinker on identity. But I think it's important to note with Appier is not only a man of the academy. He writes, the ethicists column in the New York Times magazine answering reader's questions on matters of parenting and dating and so on recently somebody asked him I'm running for reelection. How on us? Do I have to be in his new book the lies that bind? Rethinking identity Appier argues, something that's just a little bit old fashioned and not necessarily popular on the left now with everyone. He says that identities of race gender culture country can work against human solidarity and sometimes get in the way of solving our problems and with the world is globalised as it is whether you like it or not he says that we have to change. Some of our old ways of thinking about who we are. And how we relate to others. I've known Anthony happy for a long time. And we sat down recently to talk. Anthony, you've written this wonderful book about identity that began as a series of lectures, and I thought we'd start with your own identity, and your parents, your parents were perhaps one of the most famous marriages in twentieth century Britain and Ghana, can you tell us that story. Yes. My father was in in London is the lowest student for. I'm astonishing longtime because most of what he was doing wasn't. But but anti-colonial agitation he used to go to Hyde Park corner to speak against the British even during the war. So he was there. He met my mother, and my mother was working for an organization called racial harmony, which looked after colonial students, and that's how they met and your father was an important political figure in Ghana. Yes. So he was among other things at that point. He was the unofficial Representative of Kwame Nkrumah who who was going to be the first president of Ghana, and he was also very much involved in creation of the first opposition party to. Which grew out of the Asante elites to which he belonged his his his father was the brother-in-law in the secretary of the king of shanty and later on my uncle Matthew became the next game. So he was very much connected with royalty in Kumasi where we grew up. And my mother's family was also her father was Johnson exchequer Commons. Grandfather was the first leader of the house of lords and lots of cousins who were kind of language people who left leaning narrating critic elite. Yes. And they get married and the effect in Britain. And in Ghana is what how what is the reaction you have to remember that? Sense of it came from our parents who kept these newspaper scrapbooks of the coverage and went from the most extreme coverage was in South Africa and places like that. And actually some American regional newspapers in the south. Through ebony magazine, which thought this was kind of a cool. Two. Speeches in the South African parliament about what was going to happen to Britain. If they allowed the daughters of cabinet ministers to marry what they called blanket natives, I assume that means natives who have blankets, and my mother got horrible letters mostly from white women around around the empire in the world. Telling her that she was letting the side down coming from this background. How does this shape identity, which is the subject of the book your own identity? How how you view it or how you don't view it. It's multiplicity its fluidity. You recently wrote an article about the phenomenon of people beginning their sentences, testimonies speaking as a woman speaking as a black woman Jewish man, whatever because the combination of identities that I have is a bit unusual. I mean, if I'm asked to say what I am quickly. I suppose I would say I'm an American citizen of Anglo Ghanaian ancestry who's gay. I mean, those are the things that I would have mentioned religion if I had one, but I don't. So what frustrates you when you hear identity discussed in the university in the workplace and in the political realm. I think the main thing that worries me is that even people who people think I was not very complicated. In fact, have quite complicated identities. I mean, I've said that I come to this the way I do because there's an obvious sense in which my identity some way more complicated than some peoples. But you know, if we talk about the book suggests that everybody is to some extent, much more complicated. And I think that's right. So for example, we currently for obvious reasons to a great deal of talking about something we call the white working class, but their whiteness such as it is is not the same as the whiteness of everybody else. It's not the same as presidents whiteness. And some of them are Baptist and some of them are not. And that might matter a great deal to them some are born again, some not these other dimensions of their identity are for many many practical purposes, more important to them than their white identity because they're not interacting much of the time with. White so racist for a lot of the time not super important. So. If you're trying to make a Republic. We need to think about our fellow citizens as it were as they are. And what they are is complicated. Not simple and reducing them to anything, including a political identity. Reducing them to Republican democrat independent reducing them to wait reducing them to working class. Just will get you in the mess. That's one thing. Another thing is if we're going to do things about the economics. I think history suggests that we're going to need identities to do it. The great successes that created the modern welfare state occurred because starting in Britain in the early nineteenth century, the working class got organized as a class, they made labor unions. They had working men's associations when Frederick Douglass went. We didn't he talked to working men's associations. So. You couldn't do that. Unless you got. It wasn't just that you had to think of the working classes having interests in common. You had to think of them as a kind of person, and they then have to think of themselves that way in order to get mobilized. Now, they were not just working class anymore than anybody was just middle or upper class, but it was an important identity to mobilize around. So if we want to do and the last chapter my book is is is that we do need to do something about class. The first thing we need to do is to recognize it as a form of identity. So if you think as I do that there are serious problems of an economic inequality in this country that won't be dealt with a mess. We think about class then you don't want to substitute identity. Politics are not identity politics. You want to reshape identity politics to make it more productive to focus on things that you need to focus on and not to become overinvested in just one or two kinds of identities. What role did tribalism native ISM and questions of identity play in a political drama in which the very same country elected Barack Obama, and then eight years later, elected, Donald Trump will take the Russian part out of it and all the various shenanigans out of it. But tens of millions of people did vote for Donald Trump. Yes. Well, because of the way our electoral system works. We should begin by recording. That. People didn't vote for Donald Trump did. And those people were presumably people who thought that the right thing mostly thought that the right thing had been done in electing a Barack Obama. Did they were hoping to continue his his legacy? You have to remember that in in the United States. Most people vote the way they do because it's the way they've always voted. So a significant number of people will have voted for Donald Trump just because he was the person produced by the Republican process, and the fact that they continue to support him. Even though you can see that he's doing things that the Republican party used to be against like make cozying up to Russia like starting trade wars and increasing tariffs. And they now have mostly been persuaded that well, if that's what my body's in favor of I'm in favor of it. In other words, what's happened is that a particular person that's taken over the leadership of a particular identity group, namely people who identifies Republicans, and in the few places where the shifts happened that explain why he got the votes in the electoral college that he did those shifts occurred in people who did indeed make a change of mind. And I think they made the change of mind some of them because of a real fact the fact is that our country is moving away from being a white man's country. And both the white and the man in there are important to being what some of us have always hoped. It will be which is an American country in which you could be happy non white person. Happy woman than happy for that matter. Gay lesbian, transgender Besson and participate on roughly equal. Terms in the life of the Republic. And if you start out with this precious possession of a privileged identity. It's not nice view. It's hard. I understand that there's a challenge here. Eroded sometime ago. Claudia ranking was here, and as you know, among other things she talks a great deal about microaggressions, which is not her invention. Had earlier roots in academic discourse. You are very wary of talking about that in highly judgmental way, in fact, wearing your other hat as the New York Times ethicist not long ago, you had a letter from a woman somebody and a Filipino family. And there was a kind of family drama about in laws talking insensitively about the ability to tell one Asian from another as it were. And you. You said, you know, you might start by recognizing that their attitudes meeting. These relatives who are doing the offending. You might record start by recognizing that their attitudes. Most likely reflect ignorance rather than malice and by cutting them some slack. I think that one reason for wanting to cut people slack is that maybe my deepest philosophical conviction. Is that it's hard to get things. Right. Knowledge is is a difficult achievement for us. So is leading a good life. And yes, people will screw up. That's. Feature of nature not situation. The helpful thing to do when people scrubs to try and sort of help them pick themselves up and dust themselves often start off in a better direction, not to stigmatizes them and push them down. I'm perfectly happy to criticize people who behave badly. But I think also it's important to understand them. And here's one reason why it's important to understand them. If you understand what it is about a person in circumstances that makes her do something, you might be able to change the circumstances in a way that makes not want to do that anymore. Anthony, finally, you've packed a lot into a relatively short book. And one of the things is a kind of large cultural project that you're advocating you're asking readers to feel a sense of ownership over universal values, and you write this culture of liberty tolerance and rational inquiry that would be a good idea. But these values represent choices to make not tracks laid down by a western destiny, unquote. You worry that we've become complacent about understanding and upholding these values. Yes. I think that some of the responsibility of that comes from movements within the academy's. It isn't just the result of bad behavior of a few people in one body. I think it's hard to figure out. Sometimes what the right answer is in moral context. But I believe there is one. And if there is one then it doesn't matter whether you're Jewish Muslim Christian, but his ten do or atheist. That's the answer. We're not trying to develop a Muslim view about. Global warming and a western view, the better just to say, let's try and figure out what's going on with global warming. And that in that sense. I'm a creature of the environment. I really do believe in in the beautiful and the true..

Ghana Donald Trump Britain Anthony Barack Obama Appier the New York Times magazine New York University Kumasi professor of philosophy ebony magazine Republican party Frederick Douglass Baptist South Africa Johnson exchequer Commons Kwame Nkrumah White Hyde Park
"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:01 min | 3 years ago

"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's may nine hundred sixty three a first wave of decolonization has swept through africa and in the ethiopian capital addis ababa the continent's leaders gather in one place for the first time they're meeting to decide if they're nations should now become united if we fade i let this historic opportunity slip by the people the masses of the people of africa would never forgive us there was a passion for africa liberation and african unity because we felt that unless africa confronted the world with the united voice the exploitation would continue the division with continuing so that that's the starting point doc to barricade have to selassie was ethiopia's rather young attorney general supporter panafricanism since the nineteen fifties he worked on the draft charter for the summit among those arriving to attend where leaders synonymous with the struggle against colonialism the likes of the ghanaian president kwame nkrumah the first black african leader to win independence secretary from guinea julius naree from tanganyika ben bella fresh from algeria's war of independence against france it's difficult to describe the excitement of people that have never seen anything like it before these african leaders grandma and what sort of colorless shirt became known as the nearest shirt apparently in cooma was advised to put on a bulletproof plate because i could see stiffness in the way he moved it's obvious there have been some attempts on his life but the the most dramatic scene told was actually when nasa emerged airplane very charismatic tall handsome man smiling the entire airport exploded i could feel the ground shaking underneath my feet and they shouted nassar nassar nassar lhasa apparently country folks come from jim from her from from everywhere because he was a hero but when it came down to business leaders was split getting them all together had been an achievement in itself they were a device there was the french francophone anglophone divide the franck africans under the influence of french policies then of course the the ideological divide africa was divided into two groups the monrovia group which are the majority in nigeria were the most important and liberia and then the smaller but more dynamic group called the casa blanca group in secretary ben bella and nasser of egypt leftleaning socialistic so africa had actually become an ideological battleground between the east and the west is the height.

attorney egypt casa blanca liberia monrovia nasa algeria kwame nkrumah president africa selassie ben bella nigeria jim cooma france secretary ethiopia
"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Bbc world service has been broadcasting from more than seven decades among most of you want to be listening from the beginning some of you do have fond memories from back in the day take bill manson for example he's listening in california but as many happy memories of growing up in new zealand listening to a particular bbc world service program in the '60s bell tell us what two good morning africa wars and what it conjures up few the memories it work every kind of programme that for work me up immigrant by me to go and her do radio myself and i couldn't stop listening to it because her out of the bbc you know i felt result tirias risk i peaked my of wouldbe sorta interviewing people like um kwame nkrumah the president of ghana and the next minute your career you're hearing sort of this is the house of new orleans it's a song clashes into the program and pete myers had 10 this uh this uh show for africa into a kind of role because a hot new stuff jokes competitions it's sort of had a short but spectacular life the very lucky thing for bbc i think was that pete ten topped of being born in bangalore india his parents were angry indian and he spent a lot of time in a cry and got him and so when he got to modernise of where he was determined to reverse the whole sort of postcolonial yunan nonu attitude that he'd sabrine kind of fighting in the nightclubs of acc uh there is hardly any time from the 1960s on the bbc world service but we did find this clip of good morning africa regular reports at hanna bright taylor being the leader of the successful military coup against the first president of ghana docked to end krumer in february 1966 finalists says you new and doc teen crooner is now president of guinea and civilising he went to turn up at the united nations representing guinea what action would you take i doubt very much were they're coming from i will have the courage to leave gimme knowing fully well that share we are looking for him everywhere uh members of the interpol uh actually looking for him and.

california bbc president ghana the house new orleans pete myers bangalore united nations interpol bill manson africa kwame nkrumah seven decades
"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"kwame nkrumah" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Arab broke all be there he's a good guy would have doing work cowboy yucky noone let me put kim on who commuter i'm ray here berger was or uh hear more show eu vice president senior vice president they know seniors come on i don't know what you are going to bring you i don't know what you're talking about you just came to me by a you know ah you know at cardiff the matter eric we're from this was more a matter on mutual insurance company is calling from rally were you rallye door are you i'm a number city please understand rally in dar amount alcohol i'm from durham i'm in durham rocketing you sound offended by that mottaber like i've i all right next people do that to me odds have a cree mouney no created his own place mona here let me let me tell you something foster care no nobody was wearing internal cambio you at ankara hurt the people from durham care don't even threat are you crown peoria chicago it doesn't matter actually those earned the ire of special sample so you know our macho is indifference live by that don't want oval go go go well i don't want anybody calling me when i love the phone and say why didn't to correct them the call of lukasa on a should a personal brought i know people everybody else i know is not indifferent we party changeover is dead my friend okay okay so so kim's hit a marketing for north carolina mutual insurance co yes ram his person in the whole world this is dr gubler shoot phd sharing all right she got let us mehanna naming of argue let dr go in it and i say the same thing here to fed by i mean quieter i do i recall that people armed and go it'd be or if you have one of these do not be with from the but what i'm about to say but i'm not a title i'm not you know dr kwame nkrumah cam gut okay so says the person with the title okay i get you yeah here's the deal kempson shoot a second hour we've already got the cubs go on a.

kim berger senior vice president cardiff eric insurance company durham chicago cubs eu vice president ankara peoria north carolina dr kwame nkrumah the deal