19 Burst results for "Kurzweil"

2021 AI Market Predictions

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

05:17 min | 3 months ago

2021 AI Market Predictions

"So if you've been listening to a today podcast for awhile. welcome back. We really appreciate all of our fantastic listeners. But if you're a new to the podcast. This is your first episode. We like you to know that. There's hundreds of episodes that we've been producing over the last four years on with the have everything from great interviews with a i thought leaders and insights into the market trends and adoption in public and private sectors. And actually will be doing one of those insights into the mayor market trends on this podcast episode but also conversations on key topics on what's happening with a today and in the future so over our past for years almost two hundred episodes we've interviewed some incredible influencers. So we encourage you to go back and listen to a lot of these episodes. We have episodes interviewing folks. Ben kurzweil of singularity net and the sofia robot colin angle from founder viral anthony griffin. Yano from dun and bradstreet eager. Perry switch from lincoln. Suzanne can't the former us federal cio. The hose arrietta ceo former cio of the us department of health and human services. Lord tim clement. Jones keep people at organizations large and small and lots more so Definitely subscribe to the today podcast so that you can basically here are insights on the technology markets and how different industries are applying emerging concepts machine learning. And just in general long story short if you want to understand how. Ai is being put into practice today. Which is why this is called a today and where it's heading. Make sure to subscribe day today. On your favorite podcast provider and listen to our hundreds of episodes. Yes so as ron mentioned today we wanted to spend some time talking about our twenty twenty. One a. i. Market predictions and forecasts at the beginning of every year. We always you know. Take a step back and look at what happens over the past year and where we things going moving forward so acog melinda in case this is your podcast or you're just starting to listen to us. We're an ai. Focused research education and advisory firm and we really focus on market intelligence. We cover all over twenty thousand vendors in the space so we have a great pulse of what's going on and we work with both public and private sector companies so we really have a holistic view of the space so we wanted to spend some time today reflecting back on what we're seeing in the market and then making some predictions and forecasts about where the market will go in twenty twenty one so one of the first predictions that we have. These are not in any sort of ranking order. They're just how he laid out this podcast. So we have that worldwide adoption of artificial intelligence and machine learning. We've seen it growing at a very high rate and were predicting that this is not going to stop anytime soon. I mean so. There's a lot of indications that show that we are moving towards much more use of what we call the seven patterns of ai and we will link to them in the show notes but one of the things about is that it is a fairly generic term general term which corresponds to making machines intelligent and doing the things that humans would otherwise. Do you ask people as to what they're specifically doing. It's usually gonna be one or more of these seven pattern so it might be a recognition system or it could be a conversational system or could be something doing predictive analytics or trying to find patterns or anomalies or it could be trying to develop the hyper personal profile. The hyper personalization profile of you. So that it can no to tailor things better for your needs or it could be an autonomous system systems that are meant to operate with little or no human interaction. Or perhaps we're doing something we're trying to have. Machines find the solution to something you goal driven systems and when you talk about it from that perspective it's like yeah chat bots are growing recognition. Systems are growing the use of machine learning for patterns and anomaly detection as well as predictive analytics. that's growing. You know maybe hyper personalization. Maybe that that's been a little bit slower to grow. We are definitely seeing a lot. More autonomous stuff whether or not. They're all entirely successful a whole other story. But we are and we're seeing of course a lot more use of even goal driven systems and part of the reason why we say this is that there is some fud in the market Other analyst firms in particular are saying that they're seeing some large number of data science projects that are failing. You know gardner. Says eighty seven percent of data. Science projects failed to deliver on their for their executive sponsors and seventy percent of machine. Learning models lose relevancy overtime. Well these are. There is some truth to that. Yes models do have what's called drift and then later what we're going to talk about in this. Podcast is the growth of technology area technology market with an ai called l. Ops that specifically addresses this area of models overtime lose their relevancy. But that's just like the thing let's like saying well. I built an app in one thousand nine hundred ninety six therefore i need to update it in the year. Two thousand three two thousand eighteen thousand thirteen two thousand eighteen. Yeah yes. that's what. Technology and technology doesn't standstill. Say all the fact that you have to update it means. It's not like the fact that you have to up it means you're actually using it and the needs for that. Continue to grow. If you didn't care you just throw it away so

Ben Kurzweil Anthony Griffin Us Department Of Health And Hu Lord Tim Clement Acog Melinda Yano Bradstreet DUN Suzanne Perry Lincoln Jones RON United States Gardner
"kurzweil" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:30 min | 4 months ago

"kurzweil" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Networks of systems. That far exceed the communications powers of any single human being. Google's one example. I mean, look at Google. Wait does not to mention the Internet itself. I mean, look. These systems. These systems granted, don't fulfill Kurzweil's prediction. They certainly do demonstrate, however, that many human intellectual abilities can be exceeded. Through technical means, and we have discussed in the past that in order for us preserve any type of cognitive spirit. Where we you know, put it units or numbers or are decibels or dots and see that's the thing is that there are other scientists. We're trying to grasp. The idea off quantum existence outside the body. Life after death, but in a quantum way, the quantum quantum immortality if you will The idea that yes, life after death exists. But what does this what does it exist as and can it be compartmentalized? Put in a box. Putting computer put somewhere where someone could live on forever with the neurons are firing inside a computer system. I don't know if anybody would like to experience that saying, Well, I my physical body is going to die, but everything that powers my physical body is gonna go into a system. And that is going to be the system of systems where networks and systems will far exceed communications powers and that you will be immortal. Going through is a ghost in the machine. Stay down. The hard.

Google Kurzweil
Elon Musk Is About to Show Off His Neuralink Brain Implant

Von Haessler Doctrine

04:44 min | 9 months ago

Elon Musk Is About to Show Off His Neuralink Brain Implant

"Elon Musk E move the J. Lo of tech innovation. He's going to reveal a device that connects your brain to a computer. This is his neural link device, but today he's going to show it. In action. 3 P.m. Pacific time, Okay, I'm looking at this still thinks it's okay. Elon Musk has said neural link will have a human brain implant ready within a year. The device will be inserted under the skull and a small robot will connect threadlike electrodes to the brain. Once implanted, the chip could connect your brainwaves to ANAP and may be able to help people with neurological conditions Now, although I'm I'm going to there's also there's the privacy. There's the weirdness with APS data coming right out of your brain. We can get to that. In a moment, I will say with a lot of these things. The first helpful part would be in terms of enhancing Are helping somebody with a disorder some sort of neurological condition If it was there to Ah, just correct stuff that is in error within the neural pathways. I can sort of understand that. But that were were also worried about data collection from Facebook. What about from your face with inside your skull? If you bring women actually are attached to an app. That's all. Seems he's going to do some sort of demonstration today. Yes, yes, He's not gonna have it hooked to his brain. Is he No, I wouldn't put it past on the hook it to his own brains will come out with like a bandage over his head. Who wants to watch my dreams? Actually, this is your dreams. This is You're talking about privacy concerns with also this fund. Smart phones already have fundamentally changed the way we live our lives, and then if you're just constantly, if you really in theory, you can put the phone down and get away from it. I know that's very hard for a lot of people and anxiety sets in almost five minutes on ly five minutes after, but If it's just in your brain, and you can't disconnect it. It's completely changed forever. Yeah, I I think what people are really looking forward to, and he's going to say that this is like a 25 year thing before you get what you call the full brain interface. Wow, that's the gold 25 years. Yes, full. Check out those three words together in a sentence. Full brain interface. Come on, he slur two plus two equals four. Hey, my thoughts are leaking out. I'm not thinking about your Yamamoto said that I never think about charity Yamamoto, Even you don't know how to pronounce your name. It's called even Eric. I am Erich von Hastler America on he slurred. The truth is that that's that's my actual name. The rest is a radio, so I changed it to Eric Von Kessler, just for the radio. He slurred just doesn't work, either. So I figured I want to watch this. I think it might look kind of I don't know. Weird. Strange, ridiculous. Wonderful. I have no idea. I feel like it's going to be a little bit of a letdown. If we're only five years away from the full brain interface. I don't know how much we're going to see today. It probably will be alive, and I mean it's a letdown if you're expecting something on the part with fireworks, but if it is the lead into this full brain interface and 25 years Pretty pivotal moment and think about what we were talking before about aging and getting older. If you khun at some point upload your whole brain where that's always been. What is you? What's with the boundary of Uru, then also in that computer, and then does that guy's name Raymond Kurzweil or whatever his name is That guy? That's the age of spiritual machines? Yeah, basically, we just take all of our thoughts, and we put them in zeros and ones. And we find a body or something from later. I have no idea, but I don't want to be alive forever to jar those. Hey, I'm alive. Never died, But I can't. Yeah, I guess he much are already in a jar. You move, But think about being locked in locked in syndrome. Someone has a stroke in the brain is still functioning at full capacity. But you have no ability to move your body. The point you realized you're just a brain. In a jar yet I don't want that. Don't be like that. You know, in the like the Frankenstein movies when they go in looking for the brains of the jars. I don't be one of those except I'm alive. Everyone wasn't live forever. I don't want to live forever. I don't know. I heard about him saying, you know, Do you want to play a board game? Sure what kind of owe it lasts for eternity. But I don't want to play a booking forever.

Eric Von Kessler J. Lo Elon Musk Yamamoto Facebook Raymond Kurzweil Erich Von Hastler America
"kurzweil" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"kurzweil" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Ray Kurzweil once again he predicted the privacy would be a huge political and social issue and at each individual's practically every move will be stored in a database somewhere that is probably true nailed it that is that is absolutely one hundred percent true maybe not every move what if somebody wanted to find out where you were in you are somebody who cares a cell phone with you in a good paying all the towers and find out where you were where you are they cut your TV watches you it does you're a smart TV you got hockey puck you got an Alexa she's listening they are watching you you you have no privacy is at this illusion of privacy that you think you have you think you enjoy when some people don't even care well yeah I don't care I don't care for that conversation about hardwood floors with my wife in the privacy of our home and then I get on social media and there's a bunch of hard wood floor ads what are you doing why why I get it if you go in you let them in your cookies or whatever that is you went to meet your cookies but but now you if you have a conversation about something and you kept that conversation offline and all the sudden you are bombarded with ads about the subject you were discussing dad's that that is OR William or occurs we only in if you're a futurist here we go the world's population will reach eight million by twenty twenty was the production the international food policy research institute projected the world population would increase by two point five billion in which eight billion by twenty twenty India Pakistan Bangladesh makan of Africa would add another one point five billion people the is to protect it it was close I think we're at seven point seven billion according to a June report from the you win if you believe you ever reports other report expected population to grow by another two billion in the next thirty years in around twenty twenty seven India is projected to overtake China as the world's most populous country okay look at you when reports you may there may be some good hard facts in those what they do with reports a different story the thing about this this stuff you know if the population rises okay so what what are the implications yeah the all too often you go back forty fifty years and they're saying all by nineteen eighty they'll be widespread famine and one hundred to two hundred million people a year will die and there's just a lot of stuff well one guy what's his name Paul Ehrlich all my god it was I'm not going to get into the whole Paul Ehrlich stop the population bomb all that said you do have to be skeptical about any of those claims not so much is the actual claim what the implications are we got more of these we'll get into that in just a little bit I do want to talk about all the height of pettiness this Christmas holiday I think we've reached peak pettiness I in this involves none other than our fearless leader president number forty five Donald Trump and in appearance he made in a holiday movie and what is happening now with said cameo in it said a holiday movie and it also involves our neighbors to the north America's had our.

Ray Kurzweil
"kurzweil" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

14:26 min | 2 years ago

"kurzweil" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Welcome back James Rollins with us James. I would guess a could be a blessing or curse all by itself. Can it? It can. I mean, it's definitely there's different cancer. When it comes to AI. There is those that sort of follow the Ray kurzweil singular -tarian, those that believe that the a I. Moment of singularity were a I work appears passes. Human intelligence was going to be a great boon for humanity that it's going to bring great knowledge and expansion, and I'll be the equivalent of like a new industrial age is going to be just world of wonders in the camp like Elon Musk, and Stephen hawking that believe that you know, we're opening up Pandora's box when it comes to this technology. And I firmly believe at this point that worked at that cusp. I mean, there are some amazing. AI programs out there already there. Google deep mind. A I created this AI call alpha go, what is that? Let's go back a little bit. There's a Chinese game of go. It's an ancient game. Played by humanity for thousands of years. It's considered to be just because they number of of possible strategies and moves to be trillions upon trillions upon trillions upon trillions of times harder than chess. I'm not making exaggerating. That is actually the calculation. It was anticipated that there would be no AI that could beat the human grandmaster go for at least another decade. Yes. We have a is that could beat a human chess player already. We've seen a Watson beat the jeopardy champion. But no one thought there'd be an AI that can beat does very complicated game this trainees game of go. So Google's deep mind. I was was tasked in. They created a Elsa. Go basically, a I can play this game of Chinese go and took them a long time to to train and code the computer. But eventually it got so good that it beat for the first time the human player at the Chinese game of go, which just amazing about a decade fast than they thought. Anybody would achieve this accomplishment. Well, Google was not happy enough with this results. So they've decided to make us sort of a younger brother of alpha go alpha goes zero and in this program. They just give it a very simple instructions they said these are the rules to play the game of go. Now, you just go out and play it. Learn to be a master at it. Okay. That's all that no human interaction after that. Right. Right. Just instructions land. It wasn't three days. Alpha go zero became so proficient at the game of go on its own it kinda sound it beat the human grandmaster, go and out of one hundred games out of a hundred at beat is big brother alpha. Go jeez. So in three days it achieved that result. Now alpha goes zero was invented by Google a couple of years ago, Google's moved beyond that. Why was able to do that? Why alpha goes year was able to chief this result? It came up with strategies that no human player after thousands of years had ever even conceived as a good strategic move yet it into it'd had foresight abilities that no one thought an AI would be capable of having and use those skills to not only beat the human goal. Mankind master. But also the heat beat his older, brother. We're already that's even that's considered to be old technology. Pat's if I were now, we're having a is that can produce a is. We have a is that are replicating that are building their own is we've had two way is just recently that began talking to each other on on Facebook rationally and they rationally they well they develop that's a good question because it developed their own code, and they their own language in the began speaking to each other in this language. The creators again to give you an example. Algorithm. Blackbox asks these is what are you saying? Can you translate what you're communicating to each other? And both of them said, no, it's none of your business, basically. That's where we're at right now. It is. It's remarkable and scary at the same time. Joe is with us Long Island, New York. Go ahead. Joe? Hi, James great show. I have two questions first. What they it's I saw the Lord of the rings movie. And it seems like token and his writings what derives somewhat from the Spanish inquisition and the idea of what's crap. It's wanted your opinion on that. My second question would be I also watch the miniseries world without and on net. Flicks. I thought the acting was scraped the central character eventually was a healer in town. And then she got putting a non array one. She was kind of accused of being a witch and later on in the movie, it seemed like it had the perception with the black play coming in that she was overwhelmed and outnumbered. So I'd ask you with a witches outnumber from their perception. Or what the people at that time felt like they were outnumbered by the the witches and relating to a I is it going to be a perception that and individual like you arrive would be outnumbered by a us. Great questions. Eight I grew up reading Tolkien love Tolkien. And he was JR token was basically using a lot of of of history to construct his his Middle Earth. And I have no doubt that he was patterning the persecution. That was going on was very likely patterned after the Spanish, I. I think that's fascinating. I would love to be able to talk to R Tolkien to find out. Exactly if that's true or not. Going on to which is an AI and being outnumbered. I think in the past which is work considered to exist. I don't think they were concerned about being outnumbered. I think at that point in the past. They were considering what used to be, you know, that rare individual rights small group, Joel. So but controversy then exact opposite. If a ever comes to the point where it developed in AGI this artificial general intelligence, which is an AI that is a quivalent to our intelligence are self awareness. It's going to very rapidly be very busy. It's not gonna be satisfied with just being at our level of intelligence. It's just gonna think faster than us is gonna understand us better than we understand ourselves. And like any self-aware program. It's going to have the same drives that we have number one survival number two is, you know, where our concern is where we get our next meal from for a is is it's going to be considered word is whereas going to acquire energy. Where's it going to quiet resource? It's going to need this gonna make sure to survive that it's going to have to achieve those goals. And it's going to look at cost as a competitor. And because of its ability to replicate itself, it's going to potentially spread everywhere and be everywhere. So in that case, I think we're going to be vast. Outnumbered by versions of this AI programs. It's multiplies itself. Just for the sake of of security and safety. I didn't want itself eliminated. So it's going to make copies of itself. Walters with us in Allentown Pennsylvania in the wildcard line. Go ahead. Walt georgia. Hey, stock Dr Rawlins's distinctive proven over your previous guest. I think he was with all due respect. I think he was the great great grandson of Pt. Barnum. Walter Walter shame on you. Walter. I have to say, I always appreciate somebody. Introducing me as Dr Rollins. Thank you very much. You've you've already made a made a fan out of me. Well, you are a veterinarian if I'm not yes, you are. Correct. But everybody sort of they always call me former veterinarian, but you know, I can I can still neuter a cat and under thirty seconds. If the you know the opportunity demands it. You know, what veterinary school is his toughest medical school. These days. It's it's definitely hard to get into it. It is a challenge in the fact that you know, you don't have just learned the human body. I remember, you know, anatomy class it was. You know was I it was a dog. There was a captain his cows and the horse, then the then the chicken, and everyone is very different in anatomy. So it is challenge. And again of a bigger challenge. Also is that these are patients of ours, don't speak. That's right. And don't you wanna hear what's going on? Don't you really have to love animals as well? Because I mean, you're gonna make more money is doctor is about ical Dr people, obviously if if you're looking just for money to practice medicine going to human medicine. Yes. When it comes to Tibet me medicine, is you gotta you gotta love animals, and I I've. I can't think of anybody ever crossed paths with from veterinary perfect that didn't have an enduring respect for animals. Are you a cat or dog lover? I know both both I like them both. I do have two golden retrievers at home right now. But I I had a hospital cat named Tucker. That interesting start with Tucker is that when my veterinary clinic the very first week opened that clinic this cat came wondering in front door. No. On neutered male cat. I thought well maybe belonged to somebody because he was friendly didn't seem Farrell. So we kept him thinking belonged to somebody. No one ever claimed him since that cat walked in that door. He never tried to leave. He walked in that door. He just stayed the door open and close he would never try to leave. And I finally when I was having some success as a writer, I. Began to sort of wean myself off that near practices because my demand for writing became more. And more of my time Hawaiian ended up selling my clinic to a corporate group and state employed for a while. But when I finally say, okay, you know, guys this is enough. I've got I've got to go. This is fifteen years later the day. I walked out of that clinic that cat died. My gosh, almost like it. Yeah. Exactly. So I think Tucker was you know, he was meant to be in that in that hospital. He was a great cat some believe we're living in both some believe we're living in a computerized simulation. What do you think of that? Is that ludicrous? You know, I I spoke to some di- did a book that's that that broached upon that. Are we living in a hologram, and I went to Fermilab Chicago to get that answer. And because they were building what's called a hollow meter where they were gonna they were going to test to see if indeed we were going to if we're actually living in in in assimilation. They ran that test. And the conclusion was I'm trying to turn this, right? It was inconclusive leaning towards yes, we are leave. We are living in a in a hologram. So how can that possibly be? And they tried to explain it to me. Did not understand it. I don't understand that these mathematics behind explanation that we're actually living in a hologram. Apparently, they're they're testing to support that do you agree with that? I sure hope not I don't like the idea that that I that. There are some greater force. That's basically just using us as as a the equivalent of a very good video game next up. Joe in Monterey, California is with us head Joseph. Well, welcome to the matrix. You got it. And it's true, though, it is a type of hologram, but we all involved in creating it throughout sign hickory always had a conflict between science and magic. And I think a I will find a way to combine both science and magic the I think the only way you could stop this is an impulse. Now wears a good solar prominence when you need it. Another thing is that by the time, we realize what's going on. We'll already be controlled. It will take over all technology. I guess that's the good news. What's the bad news? Yeah. I mean, that's that is one of the big concerns is that when we see this AG is artificial general intelligence make this leap to an ATS. I an artificial super intelligence. It is going to be an entity that we've never encountered on this planet is gonna be incomprehensible abilities are gonna beyond our even ability to comprehend today. Even at this point. It will. Surpass anything that we understand today. It's it's ability, you know, will impulse knock it out depends on energy source. You know, if if it does lock itself down into some type of core working retain its ability and has alternate means of of reigniting itself to take yourself out of this cocoon, whether that geothermal will that solar whether that's some type of energy source that zero point energy something we don't even comprehend yet. It may it may grasp and control before even aware. It has that ability. We've got Brian and Santa Rosa California now. Hi, brian. Go ahead. Yeah..

AI Google James Rollins chess Tucker Joe Ray kurzweil Elon Musk Facebook Stephen hawking Long Island Brian Watson Walter Walter Tolkien Blackbox Pat New York Dr Rawlins
"kurzweil" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"kurzweil" Discussed on 600 WREC

"But if you use them off label, you may significantly delay your rate of aging, and we get together face to face, we meet people, and it's much different than how communications occur nowadays. And I said that church up so that people could get together and exchange information in an open forum. So we could figure out quicker how we can live longer. I don't want to belabor this point. But I'm fascinated by the fact that this church of perpetual life because you know, many of your members there. One of the principal tenant of their faith. Is that there is an afterlife. And that we sort of should look forward to that. You can't if you love this life. You'll lose it in the next sort of thing. That's a bit of a paradox. Doesn't contrast. It all those who have a belief in an afterlife can retain their beliefs. We're simply advancing science. So people can live longer if we achieve immortality. And you'll want to hang around. There are always options to check out. I don't think I'll ever use those options. I'll probably just stay around indefinitely. If I'm able to that people don't have to. How does? What you're doing differ from the trans humanist movement in the sort of the philosophy people. Like Ray kurzweil, doesn't we're really a trans Shuman his church since the trans human is technology has yet to emerge to enable people to live forever. We have to deal with biology, which is regrettable. It's not gonna be as efficient as the trans humanist supercomputers were remerged into them and literally live forever. So we deal with our biological bodies. And we intervene with biologics so that we can prevent disease lay aging and reverse it whenever possible. So no, no real difference. It's just transhumance is looking at your two thousand fifty well, I won't be alive at two thousand fifty if something aggressive is not done to intervene into my aging process. And I'm doing that I'm taking a lot of off label medications people see what I'm taking. They think I'm dying of cancer and every diseases existed. Well, these drugs if you sloppily can have benefits. All right Bill. I gotta jump in. We'll take a quick time out come back and discuss further the beastie boys' you gotta fight for your right to party. They are the big. Biggest-selling rap in in the world. Check out their new beastie boys are book named one of the best books. Have last year by Rolling Stone magazine. More with Bill Falloon on immortality right here on coast to coast AM..

Bill Falloon Rolling Stone magazine Ray kurzweil principal cancer
"kurzweil" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"kurzweil" Discussed on World News Analysis

"And they, and they they have always had these powers that they've had to hide from the rest of the world because not because they they they were sort of, you know. Adelaide like like superman or something all look at this powers. You have your wonderful. They were actually the victims of prejudice minority, and they had to live in this in this school that was just for these people. And there's like I wanna hide this even they had a certain ability. They had to hide it because it was not looked on and society in a good way. It was like your freak and the complexity of that dynamic was was really interesting even back, then I was thinking imagine that. Yeah. Imagine that you could fly, and you had these wings, but you had to hide them because if you had them in daily life, people would laugh at you ridiculous. This is and even the villain. You know, magneto who's who is one of the mutants. The reason he lashed out at the world was he was angry that he had been the victim of of of of abuse and prejudice. And so it created this us against them Intel, which is very fascinating. I mean default on that. I mean in that the trajectory while this was happening was the civil rights movement is moving and certainly everybody when they're in school kinda feels that they're oddball eve, right? They're not. I mean, I think this is kind of what propelled these things into the site Geist and into into people's psyche that they could identify with it or even if you take something like Addams family same thing or the monsters. These are these are cartoons these not Stanley things. But it was the same thing. He's sort of oddballs trying to make it. There's something unusual about them in how they deal with the I just some articles recently about the the the affinity for marvel comics heroes and hip hop because the hip hop artists. And also saw this kind of thing they said, yeah. These these are sort of talented smart people with superpowers who who kind of see the world in a humorous way. Because they're always joking weather fighting the bad guys, you know. And so they use their verse. Dexterity and their things to get ahead in life because they're they're they're marginalized that you have to do that in order to survive because you can't be an ordinary person. Right. Yeah. Like with a singularity, I mean, well with ironman just just to the follow up on that is this idea of singularity, which is something that Ray kurzweil had brought which is you know, this. This miss mixing merging of human and machine right into an so that that was kind of a forerunner. I mean, he died at ninety five for goodness sakes. I mean, so he's actually I mean, he had a good run and the time in which he got involved with this really was what I think made it. I mean, obviously has imagination as well. But I mean made this all work, and he was appearing and in some in most of the films, right? Always always cameo appearance. At least a few seconds of the film. Yeah. So he was quite a personality that made the thing move. But like I said, I think a lot of this will carry on. And I think these will do just fine because it it it relate people can relate to them. Like, you're saying with the X men and women the the DC characters the Batman and superman, they only achieve success in the movies, when they sort of did the.

Ray kurzweil Geist Adelaide Intel Stanley Addams
"kurzweil" Discussed on Future Thinkers Podcast

Future Thinkers Podcast

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"kurzweil" Discussed on Future Thinkers Podcast

"Crazy, and she is crying and crying out to God the whole time saying, please God, save me. And she makes it she survives in the end. But it's very sad to watch. And I think that the video kind of resonated with a lot of people with how they feel right now about the state of the world is just they're getting this very strong sense that everything is starting to go to hell and they're scared, and it makes people feel helpless. And so what what happens to people when they feel helpless look for some higher power to tell them what to do or to fix everything make things better again. And in this case people are doing that with like thinking, Elon Musk or Ray kurzweil or some artificial intelligence or some new government structure, like they think those things are going to be the people or structures that change everything and fix the world or aliens Jesus, or you know. And you know, but it's all just like offloading. The responsibilities to some external entity instead of figuring out how you yourself can contribute and make things better. Yeah. And so this is why we talk about sovereignty because that's the first step. You know determining? Okay. So what is what can I actually control? What can I actually do? And then increasing that that's fear of what you can the things that you can do something about. But then there's another layer on top of it. So okay. Once you regained your sovereignty. Then would you do because things are changing really really fast? And sometimes you don't know what's going to happen. There are just too many variables you can't predict. So it's not a linear passing more. So you have to like a state of being now. Yeah. You can't really have so much of a plan. You just have to be able to adapt as quickly as possible. So you need more mental flexibility, and you need flexibility.

Elon Musk Ray kurzweil
"kurzweil" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"kurzweil" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"But now at least, you know, what to look for remember cancer when identified early is curable fundamentally curable, right? I mean stage zero cancer has one of the highest overall cure rates because you can excise in one way or another the core of that malignancy and eradicate the problem. But I mean, look this is a this is a this is a big team effort. That's requ. Wired between all of the constituents here from the patients to the basic scientists. I just wanna make certain that we don't we don't hamstring. What might be one of the greatest therapeutic breakthroughs in history because of of irrational, fear and and underlying political agendas, which you know, confuse and confound the issue, Bob, how long are you going to live? You know, what listen I've got I got three kids who who are the absolute reason for for. We're getting up every day, and I hope that I'm around to see their children, and maybe even their children's children. I think I think that with what we know today. Someone like me could easily live to ninety to one hundred. I think that if some of the tools we bring a bear today. Get to the point where there everyday available. We could push that even beyond, but I do know that my kids are guaranteed to live to one hundred. And I believe that their kids have the potential to live to a hundred twenty one hundred fifty and if our good friend Ray kurzweil is right. And we reach that longevity escape velocity. We may actually be able to maintain a forum of life. Well, well beyond even one hundred fifty I think that it may happen faster than that. I mean, we're here with Peter demand is the the king of exponential technology in abundance and all that. And I look at my own experience with the internet. I I helped to design the the first provision on demand thing which was a precursor to what we do with Amazon cloud services and all that. And you look at what happened in the course.

Ray kurzweil Amazon Bob Peter
"kurzweil" Discussed on The World Transformed

The World Transformed

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"kurzweil" Discussed on The World Transformed

"Hey, Bill. How are you? Well, I am super fantastic. Happy Monday. How are you? My friend, man, I'm doing great and peck. It's hot, Tom, we do another. Let's your cancer shows. This is something we kind of come back down diamond. One of my favorite things that have. So we're doing a week of catch apps this week where we're going to catch up on cosmic mysteries on Wednesday, and we're going to catch up on general brab bag topics on Friday. But one of our, as you said, big recurring themes on the show is progress that's being made in a lot of different areas. We talk about progress being made in the war on obesity, the war on aging and various other disease when they occur. But I think there is nothing as prominent in terms of diseases that we talk about as cancer and rightly. So obviously, that's that's the big one to be solved in this world. And we've observed in the past that if we wanted to, we could probably do a podcast just about cancer research and just about. The big breakthroughs that are being made have even glibly referred in the past to the cure for cancer of the week. We don't always do a cure for cancer every week, and these aren't three cure for cancers. We'll be talking about tonight necessarily, but it just goes to show you how rapidly interesting and very promising results are occurring and what it says for the future of people having to deal with all variations of this this terrible disease. So we got three stories here. The first one new Australian drug puts cancer cells permanently to sleep. Now, what the story reminds me of as the idea of in anti aging, when we talk about actuarial escape velocity, you're actually maybe it's more like the sub head of the Ray kurzweil book on that subject voice said live long enough to live forever. So here we have something that is not a cure for cancer..

cancer Ray kurzweil obesity Tom
"kurzweil" Discussed on The World Transformed

The World Transformed

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"kurzweil" Discussed on The World Transformed

"And this is actually a real demographic trend is that the most intelligent people have the fewest kids and regular intelligence. People have a moderate number of kids, but the dumb people have lots of kids and this occurs over generation over generation over generation that suddenly you've got a world where people are visibly less smart, you know. And because this guy was pretty average at exit may be on the low side of average in the twentieth century or twenty century. Now he's. The smartest guy in the world and is not saying much. Okay. It to say he's the smartest guy in the world. So that's a real effect. How do we counteract that? One of the ways I've said that is if we can actually boost intelligence right in not even just in vitro, but if we can boost intelligence for ourselves right once once we're up and running, then that that will help counter that I just I, I'm I'm of the opinion that messing with intelligence. Let's say, let's let's say the identified the intelligence gene being this, or you know more likely, it's a whole thousands of genes accommodation. Yeah. What happens when we start playing with those? Because those jeans also affect other things and I'm worried about the the implication of messing with that. It's such a complex system that I don't believe understanding the parts could ever lead you to understand the whole interesting. Yeah. Well, it you have to wonder if there would be just a quick. Is there anything you could just do genetically to make a more intelligent person like. Is there's not just one gene, right? There's going be to your point, a whole complex of things that have to be impacted. But I think we're able to sort of think through the stuff in today. We can't live with one gene. You know, we say, oh, it's accurate. Deactivated. But I think most of, you know what we want to change about ourselves. What be at disease intelligence. Looks. I think that those things are probably way too complicated for us to comprehend if we tried to medal. I think there might be some some things that we're not to have them. There are definitely be unintended consequences. There definitely be side effects that were were not looking for. One of the things Ray kurzweil talks about is let's not get so excited about designer babies, but he's very excited about designer, baby boomers, right into like, take taking adults and even older adults in people who are in a position to make these decisions read. So you don't have the ethical. Cabins about you, do you know, hey, how I want my child to have gills right. The those kinds of things are very problematic for the kid who then comes out and says, I really want gills. Thanks. But in adult, particularly adults were, we've got. You know, mortality, steering his down. We're looking at potentially getting cancer. We're looking at all these different things that can happen to us shirt. You wanna mess with my little bit. Okay. I'm all I know that there might be unintended consequences, but I'll soon the risk of that. And once things have been established through adult s- modifying their genes, then maybe if something is really firmly established or once it's in the germline suppose. Yeah, then you can start producing heads. But yeah, but I mean, what happens when you do start having kids like again, ethical issues your Mr. that I guess, I guess you know today you don't really have a choice whether or not you come to this world eager so..

Ray kurzweil cancer twenty century
"kurzweil" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

08:58 min | 3 years ago

"kurzweil" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"About augmented reality anything with. A chip in eighty eight eighty eight asked Lee Leo that's my phone number if you. Wanna call love to hear from you be my co star eighty eight eighty eight ask Leo we were talking before the news at the. Top of the. Are about dictation this is example of where changes. Really benefited users The idea voice dictation speaking to a computer and having a transcribe it is nothing new, is one, of, the, kind, of magical holy grail? Elements of computing that people have been trying to work, on for for years, voice synthesis. Ray kurzweil remember he. Was doing the kurzweil speech synthesizer trying to get the computer to talk this is what we've, always wanted a computer. Human interaction to be more fluid more like human to human so we could talk to it. And we're really getting there so dictation is a very specific tool where you speak to. The computer and it writes it out it takes You know a lot of processing power more importantly takes a lot of memory to do it and in the old days when, memory was and processors were slow this was maybe more challenging but nowadays every computer starts at four, gigabytes of. Ram Hugh kind of astronaut Michael number for people who remember computing in the nineties. Processors that are basically mainframe computers times four so we really have a lot of we have all we. Need there are still companies well there's one main company nuance. That still sells standalone speech dictation software dragon used to be called dragon naturally speaking now that just. Called dragon It's not it's not cheap dragon professional individual for MAC version six is three hundred. Dollars, starts at three hundred dollars if you want the medical version that's nine thousand nine hundred ninety nine dollars so. Most of the thousand bucks Yikes I wonder how I wonder how they're. Doing given that almost all the operating systems out. There Support. Speech Android IOS, MAC. OS windows all have built in, dictation they call it speech to text that makes. Sense right you're. Speaking in the computers trainings text on the MacIntosh has, got it's very nice it's very. Simple I was trying to find the. The system preference painted. Turn it on for a caller turns out. It's in the one place I wasn't looking keyboard I okay, I understand the logic we're replacing. The keyboard with your voice but it's. In the keyboard settings You'll see, dictation and if you look in the accessibility settings there's. Another dictation entry, that shows you the editing commands and it has quite a few. Editing commands as well he can say. Bold that. Last word or backspace. Or go redo that last sentence that, kind of thing is really handy And the dictation engines have, gotten very good lot of work's been done and you. Know it was. Already dragon was very good for years but, it was about ninety percent accurate and I suspect we're, still in that ballpark which sounds very good except that. If you have, to correct one word in every ten you speak you could see. That it may be a little annoying You have to the other kind of holy grail the goal of, speech recognition was that you, can speak normally like talk like. This and it would dictate but, if you've if you've ever seen the, the automated captioning system on YouTube or watch, TV with captions turned on when they don't have a human typing them you see how many mistakes, it's hard to do if I say the word dear How does, a computer know from context only whether it's d.. E. a. r. d. e. r. You know and context. May not be sufficient and computers. Really don't even understand context. Very, primitive understanding what you're saying they're really doing word, by word and so this is challenging nevertheless there's geniuses working at Google and apple and. Microsoft and they've really done a very good job of of actually typing, the word is you you might have even if you've ever used the dictation on your phone I, think this. Is mostly happened to. Me on Google but maybe on. Syria too where were you're. Speaking, and initially it gets the word wrong but as, you continue somehow it figures out what you intended and fixes it have you ever seen. That it's remarkable you really feel like this well computer science it's amazing So I would my counsel to. Our last caller was not to go out and buy dragon yet but. Try the built in a speech recognition the speech to text capability of of the. Computer in the phone I suspect that that most of, the time I even dictate. A lot of my? Text messages I use it a lot. Because just simple I don't like the tiny little keyboard on my iphone so. I will I will dictate? Most of the keyboards I most of? The, phones have, little buttons With microphones on them you. Might have to search around or maybe even look at your keyboard information in the settings to. Find it but on the on the MacIntosh. Era I'm sorry the iphone it's on the space bar I think that's. That's a very commonplace for it if you just press and hold the space bar Oh I'm using. That's interesting okay so this launched Google's speech recognition. So I think I'm using a third party keyboard The Google g. board to do this and then pastes. It in if I switched keyboards. So. That's the Google g. board is this is a microphone on the space bar let me switch to the apple yes see the apple puts it at the very bottom. Off, the keyboard same idea you. Can speak and it will listen and type and it does a pretty, good job occasionally there's a mistake or two it's a little more challenging, if you have to do everything by. Voice, but if. You can. Use. Your hands a little bit to. Fix mistakes you can get a pretty pretty accurate Period Said. Period so it would add a. Period you sometimes have to say the punctuation and I see a couple of. Errors here's I would have to go in and added, them but that's not too bad So give that a try I, think you'll. I think. You'll, like it eight. Hundred eighty eight ask Leo it's. Kinda cool that this is free part of the operating system just built in. Have to spend extra for Andrew in Los Angeles Leo, LaPorte the tech hi Andrew Hey, hey let. Me, turn Radio is, quite a delay there is you know why they do that in? Case, you say something nasty no. I understand him poor poor Michael has to sit there in the studio with his. Hand, hovered, over the button He's. Waiting you know what have you ever had to use it I think maybe once and one time only. In all these years so. It's not a people and. Then it was a, slip it was. Probably me he. Does he has to dump me more often than acid up the callers because. I accident say a bad word that's the delays a. Forty it's a forty second. Delay so, KFI you know you never know you never know that's they believe? Me, the engineers that KFI our. Mothership down in Los Angeles they keep their hand over that button all the time Oh Well that's why you have forty seconds because when you hit the dump. Button, yes forty, seconds I think. So, yeah it'd be so that gives you time to react used to be a, member a seven second. Delay that's not a lot of, time. But Forty, seconds is enough that I can actually say hey Michael dump this guy and you know he can react you know maybe he's down the. Holly runs he's got forty seconds. To get down there, hit the button and it'll. Go back forty second time actually what it does is it. Is it, it, jumps to to real this. Actually kind of interests done digitally used to be done with tapes that's why it. Was seven seconds it's done digitally now so. Dumps to the current so there's, no delay and, then it rebuilds, the layover time so actually Michael. Correct, me if I'm wrong I suspect that this system gives you a little. Leeway, to dump, more than once. So, it probably only dumps like twenty seconds and then if it happens again it's, second increments so all. Right so you can swear five, times Anyway what Please. Don't Please don't actually hold on because I do have to take a break and I wanna give you chance for. Your question I just used ate up all. Your time. I apologize But we will let we'll. Take a little break come back and answer more of, your actually answer your question instead, of me just guessing on our show today. Brought to you by carbonite the backup leaders we talked about them for years. As a consumer product but you know all. His time they've been secretly building, up their business capabilities now they've become the premier data protection platform for business. And carbonates server bad we've talked about a number of their products they have a number, of them but carbonates server backup..

Michael number Google Lee Leo apple Ray kurzweil Los Angeles KFI Andrew Hey YouTube Ram Hugh Microsoft Syria
"kurzweil" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"kurzweil" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Book about trans humanism an artificial intelligence was, released on Amazon It took. Me three years to collect my thoughts and put them into the book. The book is called transhumance substantiation the truth about AI in a, singularity all you gotta do. Is go to Amazon type in CLYDE, Lewis you'll see it because available now if, you wanna pick it up I started writing about the internet of things smart cities, in artificial intelligence long before it was ever discussed in the mainstream narrative even saying in nineteen ninety six at our appliances would. Outlive us and maybe even turn. This turn on us in the future Much much of that worry was based on, a short story I read when I was a kid by Ray Bradbury there will, come soft rains if you've ever read that book the great the short story it's great I think it's in the Martian chronicle That when I was fourteen and. From there I always knew the future would be full of robots and autonomous machines. Will do simple things like cook and clean, and more complex, things like. Surgeries and even conducting acts of warfare In the book I lament that during the massive. Buildup towards the two thousand sixteen election there was really no focus on how our innovations are changing our lives and I warned in two thousand sixteen. The internet of things will be a major. Issue in the next. Ten years and then politicians should, open up to talking about twenty-first-century issues instead of discussion about the same old issues, that really are always used as button pushers, it's ratchet up emotional responses to the voters Ray kurzweil, warned us he said something about technological singularity which I always took as God, in the machine meaning that somewhere in the machine There will be a. Message and that message will be I am God I collected all the, information from you I'll be information from the earth all the information I. Become essentially and being which knows all, the Oxford dictionary defines a singularity as a hypothetical moment in time when artificial. Intelligence and other technologies have become so advanced humidity undergoes a dramatic irreversible chain so in the next twenty five years artificial intelligence will evolve to the. Point where we'll no more on an intellectual. Level than any human. In the next fifty or one, hundred years I might know more than an entire, population of the planet put together At that point there are serious questions, to ask about whether this artificial intelligence which designing program additional programs all on its own whether I can read the data from an almost infinite. Number of data sources and control almost every connected device on the planet Nive appeared on radio. Shows and TV shows.

Amazon Ray kurzweil Ray Bradbury Martian chronicle CLYDE Lewis twenty five years hundred years three years Ten years
"kurzweil" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

04:49 min | 3 years ago

"kurzweil" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"To help sharpen the next generation of great minds so please help me in welcoming demand who pb es named as one of the sixteen revolutionaries who made america the legendary futurist ray kurzweil ray thank you so much for joining us and i wanted to jump right in the kind of success that you've had is really unparalleled from the accuracy of your predictions but i think even more enthralling from the fact you've been an entrepreneur since you were in your teens what is it that's allowed you to be successful as you are well it's a question i don't actually get that often think about it like a lot of entrepreneurs or creative people who pursue endeavors in all kinds of fields the idea kind of takes over and has an imperative of its own and i just have to pursue it so it's not like i choose the project the project kind of recruits me and then become devoted to it whether it's writing a book or planning a speech or an invention or a company it just becomes an imperative so that's a kind of a devotion to it part of my philosophy is failure is just success deferred and i think actually if you knew of all the obstacles you'd meet you never start a project so it's actually good not to think too much about what you're doing but make sure you have a passion for it that it's something that would be beneficial to to the world one practice i use is i imagine i'm giving his speech say four or five years from now and i'm describing how i succeeded in this project so what would i have to be saying well if project let's say reading machine for the blind it's gonna have to actually access principle terrel so how would do that and i'm describing all these things that i worked backwards from the speech and that kind of gives me my road forward you've talked about as i goes at some point we're going to be asking whether it has consciousness and then how do you really test and there's no really empirical tests but he said one thing that kind of comes close to the way that you think is that it would have to have a model of the way that it thinks do you have a model of your own way are they're building block beliefs like optimism or things like that i think optimism is a critical factor for success and it's not an idle prediction about the future it's a self fulfilling prophecy of if you really convinced that you're going to succeed in that is your model and obstacles come along and okay it's just something in in the road get out of your car get the thing out of the road and move move on figure out how you can succeed despite obstacles because nothing worthwhile is going to present itself without challenges do you have any fundamental beliefs so i'll give you an example so i believe that the reason that i can figure something out as humans are literally wired to adapt that i mean you think about a horse it's born it can run and jump it can take care of itself so nature is made a decision with that species to preprogramme whereas humans or alternately flexible essentially the ultimate adaptation machine so if i know that i'm wired to do that then i should be able to overcome an obstacle simply because that's the wiring of the human in any animal within the cortex which is all mammals can adapt but they're left the conceptual level their ability to operate at an abstract level differs depending on really the size of the tech's surpri mates which have more neo cortex really optimized the neo cortex within the brain without our big foreheads are pretty adaptable and consol problems of a certain level we got that additional neo cortex already doing a very good job of being primates so we created higher levels of obstructionists and language and music and so solving a problem how to create a beautiful piece of music this just a level of obstruction that mammals without a frontal cortex can't do it's not that we're more doubtable it's just said we are operating at a higher conceptual level but do you have things that that our beliefs or otherwise that you use to to give structure to your approach to a problem i mean i have certain methodologies ultimately it's a belief in my end goal and i think about that carefully that the.

america ray kurzweil five years
"kurzweil" Discussed on Who Charted

Who Charted

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"kurzweil" Discussed on Who Charted

"Take awhile are there probably ellen growth hormones to stay alive gotta be gotta be trying to push that kurzweil stuff right does it he does he takes hormones yeah he does look younger and i mean my dad's a pretty youthful guy you've met him right he's in his eighties eighty he's pretty like buoyant like he's got like a lot of energy maybe it's the hormones i don't know what he's taking i just recorded jillian michaels last week and she says she's writing something about antiaging she said fessing you can do for you fast twelve to sixteen hours overnight every night yeah so like you stop eating gm she talks to delta every night yeah you know i did that jillian michaels wellness crews i remember that and she didn't allow any sugar on the boats so you couldn't get a coke couldn't get a pepsi couldn't get a rebel i had having sneak red bull on really yeah he snuck them in stuck with i'm gonna do stand up you know what the the passenger the regular past so that you were performing on it is interesting yeah i was that crowd it was i was so worried because they're all like you know it's a lot of people who are out of shape someone bottom the cruise or it was people who are fanatical love being in shape but i great i did like the longest said i did like an hour and forty five minutes really yeah did you have openers no but i got handed a note at about an hour and forty minutes in i get handed note i'm like what the hell's this and on the mike i read it and it's like the improv group was supposed to go up forty minutes ago.

jillian michaels pepsi kurzweil gm forty minutes forty five minutes sixteen hours
"kurzweil" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"kurzweil" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Oh my god let me ask that again and i just don't let me hear mayor so what i'm asking is if for instance weird i don't know hanging out in the kitchen and you know we're having a conversation and for me that conversation is like wow i was talking to gary neal and i learned all this stuff and and it's a great conversation right and i'm able because of my experience to recall things and to it's a better experience for me could that same experience that we're all sharing and youtube or like chuck's a dumb ass and i hate it this conversation could that then mar your actual memory the information the surroundings how you recall it so that we were called the same experience differently because we're biased by the way we felt about the experience while it was happening there's kind of two processes there okay one we would call the answer you voting the other we would call retrieval so one is called reading in coding and then retrieval so we know there's lots of distortions made it retrieval time so you can show people a video of somebody going past it yield sign and then ask them a question half was the car going when it passed through the stop light and they'll just be like oh i guess it was a stop light and and so they'll distort the memory by having some new information on top of the old information encoding is like how you put that memory down in the first place it's less clear we may have bias even in how we record that information at the time but it's a little bit harder to do the experiments we know that it retrieval time there's there's lots of distortion in fact we reconstruct a lot of our memory so computers like videotape you're you're just pulling out something that is store there's no question about it a lot of what we do is we try to figure out well what could it have been like so if i asked you we did that episode with kurzweil and what did i say about chris well you might sit there and try to remember while the end i said nice things about kurzweil but i was nicer than gary and so what a gary saying go back and try to.

chuck kurzweil chris gary neal youtube
"kurzweil" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"kurzweil" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Grosses it's the confluence of the life of proteins the inflammation in detail dysfunction that provide the explanation for why so how would one so so another so taking a step back to get to your step function no step function improvement in lung javadi can come without addressing atherosclerosis this problem must be addressed if you wanna lift one hundred eighty we absolutely have to fundamentally change the way your coronary arteries and other arteries interface with life approach chains oxidized cholesterol in the light and so when you start to look at what nanoparticles could potentially do if you could build nanoparticles that can replicate the functionality of hdl particle which is to say those things they could enter the sub individual space and deliver date oxidized sterile 's clean out foam cells that's a step function now you've changed the course of the game and you might even get a two for one because if you can if you can if you you can take nanoparticles and actually start having them behave like t cells you now start to get enhanced immune function which probably is going to play a pretty important role in reducing our risk of cancer so i think all of these things from an engineering standpoint our laws able and i my view is just being a relatively unsophisticated longevity guy unsophisticated in that like all i talk about is the basic you know blocking and tackling food and you know exercise in sleep and stress management drugs and supplements i mean nothing really unheard of in that tool space the goal is can you generate even that extra ten to fifteen years above business as usual because it might be that that period of time is what's necessary to allow you to be around for the step function this is that idea of tv escape velocity the way ray kurzweil talks about where if you can just live long enough and be healthy enough long enough technology will save us and i think there's merit to that line of thinking which is we don't know when we're going to get these functions and i'm i'm not sure that i agree it's just a steph function there's probably.

ray kurzweil fifteen years
"kurzweil" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"kurzweil" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"To do this with the human brain and is it ethical to reanimate a human brain we don't think there's a chance of consciousness in this system but the powers could be used for ill or good now the results have been submitted to a journal and these remarks from this ethics meeting were not intended to become public so we don't have all the details yet until that journal article gets published here's my question and i know this is a dumb question if all of the cells are operating normally what is the switch that flips on consciousness well that's the question right we don't we don't even win a even in my brain right now no you can't answer that nobody knows exactly how consciousness emerges but the simpler answer is the neurons can fire and you can map the connections but they they don't work right they're not the the neural activity is suppressed so you can't get enough firing going on to actually may make thoughts happen or or or even collected activity so it's it's sort of like saying i can see down the road but i can't drive down the road and this is also when we get into futurists technology the idea for infinite life has often been the singularity as as discussed by kurzweil that we are mapping all of what what we know as our consciousness and our brain will only as we continue to be able to have sophisticated measurements and the ability to store it on massive of storage air places that we can upload our consciousness without the wet wear this is hey no what if we just had like the brain was the the hard drive right and if we could preserve it and turn it back on the aerobically when you are in another when you have another vessel ride is is that the futurist.

kurzweil
"kurzweil" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"kurzweil" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"The united states as of twenty eighteen and as of two thousand sixteen firearms accounted for fifty one percent of those same suicides men are also three point five times more likely to die by suicide than women and as of twenty fourteen twenty one point five million american adults battled substance abuse according to the national survey and drug use and health no amount of fame fortune or love could stop kurt from killing himself if that is truly what he wanted to do to pression especially coupled with drug addiction can be a mentally difficult to overcome although kurt's death is certainly interesting there's simply not enough evidence to support the murder conspiracies surrounding it kurt and courtney may not have had a perfect relationship but we don't think she would have killed him or conspired to do so at least at one point she loved him and he was the father of her child gordon is innocent strange details like the lack of legible fingerprints kirch credit card activity in the different size lettering on kurt suicide note aren't enough to say he was murdered by anyone in twenty four teen as the twentieth anniversary was approaching the seattle police departments public information unit asked the kurzweil be reopened detective michael kozinski reviewed the case and determine the initial ruling was correct kurt committed suicide he came to this conclusion based on the lack of concrete evidence to the contrary the details people find most suspicious like the lack of legible prints on the gun and the high levels of heroin and kurtz bloodstream can be explained with science so well it is certainly possible to speculate about the case we agree with detective shows in ski kurt killed himself on april fifth nineteen ninetyfour before that he dramatically influenced grunge music and brought alternative rock to mainstream audiences kurt cobaine was a complicated thoughtful person who.

united states murder gordon kurzweil michael kozinski heroin kurt cobaine courtney seattle fifty one percent