35 Burst results for "Kurtz"

Stanley Kurtz: Why Republicans Won't Stop Civics Secures Democracy Act

Mark Levin

00:49 sec | Last month

Stanley Kurtz: Why Republicans Won't Stop Civics Secures Democracy Act

"Well why aren't the Republicans speaking out against this Do they not know what's taking place I think some many Republicans do frankly to be honest I think that they don't want to take a swipe at cornyn I think cornyn has been in leadership And I think he aspires to succeed Mitch McConnell This is my speculation but it's informed speculation And I think Republican senators have bottled up the bill up to now But corn is making another big push He's roped in a few other people and I don't know whether they can stop him but I don't think they like the internal fighting amongst themselves So now that there are three Republican senators on this I worry that the others won't be willing to speak up

Cornyn Mitch Mcconnell
Stanley Kurtz: Dems Are Rushing to Pass Civics Secures Democracy Act

Mark Levin

00:59 min | Last month

Stanley Kurtz: Dems Are Rushing to Pass Civics Secures Democracy Act

"This passing if the people listening in this audience don't act immediately I'm worried about it because the Democrats of course are going to go forward completely They've already signed up three Republicans I've seen a fourth Republican on a somewhat related bill It's getting a lot too close for comfort They want to pass this bill it's called the civics secures democracy act a very misleading name that ought to be called critical race theory destroys democracy But it's called the civic secures democracy act and they want to pass it before the August recess because we're talking about many many hundreds of millions of dollars that will go into the coffers of the leftist civics groups pushing their political protests And this is their last chance to get that money before Congress has taken over by the Republicans So they're hoping to sneak it by this summer and they've already signed up almost an effort Republicans to break a filibuster So I'm worried

Congress
Fox Fails on Day 1 of Jan. 6 Hearings

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

01:21 min | 2 months ago

Fox Fails on Day 1 of Jan. 6 Hearings

"Apparently on Fox News didn't do so well. First off, they didn't have the commercials. No. Secondly, they didn't have the ratings. No. They had their normal rating. Exactly. I'm a parent. This has got a bump. Actually, I believe their ratings were down. They were down. They went down that guy because people were tuning in to where they could actually see the coverage of Fox business got a bump. So people did want to see that watch their program and Devin Nunez got it wrong. Yes. Howard Kurtz had to correct Devin Nunes because he said to put this in prime time, the numbers were way down. So I don't understand how these big corporations, I know it was spread across some 20 different networks when you compare Fox News, which didn't air it live. It just destroyed CNN and MSNBC, right? And Kurtz went, no. Actually, no. Computer says no. Compute says no. The networks like MSNBC did very well covering the hearing Kurtz noted. Two Devin's face, obviously it would appeal to the liberal viewers of that network. Devon. Devin. Amongst cable networks, by the way, MSNBC did lead the pack with 4.2 million total viewers followed by CNN. At 2.6 million Fox, which didn't cover the hearings, averaged its usual 3 million. Yeah. So it didn't gain any viewers. It didn't necessarily lose

Devin Nunez Fox News Devin Nunes Howard Kurtz Kurtz Msnbc FOX Devin CNN Devon
Did Laurie Garrett's Opinion About Masks Change From 2018?

The Dan Bongino Show

01:32 min | 3 months ago

Did Laurie Garrett's Opinion About Masks Change From 2018?

"This is a woman by the name of Laurie Garrett She's at a national academy of medicine Now this is from 2018 That's important This is before the outbreak of COVID right She's giving a speech I saw this on Phil Kurtz feet And she's giving a speech about masks in a study they did in Japan about masks And she inadvertently at the time lets out the real reason why they need masks Now you'll see fear folks fear is their coin of the realm Listen she says it's only a couple of countries that have ever really done large scale studies to try and figure out what might work Japan it may not surprise you as one of them And they in one of their large studies they basically showed that the masks it seemed like the major efficacy of a mask is that it causes alarm in the other person And so you stay away from each other And that's what I think happened with SARS When I was in the SARS epidemic I saw everywhere all over Asia people started wearing these masks and it is alarming When you walk down the street and everybody coming towards you has a mask on You definitely do social distancing You definitely it's just a gut thing but did the mask really help them Did the mass keep the virus out Almost certainly not If the virus was in there around their face the mask would not have made the difference Wow Really That was 2018 is the science changed in that study in Japan and something we know now we didn't know then

Laurie Garrett National Academy Of Medicine Phil Kurtz Japan Sars Asia
Kurt Schlichter on the Realities of War in Eastern Europe

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:32 min | 7 months ago

Kurt Schlichter on the Realities of War in Eastern Europe

"We're back with Kurtz. They're calling Pete doocy. I mean, come on, big, blond boy scout, lovely champ, an SOB. That's who sleepy, creepy joeys. We're back with the author of the Kelly Turnbull soon. What are you? Is it number 6? I'm writing number 7 as we speak. I just turned in my manuscript to regnery another Salem property folks. For the fallen rise of America and I just and I did it and I actually did an extra revision of the China chapter just today to correct us some things about DF 21 missiles. He sleeps as the little as president Trump does. He's unstoppable follow him at Kurtz left to follow his locals account the 5th arena dot locals dot com in the break for those of you viewing a rum, but you saw this, we were talking about the realities of war in Eastern Europe, the importance of geography, a weather. Let's go through, I think you're right. We'll just quickly summarize that. Rapid decapitation take Kyiv in install your puppet regime maybe one or two other cities and then take over the Ukraine. What happens next? And talk to us about the next three years of Biden or calcular or whoever is this going to be a domino effect that next it's Taiwan, then it's Pyongyang taking action against Japan. What is kennel K's war college predictions? Well, look, I think it's easier to ask yourself, what is a good strategic and tactical reason for the Chinese not to strike a Taiwan within the next three years? What is the thing that would stop them? American American forces are weaker than a year ago because one of our ships went a lot went offline because one of the sailor allegedly set it on fire and the sailors didn't know how to put out a fire. I would give you odds that they were a 100% caught up in their trans awareness training, though their firefighting training was apparently deficient. But what would stop you if you were G you have seen Americans? Nothing. Nothing. You think the Germans are going to suddenly stop trading with the Chinese? Maybe the Americans will for a little while. And then you know the walmarts and the costcos and everybody are going to start calling their senators. And saying, hey, I can't get my cheap garbage to sell to Americans.

Pete Doocy Kelly Turnbull Kurtz President Trump Salem Taiwan Kyiv Eastern Europe Pyongyang China Biden America Ukraine Japan
Author Kurt Schlichter on the MAGA Movement and Trump's Political Future

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:30 min | 8 months ago

Author Kurt Schlichter on the MAGA Movement and Trump's Political Future

"Welcome back to one on one with Kurtz lecter. Talk to us about your understanding of the America first movement maga, the midterms in 2024. I absolutely agree with you about what we need. The question is, do is the person. Now I am a big fan of Donald Trump. I was not early on. I and I became a one because he earned it. He earned my respect for keeping his word, which I did not think he was going to do. I thought he was just in our politician. I was wrong. I became a big supporter. As you noted, I wrote a book about. I am also entirely on sentimental. If Donald Trump is not the best candidate, I will not support it. If he is the best candidate that is most likely to win and affect conservative tanks, I will. I know a lot of people are very loyal to Donald Trump and I am too. But his loyalty, the loyalty of a politician, is to the people. And if he's not going to be the best, then he needs to get out of the way. Now, question is, will he be the best? He may very well be. You look at you, look at the polls right now and I know the president is looking at them. Joe Biden is pulling right down there with tofu. And camel is doing even worse. I think Donald Trump has a lot of he has a ceiling of support because there are people out there who irrationally hate him. But I think there are a lot of people who are sorry that they gave Biden a chance because they saw Biden falsely as normalcy. They saw Trump as a disruptive force. Trump is a disruptive force. And I think that's what we need. But I don't represent all

Donald Trump Kurtz Lecter America Joe Biden Biden
Kurt Schlichter: From the Gulf War to the LA Riots

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:03 min | 8 months ago

Kurt Schlichter: From the Gulf War to the LA Riots

"And way back with colonel Kurtz later. Okay, so you're back from the Gulf War. You've just started law school a little bit more mature than the people around you and give us how things proceed from that point cut. Well, it was interesting. I was in kind of a strange place. I would party harder than anybody else in law school. Because an army guy, you could, 'cause you knew how to and you could do it, you could survive it. I could and, you know, I mean, I'm back from the goal. I'm not with any other military people. I think there were a total four out of 404 veterans out 400 in my client. One guy had 20 years ago been in the air force. There was another guy who'd been a seal. And it was strange. And I didn't, I didn't really stop until about 6 months later when I joined the California National Guard. And I don't know why I did. I just, I guess I just wanted to be back with, you know, at least once a year, once a month, a few days a month, be with guys who kind of knew what I did. And I found myself in the last angel's riot. Which you said, what you said was scarier than being deployed to the Balkans, right? Oh, God. Much, much more so. The LA riots, I was living in Pasadena. I look at this thing and we weren't expecting to get deployed. When I had actually joined up, I'm standing in the operations room at the Inglewood armor in Burbank, and I said, so what happens if we get mobilized and the full-time guys just left? 20 some years later as commander in that armory, I would deploy a company standing in that same place. I gave the order to set up a go. But at that time, I call into the United States, look, I'm watching people get the help now of them in TV. Are we getting deployed? Nah, they're not going to call us off. I go, oh, okay. And having enough experience in the army, I immediately packed my stock.

Colonel Kurtz California National Guard Inglewood Armor Army Air Force Balkans Pasadena Burbank United States
"kurtz" Discussed on The Hull Show ? 1310 KFKA

The Hull Show ? 1310 KFKA

04:59 min | 10 months ago

"kurtz" Discussed on The Hull Show ? 1310 KFKA

"This is kristen. Keogh your unc basketball coach and you are listening to the whole show. Thirteen ten kfi day. Thirty six minutes after the hour on the christian. Matteo she was at the coaches show last night. Jerry schimmel interviewing her live from the goat last night and it was a great time. That place is packed every single tuesday. It's a great a great atmosphere. The big time. Sports bar greeley colorado joining us now lead anchor for the mountain west network. Jesse kurtz jesse my friend. It's always always great to catch up with you every wednesday man like what. Hey i've been to the goat. That place is phenomenal. You have been oh. My jessica occurs endorsed endorsement. Man that that's when you know that place is legit. Yeah big time big time. One of my favorite places in greeley next time. You're up here man. Let me know. We'll we'll jump over there. I'll i'll i'll buy. I'll buy you dinner by a lunch time. My friend Big weekend coming up in the mountain west. You're looking at these standings. You're of still waiting for that team to to kind of run away with especially on the mountain mountain west side of things and you got to ranked teams which is fantastic for the conference in fresno state and san diego state. Yeah that was a big night last night and you never really know which way that the committee is going to go with these things because there's so many opinions that go into that equation but to have two teams ranked More than the pac twelve Best to the group of five Certainly like where we stand. And i think that's a credit to fresno state and san diego state in the way that they scheduled if you're asking me and this is just my opinion. That's what put him over the top here. You got teams. That went out and scheduled san diego st. schedules arizona and utah Beat the bowl. Fresno state goes out and schedules. You oregon plays them very tight. Ucla goes on the road and wins and then fresno state of course beat san diego state last weekend in arguably the biggest game this far in the mountain west that's that strategic scheduling and. Make sure that you've got those those teams that you win and you make a splash. people take notice and last night. The the cfp committee committee took notice and rank bowl team. So certainly proud of that. Yeah no question about it. A big big night for the mountain west conference and and now we'll see just looking at the schedule ahead. Obviously the one. I think most of us have our eyes on. If we're just fans of the conference looking at fresno state and boise state broncos came out. Beat the rams came back after being down thirteen nothing..

Jerry schimmel mountain west network Jesse kurtz jesse greeley Keogh san diego Matteo unc kristen basketball fresno state fresno jessica colorado cfp committee committee Fresno Ucla utah arizona oregon
"kurtz" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

05:55 min | 10 months ago

"kurtz" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"You can go to Ikea. They got free ones there. And you can do anything with a pencil. And all the artwork in this book is either folded paper or handwritten pencil. Talk about the folded paper art because it really is an absolute perfect partnering to your words. How did you come up with the idea? Did you make all of that art yourself with actual paper? Did you photograph it? How did you do it? So the idea for the paper came actually a few years ago, I am a big. And I am always rolling and folding little scraps of paper to sort of stay caught. The listeners don't know that I've been playing with a fidget ring this whole time just to stay on track. And I thought, what if I could make art from this physical manifestation of my anxiety? And I started folding and tearing these little paper kind of collages and I hung them up in the studio. And as I was working on this book and developing the concept of the book and realizing that it was a book, not so much about how to be a person, but the process of figuring out how to be a person, I became obsessed with the idea that the artwork would be paper sheets transforming sequentially, like origami step by step. And so the artwork starts with a plain sheet of blue paper, and that's us. We all start as a blank, a blank slate. And as life bends us and folds us or tears us or punctures us, we transform into who we're meant to be. And so the these transformation sequences are flows in the book, the result is always some different artwork or shape or form, often with a phrase a reminder or a pun attached. One question you ask in the book that I personally relate to and struggle with is this. What happens when you get what you want, and then you want something else. And I truly am a victim of metabolizing any goal or achievement soon as I reach something that I've strived for. I want something else. And I recognize that that's part of my cycle of self loathing, you know, that I only feel good when I'm being productive. And you talk about that as well, the sort of notion of productivity being something that helps us stave off the depression, stave off those dark moments. Talk a little bit about how to better be in touch with what it is that we want and then once we achieve that deciding we want something else or deciding we don't want it anymore. I think that it is often, you know when you get there kind of thing, which isn't helpful, right? I don't have expert advice for you so much as just being aware of the fact that you can get something and then change your mind. That might help someone who is obsessing over a goal that is maybe not just out of reach, but pretty far out of reach. You know, someone who has been going after a goal for quite a while and maybe the circumstances have changed so much that even if they were to achieve that goal, it would no longer satisfy them. And so I'm almost saying, hey, you might be in a scenario where you could save yourself the heartache by doing that bigger picture thinking now, for me, though, that phrase was inspired by January 1st, 2018, when I woke up, my last book had come out, I got married, and I was like, well, now what? All my life, I just wanted to find my true love and all my life. I just wanted to like, you know, make something of what I was doing. And I actually felt like I had done it all, and then I didn't know what to do. And that was a really hard winter for me. As I really had to sort of identify where do I go from here? Well, it's so interesting because one of the questions that you pose in the book and when I ask myself over and over, if you could strip away all of your distractions and obligations, who would you be left with? So who were you left with when you were cognizant of having gotten everything that you wanted? In that moment, I think I was left with my truest, most honest self, which is a sort of depressive nerdy gay Jew. And I was like, wait a minute. That's who I am. I can't hide it, and also I think it's a superpower. And at that moment, I started to really lean into being earnest. I finally stripped away the last dregs of wanting to be cool. And I realized that I could lower some barriers because they weren't as high as I thought they were. And once I embrace that fully, it really helped to shift the direction of my work, where I became more vulnerable more honest, made work that I think is more functional and more useful and this book would not have happened if not for that shift in thinking three years ago. Isn't that interesting how the very things that we feel sort of contain us that once we're able to push through them are things that help us become who we are? You know, I had so much shame about so much of who I was. And when I finally just acknowledged it, the shame kind of disappeared, is that how you feel? I do feel that way. And I'm so glad that you feel that way. Because after the last time I was in the podcast, I remember sitting in your office and having a more personal conversation and realizing that we actually had quite a lot in common and I had no idea. And when I knew that I felt so empowered because here was someone who I viewed as successful and highly intelligent and powerful and she and I had these points of commonality. And so maybe I was.

Ikea depression
"kurtz" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:41 min | 10 months ago

"kurtz" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"It's written a lot about this, how really important posts where she's talking about something that she would deem important. Don't get as much traction as happy pictures of her son, for example. And that can be troubling because you do want your message to be read if it's important to you. I'm wondering how you feel about that if you found that experience to be true. I think my perspective now is that we really need to rely less on these platforms. You know, it used to be that it was like a subscription and people would subscribe to your updates and then get them and what social media has become is more of a mixed bag trickle. And so that can not be your only way of connecting. Also, what I realize is that social media feels really personal, but is actually probably the least personal method of communication I have. Yeah, it's antisocial media. It feels like it. So for me, I decided, let me put the more personal stuff in a book that has a double opt in. You have to order the book, and then you have to open the book, and at that point, welcome to my home, let's have a conversation, sit on the couch. Let's get into it. How do you recommend that people avoid the sort of human nature comparisons when looking at looking at Facebook or Instagram? You know, years and years ago, I was going through a depression and I remember meeting somebody on the street and she asked me how I was and I started crying. And she was shocked because she said it seemed like I was fine from Facebook. And I'm like, everybody's fine on Facebook. It's hard to know how much to share that sort of deeply real, because then people get all freaked out that you might be in a bad place. So how do you recommend that people sort of calibrate in sharing and comparing? You know, I think when it comes to sharing, it is a gut check. It is a, is this helpful? Is this useful? Is this interesting? Does this make me feel good right now, but hurt me in the long run? And I am, I think you might know this. I'm a serial tweet delete. I will tweet something and delete it within minutes. Because I know that. I am especially late night Twitter, you know, I'll say something that is maybe very true, but kind of inflammatory. I would love to share something on the podcast that will for sure get me in trouble. It's mental health awareness week. And I've been seeing social media influencers doing sort of like sponsored content for brands that are cashing in on mental health. And I tweeted, if I don't get a mental health awareness week sponsorship, I will literally kill myself. Oh, dear. And I of course deleted that. Thank you two minutes. Because we can't actually say that. But what I meant was, can mental health awareness, sponsorship, branded products, get a little bit more real, because no amount of candles is going to replace Lexapro. Well, it comes back to the question about brands, affiliating themselves with any kind of social movement, whether it be mental health week or right or Black Lives Matter. I mean, I still find it really frustrating every June when everybody's suddenly rainbow washing. You know, where were they ten years ago? Now that doesn't mean they couldn't have changed their stance and are now more welcoming and more inclusive, but unless you've done the work within the organization to address these changes person by person, having a rainbow as part of your logo isn't really going to impress me. Yeah. I feel like there are so many people who get that wrong. So many brands I should say they get it wrong. And so when a brand gets it right, it feels incredible. And I would love to shout out the brand aesop, the skin care brand for pride they took three of their stores in New York. I didn't work with them. I'm not affiliated with them. New York, LA and Toronto, cleared out all the products and turned them into free bookstores that stocked books by LGBTQ authors. And you could just go and get a book. You didn't have to buy anything. There wasn't anything to buy. Just beautiful, well designed bookstores, and that was so, so cool. I think that's a wonderful example. When anybody is thinking about latching on to some type of movement, my question to them would be, why are we doing this? Are we doing this for the people that we are trying to affiliate with, or are we trying to sell more product? And if it's to sell more product, they really recommend that you back away. Yeah. There was, should I can I share a negative example? Yeah, absolutely. There was an example in 2020 in sort of the explosion of a Black Lives Matter protests where the artist chantel Martin shared an email she received from an agency representing a major brand and essentially reducing her to a black woman and asking her to throw up a mural on their store in support of black lives, and it was so in such poor taste. And chantel is so brave that she shared it. Knowing that she could potentially lose a lot of future work, knowing that she was burning a bridge with an agency Anna and a company, but she shared it. And she brought awareness to the fact that this happens, it happens often, and that it's fucking disgusting. Yeah. I did read about it, The New York Times covered it and I was really glad that she did it. I hope she hasn't gotten less work because of it. I would hope she'd get more. I will say I know chantel personally and for everything she does in the public sphere, she's doing so much behind the scenes. She's really, I believe looking out for a lot of people and has been a wonderful mentor to me offered great advice. And she's queer. So, you know, absolutely. She's been on the show. We love her. Yeah. In your book, you recount this story of going to the Internet and ordering 720 printed pencils. And one of the things I love so much about the book is the personal anecdotes that you include. Can you share the story today? And talk about why you believe a pencil is a great equalizer. I was sort of in the midst of a very tumultuous time of mental health and a lot of different outside conflicts and I took a phrase that could have been a tweet and I ordered 744 pencils instead. And the pencils say, I am a tool or a weapon and completely free, which is literally terrifying. And that was me finding my power and then suddenly becoming very afraid that now that I had power, I might die before I got to use it. And it was this awareness of my innate potential and the potential that we all have and then a sudden fear of protecting that value. And what I love about pencils so much is that they are so ubiquitous and we all have some. I'm sure people have a pencil with you right now or nearby if you don't, you can get one, you know the gas station when you're buying your lotteries, scratch offs or.

Facebook chantel Martin chantel depression New York Twitter Toronto LA Anna The New York Times
"kurtz" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:02 min | 10 months ago

"kurtz" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Busy doesn't make you more important, and being busy is definitely not a badge of honor. Being busy isn't a sign that you're more productive, being busy doesn't signal that you're more valuable or more worthy. You might be busy, but being busy isn't a single tangible thing. And it's definitely not an entire personality. Being busy isn't an excuse for why you're being an asshole right now. Being busy isn't really an explanation for why you couldn't text back eventually. Being busy doesn't negate the fact that you didn't do that one thing you were tasked with, and now everyone else has to pick up the slack. I'm sensing Adam that you think being busy is a bad thing or saying that you're busy as a bad thing. I think that it can be. There's a certain type of person that really weaponizes there being busy as this badge of honor as this, I'm a city person and I'm doing this and this and sorry, I've got to run in a minute because I'm meeting this person there and there's something very 80s business boss about it that I think maybe people in my generation grew up admiring and TV and movies. But in actual practice, it's so fucking irritating. If you couldn't be here right now, that's okay. Just let me know. Right. I always say that busy is a decision. The busy is shorthand for not important enough. It feels like it. It's just not a priority. If you're too busy to do something because it means it's because something else is more important. And it's simple as that, and people that use busy as an excuse. I think the alarm bells should go off, because what you're really saying is that at this particular moment, what I'm doing now is more important than what I'm either supposed to be doing or should be doing. Yeah. I mean, and that's what the chapter goes on to talk about is if you're busy, what can we do to mitigate that? How can we plan ahead? Can we ask for help? Can we delegate? Can we get a planner, you know? People who are always busy, it's not your fault. You might need some management skills. Time management skills. Will you say that sometimes busy is shorthand for something else in the same way that tired can mean anything from physically exhausted to extremely depressed, what do you think that busy can be shorthand for? I think busy can just be, hey, I'm overwhelmed right now. I think busy can be, you could handle this workload, but I kind of can't because I'm short circuiting because I'm sick because I'm cash strapped, you know, maybe I can't hop in an Uber because I need to take the train for budget reason. It's like, there's so many reasons why someone can be busy and so when I say it's not a personality, that's not me saying how dare you've ever be busy. I'm really just speaking to the people that love their busyness and relish in it and make it everyone else's problem. For our listeners that might be using busy as an excuse to not do something. What suggestions do you have for getting out of that cycle? Just being more transparent. Instead of saying I'm busy you could say I'm behind on a project and I really would benefit from spending the day working or I'm sorry. I double booked and I need to prioritize this other thing because it's for work or family or it's an opportunity that has an end date in sight. And can we reschedule because we're more flexible? I just think transparency and understanding. And trust that your friends get it. You know, if you're my friend, I'm not mad that you skipped lunch because you had to go to the doctor's office. You know, why would I be mad about that? I'd rather see you when you're not worried about having to go to the doctor right after. Let's talk about social media. We have to. We have to talk about that. I think we do. Let's talk about social media. I'm going to read this next quote because that's how much I love it. You say, you write social media in particular, shapes reality into something that feels competitive. Because not only do we work to present the most idealized version of ourselves or at least a specific version, we then opt in to real-time judgment, a system of likes and comments that purports to conform were deny our contents inherent worth in a way that we all understand is negative and even harmful, but also doesn't stop us from paying attention. Could almost feel useful to keep tabs on others, drawing comparisons or any other false correlation. We may seek out in order to inspect ourselves. Maybe you're a better person than I am, but I definitely notice. To adopt the language of the Internet, I know when a post is a flop, and it's hard not to feel it, a piece of my life that I prepared for consumption has flopped, therefore, I am a flop. Nobody stands a flop. Nobody stands a flop. Some people are in their flop era and we don't currently stand and we may stand again. I had to explain that one to my editor. I was like, sometimes you just don't have it. Now, in terms of just describing it or defining it to your editor, the word flop or the word stands or both. I think Stan in relation to flop, the way that pop music fans, it seems like on gay Twitter specifically have really latched onto those words. Now for our listeners that might be in your editor's camp and didn't quite understand what they were defined them for us. So a Stan is really just like a hardcore fan, a super fan and a flop is what it sounds like. It's, you know, underwhelming or misses the mark. And so it's hard to rally your super fans behind something that's just not good. And so if I post art and it seems like even the fans don't like it, it must have been really shitty. And then I started to feel like maybe I'm really shitty. So how do you I mean, you have a huge social media following. You are extremely prolific. You create wonderfully creative posts. Talk about how you feel if you're not getting the response that you want. And what are the responses that you hope for? What are the things that you look for? You know, it's so arbitrary and the more we learn about the way that the social platforms create algorithms, designed to focus on things they already believe we'll get engagement really takes a lot of the pressure off. Even in the time since I wrote this book, which was not even a full year ago, we've learned more about some of these algorithms in the way that the platforms really seem to champion outrage, clickbait, fake news. Things designed to elicit a response. And so it can be frustrating to just post like a nice art and feel like if it doesn't get enough engagement in the first ten minutes, then the platform itself will decide not to share it with anyone else. And that's just frustrating because why else make art if not to share it?.

Adam Stan Twitter
"kurtz" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

03:27 min | 10 months ago

"kurtz" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"They didn't take no for an answer, and they manifested the shit out of it. So now that the kind of person who says, just believe in yourself and it feels like maybe they're on to something. Please know that I don't feel like that person. As someone who seems decidedly anti self help. What made you decide to write this kind of book right now? I'm not anti self help, but there's a certain type of self help book that exists that doesn't speak to me at all, that I can't connect with. When someone says to me, I'm the expert at this and I'll teach you how to be the expert. I don't trust them. I don't, because how convenient that you're the expert and I need to buy your book. Very excellent marketing, sir. And I do mean sir. So for me, I learned through participation and conversation and I wrote this book to be as conversational as possible to say, hey, this is what I struggle with. And this is what I have figured out so far. You know, a lot of the book talks about not having the answers, but knowing the questions to ask, and knowing the questions is a very important step, and depending on how much you have or have an experienced, you may not have other questions yet. So if I can say these are ten things that I've struggled with, and you think, well, I've had 5 of those and two of them seem like they're on the horizon. Maybe you'll pay attention to those last three and see if you already know the answers before the question comes up. Yeah, that's what I enjoyed so much about the book almost like prompts to get you to think about how this relates to your own personal life history, life experience, life challenges. Yeah. Because it's a book about both of us. It's not a book from an expert who knows how to be alive. It's a book from an artist that's questioning how to be an artist. I think so. I really do. And I'm wondering if you could read a few excerpts from your book so we can discuss them. I've chosen a few, because I think they're not only things I grapple with, but I also think the universal, but I also did them selfishly, so we could talk about them. The first one I've chosen is from the chapter, it's okay not to know. I spent so long wondering what my path would be like, where it starts and how I would follow it. What's out there for me? What or who is waiting for me to find it or them? One thing that has become clear to me as I get older is that there is a path. I simply couldn't see it until now that it's behind me. There's been a path all along and I've been on it with clear markers and pivotal moments that led me from place to job to relationship to insight to milestone, my path exists, but it's not linear and I can't see too far ahead. I was so struck by the notion that we're on a path, but we don't necessarily see it until it is behind us. Especially because now I can look back at my life and say those really black years when they occurred prepared me in so many ways for what I know now about blackness. And it's helped me make sense of my life in ways that I never never would have imagined happening. And one thing that I really appreciated in the book was your suggestion that not having a plan isn't the same as not planning ahead, which you can do in a broad sense and whatever ways might be available to you..

"kurtz" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

03:14 min | 10 months ago

"kurtz" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Art and essays about topics that keep you up at night. Did I write that? Yes. Oh, that's great. Talk about what that includes. What was keeping you up at night as you were approaching the writing and why structured in that way? You know, it really is about not ignoring the signs anymore of who you are, who you want to be, the things that are holding you back. So fear, competition, comparison, defining success. You know, some of this is very much rooted to the creative type, the artist type, but then there were also things about suicidal ideation or just being uncertain about your place in the world at all. That stuff I was just thinking about so much more, especially as I left New York and then had to parse through my own actual identity instead of just wearing New York as a badge of honor. You know, there was so much of my identity that I think I pegged to the city and when I left, I had to say, who are you? And it required me to go within it required me to look at my past to get more comfortable talking about faith and my origin, and then also really think about what do I want from the future? Who do I want to be? What is my purpose? What do I have to offer the world if anything? Or do I even feel like I need to offer the world something, or can I just be a good person that takes care of my people and isn't an asshole? What did you discover in the process? That I want to help people and not be an asshole. I guess I've been very concerned about being an asshole since day one with the sorry I'm such an asshole balloons. There's always a sense that I need to try extra hard to be kind because I can come off as a little too snarky and that was probably also me hiding, you know, behind humor and sarcasm, which is kind of a common trope for young gay men anyway. I guess so. I mean, I don't know that snarky is the word I would use. I would just say exceptionally witty. But again, that's all just perspective. I feel like your perspective on me is the kindest perspective that's ever been applied to me. And if I had half of it, I would be a happier person. Do you feel differently about what you've discovered now that you are sort of on the other side of it a little bit? I do. I think the biggest realization that I've had in the last year is that I actually know quite a lot about what I do and my industry illustration and product design and publishing and self publishing and distribution and I've become very interested in mentorship and being a mentor to others, you know, to young and emerging artists to students, but also to peers, even people that I look up to who now when I see their work, I'm realizing like, oh, you have all the pieces, but you're sort of struggling with this one industry thing that I have gained experience and let me help you. And realizing that, you know, I've said that the competition model is outdated. I've said that we can all succeed, but now really acting on it. Not being a gatekeeper of resources at all in acknowledgment of those who have helped me and wanting.

New York
"kurtz" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:36 min | 10 months ago

"kurtz" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Did your publisher feel about that? My editor agreed. Oh, good. It was my last week before moving away from New York and we went to Madison Square park and had coffee and we sat on a bench for a couple hours, and we talked about what I really wanted to accomplish with the book, and I just realized it needed to be more urgent and more real. And I needed to speak up about mental illness about mental health, about faith. I needed to be more vulnerable if I was to reach the people I wanted to reach. Talk about the role that mental health has in this book because in reading it and in our discussion prior to the podcast, while I think that that is certainly an undercurrent and a foundation of a lot of your work, I didn't specifically see it as a book about mental health. So talk a little bit about that. I think you're right. It's not a book specifically about mental health and mental health is the undercurrent of all of my work. I would totally agree. But what I've maybe realized is that I hide behind subtlety and universality to avoid having a tough conversation about myself and to avoid putting myself in the work. Why, why? Charming, funny, affable, smart person. Because I didn't believe in myself for a really long time. You know? I can say it plainly now that I'm really doing the work to unpack it. But yeah, I hit a lot, even as I was being vulnerable being rewarded for my vulnerability, I felt like I was faking it a little bit. And even when I sold this book to penguin, the pitch was very soft, and it was a gift book and it wasn't going to be this. And during the pandemic, I said to myself, I don't have time to make junk. Like if I, if I don't make this what it needs to be, then I need to give back the advance. Because at this point in my career, gratefully, I didn't need that advance. I would have given it back if I didn't have a book that I believed in. Do you feel that it was the pandemic that changed your thinking? Or do you feel that it was something else more internal? It was definitely internal, but I think the pandemic pushed me inside because I spent all of 2019 traveling. I went to ten weddings and I spoke at a lot of conferences. I did a 6 city speaking tour in Australia. I had a great year so fun and I didn't have to think about my problems at all. And you can do that for a lifetime. You can spend your whole life ignoring the call from inside the house. And then the pandemic pushed a lot of us in our homes and into the depths of our mind, and we could no longer distract ourselves from the obvious truth. You know, the signs are always there, but sometimes I think they're small enough to ignore, and for me, you are here for now is this giant sign that says, you can't ignore me anymore. When you say you can't ignore me anymore, who is the me? You and me are both you in that one. You know? You know, we, as people, we often know what we need, we're great at giving others advice, but we don't take the advice. That we give. And we often ignore that small voice in our head. For years. And so many of us wait until it's too late, or we wait until we're at the edge of the cliff. And I think what I'm saying is, run off the cliff. But if you have the time to prepare, bring a parachute. That's so interesting. It's so interesting to talk to you from that perspective. Because this book really spoke to me in so many ways, but not from that sort of place of mortality, although, I guess, in some ways it did, because I just kept thinking, you know, if not now when, if not, then when. And that's really what I've been grappling with as I'm about to turn 60 as I'm thinking about life changes and what do I want for this sort of what I am imagining and hoping will be my third chapter. And you know, one of the things that I've been, I don't know, it's not struggling with. I guess more just obsessed with thinking about are so many of the themes in your book, so it just came to me at this perfect moment. About what do we put off because we're afraid to attempt to do it today. And so just the idea of thinking about time. Well, I really want to do this, but because I'm afraid to do it today, I'm going to think about doing it sometime in the future. Will you get to a point where, you know, like 60, like the jig is up, you know? Yeah. You no longer, you know, this little young thing that can just sort of do anything whenever they want. Did that influence your thinking at all? Were you thinking about sort of not death so much, but just what you want your life to stand for and mean? Absolutely. And I think, you know, to me, it's so obviously about mental health because for me, that was the thing that I was putting off. For me, that was the, if not now when. So what does that mean? What was it going to therapy? It was going back to therapy. It was changing my med management. It was just being open about the fact that this wasn't something I could push to the back of my mind. But really had to be at the forefront of what I worked on to be a happier person to be a better husband for my partner to be a better friend to make better art to just show up in the world better and so, you know, it's interesting to talk through. You're one of the first people to have read this book, and it's interesting to talk through I know what I came to it with, but you're right, the universality, it's much more about listening to the science, it's much more about being okay with who you are at this moment and understanding that you're on a path. And being open to possibility and change. Yeah, I felt like it sort of was kind of a kick in the pants, but also giving me sort of permission. And I don't mean kick in the pants in a violent way. I just mean kind of a gentle urging, a tap, a tap in the pants. You know, when I say that this book is an urgent rallying cry, it's still me, you know, my version of that is is jokey humor and an empathy and it's warm and so to me, that's urgent, but I think someone else who hears this podcast and then reads the book that are gonna be like, oh, this isn't, I think that maybe that was a misnomer. It's prescient. Thank you. I'll take it. That's the word I would use. You described the book as a collection of.

Madison Square park New York Australia
"kurtz" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:17 min | 10 months ago

"kurtz" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Job at BuzzFeed where you said you made gifts or gifs depending on how you say it all day and created memes in response to breaking news. And I didn't even know that a job like that existed. What kind of job description did you respond to when you first applied for the job? I think that the job was called social web artist and I didn't really know what that meant, but I was looking for a way to leave advertising. Barton F graff was such a cool agency, and I was a studio designer, which meant that I touched a little bit of everything and learned so much. And there came a day when I was offered a promotion to art director and to be an art director of Barton of graph would have launched me in a very successful advertising career. That was a very sought after job. But I knew that taking that job would mean even less time for personal work. And there was something telling me that I actually needed a job that felt like a dot retirement with a salary. And so I did that instead. You've said that everything about your career trajectory has been a mistake. In what way? I remember calling it like a pattern of flukes and in retrospect, I realized that's me being an unkind to myself, you know, to say it was a mistake or just pure luck, really ignores the fact that I work hard. I work really hard, and something that's happened as I've gotten older and also gotten on antidepressants is that I realized I was kind of sabotaging my own happiness in a lot of ways, including discrediting that work. How has addressing some of those issues from a mental health perspective changed how you view who you are and what you do? Because there was a time when you also said that design is the only thing you've ever been passionate about, yet you're a published author of several bugs. You're a successful entrepreneur. Those words don't really show up. Entrepreneur doesn't really show up very much in any of your bios. I would never publicly call myself an entrepreneur or a business owner. You said it. And I'm gratefully smiling. Yes, I am an entrepreneur. You know, I am that, but to me, I'm a human and an artist and a designer first. The design skills are what enable me to make products and then sell products enable me to design a logo and a website. And so that's been the thread that's carried me through. It's almost like I wasn't an entrepreneur until I started making money, and then it was like, okay, wait, maybe I'm an entrepreneur because I figured something out. Some of your solo projects as an entrepreneur and an artist. Maybe it should be an entrepreneur or something like that, right? Some of your solo projects include a daily planner titled unsolicited advice, which you started in 2012 with a KickStarter. You have an annual planner and a journal. You've designed postcards, many collections of pins, t-shirts, stickers, even balloons. You've done some collaborative work with a number of retailers and you partnered with fish's Eddie to create a collection of dishware, are retail collaborations still something you're interested in doing? I love retail collaborations. You know, something that we know as designers and creatives is like you can't do everything. And so you hire the people who are good at what they do. And I could figure out manufacturing of ceramics, you know, but do I want to? I would rather go to fish as Eddie, who make these beautiful pieces and know how to produce and distribute and so I'm always looking for what's the next brand partnership that enables me to create work in a new medium. One other thing Adam that you did mention in our last interview was that you struggled with the word creative. Yeah, I think it took me a while to wrap my head around that word because it really became shorthand for something that was so all encompassing it meant nothing. And what I've realized is that we actually need a blanket word for all the many elements of creativity that our jobs now because the jobs are evolving faster than the language for them is, which is why at BuzzFeed I was a social web artist, which that's just three words. So creative really includes so many more people, but also I think I've realized that and this was sort of a theme of my book, things are what you make of them is that creative is really a type that artist type that tethers their happiness and self worth to productivity, the type that sees beauty in the world and seeks to replicate it and then beats themselves up when they can't get it right. You know, not everyone's wired that way. So I really see creative and artists now as this sort of archetype. And those are my people. I agree. The one the one problem I have with the word creative, it's when it's used in the plural, creatives. I'm like, please. You're going to hate her subtitle. Well, life advice for creatives. Well, I just think it's for artists for creative people. I don't hate this up title. I just don't like when people say it. Yeah. And you know what else? We know we mean artists, but so many people struggle with that word. They do. Creative is like we've softened it so that more people can find themselves in it. That's wonderful. I like the way you've said that. Well, let's talk about your new book. What is it called again? Is it you are here for now? Available wherever books are result? That's what it's called. Wow. I know. Well, in the last few years, you've published several books, including things are what you make of them. Life advice for creatives, pick me up, a pep talk for now and later, and you just published your brand new book. You are here for now, a guide to finding your way. Congratulations. Thank you. Talk about the title you are here for now. For now is in parentheses. Yeah. So that's for an artist. And a designer and a creative person. That's a big decision to put a title part of a title in parentheses. Yeah. You know, I wanted to call out you are here for now very specifically. As a reminder that everything changes, but also time isn't promised. You know, and so it is simultaneously this, it gets better. You know, you're only in this dark place, temporarily, but also don't wait too long to change things because you could die at any time. And that wasn't the original title. That was from a sketch that was in the original pitch, back in 2019, the book was called soon, and it was really more about optimism and waiting for things to get better. And then the pandemic happened, and how do you write a book about optimism in a pandemic? You don't. It would be insane for me to just tell everyone, don't worry, everything's going to be okay while people are dying. While lives are uprooted and jobs are lost, and so that artwork that said you are here for now kept jumping out and I think I changed the title like two months before the entire book was due..

Barton F graff Barton of graph Eddie Adam
"kurtz" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:58 min | 10 months ago

"kurtz" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"You said that growing up was like living in a nonstop Michaels. And I love that quote so much I actually included it in my upcoming book. And you created monthly themes for your bedroom decor. Yes. Talk about the kinds of decorations and themes that you made. You know, when I look back now, the path is so linear because I was just cutting up construction paper or post it notes, taping things together, scribble it. The quality of my art hasn't increased by too much. I've just gotten better at using it to communicate my voice. And so I remember one time the theme was up in the sky and I strung up these cut out these cloud shapes and had birds and I probably had a hot air balloon. You know, that's sort of thing. And you made an actual cloud from what I remember now. I think it was just cloud shaped paper, but a lot of them. Okay. And I probably spent a whole weekend doing it and then my family was like, oh, great. That's really great for you. By the time you were 12, you had taught yourself basic coding and began building fan sites, including one for Pokémon. Are you still a Pokémon? Fan. My wife and brother are obsessed, by the way. You know, I am not a huge Pokémon fan, but out in Hawaii. We play this game called pickleball twice a week, and on Saturdays, a family comes and they have young kids who love Pokémon. And they have a very well weathered Pokémon book and they're constantly flipping the pages and they're like, do you know what this is? Do you know what this is? And I have won a lot of cool points within 8 year old. Very nice. That's impressive. You have a range that I would have been unaware of had I not done this new bit of research. You've been using your middle initial J as part of how you share your name since middle school. And the J stands for Jason. And one other thing I learned about you in this recent round of research was that you've always loved that your name starts with an a and Z with a Z yeah. And did your parents do that on purpose? I don't think so. I think it is just coincidental. You can use the Amazon logo if you needed to. I would love to use the Amazon logo. My favorite brand that I support. He's joking listeners just saying you know. I'm not joking. Jeff Bezos, I love you and please don't murder me in my sleep. Those drones. Adam, you went to community college for a year when you were 16 years old. Yeah. Why did you graduate high school so young? I left you Shiva when I came out and you know, there was no longer a place there for me. It was also the last place I wanted to be. I was sneaking out of my ishiba to take GED prep courses. That's true. And then I took the GED and I just got on with life. What is your relationship with your parents now that you're out? You know, it was tough at first, I think that is not an uncommon story, but they have come around in a way that I'm very grateful for, you know, they've met up with me and my husband before. We're actually going to see them this weekend. Now that I'm on the east coast again. And I can't wait. And I think that it is a thing where, you know, time heals wounds and also our parents worry for us. You know, I think people of a certain generation, they hear that their kid is gay, and they think my son's gonna die of ants. It's the first thing they think, and for them to see me be happy, be my whole self, to find love to build a career, really rooted in my identity, where being gay has not only not hurt me, but probably helped as I think led them past that fear to just see me, you know, as I am today. E transferred to the university of Maryland, Baltimore county after an adviser at the community college told you about their graphic design program. And you transferred and have said that you wouldn't be who you are today right now without the experience you had there. What made it so special for you? UMBC for me was a small enough school where you would really get out of it what you put in, you know, a lot of people were commuting students or were involved with Greek life or athletics or science. The art community there was very different. And so I was able to be the vice president of the arts council of majors, and I was the marketing director for the campus radio station. And I was the one of the designers for the student events board. And I did design for the student government association, and I was the manager at common vision, which was the campus print and design center. I did so much that wasn't coursework, and that really taught me to think on my feet. It taught me how to recreate a logo from a blurry jpeg. And it taught me how to really maximize black and white printing. Like, to really create work on a shoestring budget for these student groups that were given maybe $20 of printing tokens that I had to maximize. So I'm so, so grateful for that experience. Was that the first time you felt like you were getting feedback for your creative work? I think that I had gotten feedback online. You know, I was very active on online communities and message boards. The Michelle Branch message board was very big for me. And I did do a design for Michelle branches MySpace, page. It was one of my first gigs for Warner music group at 16. But to get feedback on work that required me to create indifferent aesthetics, different directions to be handed, brand guidelines for the first time and have to execute within them really, really informed the work that I did professionally for the years after. It's not unlikely that you very well may be the world's biggest Michelle Branch fan. Oh, without a doubt the world's biggest Michelle Branch fan. So talk about your relationship now. You know, I dedicated my first book to her and I wrote this book is dedicated to Michelle Branch, who I do not know personally. And then by the second book she had blurbed it. And now you are here for now. I quote one of her lyrics. We're friends now. It's very unique. She has a guest episode on the you are here for now podcast, where she let me pick three songs to play, and I got her to debut and unreleased song. Wow. Yeah, I mean, my teen dreams, dreams come true, you know? Who would have thought, right? I'm always pinching myself. I would love to be a New York Times Best Seller, but even if I'm not, Michelle Branch is performing at my book release. So I'm good. Now, what would that mean to you to be a New York Times Best Seller? You know, I'm just so insecure that I am constantly seeking external validation in whatever way I can get it. And I already have the blue check mark. So now I want and want the next one. It is a really wonderful book. We'll talk about it in a few minutes, but I really do hope you get it because you certainly deserve it. I don't even know if this book qualifies for it. It's, you know, it's an interesting essay collection art book thing. I'm kind of being facetious. You know, if I do want it, but I'm just excited this book gets to exist. Well, whenever one of my friends does get it, I always say to them, this is something you're going to have now for the rest of your life. You're a New York Times bestselling author. That's pretty special. I did see a tweet recently that was like, there's too many New York Times bestsellers. Someone who someone who's not an active reader who is like, how is this special if every book I see at target says New York Times Best Seller? And I was like, well, it's actually quite hard to get your book up target. Life. When you first moved to New York City, you worked at the ad agency Barton Graf.

pickleball ishiba Michelle Branch Amazon Michaels arts council of majors Jeff Bezos student government association Hawaii UMBC Baltimore county Jason university of Maryland east coast Adam community college athletics Warner music group
"kurtz" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:16 min | 10 months ago

"kurtz" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"It picks you up when you're down, it gives wise counsel. It encourages us in our creative work. It's funny and gentle and caring and witty and it's a book you just want to be around. Adam J Kurtz is a designer and artist and entrepreneur and a match. Adam welcome back to design matters. Thanks for having me Debbie. Our interview today is the second time you've been on design matters. So I want to start by asking you about something I seem to have missed in our first interview, which I've subsequently regretted and want to ask you about now. I understand you have a special relationship to the game candy crush. Still? Oh my God. I was playing candy crush every day for like 7 years. 7 years. Yeah. Like, for so, so long my life was marked by this candy crush. Addiction, and I only probably spent $10 the whole time. So I'm still frugal, but at some point in the pandemic, I stopped playing. Why? I think my subconscious brain knew if I didn't shut down candy crush, it would be 12 hours a day. It would crush you. Could it resist? I didn't even see that coming. So what was it about? I have to confession. I've never once played candy crush. I don't even know really beyond that it's a game on your phone that I don't know anything else about it. You know, it's a pretty simple puzzle game and level by level the situations change the variables change. What's nice is that you can play it with one hand so you can do it on the train. And then they sort of gamify it by there's bonus items that you can win or pay for. There's bonus lives that you can win or pay for, and I notice that over the 7 years, you know, something I would notice as a creative as a writer and designer as they would change things to sort of psychologically encourage you to keep playing. And there was one day when I realized they had changed the language around losing a life to make it seem like if you didn't keep playing, you were giving up. And I was so like, that's gross. I'm not gonna stop playing, but that's gross. So during the pandemic, one day you just woke up and said I'm done. You know, maybe during the pandemic, I was too stoned. You know, for 18 months, I was just like too high to play. No, I don't know. I'm kidding, but, you know, I don't know. I think so. Yeah. Well, our interview today is about 5 years since the first and a lot has changed for you. Yeah. You got married to Mitchell kuga in 2017. You moved from New York City to Hawaii, pretty recently, how different does everything feel for you, especially being back in New York right now? Being back in New York is so wonderful, but also very affirming because I love going to my familiar places and eating good pizza, but I'm looking around and I'm thinking you know what? I am very satisfied with my choice to leave. And Mitchell is born and raised in Honolulu and during the pandemic, it became clear to him that he wanted to be closer to his parents. And he wanted to be closer to his home. You know, I had to think about it for a while because I've really pegged my identity to being a Jewish New Yorker. I wanted that. That's my name. I hear you. But when you are in love, it changes everything. And I had this moment of, I love this person. It is the number one thing that matters to me more than anything. I'm going to do it. And I have fallen in love with it. I love our little home. I love decorating our home and buying kitschy, nonsense to put all over it. I'm having a lot of fun. And how has your practice changed since you've moved? I think that my work has always been about the things are what you make of them mantra of use what you have, just make the best of the supplies at hand. And so a lot of my art has already been office supplies. Simple stationary, you know, lo fi tools. But this new book you are here for now was created in my sister in law's childhood bedroom on a little blue desk that was actually so small I couldn't sit at it straight. I would sit. The way I'm sitting now with my leg cross, I mean, I'm also gay, so I think that's why this is happening. But I also very tall. Yeah. Yeah. Thank you. Podcast listeners, please know that I'm taller than I might seem. But I had to take all my own advice and make a whole book, you know, write the book, do the handwriting art, do the scanning do the photography? Sister in law's childhood bedroom with a hello kitty piggy bank watching over me. What color were the walls? Blue. Interesting. There weren't gender nonconforming. You know, Marissa's cool. She had a baby blue desk and she had a very vibrant blue wall extremely on brand for me. Yeah, it was very cool. Since you've been on design matters before, I don't want to be redundant with your origin story, which we've spoken about at length on our previous podcast. But since I have an interview in a few years, I'd like to give folks a little refresher just sort of some highlights. Are you good with that? Yeah. Okay, good. So you grew up in an orthodox Jewish family. Yes. In Toronto, you went to school at a yashi. I did. So did my brother. Yet you and Mitchell were married by a Buddhist teacher and universal life minister in the rare books room of the strand bookstore. Talk about faith is it still a big part of your life and if so has it changed at all? Faith has changed a lot for me, you know, when I realized that orthodox Judaism was not, for me, I kind of shut down on faith. You know, some people are irreligious or I should say atheists or agnostic, you know, because they just haven't spent too much time with it. It's not of interest to them. I know too much. You know, I have to hold my tongue when people who are culturally Jewish are celebrating things or telling me things that they love and in my head I'm like, well, if you study the talmud, it's different. And then I'm like, Adam. They don't care. I don't care. So I've come back around to spirituality and faith in a more kind of universal way. You know, I believe in love and energy in the way that we show up for each other. I believe in the imprint that the people we love live on us, even after they're gone. But I also love shrimp. I know I love shrimp and how sad would it be for me if I never tried shrimp? What about bacon and lobster? Controversial opinion, I don't think I like crab a lot more than lobster. Really? I do. To me, lobster is just a holder for butter, and if something's going to hold butter, I would want it to be. Bread. Yeah. You can take the Jew out of the Shoal, but you can take the shell..

Adam J Kurtz Mitchell kuga Jewish New Yorker Debbie Adam New York Mitchell Honolulu Hawaii New York City Marissa Toronto bacon
"kurtz" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

01:44 min | 10 months ago

"kurtz" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Can't see too far ahead. Thank you for listening to today's episode of design matters, sponsored by user testing. Stay tuned for later in the episode to hear about how user testing can help you with your new project. There is no place in the world I feel happier than at home. I get palpable joy from my surroundings, whether it be art, furniture, textiles, or my pets. I've tried to decorate everything to maximize style and comfort, and joy for everyone in my family. Both inside and out. That's why I love joy bird. And now, with joy birds fall sail upon us, you can get modern customizable furniture for every space available in 18,000 customization options for less. Joint board is committed to creating quality furniture and a more sustainable future. Everything joy bird creates is made with incredible care using responsibly sourced materials, free of harmful chemicals. And through partnerships with one tree planted, Joybird is helping conserve and restore earth's most precious, natural resources. Joybird firmly stands by its quality and craftsmanship, so if it's not everything you hope for, you can simply send it back. Create a space that brings you joy with joy bird. Visit Joybird dot com forward slash matters and get 30% off your purchase that's 30% off at Joybird dot com forward slash.

"kurtz" Discussed on The Hull Show ? 1310 KFKA

The Hull Show ? 1310 KFKA

03:19 min | 11 months ago

"kurtz" Discussed on The Hull Show ? 1310 KFKA

"Thirty one to seven There are three and one to start season so that they're feeling pretty good about themselves today. Yeah i didn't see that one coming now. I thought air force. Who's going to win. You know we always play the in the booth you know. What do you think here. And i thought air force is gonna win. Something i think. Thirty eight to twenty eight Man you talk about a balanced back performance in a major way by defense I don't know that you can find a better bounce back than what you saw. At air force between giving up forty nine points against utah state and a billion yards of offense to then taking on a florida. Atlantic team by all accounts is just as good as utah state. They have a quarterback in the cozy. Perry that transferred from the university of miami was a very successful starter for the hurricanes. Limb to Some bowl victories. And you hold that team to just seven points. They didn't cross midfield for a long time until midway through the second quarter. And you hold the team to A hundred and forty yard rushing and just seventy eight yards passing I- you'd be hard pressed to find a a better where we were to wear. We're going sort of performance. By by the falcons. It really was something impressive. Defensively and i think daniels Longest run they call it. Football has seen since two thousand three goes ninety four yards the jets and out runs the outside of the end zone. It was an all around really good performance. Talking to jesse kurtz of the Lead anchor of the mountain west networks. Some other interesting ones coming up this week. I'll tell you the one on my radar. Is that nevada boise. State game boy. That should be interesting. Yeah match up of the two preseason favorites as voted on by the media and the league allies. You're cooks is banged up for for nevada. I'm not sure that he is going to play I've read where he he may be out for a while Hopefully that's not the case but Y- you got two teams with nfl caliber talent carson. Strong and romeo dubs for nevada and boise state always has nfl talent across the board and and really has I mean th. They're out to prove something after the two losses that maybe they they let get away from them. This is the team that these could be four now So this is another chance randy envelopes and his team to make a statement if you will And put nevada who everyone thought could be team in the league May put them back in their place and boise state Reclaims its its top Of the perch here through five weeks. Well it's to be interesting a fun weekend. I'm looking forward to it like you said the rams are off. I think the cowboys are off. But we're starting to. We're starting to get into some conference play so it's always a to me the most exciting portion of the season. Jesse appreciate your time and insight as always my friend and we'll look to catch up with the next week. Look forward to a man. I'm to jesse kurtz lead anchor of the mountain west network and listen. I love talking about and west. Things are maybe going to change very very soon. Csu you air force perhaps boise state going to the afc. We're gonna find out we're going to find out what that looks like ultimately all right forty eight minutes.

air force jesse kurtz utah mountain west networks nevada boise nevada university of miami romeo dubs Perry Atlantic falcons randy envelopes boise nfl daniels florida jets
Several San Jose Sharks Teammates Don't Want Evander Kane Back on the Team

The Instigators with Andrew Peters and Craig Rivet

01:53 min | 1 year ago

Several San Jose Sharks Teammates Don't Want Evander Kane Back on the Team

"Craig, if you can believe that. I feel like that. We've heard that before. Somewhere with Evander Kane surprising I don't know. I guess you know what? When? When he had left to San Jose. I You know, like, okay, so I always kind of wished the best for players. Always do you know if if a guy's got off ice issues or whatever you hope that he can figure it out and You know what I mean and grow from it right? And when he went to San Jose I thought Was good for the same as that he was gone. Um, thank Yeah. But I also thought when you know when he lands there, and Joe Thornton picks him up and brings him to his house. I think, Okay, this is going to be a a new turn for Evander Kane here because he's going to have you know a good mentor there with Jumbo and Other good leaders that they had there in San Jose. And I thought, you know what this could be beneficial for. Um, So here's to hoping that You can you can sharpen up. You know, And then here we are. And so, so Kevin Kurtz has been on our show before yesterday was reporting that Players. On San Jose. We're talking about How they don't want him back. Says the team was trying to trade Kane earlier this summer, a source says, confirming a report from the daily face off. A big part of the reason for the team to pursue a deal was canes strained relationship with many of his teammates, according to several sources, According to one source. The frustration with Kane stem from the general disrespect of team rules such as being late for practices and games. And zero consequences came, which caused ripple effect with other younger players, added the source. According to another source, it wasn't easy dealing with him this season, so We'll talk about another

Evander Kane San Jose Kevin Kurtz Joe Thornton Craig Kane
Joe Biden Is Destroying America With His Radical, Fringe Policies

Mark Levin

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Joe Biden Is Destroying America With His Radical, Fringe Policies

"In place. He's destroyed the border. He's destroying our finances with the spending. He's strongly federalism system. They want to destroy the court by packing it. They want to destroy the Senate by packing it. They want to destroy the legislative process by packing that, eliminating the filibuster, which they used hundreds of times in the recent past. They've undermined Law enforcement's an hour at really a critical stage where people are being slaughtered, particularly in the inner cities. They're destroying our school systems by pushing their radical Fringe ideology. We've talked about. Long time and a lot of times with Stanley, Kurtz and others and the president, that is, President Trump brought it up. The war they're about to unleash on the suburbs. They've created ambiguity between What is male? Jenna? Tell you what is female? Janet? Tell you what's Jenna? Tell you at all? I mean, The most basic things are now up for dispute and debate. And Biden has played into every piece of this. The Democrat Party has embraced every piece of this. Now they're worried that some aspects of this they're going to catch up with them. People don't like crying. People do not like crime. For good reason. And people don't like excuses for politicians. Whose policies create more dangerous environment. Now you don't have to be a Political strategist to figure this out. This is a fact. And so now they're running from it. But they can't run from it. It's like how they're going to Unleash against the private sector in the economy with this

President Trump Jenna Senate Kurtz Stanley Democrat Party Janet Biden
Biden Announces Tentative Infrastructure Compromise

The Boxer Show

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Biden Announces Tentative Infrastructure Compromise

"On a trillion dollar infrastructure package, which was a risky move because, like all hill compromises, it could easily fall apart. In fact, that was the first question from Reporter. Do you have sufficient democratic support both in the Senate and the House to move both on this bipartisan deal and on the reconciliation, the one party vote that the Democrats can do without any Republican votes to get more of the spending that the president wants. Biden was annoyed, he said. You always ask me these questions. Nobody knows for certain It's your job. But you know, it's not a reasonable question. Actually, it's a very reasonable question. Do you have the votes to make this happen? It was an echo, although much more good natured of what he did in Geneva when he challenged the reporter who Ask your confidence he could change Putin's behavior might also said he knows a lot more about how Congress works in any reporter there. The fact check on that one is true with your media minute. Howie Kurtz, Fox News.

Senate Biden House Geneva Putin Congress Howie Kurtz Fox News
What Is Bidenomics?

The Indicator from Planet Money

07:12 min | 1 year ago

What Is Bidenomics?

"Three parts of Joe Biden's economic policy agenda with Danielle Kurtz Laban reporter on NPR politics team. Then now here's where I want to start. You said something interesting to me recently, which is for both of these candidates pandemic policy ease economic policy. Let's make that. The first thing we discuss what is Joe binds pandemic policy as it relates to his economic policy. Sure. So Joe Biden is very much focused. On containing the corona virus yes. He wants as badly as any of us do for there to be a vaccine for pharmaceutical companies to stay at work on that but he also is saying look until then make sure that we have the virus as reigned in as possible, and here's a line actually from his website that really struck me it says Biden believes we must spend whatever it takes without. Delay to meet public health needs and deal with the mounting economic consequences. I mean. He's really saying one can't happen before the other you can't have the economy bounced back without corona virus at least to some degree really hemmed in. So to do that, he's encouraging a lot of things like mask wearing that sort of thing more testing but one other thing he said is that the CDC centers. For Disease Control needs to come out with clear guidance for states and localities on. Okay. Here's what you should be opening and when based on how Corona virus looks in your area. So of Corona virus is really bad. Maybe you shouldn't have schools open right now indefinitely, not restaurants or concerts or whatever. But if things are looking better, maybe you can open schools but what he saying is this is not. Necessarily an all or nothing thing but we need clear guidance from scientists on exactly what to close down and one. So it's fair to describe this as a somewhat detailed approach as opposed to thinking of it in binary terms like everything locks down everything stays open. It's an attempt to find out. Okay. What are the details at matter and then let's apply those on a situation by situation basis, right? I mean the way he makes it sound as nuance, but also to some degree simple or at least clear like, yes, there might be gradations between states but we at least want to give states some sort of guidance on exactly what they could or should be doing in one. Let's go on to the second part of his economic policy agenda that we're talking about here, and this has to do with. Joe Biden's proposed spending programs which are a lot higher than say what Donald Trump is proposed. So why don't we get into that? What? What is Joe Biden proposing spending money on all right. So the umbrella that he has put all of these policies under he is calling build back better now I've heard better alliterative strokes of genius but fine we'll stick with that build back better and what's in that This isn't about marketing. This is about economics. So okay the first is manufacturing making sure that there are more manufacturing jobs and he's clear on this. He wants them to be unionized manufacturing jobs and also to make sure that there are supply chains here in the US to make sure people can get the goods they want, which is something that we have seen laid bare a bit by Cova. Number two is green infrastructure. So yes, he wants to build roads and bridges the way that we think of infrastructure pretty traditionally, but he also wants to make sure that lower pollution methods of transportation for example, are encouraged like light rail's in cities, electric car production, that sort of thing. Three racial equity he wants to close some of the really gaping economic gaps that we have between races and ethnicities in the country and I know you guys have reported on this on your show. The, very big for example, unemployment gaps between black Americans and white Americans. Also Hispanic and Asian Americans. There are some huge gaps there likewise the big wealth gaps and finally caregiving he wants to make sure that people are able to get quality and affordable care for their kids and also for their older relatives when they need it and that one's interesting. Tell us a little bit more about the approach to caregiving that Joe Biden is pursuing here sir, and this is really of course important right now because cove has shown us as we're all staying home as kids are not at school, that caregiving is important for people to be able to do their jobs and participate in the economy. In fact, we've seen people falling out of the workforce because they didn't have access to childcare and elderly care. Yes. Most definitely. So what Biden is proposing is pretty ambitious I mean what he wants to do is universal pre-k available to all kids. He wants there to be higher pay for childcare providers he wants them to be able to unionize to collectively bargain. And he wants to grow the number the supply of childcare establishments around the country to make sure people can get that child care aside from that in terms of spending and making it more affordable he wants to make sure there are refundable tax credits to low and middle class families to help them pay for childcare. So that's a lot of stuff and childcare I. Know You know it's a complicated thing to make sure everybody can get it to make sure there's enough that it's high quality that it's affordable. So it's a tough needle to thread, but this is his attempt at doing. Okay and let's get to the third part of the agenda, which is sort of the flip side of the spending, which is where are the tax revenues to pay for some of this spending to actually come from higher income people incorporations room. That's it. We're done. That's not okay. So it's not gonNA come from a middle income or lower income folkston what Biden is saying, right so what he wants to do is raise taxes for households with incomes above four, hundred, thousand dollars a year, limit their deductions, and also he wants to increase. The top corporate income tax rate from twenty one percent where it is now twenty eight percents. Now, president trump you'll remember lowered these taxes with the tax cuts and jobs act that big tax bill that Republicans passed in two thousand seventeen. So Joe Biden is saying look I, WanNa roll a lot of that back I want to change things back now. So in terms of those income tax changes yes that would overwhelmingly, of course effect the highest income people there is some question about what the corporate tax plan would do I. Mean how? Much that would be knocked on it all to people at the lower end of the income spectrum. It's possible that it would be to some degree but again, you compare it to those income tax changes in it's nowhere near what a change those would be essentially looking at the last four years in saying, I'm undoing some of this and putting place the agenda I prefer instead of the one that president trump has preferred, right? Yes. Now listen we're laying out all of these economic plans. Here's what Joe Biden wants to do would do in. His perfect world has theoretical I get everything I want world. But of course, he won't get everything. He wants he can't. Okay. But what's your priority in Biden's cases are going to be green jobs is going to be this tax plan is going to be childcare. What does he do? I decide to spend all of his power on right you've got to prioritize because you're not going to get everything you might not get anything you are true right? Yeah. But in speaking with you today tomorrow I am getting everything I want what a pleasure

Joe Biden Donald Trump Corona Danielle Kurtz Laban CDC United States NPR Reporter Disease Control President Trump
Ruth Bader Ginsburg's army of clerks to stand guard at the Supreme Court

Morning Edition

02:30 min | 2 years ago

Ruth Bader Ginsburg's army of clerks to stand guard at the Supreme Court

"To the United States Supreme Court. Her body is arriving now in a black hearse in front of the Supreme Court building here in Washington, D. C. It will be brought inside for a memorial service in a building where she took part in historic rulings over more than a quarter of a century. We want to tell you that her former law clerks and dark suits and dark masks have lined the marble steps in front of the court. Supreme Court police officers are about to carry the casket into the building. Her foiled fellow justices, of course, were there along with court colleagues and family and friends for what is the first of several services. To honor her life and her legacy. Ginsberg lived 87 years was born in the Depression and lived well into the 21st century and her influence on American history spread over decades. Well before her appointment to the Supreme Court. As a lawyer in the 19 seventies, she argued a string of cases before the court, pressing it to recognize the equality of the sexes. As a justice, she authored landmark rulings herself and we're going to bring that service live. NPR's Daniel Kurtz Leben is outside the court. Now as Supreme Court police officers have taken the casket to carry it inside. Daniel, What are you able to see in here? Well from a distance. I can see those. There's just started to carry the casket. And right now, now where I am I'm on the south side of the port, where people are lined up socially distance to to pay their respects to her later this morning, and it's it's really hard for me to convey to you how much she personally met so many people here. I want to play a piece of tape for you. I spoke to a woman named Shaft Collins. She flew here from Colorado. People came from far and wide to come to this today on she told me just how much theater Ginsberg meant to her. Here she is. I have struggled in my own life and her achievements. Let me know that I actually might be able to achieve something in life. I was a homeless veteran for years. And although I'm now late to school, I hope to go to law school one day, so I'm now pursuing my bachelor's, and that's all from having been on the streets after serving in the Army. Yeah, There are so many people who I talked to who who start crying when they talked about received organs, especially women. She she meant so much to a lot of these people.

United States Supreme Court Supreme Court Daniel Kurtz Leben Ginsberg Shaft Collins NPR Washington Depression Army Colorado
The Secret History of the Korean Bat Flip

ESPN Daily

03:29 min | 2 years ago

The Secret History of the Korean Bat Flip

"Icl Insane power right now. I don't know how I feel about this. Meantime, is a senior writer for ESPN and NFL analyst on NFL live and yeah, the former host of this podcast. I am the captain. Now you will feel how I want you to feel I think is how this works. People can't see this, but Kabul was doing the thing where he points his fingers at his eyes and then he's pointing them at my eyes and it's very upsetting. So. How did the story which I love so much actually come about what was I think the spring early summer of twenty sixteen, which is important because we are coming off of the two thousand, fifteen mlb playoffs where as I'm sure you will remember Joey Batista flipped his bat which feels almost like I'm understanding what he did after an home run in the Al. Ds. I was between the Blue Jays and the Texas Rangers, and there were much hand wringing and commentary and debate as a result of that critics called the BAP slip disrespectful not only to the opposing pitcher button. The game in general were a player. I wouldn't do that. The fact of the matter is what he did did not offend you just don't sit there and flip your bad especially in the seventh inning but throughout this time, and before that, there were these videos of backflips coming from Korea right where. Korean baseball players were flipping their bats as defiantly as Batista and with great joy and style and panache, and these videos had gone viral in social media. Turk. Looking, looking into it a little bit. There's a there was an account on twitter website called Mike Abo run by a Korean American guy named Dan Kurtz, and so he was sending them out and then they go viral. Asked him kind of how he got into it? He used to live in Korea he was huge. Fan Korean based organization. But then I asked him. Okay. So why why are they? So Common Korea is this normal there why our guys not getting drilled in the head and he didn't know and I was super intrigued by that. So I got in touch with another Korean baseball expert, a commentator for the Daniel Kim who is based in Korea, and he had so many great stories about backflips and what they meant there in how they were so common but he also didn't know why or where it started and he told me you should just come here and figure it out. So that's what I did. So, you actually go to Korea and this I. Remember I, remember it sounding like one of the great expense report boondoggles ever. But you actually go to Korea with Mickey and your story begins in in Bussan right and so what do you actually find when you travel across the ocean and get there So we went to Poussin, which is a extremely large seaside city on the southern tip of South Korea. So they have a very popular team, the low tech giants, and the first thing we do is we go to a game at stadium and. It was revelatory.

South Korea Dan Kurtz Joey Batista Common Korea NFL Daniel Kim Baseball Kabul Espn MLB Blue Jays BAP Twitter Writer Analyst Mike Abo AL Texas Rangers Poussin
Trump: Americans Who Died in War Are ‘Losers’ and ‘Suckers’

Science Friday

00:54 sec | 2 years ago

Trump: Americans Who Died in War Are ‘Losers’ and ‘Suckers’

"New reporting from the Atlantic details several instances in which unnamed sources say President Trump disparage the U. S military members. The president calls the reporting false. NPR's Daniel Kurtz, Leben reports. Democratic rival Joe Biden blasted Trump during an address on Friday in a speech planned as a response to the August jobs report. Biden started by addressing the article, which alleged that Trump had called Americans who died in war suckers and losers. These statements are true. President should humbly apologize. Every gold star mother and father. Every blue star family. And he's denigrated and sold it. Who the heck does he think he is? By then added that this may be the closest he's come this campaign toe losing his temper, and he invoked the memory of his late son, Beau, who served in Iraq with the Army National Guard

Joe Biden Donald Trump President Trump Daniel Kurtz Army National Guard Atlantic NPR Iraq Beau U. S
Fox News anchors and former reporter accused of sexual misconduct

Dana Loesch

01:36 min | 2 years ago

Fox News anchors and former reporter accused of sexual misconduct

"Former Fox News contributors, Jennifer Ebt Card and Cathy Areu. Filed a lawsuit in federal courts on Monday, accusing Fox News host Tucker Carlson, Sean Hannity and Howard Kurtz of sexual misconduct. Now. The suit also includes previous rape allegations against former host Ed Henry, who has been fired from the network. Hey was let go on July 1st. It was the ugliest of that article at Henry again, but it just seemed like a square dude, like a straight area kind of energy. What you mean and then the allegations. The details in this thing are a little whoa from 50 shades of grey stuff going on and write with now. Now Tucker's mentioned in this Suit and Hannity. I don't know what the allegation was The Tucker Carlson told one of these contributors that am staying in the hotel tonight, and I don't have my wife and kids just let you know. Right on. And then Sean Hannity, accused of laying down $100 bill in front of one of the contributors and saying, Hey, 100 bucks to anybody that could go out on a date with her like a bounty. Or Yeah, so you certainly you don't want to do that, Even though these air contributors they weren't working four Tucker or Sean, These were people that were contributors to the Just night and day allegations between Henry and Sean Hannity of Dr Carlson won't just put it that way.

Sean Hannity Tucker Carlson Ed Henry Cathy Areu Fox News Howard Kurtz Rape
Ed Henry accused of rape in civil suit that also targets Fox News, Sean Hannity and Tucker Carlson

Joel Riley

00:18 sec | 2 years ago

Ed Henry accused of rape in civil suit that also targets Fox News, Sean Hannity and Tucker Carlson

"To former Fox News employees suing the network as well as accusing multiple top Fox News personalities of sexual misconduct. Jennifer Red Car claims of former Fox employee Ed Henry raped her. Other plaintiff can theory You says she was sexually harassed by Tucker Carlson, Sean Hannity, Howard Kurtz and Jonah Caldwell. Throughout her appearances on the

Fox News FOX Tucker Carlson Sean Hannity Ed Henry Howard Kurtz Jonah Caldwell Jennifer Red
Former Fox News host Ed Henry accused of rape in lawsuit

All Of It

01:01 min | 2 years ago

Former Fox News host Ed Henry accused of rape in lawsuit

"Culture of sexual harassment at the Fox News Channel. The case implicates some of the networks. Major stars. NPR's David Folkenflik reports that Fox rejects the allegations. Except for those against recently fired host at Henry. The most grave accusations were made by former Fox Business Network producer Jennifer Eckhart. She says that Henry repeatedly sent her graphic texts and images. Promising to propel her career and that she initially yielded to his advances. She also alleges that on other occasions, Henry sexually assaulted and raped her. Fox terminated her last month. This month, Fox News fired Henry, citing willful sexual misconduct in the workplace. Henry's lawyer says the two had a provably consensual relationship. Fox contributor, Kathy Aru alleges she was propositioned by Henry and separately by Tucker Carlson and Howard Kurtz. Fox has a thorough review by an outside law firm found Arosa allegations quote false, patently frivolous and utterly devoid of any merit except those against Henry, whom the network noted it fired. David Folkenflik,

Henry FOX Fox Business Network Fox News David Folkenflik Harassment Kathy Aru Jennifer Eckhart Howard Kurtz Tucker Carlson NPR Producer Arosa
Biden uses progressive message to roll out his moderate economic plan

All Things Considered

03:42 min | 2 years ago

Biden uses progressive message to roll out his moderate economic plan

"Learned learned that that 1.3 1.3 million million people people newly newly filed filed for for unemployment unemployment in in the the U. U. S. S. Last Last week. It adds to the bleak backdrop for the presidential election as the candidates pitch their plans to revive a pandemic ravaged economy. Today, Joe Biden went to Pennsylvania to announce his economic recovery plan. And here to unpack it is NPR's Daniel Kurtz livin. Hey, Daniel. Ailsa. Hey. So, what is Biden proposing here? So it's a plan, he said, to rebuild after Cove it after this recession we're having. He has said already, for example, that he wants to better aid local governments and extend the crisis. Unemployment payments people have now But his speech today also laid out more. He took an optimistic tone. Amid all this bleakness, saying, yes, their crises happening right now multiple, but that those can also be opportunities. But each of these also presents tremendous opportunity for the nation on opportunity to prepare now for the future threats. Ueno are just around the corner on opportunity. To address fundamental inequities of our nation. Growing gap between the very wealthy and everyone else. So he has four big pillars to this plan he laid out today. One is boosting manufacturing One is spending on infrastructure. One is boosting people's ability to get childcare and provide care to their relatives and fourth racial economic equities, closing some very big gaps between different racial and ethnic groups in our country, so Yes, he's saying, Here's how I want to get out of this crisis. But also he was making the pitch that we can come out of this with better fundamentals Underlying the economy. I mean, wow, when you lay out the four pillars like that, they're pretty ambitious ideas. What struck you in all of this? Yes, it is ambitious. That is definitely a big thing. I mean, largely what he put out there is just an outline with more concrete plans to come. But one is that this is a firmly Democratic capital D plan with a focus on unionization and racial equity and paid leave. Very popular ideas among Democrats. So while some of the ideas are ambitious in size or scope, the what of these plans like buying American goods and boosting unions, those are broadly agreeable among Democrats and maybe some independence, too. One other thing is, we should also say that he did release more detailed plans in particular on one of those pillars manufacturing. He wanted to make sure, for example, that the government buys American goods when it spends taxpayer money and That is one of those big in size and scope, things. He's proposing for $100 billion in procure procurement from US manufacturers. That's a lot. Yeah, it is a lot. I mean, on manufacturing. We do see politicians talk a lot about manufacturing. Like President Obama did it. President Trump definitely does it. Tell me why does manufacturing in particular? Why does it so often gets so much political attention. That's there's so much here. I mean, you can read both economic and political motives into it Economic because yes, automation has eaten away at a lot of manufacturing jobs. But even then, manufacturing still employs a lot of Americans and those can be good paying stable jobs like Joe Biden often says. And by the way we've seen during this pandemic that we've needed a boost in producing things like protective gear and ventilators. But aside from that, think about demographics. There are lots of white men in manufacturing. Trump has done very well with them so Biden could maybe pick up some votes there. And super importantly, manufacturing is big, big and swing states like Pennsylvania, where from where Biden was today.

Joe Biden Daniel Kurtz NPR Pennsylvania Donald Trump President Obama United States President Trump
"kurtz" Discussed on Influencer Networking Secrets Podcast

Influencer Networking Secrets Podcast

08:26 min | 2 years ago

"kurtz" Discussed on Influencer Networking Secrets Podcast

"Online marketing when you're launching something, you're giving away your best content your. Know? Developing a relationship with your audience, because email is cheap, you know facebook is cheap everything. Is it more expensive, but expensive doesn't mean you still don't use the same discipline and you have A. I'm kidding candy store. I would say with the Internet versus direct now because now I have the opportunity to basically and I. When we were riffing a little bit before we started that I'm unable to fish without bay. By that you know in in a direct mail package. You always have to lead to the sale immediately because you're paying a lot of money to be in the mail with this piece. That's going into someone's mailbox, so you really have to. Have the call to action, and you got lead up to it and all of that online you could I mean I have I. I just did a course copywriters. Yesterday and I'm not. I'm not a copywriter. I mean I write a lot of copy and everybody's copywriter to some degree, but the idea that copywriter kind of weirds me out because I don't write sales, letters left and right. What would I do is I blog every week I was going through my by half blocks or going back five years, and every blog is has a purpose. It's got you say it's got Achieve something from me I. Mean sometimes aren't even have a PS in. It and people say how come you didn't have a PS. I said well. I didn't want one house that. Because I'm figuring that next week. You'll read my blog because you read it this week. And then maybe I'll have a ps that all will something now what I do in my in my life, I mean I'm not a nonprofit so I'm not looking to You know to not make a profit in my business, but I'm basically my women. The consistency is so important because my blog goes out every Sunday at six am us, eastern time regardless I, get something in the mail. Everybody knows who opens it. They know it's going to be content, and that's why the content it's like it's like content, marketing and away so I have this long blog. I might refer to something. with with a link that might be something that was something I had sold in the past or I'm talking about the great copywriter. Jean Schwartz and breakthrough advertising, and just hyperlink breakthrough advertising, because I sell it not subtle, but I'm not really selling, and then I use the PS as my selling vehicle. so and when I say selling vehicle. Telling, you know I I. You know I have a mastermind group that Scott a hundred seventy people in it for two thousand dollars a year, and I'll put down in the PS I'll say you know the thing I was talking about. It came up in our call at titans accelerator, and I'll hyperlink tightened celebrator, and then I'll say know, and if you want to join, go to the slain, we do calls very subtle, and again I'm dishing without bay. What I'm doing is. Shining a light over it basically saying I'm here when you need me, I'm here. You know when you're ready when you're ready. Come see me, but if you don't WanNa see me now, that's fine. And so it's the whole spirit of. Life is long. That that you are To think that everything you do has to sell. All the time is just crazy now. A lot of people do it. A lot of people think I. Leave a lot of money on the table because I could be selling like crazy every week. And I don't I also one thing I, do and again I'm not endorsing these things. This is what I do. But. This is in the in the spirit of using content strategically. I don't do affiliate deals. So if someone wants I, have a if someone has a copywriting course and want to advertise in my in my blog. I don't do it for commission, but if I have a strategic way to use it. I do that, so I just did it last week. It was really exciting. This guy who's a WHO's a top notch copywriter just developed this incredible course, and I endorse it I mean it's a great course, and it's a thousand hours. And I said I said to him. I said all. I said I don't want the you'll. He chose two thousand dollars means the commission five hundred dollars so for everyone I I sell I would get five hundred dollars I said to the guy. I don't want the five hundred dollars, but if I can link it up with my titans, accelerator program and people who pay two thousand dollars for their years, subscriptions accelerator if they buy your course and. And I could reduce their their fi five hundred dollars to fifteen hundred from two thousand I would do that, because then. He's getting the same amount of money that he would gotten from my link. He's getting his thousand dollars and he's giving me five hundred, but I'm taking the five hundred and I'm giving it to my my my people, not I'm not jumping. It's my people for a discount. If I can swing. At that's what I'll do an affiliate. or I'll give it to charity, and I'll even say giving it to charity. 'cause it also. It enhances it always. It always enhances yourself by standing on the shoulders of someone else like you know when I when I When I give Like to take credit for a way of looking at things or a quote, or a a method, and I go out of my way to make sure that you know who invented that. I gotTA give him credit. I? Think it's way better. Because again I didn't invent anything, but I want to give people credits for it, and you get you get so much more from giving people credit, but finding it is the kids I never would have found it without you so I'm the bloodhound looking for everything. I found you this course. You never would have found it on your own. But it says it's amazing. I didn't invent it. It's great, and so that kind of thing is also just a great way to. Use content strategically so there's a lot of elements to it. But I I and I have a philosophy of my blog, which is my philosophy and I'm sticking to it, and it's not necessarily the best, but it's. It's what I do. Yeah I Well, there was several things there. That were starting to to ring bells in my head. Brian but the the. Accreditation. Not Accreditation but but crediting your source with something. I learned I went through a communications degree. In in university. And they emphasize that and I. Just it just totally made sense to me, and as time has gone on, I've found you can. Even you can even play with it. You know so my favorite way of saying it is I stole this from from Ballantyne, but he stole it from somebody else, too, so you know. That's funny when I I have a close US ally. It's in my book. The if you're the smartest person in the room, you're wrong room. So I went on I, went on, and on the Google and I tried to find you know who said it and I found all these like like you know thought leaders taking credit for it like and he got, and was like these guys that I never even, and I went back, and I went back, and I went back, and I finally found out who said it originally, and it was Confucius. That's about as far back as I go. I go. said it I made a t shirts with the whole oil you know. If you're smart person in the room. You're in the wrong Confucius and have a big picture of Confucius, and so I put a big picture on the back of the t shirts because you know what stop taking credit for it, I've used it forever in my in my work. I've used it. Totally, but I never never said and people give me credit for it is said. Brian Kurtz always says. I didn't invent it. It's Confucius now, so I.

Confucius Brian Kurtz facebook titans Jean Schwartz Google US Scott Ballantyne
"kurtz" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Byte

Sci-Fi Talk Byte

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"kurtz" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Byte

"Bite is a new series here on Scifi, talk in the sci-fi talk, archive, podcast and so parenting in apocalypse. It's not the same way we would do it. Either full interviews or a comment or question from past interviews time wise, it's about one to four minutes long on an average. When you when you live long enough, all kinds of strange things happened. Very, right in saying that the Greek heroes were the original superheroes. In part because of the whole nature of genes vision, but also because of its message of diversity and inclusion. Recently, I spoke to Greg Miller. He's the author of Star Wars Memories someone who's involved in the very beginning of the Star Wars. Universe and we talked about Gary Kurtz Yeah. Gary does not get I feel the credit he deserves. I mean not to take anything away from George of course. AIRY was part of the creation of Star Wars. He worked with George on American graffiti. As. They were sitting in I don't know where they were sitting, but they wanted to go see a movie, and this was in the early seventies I guess like seventy two seventy three something like that and the way you decided what movie go to back then if you look in the newspaper to see what was playing. And back when we still had newspapers and they look through the paper and they couldn't find anything they wanted to fe. and so they decided they should make a movie like they wanNA sing which was going to be like a science fiction adventure movie. And at first they went, they approached universal where George had an overall deal. Yet a three picture deal based on American graffiti. About doing Flash Gordon, 'cause universal owned the rights to Flash Gordon. But they would not. They were not interested and they wouldn't sell the rights. so they decided to do something else. which was star, wars or Star Wars than idea? That Georgia come up with in college, although it significantly different as produced than his original version. In some ways he was both the. Technological brain and the spirit behind Kerry was a very spiritual guy. And he's been credited by Georgian others for really having come up with. The whole concept behind the force George wanted had the force, but Gary was the figured out how it worked and how it played through everything. And he was I've I worked on a lot of movies over the years worse because a lot of directors and producers and Gary was by far the most knowledgeable. Filmmaker he actually, he was not a deal guy although he did make deals. He actually had been a camera man. He had been found man He was in U. USC film school with George. He was the one everyone always went to when there was a production difficulty when there was. How are we going to get this done? He really knew how to get the movie made and on the budget they had available. so yeah, he really isn't as credited as he should be. And I I? Do have a section as you know in the book about Gary. Just became rightly sung uses well known as he should be. Look for Star Wars Memories ever you get your books..

George Gary Kurtz Gordon Scifi Greg Miller Georgia Kerry
"kurtz" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"kurtz" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Met with Howard Kurtz is a viral video of news twelve Long Island reporter Kevin Vesey covering a rally for the re opening of local businesses when protesters started harassing him insulting him yelling at him calling him fake news some of them invading his personal space while refusing to wear a mask Vesey tweeted the level of anger directed at the media from these protesters was alarming as always I will tell a fair and unbiased story the reason this is getting national attention is that president trump gleefully retweeted the video writing people can't get enough of this great people on the other hand Senate democratic leader Chuck Schumer on MSNBC said the coverage of such protests is overblown he said I do fault the media thousand people gather in a state of eight million people and they're carrying Confederate flags **** flags and they're given a whole lot of attention the thing about this scene along now it is the reporter was there to interview them to get their point of view to give them a platform instead he became the target of ire and harassment with your media minute alley Kurtz fox news.

Howard Kurtz trump Chuck Schumer MSNBC reporter Long Island Kevin Vesey president Senate harassment
"kurtz" Discussed on The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"kurtz" Discussed on The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

"The inserts just the basic media that you could get it was a finite group and as I went through my career and the Internet came about and we started getting into e newsletters who started getting into you know online search. We got into a lot of different things. I realized that you know uh of that. The Internet was this incredible direct marketing medium that I had to learn about now a lot of the people that I grew up with they didn't feel that way some ended but most either stayed in their niche of of direct mail and print or they retired or they got out of the business or whatever because it was kind of intimidating eminating now it was intimidating to me too but what I did was I. I put myself in places where there was I I joined mastermind groups. I went to events of online marketing so I got myself exposed that couldn't become an expert right away but I got myself self exposed to all of it and then was able to bring that back to my company and then after I left board room and that's the end of the career at this point or the beginning meeting of the new career I went and formed titans marketing after I did an event at boardroom. That was the titans of direct response. It was a tribute events. It's a more yellowstone. The founder of boardroom would passed away in two thousand thirteen and then I did that event and then after the event. I said you know what I think. It's time to teach this stuff So I had forty years experience. I went out and I formed a couple of mastermind groups. I got the I got the rights to gene Schwartz's books because he was a good a friend of mine and his wife trusted me with them. I've done swipe files low jamie and now jim rats so I basically created a lot of educational materials and to mastermind groups soon to be three and so the difference so the whole career I did a little more than three minutes but the whole career was was the first thirty.

gene Schwartz jim rats founder jamie three minutes forty years
"kurtz" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"kurtz" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"I am Brian Kurtz, president of a p financial services, and we're happy to have you along for the ride this afternoon. The Tigers are doing surprisingly. Well, I say surprisingly because nobody expected him to win you know, they they had one they were seven and three at one point one seven and their first ten games. And I think that's how many games people expected them to win pretty much all summer. So they've already beaten expectations in some minds in the starting pitching has been doing real. Well, and was glad that we're able to give away some tickets for last week's game. And I was out there for opening day freezing my butt off. But Tigers head Victor and opening day to sew up and away from here. The team may surprise us this year who knows and you know, win more than than we think. But I'm always happier. When baseball season is in full force. And I hope you are joining me. Down there at Comerica park. We're going to give away some more tickets today, but we'll give away more during the during the course of the year for sure we will have your interest rate update at about twelve forty five or so QB the highest interest rates available anywhere in the nation and your short term, CDs and fixed newest he's and we'll talk about bonuses on index contracts as well, the market has been kind of shuffling back and forth lately. And some people are concerned, but it's always my recommendation that there should be a piece of the portfolio just a piece that that can't go down that can't take a loss. And how big that pieces depends on you know, your philosophy your risk tolerance. And all that other good stuff. That's why I'm a fiduciary. That's why I take the time to get to know people. That's frankly, why don't take calls on the radio because in order for me to give recommendations that I would be comfortable with. I'd have to ask so many personal questions that it just it just wouldn't be good radio and probably. You need to give out more information than you want to give on the radio that you should give. So anyway, that's what we're doing over at square lake and John are at p financial services. We'll get to your questions of the week later on onto if we have time to get both of them in if you would like to have your question answered on the show, I'm happy to.

Tigers Brian Kurtz Comerica park square lake president fiduciary John