35 Burst results for "Kurt Andersen"

"kurt andersen" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"kurt andersen" Discussed on The Book Review

"Kurt Anderson joins us. . Now he has a new book out. . It's called evil geniuses the unmaking of America a recent history. . Kurt thanks for being here. . Thanks for having me. . All right. . So your previous spoke to this was fantasy land and I feel like there's a connection where did you leave off in that book and pick up in your new book? ? There's definitely a connection and they really amount to kind of a two volume history of the screwing up of America the last half century. . Fantasyland was about how this chronic condition in America of the weakness for the irrational and magical thinking in entertaining lies. . Turned into this acute illness after having been a centuries long chronic illness, , the last fifty years, , and thus the President United States as the poster boy for that. . This is a different story. . This is not a spontaneous organic. . Problem that I'm talking about here. . About the Paradigm. . Shift and hijacking of our political economy that happened starting fifty years ago by who what the people I call. . Evil Jesus, it's , this very rational, , very specific, , very strategic, , long war that had the effect in a hundred different ways of making the majority of Americans worse off. . So if fantasy land talked about America has propensity to believe in nonsensical illogical things. . It sounds like evil genius is this kind of why the efforts that were made on the part of institutions and individuals that have led to that kind of thinking. . No actually not that led to that kind of thinking that. . It's a wholly different thing. . What would i. . have having a Neo Liberal Clinton Centrist Democrat all of my adult life partners may culpa for simply being. . Oblivious to what the economic right was doing. So . these. . Are People of the economic rights. . The coax are the most obvious buzzword way of saying that and how they manipulated and used and changed through all of these different means the way we thought society. . The economy should be since the new deal they used the fantasies and delusions and. . All that of their political allies on the right to enable their real project, , which is to make Americans think the government has no role in anything involving the free market when you are working on fantasy land, , did you know that you were going to be writing the second kind of companion book? ? I really didn't know that it was late in the game working were. . I realized wait I am kind of telling half the story here. . There is this other story that isn't about look at Wacky America. . We've always been wacky for four hundred years and believed all kinds of nonsense but I realized that there was this other story about how the economy changed in how politics changed and what technology is doing. . That is the other half and it. . Really came when I was out talking about fantasy land with people readers, whatever , I remember early on a woman rating stood up and said, well, , , what about climate change? ? Yes. It's . a matter of nonsensical disregarding science in the facts, , but it's it's all about people like the Koch Brothers shifting the way people thought in denying science and I said yeah but it wouldn't have happened. . To the extent has the United States without this underlying iffy grip on empirical reality. . But I realized that it was both of those things you know people all over the world had if he grips on honeybear curiosity but they don't have this massive politicized denial of climate change. . For instance, , it's the to in concert in so many ways that has led us where we are. . Okay I have to time related questions the first about the writing of the book and the second about the time that you cover in the book, , and I'm getting very specific about the timing of the writing the book because as you know, , things are moving so fast that the second you think that something is the big story. . Something else becomes the big story and these are both kind of Sixteen Post Twenty Sixteen Bucks where did you do pick up in writing this book and also when did you stop because you know it probably I'm assuming this was a pre black lives matter but maybe post covid book or am I getting that First of all fantasyland I wrote and finished before Donald Trump was even nominated. . So it wasn't like Oh look Donald Trump I'll reverse engineer how that happened over several Hundred Years This I delivered it early February, , but then bless random house had the next several months to incorporate, , which is a significant INC because it reflects. . So much of what I'm talking about the pandemic and the. . Horrific. . US government trump administration response to the pandemic, , which illustrates most of my major themes in this book. . So I the whole last chapter is about that and indeed the the black lives matter protest also is in here as well to the degree that relates to what I'm talking about this. . This is a book less about race than it is about economics and technology, , but it certainly all of the peace and I dress both the pandemic thoroughly, ,

America Kurt Anderson Kurt The New York Times Pamela Paul John Hearses Leslie m M. Bloom Fantasyland reporter President United States Clinton
Kurt Andersen on Evil Geniuses

The Book Review

05:26 min | 1 year ago

Kurt Andersen on Evil Geniuses

"Kurt Anderson joins us. Now he has a new book out. It's called evil geniuses the unmaking of America a recent history. Kurt thanks for being here. Thanks for having me. All right. So your previous spoke to this was fantasy land and I feel like there's a connection where did you leave off in that book and pick up in your new book? There's definitely a connection and they really amount to kind of a two volume history of the screwing up of America the last half century. Fantasyland was about how this chronic condition in America of the weakness for the irrational and magical thinking in entertaining lies. Turned into this acute illness after having been a centuries long chronic illness, the last fifty years, and thus the President United States as the poster boy for that. This is a different story. This is not a spontaneous organic. Problem that I'm talking about here. About the Paradigm. Shift and hijacking of our political economy that happened starting fifty years ago by who what the people I call. Evil Jesus, it's this very rational, very specific, very strategic, long war that had the effect in a hundred different ways of making the majority of Americans worse off. So if fantasy land talked about America has propensity to believe in nonsensical illogical things. It sounds like evil genius is this kind of why the efforts that were made on the part of institutions and individuals that have led to that kind of thinking. No actually not that led to that kind of thinking that. It's a wholly different thing. What would i. have having a Neo Liberal Clinton Centrist Democrat all of my adult life partners may culpa for simply being. Oblivious to what the economic right was doing. So these. Are People of the economic rights. The coax are the most obvious buzzword way of saying that and how they manipulated and used and changed through all of these different means the way we thought society. The economy should be since the new deal they used the fantasies and delusions and. All that of their political allies on the right to enable their real project, which is to make Americans think the government has no role in anything involving the free market when you are working on fantasy land, did you know that you were going to be writing the second kind of companion book? I really didn't know that it was late in the game working were. I realized wait I am kind of telling half the story here. There is this other story that isn't about look at Wacky America. We've always been wacky for four hundred years and believed all kinds of nonsense but I realized that there was this other story about how the economy changed in how politics changed and what technology is doing. That is the other half and it. Really came when I was out talking about fantasy land with people readers, whatever I remember early on a woman rating stood up and said, well, what about climate change? Yes. It's a matter of nonsensical disregarding science in the facts, but it's it's all about people like the Koch Brothers shifting the way people thought in denying science and I said yeah but it wouldn't have happened. To the extent has the United States without this underlying iffy grip on empirical reality. But I realized that it was both of those things you know people all over the world had if he grips on honeybear curiosity but they don't have this massive politicized denial of climate change. For instance, it's the to in concert in so many ways that has led us where we are. Okay I have to time related questions the first about the writing of the book and the second about the time that you cover in the book, and I'm getting very specific about the timing of the writing the book because as you know, things are moving so fast that the second you think that something is the big story. Something else becomes the big story and these are both kind of Sixteen Post Twenty Sixteen Bucks where did you do pick up in writing this book and also when did you stop because you know it probably I'm assuming this was a pre black lives matter but maybe post covid book or am I getting that First of all fantasyland I wrote and finished before Donald Trump was even nominated. So it wasn't like Oh look Donald Trump I'll reverse engineer how that happened over several Hundred Years This I delivered it early February, but then bless random house had the next several months to incorporate, which is a significant INC because it reflects. So much of what I'm talking about the pandemic and the. Horrific. US government trump administration response to the pandemic, which illustrates most of my major themes in this book. So I the whole last chapter is about that and indeed the the black lives matter protest also is in here as well to the degree that relates to what I'm talking about this. This is a book less about race than it is about economics and technology, but it certainly all of the peace and I dress both the pandemic thoroughly,

America United States Fantasyland Kurt Anderson Donald Trump Kurt President United States Koch Brothers Clinton Engineer
How Studio 360 Got Started

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

07:38 min | 1 year ago

How Studio 360 Got Started

"Hosting studio three sixty Kurt. Anderson Co founded. Spy magazine was a writer editor. Columnist design and architecture critic and playwright. He'd also just written a novel turn of the century which came out in nineteen ninety nine. The Britain plays. He worked for television. I mean he just was a renaissance person in the arts and in journalism and that was exactly the kind of person we were looking for. That's Melinda Ward the former chief content officer for Public Radio International and creative studio three sixty. And here's Julie Bursting again. I remember that lunch that I had with him when I was interviewing for the job. And he said you know. I've been working with a vocal coach to try to get me to not sound like I grew up in Omaha. That didn't work. Well I said to him. We're firing that person because you need to sound like you if you sound like just yet. Another announcer with a announcer voice. This show is GonNa fail so you gotta sound like yourself. Good Morning. I have realized over the years that I am always. I think much better at this. If I've worked out for Sunday off my super villain name. I speak Spanish. I'M CISCO I need. This is a child to crew. I had a forty five this record in. Oh this is the end and I'm curt Anderson. Thanks very much for listening so for me I was. I would always record Kurt in his sessions and I was in some of his first sessions. And you know he was brand new at doing it. He wasn't sure what P popping was. He didn't know how close to sit to the microphone. He didn't know what a pickup was. It was fun to help someone figure all that stuff out in the interviews. I felt like it took them awhile. Loosen up I'm just GONNA say that. Pairing Him with interesting people felt like the best way to use him so in those early days we just looked for really cool funny interesting people for him to sit down with and that got him excited to come into the office and into the studio and do that and I still remember the day that season Santana came in people do feel a turned off or or indifferent. two images of horror and and war and suffering that they see in that they feel indignant about I think it's comes not because they're blase but because they feel impotent or powerless and I think that's perfectly understandable reaction and I saw Kurt in our conference room and the look on his face of sort of terror was really powerful but I knew he would do a great job but I could see that. This was like the first person we've ever had in the studio that he was a bit in awe of it was just this powerful show about how artists have looked at war since homer and she was phenomenal and he did a great job. Do you feel okay about the new. Whatever you say okay. We show him how current into a lot of different situations that require lots of different levels of sort of being alert to possibilities. We just through so much stuff at him and you know it's a different kind of show in that. He didn't generate ideas but he would rarely say no. I remember doing this segment on sky. Come up with this talk show within the video game halo and we had. Kurt like go and be like an Avatar in the game. They're shooting I'm trying to defend us here. Your need to move faster Kurt. I'm sorry I mean it seems funny to think about it now but like at the time it was super crazy and cutting edge at this guy had figured out how. Sorta hack the game and had this whole virtual reality six months after Katrina. We planned a trip to go to New Orleans. Really figuring out how they were going to try to solve this problem of of how to. Kinda rebuild the city and what the design questions were around at all. The water is gone now of course but the wreckage. That remains is absolutely shocking. Presumably the people in this neighborhood are among those who a great many of them majority perhaps didn't have that's right. They didn't have a choice. I think that's one of the great travesties of Katrina went on a trip to New Orleans for a few days to kind of produce it and get all the different voices together. But you know he's always been really passionate about design and kind of see him step up and really tap into the the human element of what was going on there. It wasn't just like an architecture is it was about people's homes and lives. It was really interesting to see him in that element because so often he is just in a studio and actually one of a favorite memories of working with them in the studio was a program that we did In two thousand fourteen and it was our nineteen fourteen episode and we produce the whole thing as though we had been on the air in nineteen fourteen and today's program we present to you through the medium of radio some singular developments taking place in the arts today in literature drama music and the media. Moving pictures new technologies and new ideas are changing. What we the American people create and how we are entertained. He delivered it in the crazy. Old Timey Voice. That people use stood us for broadcast announcing and our technical director at that time. John Galore. Who brought in a megaphone? Like a troll off Warne and had Kurt record threw it into the mic to compress everything down. I mean I've seen Kurt Geek out on many wonderful occasions but I have never seen him geek out that joyfully. It may not be too old to speculate that later. Generations will look back upon nineteen fourteen as a remarkable year perhaps as a year in which the twentieth century cruelly began. This week on the PODCASTS. Were looking back at the early years of studio three sixty which is drawing to a close after two decades of covering arts and culture on the radio after the first year on the air the show was finding its groove and its audience but then in the fall of two thousand one. The unthinkable happened. There has been an explosion at the World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan. The upper floors of northern tower at the World Trade Center has experienced an explosion studio three sixties original offices were at wnyc in the municipal building at the base of the Brooklyn Bridge just blocks away from the World Trade Center. I remember coming into work in. Minneapolis and hearing on the radio about the the hit on the towers and then coming into PRI and of course the WNYC studios were right under. The twin towers are right next to them and the that a lot of people took came up under the twin tower so we were horrified and terrified didn't terribly worried about a whole. Wnyc staff and studio three sixty staff you know found out later that Julia Burstein had been in the office and she had had she'd left. Wnyc had to walk all the way up the west side of Manhattan to think it was her brother's apartment or something to call day and coughing and choking and nobody knew what was going on.

Kurt New Orleans World Trade Center Wnyc Public Radio International Anderson Co Britain Curt Anderson Spy Magazine Melinda Ward Julie Bursting Chief Content Officer Omaha Julia Burstein Manhattan Cisco Writer Santana
Studio 360 Extra: Aural History: How Studio 360 Got Started

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

09:43 min | 1 year ago

Studio 360 Extra: Aural History: How Studio 360 Got Started

"Invited the rock the World Wrestling Federation champion to speak at the Republican National Convention. Pupil sock it to me. I became an official painter. I don't express political desires in my novels. I just tell story. Hello I'm Chris Anderson and this is studio three six. That's how studio three sixty began. Its first episode on November. Four two thousand just before we elected George W Bush and we all learned what a hanging Chad was my special guest today in Studio. Three sixty is the artist. Barbara Kruger. Who will talk with us about politics and power in movies and music and even in her own art? I make art about the collision of my days and nights with the culture that has constructed and contains me all that and more coming up in studio three sixty from WNYC and PRI public radio international originally produced out of WNYC. Here in New York. The show is all about the cool but complicated and sometimes strange ways that art touches our lives two decades later. That mission hasn't changed. Even if the people making the show have come and gone I'm Jocelyn Gonzalez executive producer of studio three sixty but I was still wet behind the ears associate producer when the show debuted two decades ago. I was away from the show for about ten years before returning to the staff in two thousand seventeen so as the show draws to a close sadly after twenty years I turned to some of my friends from the formative years of studio three sixty for their impressions. Could we create these beautiful stories that represent all sorts of interesting things that are going on in the country in terms of arts and then have Kurt sit with some of that? He was comfortable with and talk about them. That's Julie Bursting who was executive producer of studio three sixty when the show launched and who wrote the studio three sixty book called spark in two thousand eleven and this is Carrie Hillman who was our first senior producer and is now the executive producer at story car. At the time there had been a lot of magazines shows and it was a way for us to sort of do something different and fresh and it was like a a really creative solution to like a lot of really boring magazine. Formatted programming so I was like really game to try to figure it out. We also had two assistant producers. I'm Michelle Seagull. I started at studio three sixty as a assistant producer. In September of two thousand. I stayed through twenty thirteen as a pretty Sir and I'm now the managing producer of Sleet Studios I'm Tall Milad and I started at St Three Sixty as an intern in the year. Two Thousand and I was there until two thousand fifteen When I left I was senior producer of the show for about ten years before that and I now work at Pushkin Industries Heading up development also on staff during the early days of the show was producer and technical director. Steve Nelson Steve's now a programming executive at NPR Johnson. Do you remember what the working title was when we got there? Oh yeah hot ticket right which is first of all a terrible name and doesn't get to any of the big ideas that studio three sixty does as a name but secondly this is sort of in the relatively this was during the post dotcom boom and someone typed in hot ticket dot com into a website and it was an adult site for general audiences for sure. That was the end of hot ticket as a name every week. Studio three sixty we explore. One big idea in-depth. Today we look at the intersections of art and medicine. The idea of studio three sixty or an art show for public radio had been kind of kicking around for a long time. People were on the ground producing pieces. Trying to sort of see what would stick Eventually they brought Julie Burstein and she had this idea of like putting on pieces that sort of built on one another in having an artist or somebody else react to each piece. We started calling it a through line which was just an idea that we would carry through the show and I think the idea of having a theme came from we have to have some structure in order inside it to be able to play. The idea was that Kurt would open the show with a monologue is always delightful to look back and see that exotic bits of civilization. John Ashcroft was a senator his most celebrated crusade a failed crusade for some years. Now one of my hobby horses has been the blurring lines between news politics crime or and entertainment and then he would have a person in the studio with him and then we would present pre recorded pieces to play for this person. I try in my work to speak to the human in US and That human end to bear kind of witness and in enabled react to it. That's really fascinating That makes me think of this. Yes we looked a lot at the degeneration of people's memories and one of the pieces of research we discovered is precisely why I found listening to that piece so fascinating so it would give us an opportunity. Say something that took them off of their typical talking points that gave us an insight into the way they think their personality It also added some depth. I think to the the pieces themselves because you can't do everything in five minutes and so maybe you have to like leave something on the cutting room floor but you can resurrect it a little bit with with the like well-placed Kirk question so I thought it was really cool. I loved gathering stories from really disparate places and putting them next to each other and then talking about them. It was just so much fun. Do you remember a point when you realize it was working? I have to say. I think that first Shakespeare show because it was a whole show bringing Shakespeare up-to-date but we had Neil Gaiman Willie's just grumbling about the fact that he's a crappy writer and the San man the eponymous Lord of the rings who happens to be in this up goes over to will and offices deal are you will shakespeare. I have we met. We have but men forget in waking hours. And you and Steve or maybe it was Steve. That incredible intro He started it with Scharzenegger's hang on not to be not to be tied in the phase of man when in disgrace with fortune and men's on have we hear. Hello I'm curt Anderson and Mrs Studio Three six. It was so hilarious and it was just. It was like okay. We got it this works. I'm Peter Clowney and I was studio three six I Adler and these days I live in Saint Paul and I'm vp of content strategy for stitcher. It's a struggle sometimes to do a show. That has a theme I approach. That idea would caution now if someone wants to do a show that theme like to say like remember. It's got multiple pieces in it. You're going to have the fifth favourite piece about Gardens in this episode. But it's true that like building on the ideas across an hour is like really meaningful. My name is Eric Linski. I started as an intern. In two thousand four became assistant producer and then decided to become a contributing reporter of which I was to studio three sixty through the beginning of two thousand sixteen and I am now the host and creator of the podcast imaginary worlds. Yeah I remember this one episode where they had Madeleine Albright the through line theme was democracy and so she's sitting in the studio with Kurt and then one of the pieces was about American idol. Which was the hottest thing back? Then and they were talking about how people were taking American idol democracy far more seriously than actual presidential elections. Have you ever had a chance to see American idol? Well I actually have and I've been pretty depressed As I am by television generally these days which seems to be going to the lowest common denominator and I. I don't like the word Elitism as we kind of lost me on this last segment of him and it was really funny here. Man Albright come out of that piece. And what do you think of that? She was not too thrilled with the peace to quality that piece but what she was hearing in the piece. I'm Derek John. I was a producer and editor on the show from about two thousand four to two thousand twelve ish and since then I've done a whole bunch of work in the podcast world but I am now currently an executive producer of the how to with Charles Duhig podcasts. At slate when the theme through line shows worked man they were amazing. I mean it was like we had set this high bar and they were so hard to pull up when they clicked and everything fit together. It was truly fantastic radio and it was hard I would say we had some shows that weren't successful and that's actually what led to having to change one. Really terrible through line. Thematic show was fish the fish just literal fish in the sea. Animals really jumped the shark on that one

Producer Executive Producer Kurt Steve Nelson Steve Madeleine Albright Intern World Wrestling Federation George W Bush Chris Anderson Wnyc Barbara Kruger Official Republican National Convention Mrs Studio United States Chad John Ashcroft Julie Burstein Michelle Seagull Jocelyn Gonzalez
New York Icons: Kaufman Astoria Studios

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

10:09 min | 1 year ago

New York Icons: Kaufman Astoria Studios

"New York for its entire. History has brought people together of wildly different backgrounds and that might be different races or cultures or a geographic areas Irish people and Jews and African Americans and you know Italians but also different classes. You had the tenement girl and the rich playboy and everybody in between well. That's just a natural for storytelling. But when these stories were told by Hollywood what was distinctly New York about them could get flattened out for the mainstream. If you look today at a Marx brothers movies the first couple of Marx brothers films. They're throwing all these terms around. Mommy's Nora Nori. There is Jewish for free loader animal crackers in the coconuts where designs you know for a New York audience but when the Marx Brothers then do moved to Hollywood and they begin making films for MGM. There's no Yiddish in those movies anymore. Right they become the sort of universal. You Know Hollywood movie Marx Brothers that that's from forty second street classical nine hundred thirty three musical about the Broadway chorus girl who becomes a star that connick number has the busby Berkeley dance formations but it also has the skyline the elevated train street vendors and attempted rape and murder. It's a film about New York. Made in Hollywood that helped form what sanders calls the mythic city. That dream version of New York. That's a distillation of the real place. Forty Second Street and all those back stage musicals that were made all the homes that were about the putting on of a Broadway show. They were shot in Broadway theaters. They were shot in Hollywood sound stage theaters. You know there was just endless numbers of these amazing films which did not have a single frame except possibly the establishing shot the opening shot would be shot in New York as the credits ran by with music behind him in. May Nineteen thirty. Three paramount turned the Astoria studios over to its main creditor western electric that companies filmmaking arm Eastern Services Studios INC operated it as a rental studio for independent productions. Its output varied widely. The Scoundrel for example was set in Manhattan's literary world. Noel Coward plays a ruthless hated publisher. Julian place the woman he charms. Mary's then abandoned putting something happened. Man I do live. I hope you're playing folk killed when you're dying using it on. The homepage of the year does not think of human when he dies. He's condemned to damnation unless he finds one person on Earth to mourn. Him novelists writes Ben. Hecht and Charles MacArthur rotated but at Astoria. They also got to produce and direct. They won an academy award for best original. We don't be Marquette. Hulu your new. There was a series of Spanish language. Musical starring Tangos Star Carlos Gardell Tambien. A nineteen thirty. Three's Emperor Jones was based on the controversial Eugene O'Neill play main character was a black pullman porter who escapes prison to become dictator of a small island. The film could only have been made with independent funding. Then the studios were called to service for World War Two. The Department acquired the property in Nineteen Forty Two and the pictorial center of the army. Signal Corps moved into make trading and propaganda films. They expanded the facility and built barracks for the soldiers. The army used motion pictures in the war effort and turned to experienced filmmakers for help frank. Capra worked on a series of orientation films called why we fight one episode related to our won the Oscar for best documentary. Just what was it? Made US change our way of living overnight but turned our resources are machines our whole nation into one vast awesome producing more and more weapons of war instead of the old materials by the end of the war the ABC employed over two thousand people making movies over half of them civilians. All this work even brought new film techniques like multiple angles shooting and change film in even more momentous ways for five years American audience. It has been seeing newsreels. And it's someone you know. A movie maker said well you couldn't you couldn't bring in the enemy for for production meeting you know before. The battle and people went out with sixteen millimeter cameras. And these lightweight cameras that could go everywhere. They saw actual action after the war audiences and creators had developed a taste for this more realistic filmmaking. There was an appetite. For a new kind of filmmaking. That would be used more available light less contrived cinematography be shot with faster. Granier film be more shot on location and feel more like a took place in real place and not this kind of fabricated construct and be more adult this desire for realism meant the glossy representations of New York. That Hollywood made before the war wouldn't do director is like Ilya. Kazan felt their stories needed New York locations and New York talent. You don't understand I coulda had class. Gerber contamination could have been somebody by the MID FIFTIES NEW YORK. Filmmakers were more than just contenders. The Oscar wins for on the waterfront in nineteen fifty five and Mardi fifty six affirm. That excellence could come from outside. Hollywood New York is setting is capable of whatever mood or dramatic statement? You WanNa make architecturally in its light for talk about winter light as Mr Bergman did. New York's winter light image. That Sidney Lumet in the documentary film titled by Sidney Lumet. He grew up on the lower east side in nineteen fifty seven. He went from directing theater and TV. Two movies with twelve angry men. You're asking us to believe that somebody else did the stabbing with exactly the same kind of knife. Larger a million or one go onto make more New York classics like Serpico Dog Day afternoon and network. He died in twenty eleven. I'm not comfortable anyplace but New York when I leave New York for any other place in the United States My nose starts to bleed. Filmmakers at this time took full advantage of New York locations for their exterior shooting. When they needed a controlled indoor set they may do with whatever studios were available. Tv Or old movie studios the old Bronx by graph for example operated as a rental studio under different names until the seventy s the Astoria Studios. Meanwhile were still occupied by the army. There was some leftover stages from the twenty s and they reuse them and Sidney Lumet told me amazing stories of going onto these studios which he was in an editing room up in the Bronx. That had been Edison's old editing suite with an e draw you know kind of worked into the curtains E for Edison. These were the oldest movie studios in the world and they were using them in the nineteen fifties to make all those great early in mid fifty s movies like Twelve angry men and on the waterfront the city eventually recognized how vital New York and the screener to each other in nineteen sixty six mayor. John established the first mayor's film office in the world to lower hurdles to filming their Lindsay's film office streamline the permitting process and removed a lot of red tape for shooting in the city he even dedicated a police. Unit to location shoots then in nineteen seventy. The army moved production to different site and turned the Astoria property over to the federal government. This was not simply a movement of some soldiers because most of the people making the films were grips carpenters electricians and actress who were part of. New York's commercial motion picture industry so they were not at all happy when this plug got pulled in Astoria. The complex sat abandoned. For years unprotected and open vandals people would go in there. Rip The copper out of the walls and those people with a purpose then they were also just people in there for mischief terrible condition in the meantime you have this eyesore at the edge of a residential communities have halfway between the area and Long Island city. It's just getting worse and worse and worse. They abandoned cars dropped all around weeds growing through the sidewalk. I remember this very clearly. The film unions local community and the city got together to preserve the studio site. Save film jobs and clean up the neighborhood in nineteen seventy seven. They formed the nonprofit a story of Motion Picture and Television Center Foundation. They managed to prevent the studio from being sold off or turn down by getting the site on the National Register of historic places a process that normally took years.

New York Hollywood Astoria Studios Army Sidney Lumet Astoria Marx Brothers United States Oscar Nora Nori Marx MGM Noel Coward Long Island Eastern Services Studios Inc Manhattan Carlos Gardell Tambien
The making of Yanni

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

03:56 min | 1 year ago

The making of Yanni

"In the nineteen nineties. I wrote an op Ed. For The New York Times where I tried to make sense and make fun of an inexplicable pop phenomenon that was sweeping the planet. Another single name star. Yanni was a huge deal at the time this new age composer and performer doing concerts at the Taj Mahal and the Forbidden City in Beijing. He released his live at the Acropolis album in the spring of Nineteen ninety-four which sold more than four million copies. This baffled me and my times s I propose facetiously that Johnny success must be the product of some powerful global conspiracy because this young Yanni guy and his music were so completely blah. Lots of people agreed. There's one guy the worst guy the music the Yanni man. You know Yanni first of all anyone who looks like a magician and doesn't do magic I don't like oh no. This is yawning. This guy is the biggest pothole I've ever seen in my life. So how did it happen? How did somebody who made? What sounded like high-end Muzak? How at that moment of Nirvana and a tribe called quest? Did he emerged as this superstar? Studio Three Sixty Seven Chong has the answers. The nineteen ninety. Tv special of Yanni's concert at the Acropolis has all the trappings of a musician. Doing a victory lap. After really hitting the big time there was set against the backdrop of the Parthenon backed by no less than the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra Tossing back. His dark flowing locks as tap that his synthesizers while an enormous crowd cheered them on. But if you thought that this was Yanni's ward for being world-famous you'd have it backwards. Yanni wasn't on TV. Because he was a star. He was a star because he was on TV. Yanni was a niche player. He was big in his area. But that's relative George Barris produced and directed the live at the Acropolis special and worked with Yanni for years. He wasn't considered a big player. In the overall music field. Yanni's field was the world of instrumental electronic new age music. He had been releasing albums for a small new age label since the mid eighties and they got respectable sales within that market but the general public dismissed all that stuff as music for hot stone massages or being put on hold. He was being buttonholes. A new age artists and there was no superstar Andrea. If Yanni was well known for anything it was for being the new boyfriend of a celebrity opened. The front door opened the door. I took one look at him. I lost my heart. This entire one thousand. Nine Hundred Oprah episode is actually devoted to dynasty actress. Linda Evans and her meet cute with Yanni. It was as if he was made. Just for my eyes. I mean there's nothing about exposure was nice but Yanni wanted to be more than talk show fodder the frustration was. He was hitting like a glass ceiling. But we believe in the music we saw there could be used in a lot of other areas than just in elevators and that was the challenge we had to get it out there and let the public decide the what options beyond he have. His music wasn't really radio. Friendly an MTV wasn't exactly making a lot of room for instrumental new age composers. And then.

Yanni Acropolis The New York Times Taj Mahal Royal Philharmonic Orchestra Beijing Linda Evans MTV Chong Johnny George Barris Andrea
Adam Driver Hates Watching Himself in Movies

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Adam Driver Hates Watching Himself in Movies

"It'll be interesting to see during the Oscar. TV Show exactly how Adam driver reacts when they play a clip of his best actor nominated performance because he hates seeing or hearing himself on screen so much that a few months ago he walked out on Terry Gross in the middle of an interview for fresh air when she played a clip of him which surprised me because when I talked to him in two thousand thirteen he was indulgent as we watched one scenes from the TV show girls. I did ask him why it made him so uncomfortable. I mean lots of reasons I just forgot why look like to was reminded in my God. That's what you have to go through that But mostly because I feel like If he was gonNA continue if it was going to kind of go on that You know I came from a theater background or you. Don't get to look at the end result or what what is actually being a Brosseau. You just have to do your homework than As much as you can then show up on the day and be open to something being different or not knowing the answer and I think think in things that I've watched in the past one I would just obsessed about them for months and drive myself crazy after you saw your work of things that I wanted to fix and change your or do over again in an obviously you can't and and same thing with the people around me. I just drive them nuts with like ask him quite so we would just couldn't wouldn't it be allow you to like. Oh next time and I won't do that or get better the next time. I don't think it's necessarily a good idea. Just kind of seems to be what I think. I have a natural tendency to try to make things perfect or better looking or Change it for the sake of changing at arbitrary Changing making it look better in the things that I'm interested in an watching in film theatre and television role is the imperfect or the ugly part of it. I just know it myself. Especially while we're shooting I have no interest to see what is coming

Terry Gross Oscar Brosseau Adam
This Woman's Work: Black Gold by Nina Simone

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

01:19 min | 1 year ago

This Woman's Work: Black Gold by Nina Simone

"Classic Kulgam. Sundays is a program of community listening events founded by Coline Cosmo Murphy were fans listened to essential albums uninterrupted. On state of the art sound systems systems. For this woman's work we're highlighting classic albums by female artists who have made a lasting impact on music and pop culture. This time the grammy nominated donated live album black gold by Nina Simone for us. It was recorded in front of a packed audience at Philharmonic recall in New York City on October. Twenty six thousand nine hundred sixty nine and released in nineteen seventy. The record captures the commanding poignant performance by Nina Nisa Mellon that night but we also hear her onstage banter between songs at times she seems Aloof and dignified. But then she's teasing lighthearted and the audience is clearly delighted lack gold displays Nina Simone's talents at interpreting Asong not to mention her range moving from soul and Gospel to show tunes and folk music through it. All her distinctive voice soars into moments of defiance and uplift is record represents not only an artist at the peak of for talents but an important figure in the civil rights movement in the US in this episode of this woman's work. Nina Simone's black gold.

Nina Simone Nina Nisa Mellon Coline Cosmo Murphy Grammy United States New York City Asong
The Symphonic Side of Wynton Marsalis

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

02:15 min | 1 year ago

The Symphonic Side of Wynton Marsalis

"Wynton Marsalis was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for his work. Blood on the fields at two and a half hour jazz or thorough about a couple moving from slavery to Freedom Freedom Heaven Jus- own freedom is on his aw. It was the first time a jazz composition had ever won. But even the Wynton Marsalis is best known as a jazz trumpet player he also as a classical composer. Sorry himself he has written four seemed funny as and a Violin Concerto and this year he released a recording of symphony number three the swing symphony with adjusted adjusted Lincoln Center Orchestra Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra conducted by David Robertson. In these but guess extra Wynton Marsalis sits down with Kurt Andersen to talk about his love of classical music. He says it all started with a chance encounter on a New Orleans Streetcar when he was just a kit. So guy went into the back of the STREE- rijkaard white trump'll from college. which was unusual for a white guy? DOOKIE saw my trumpet trumpet case. Weight as a kid in the in the seventies. You're you're you're sitting in the back of the Streetcar. 'CAUSE 'cause that's the wire you didn't have to was not required that's where you were just was a mandated. You you wanted to sit there. Yeah but it was an area that was not populated with white. Gotcha so this student for. Some reason stepped across those lines and put his trumpet case down by mine so I was not dead daddy to see him. Everybody of course started looking at him and he was insisting on. Tell me something I was kind of not as friendly and fuzzy as I should have been but then he gave me an album just absolutely ran. mcgurn said check this album and it was an album of a trumpet. Player named Maurice Andrey and I thought you know classical music okay. Okay man the famous French but I didn't know he was a dead time. I was thirteen and I read the the album jacket or something said that his parents were coal miners and man. Is People. Disguise people worked in coal mines and he played classical trumpet. I got to put this on when I get home so I put it on. It was a recording.

Wynton Marsalis Kurt Andersen Lincoln Center Orchestra Saint New Orleans Streetcar Pulitzer Prize Stree David Robertson Maurice Andrey Mcgurn
New York Icons: The Bell Jar

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

09:24 min | 2 years ago

New York Icons: The Bell Jar

"It's good to meet you as Clark is the author of the forthcoming nine hundred page biography of Platt I meet up with her and we take a look at the magazine Plath oversaw that summer you know what struck me the first time I looked through this was the number of ads you just can't quite believe how many ads are in this Zine it's almost page after page and of course fashion spreads to fashion magazine so in a back room of the New York Public Library where flipping through a copy of the magazine Clark points out one ad in particular it's for shape wear that's also sportswear so this Janssen add anyone for action anyone for beautiful perform an action there is a woman with a Barbie Physique wearing a hat and gloves connect with a bra and girdle as she gets ready to serve in a game of tennis this is positively the most pleasant to wear slimming trimming smoothing soothing figure maker ever devised and there's a poem called the applicant where she uses this kind of language I noticed you were stock naked how about this suit blackened stiff but not a bad it when you marry it it is waterproof shatterproof proof against fire and bombs through the roof believe me they'll bury you in it Mademoiselle had become interested in her after a story she had submitted a year earlier one it's national fiction contest but Clark says that Platt Struggle old in her role as managing editor she had wanted to be fiction editor at just nineteen years old plath had already published poems and won awards Mademoiselle published some of the top writers of its day Dylan Thomas Tennessee Williams Truman capote but instead of selecting editing short stories plan throats fashioned blurbs including one praising the versatility of sweaters I think plath found her self suddenly embedded in this fashion and beauty industry and she's become part of this vast propaganda machine that woman's women into objects and she wanted to be the subject of her own life she didn't want to be the objective someone else's life so I think that contributed to her sense of disillusion that summer suddenly it was her job to kind of objectify women bio green they were promoting it for fall title green with black bio green white bio green with Nio green it's kissing cousin fashion blurb silver and full of nothing sent up there fishy bubbles in my brain they surfaced with a hollow pop but it isn't just the limitations of fashion and magazines that got to plant she was also troubled by the limitations placed on women in the nineteen fifties even in New York City that place of possibility I made a point beating so fast I never kept the other people waiting who generally ordered only chefs salad and grapefruit juice at one point in the bell jar she says everyone in New York to reduce PAS not trying to reduce plath has an enormous appetite is her actual appetite was legendary she wants emptied out hosts refrigerator before a dinner party but she had an appetite for everything you know she wanted to be the best writer she wanted to so I'm close she wanted to raise honeybees you went to make her own honey and she just wanted it all can women have it all it's a question still asking it had just started to come up in the nineteen fifties when women who've done the whole rosie the riveter thing during the war were now expected to be homemade occurs again even though many thrived in the workforce and developed real professional aspirations it was an ongoing discussion within society about whether women could do three things at once dying Johnson got married one month after the gas ownership Mademoiselle the summer had changed her and given her a greater sense of what her life could be but then she had four children within the span of six years so I was home with these little kids but they had naps and that's when somebody said why don't you the novel about something that you can do during nap time you know that's the way things evolve house of naptime Johnson has since written more than a dozen books and been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Plath during a man who would support her as a writer was a major anxiety when she wrote about extensively in her journals in the Bell Jar Esther Greenwood reflection in her sort of boyfriend a medical student at Yale who everyone told her was such a good guy I also remembered Buddy Willard saying innocent minister knowing way that after I had children I would feel differently I wouldn't want to write poems anymore so I began to think maybe it was true that when you were married and had children it was like being brainwashed and afterward you went numb as a slave in some private totalitarian state a few years later plath thought she found a man who would not brainwash her as a graduate student at Cambridge she met fellow poets Ted Hughes who she married in Nineteen fifty sex both enjoyed growing reputations as writers when they were interviewed by the BBC's Owen Leeming in nineteen sixty one you'll have to give the impression that Oh you spend your whole Mary lives thinking poems and reading to each other I think our domestic life is is practically indistinguishable from all the people who live around I'm not the only main difference is that Ted doesn't go out to work at nine and come home at five he retires about nine to to his room and and works but I certainly having a life just like all the other housewives and mothers district shopping dishes and taking care of the baby in four so for Hughes Writing was a fulltime job a career but plath was a wife and mother who happened to write perhaps like Johnson during nap time plath was actually writing the bell jar at the time of that interview she alluded to it when she was interviewed again the next year this time by the BBC's Peter or he asks plath if there are particular themes that she's interested in exploring and he rambles off this list of ingredients that she's baked right into the bell jar Robert lulls poems about his experiences in a mental hospital for example interested very much these peculiar private and to move subjects it's I feel have been explored in recent American poetry I think particularly the poorest and Sexton who writes also about her experiences I always wanted to write the long short story I wanted to rise Nawfal now that I have attained shall I say a respectable age and have had experiences I feel much more interested in pros in the novel I feel that Plath published the bell jar under a pseudonym because she was so worried about offending the people she fictionalized as characters in it one of those characters was her editor at Mademoiselle who she called JC in the Bell Jar JC asks esther what she wants to do after college and suddenly she draws a blank unable to list off for am visions of being a professor writer or an editor and a writer. I've always thought I'd like to go into publishing I tried to recover thread that might lead me back to my old bright salesmanship I guess what I'll do is apply at some publishing house you ought to read French and German. JC said mercilessly and probably several other languages as well Spanish and Italian better still Russian hundreds of girls flood into New York every June thinking they'll be editors Utah for something more than the run of the mill person you better learn some languages. JC is a tough editor who cuts her down to size in that way she calls to mind another memorable story said Ed Women's magazine in New York so you don't read runway no for today you had never heard of me now you have no style or something fashion while similar take down to Andy Sacks her would be assistant that's a complete exaggeration of winter is the longtime editor of Vogue and the basis for maranda priestly

Editor New York Clark Platt Utah Ed Women Vogue Andy Sacks Nineteen Years One Month Six Years Mill
The Bell Jar

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

02:51 min | 2 years ago

The Bell Jar

"The bell jar by Sylvia Plath is set mainly in New York City but it's not always thought of as a New York novel like Catcher in the raw I or the age of innocence are that's probably because what's autobiographical the novel tends to eclipse other aspect of it just a month after the Bell Jar was first published in nineteen sixty three plath killed herself since the book is pretty autobiographical and its narrator attempt suicide it can be hard not to read it as a sort of literary suicide note but of course there's a lot more to the novel it's about a young woman from the Boston suburbs who like plath Lanza Plum Internship Guest Editing Women's magazine in New York in the summer of Nineteen fifty-three and it does a lot to capture what did and still does go along with trying to make it in New York all the outsized possibilities and outside disappointments on this Shen of New York icons producer Beenish Ahmed has the story of the Bell Jar I I read the Bell Jar when I was sixteen and Board in Ohio dreaming of being a writer and reporter in New York City a lot like Sylvia plath who won a golden ticket to that Dream Life a summer working at a top women's Xena when Sylvia Plath was at Smith college she went to guest editorship to Mademoiselle magazine her and a number of other girls to New York in the Mark Nineteen fifty three if you know anything about the bell jar is that it's based on Sylvia plath its own life when the main character Esther Greenwood goes back home after that summer she liked plath attempt suicide is committed to mental institutions and is treated with octroi shock therapy but the bell jar is not just a story of an unstable teenager plath uses her own story to reflect on the culture she lived in she lays out that mission right there in the first sentence it was a queer sultry summer the summer they electrocuted the rosenbergs and I didn't know what I was doing in New York Julius and Ethel Rosenberg had been convicted of conspiring to sell secrets about the atomic bomb to Soviet spies that's a powerful Metaphor says novelist med bullets are the beginning the first lines of the bell jar she talks about the execution of the Rosenbergs and then later on the character of Greenwood experiences electroconvulsive therapy and you make the link as a reader about electricity the and the terrible time in America which I didn't live through the rosenbergs but just the sense of her pain being expressed so beautifully so

Ethel Rosenberg Smith Dream Life Reporter Producer Plath Lanza Boston New York America Sylvia Plath Julius Esther Greenwood Mademoiselle Magazine Writer Ohio Beenish Ahmed Bell Jar New York City
Michelle Obamas portraitist and 96 Tears

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

07:37 min | 2 years ago

Michelle Obamas portraitist and 96 Tears

"My father was the first of his family to go to college he was a dentist so I mean all those things matter it's about creating a legacy and they didn't see that happening with art you know my father was a dentist my great uncle was Titian and my aunt's found a way to get their master's degrees at Nyu back at that time they have programs for that kind of stuff but So education was important there was there was a Bishen yeah it was a way out yeah how did you make your way to art and decide I want to do this. I'd say it just chose me I don't you know I had a great art teacher who really encouraged me even from high school to create images that were my own ideal and it's just I don't know what I felt comfortable doing I didn't have to interact with people I was super self conscious and you know I didn't do a lot that was interested in because I didn't want to be in ruins the people that I didn't know it was just like over the top self conscious so it was easy for me to do it and it's what I excelled at and the There's no conversation about visual learning them but I was a visual learner so it's just you know what my proclivity was to do this stuff or to be jeff that's what I was cooking and you were like the last pre internet generation as well I got my email address when I was twenty which which might be why you have the time inclination to do this yeah I mean I say that when when people ask me why do I do I think it's because of when I was born because I didn't I had a Tandy two thousand we had to pretty much coded ourselves like make the Games work and for me making art was I figure I really didn't know who Jackson pollock was Andy were haller you know these other craters and thinkers that were bending the rules so I this is what I thinking I was supposed to do and so that's what I did to be good and be really be good be realistic yeah did you ever have a a non representational phase I kind of did when I studied with grace hard again in in graduate school the paintings got a little looser little drip easier but ultimately never lost the figure and it just wasn't something that I knew I could expound on on for the rest of my life and so I knew I was still looking for what it was that I was going to make you seem like you need an armature or I'm going to do within this thing you need some kind of almost conceptual aesthetic structure maybe me you to make work yeah I mean like you're not doing changing crazily from abstraction to this to whatever well the thing is you know I mean if you know you're doing this kind of know what you're doing once you become known or something then that's kind of what you do like I could change it but I think at this point in my career that would be a mistake career wise then you can expound on that and and you know like I went from individual to these multi figure and I'll keep challenging myself to do different things but they will all tie into you know what I this body of work in a practical view yeah well you know I had friends who particular one friend who made really great work became really well known and didn't want to make that work anymore any stops making the work and he doesn't he didn't have a gallery after a while he ended up not being an artist one time he still trying to make his way back in do you ever like God I'm going to do a still life or landscape to the I'll just keep it secret no I had no interest I love painting this painting the figures Silvio bombs yeah are they the only a commission you've done yes you want to do any others really I mean if I could choose to people to do I would do Serena Williams Do Meghan Markle I could happen yeah maybe when it was unveiled Obama told this story of meaning you at the interview in the Oval Office now I've been in the Oval Office wants with no president in it just empty and it's pretty amazing justice the thing is you a it's a big job interview the biggest job interview and it's the Oval Office and there's the president and the first eighty what was in your heart and feeling ahead I was I was nervous the first thing that happened and I don't know whether anybody else notices when they walk in but the rest of the White House has like this really kind of strange fluorescent green light and then when you walk to the Oval Office it's like lit for television and that almost triggered my brain to think that it wasn't happening when it really was happening here for about five seconds hours like stuck in this moment of like am I aaa meeting or is yeah or or is Barack walking towards me and so I sent out of it and yeah shook his hand I was nervous life so if she had been you know Michelle Robinson Chicago Hospital executive would you why would the image be precisely what we see in the National Gallery that's interesting Probably Yeah because what I presented to the world I think is the real well her and not the the image of you know the millions of photographs that we have on with her on the Internet means private and that's the kind of feel that I wanted to to something personal in private and not a glamour shot or anything like that it's a painting and it's it's a sobering moment in history and making it exactly but at the end of it when I look back at it like those are the things that I that I think we're kind of circulating in my head in ten years it will just be one big thing did you look forward to that time when it's not all about that all about the Michelle Obama's portraitist yeah it's funny I went from the artist who survived a heart transplant to become a famous painter to the artist painted Michelle Obama and I'm pretty sure sure I could climb out ever and I still be that because she is still who she is and she has such a great influence you know worldwide and you know and I guess I'm okay with that I mean sure it has been a great pleasure meeting you nice to meet you meet you thanks thank you

Titian NYU Five Seconds Ten Years
The B-52s Look Back At Their 40-Year Career

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

04:35 min | 2 years ago

The B-52s Look Back At Their 40-Year Career

"For decades ago. The beef fifty two's arrived on the Athens Georgia Party scene with killer guitar riffs. They're silly but Erie lyrics and their sky high beehive wigs the two women in the Band Hand Sydney Wilson and Kate Pearson created some of the groups more surreal and beautiful vocal moments while also co writing the songs and playing keyboards guitar and Percussion in this episode of this woman's work. We'll look back on the beef fifty choose first album which was released this month in one thousand nine hundred seventy nine. Here's colleen whenever amassed. What was your favorite Gig? One that still springs to mind is a concert in December nineteen eighty four an old theater called E._m.. LSM Worcester Massachusetts two thousand oddballs including myself. We're singing at the top of our lungs and dancing footloose and fancy free and an invitation invitation of the bound themselves dress arrest from head to toe and our finest vintage gear and when the baseline kicked on this they're opening song that evening and the memorable opener their debut album from five years before we all screamed in in unison the B. Fifty Two's concert that I attended thirty five years ago had a liberated and joyous atmosphere ear and inclusively populated moon in the sky orbiting around the hilariously self-confessed tacky little downtown's from Athens Georgia. I was a teenager who didn't really fit in with Jocson cheerleaders of my small town wound but here at this beef of twos concert I totally fed him. It was also a huge inspiration to my sixteen year old self to see a ban that prominently featured two women the lineup at that concert featuring the same members found on that beef fifty two's debut album which was posthumously titled the Late Ricky Wilson on guitar singer Fred Schneider Drummer Keith Strickland and the beehive gloriously attired singer percussionist Cindy Wilson and singer Keyboard is Kate Pearson. This was a big deal for me. You have to remember that for the most part up to that time with the behemoths Abba and Fleetwood fleetwood Mac as big exceptions boundary usually all girl groups are featured one woman usually fronting the band as a singer despite their overall other worldliness the beef 52s help normalize mixed gender obvious collapse the beef fifty to debut album didn't sound like anything else when it was released nineteen seventy-nine it was almost as if the jetsons forms of bands in which they transmitted the melodic hooks of the twilight zone theme underpinned by the Propelling Guitar Drum Drum Combo of nineteen sixty surf music but just as a band drew upon the past they also had their gaze firmly set upon the future. You can hear how they knowingly drew roof and minimalist and modern synth pop sound of avangard groups like New York City duo suicide Schroeder cycle and Akron Ohio's Art Rock Anomaly Depot <music> Miss Their retro-futurism sound was augmented by nonsensical and seemingly ridiculous lyrics. There were easy to remember and to sing along with and equally important to their alert as their debut L._p.. Apiece Sonic style was the ban Sartorial flair which is gloriously on display on the album's cover set against the bright yellow background the ban post and their kooky thrift store kitsch inviting the listener to the party hardy found in the album's grooves after all it was the mission to have a good time that

Kate Pearson Athens Georgia Party Ricky Wilson Cindy Wilson Sydney Wilson Massachusetts Colleen Jocson Athens Erie New York City Akron Ohio Abba Georgia Schroeder Keith Strickland Fred Schneider Thirty Five Years Sixteen Year
Game of Thrones spinoff shows in the works

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

06:17 min | 2 years ago

Game of Thrones spinoff shows in the works

"Two. This episode of studio. Three sixty is brought to you by the relentless, which is a new podcast from slate studios and century twenty one real estate. The relentless is about extrordinary people and mindsets. And behaviors that drive them to achieve inspiring things. Join host and doctor of clinical psychology, Julie Gerner she talks to business leaders across industries about what sets them apart and how they view success differently. You'll hear about what they've learned from their successes and failures and how they're continuing to evolve. Listen and subscribe to the relentless today wherever you get your podcasts. This is new three sixteen. I'm courteous. I'm Josh Allen Gonzalez from studio. Three sixty. We're back with another installment of this woman's work. A series of stories from classic Elba, Sundays and studio. Three. Sixty classic album. Sundays is a program of community listening events, founded by Coline, Cosmo Murphy, where fans listened to essential albums uninterrupted on state of the art sound systems for this woman's work were highlighting classic albums by female artists women who have made a lasting impact on music and pop culture. This time lady sings the blues by jazz singer, Billie holiday. It was released in nineteen fifty six to coincide with her autobiography of the same name by this point in her career when she was just in her early forties. Holiday's voice was sounding fragile and warn the toll of a life marked by hardship and addiction. Although the more energetic sound of her earlier records is muted here, holiday still delivers wise and moving performances in this collection of emotional, jazz tunes, many of the songs here became synonymous with her unique sound and persona. Here's colleen. Billie holiday remains one of the greatest jazz, voices of all time and is still easily recognizable to music fans from all generations. She's got them. The musicians and clubs of New York City were integral to the development of jazz in the nineteen forties. Bebop was born in the Big Apple with artists like Charlie Parker bologna, smoke and Dizzy, Gillespie. The nineteen fifties saw the development of hard bop with Sonny Rollins and our Blakey the cool jazz of miles Davis and later, the free jazz of Ornette Coleman, and later John Coltrane explored in downtown, Manhattan venues, like the five spot. But vocal innovator and world-famous Billie holiday with unable to perform these notable. Jaaz clubs in the nineteen fifties as her cabaret card had been revoked due to narcotics charges. So instead, she brought jazz to the mainstream by performing it a major concert venue Carnegie Hall in nineteen fifty six. Nothing. On nothing. She wants said of her style. If I'm going to sing like someone else, then I don't need to sing at all in nineteen fifty eight Frank Sinatra told ebony magazine with few exceptions, every major pop singer in the US during her generation has been touched in some way by her genius. It is Billie holiday who was and still remains the greatest single musical influence on me. She also had a profound impact on contemporary artists, including Jose James, a singer, who is beautifully bridge, the world of jazz, and hip hop for over a decade since the release of his debut album, the dreamer. Ver- dream. Series. In two thousand fifteen chamber quarter tribute album to Billie holiday covering his favorite songs on the album yesterday. I had the blues the music of Billie holiday for the legendary blue note records. When I phoned Billie holiday, it really matched. My teenage angst in a deep way, not in a superficial way. You know, not in like, I'm a loner and against the world. But she showed me that there was a way to feel pain and to transform it into art. You don't have to know anything about our life to feel the kind of pain and tragedy that embodies her music. Holy likewise, British singer. Actress and former cabaret act. Paloma faith rates lady day as one of the most influential artists in her own upbringing on always dry bridge, and this will work out, but lately Acton, just no go. Maybe we'll Noel. Maybe we're not. We got us to relate. How Billy was a unifying force at one of my classic album. Sunday's events might mother and father is taste was always really convicting just the hell relationship, but. But. But this is the one person I listen to in both households. I would say that for me that she was the holy grail of how I wanted to be able to sing. I didn't realize as the young person so of trying to copies the econ- thing that entail sim batches happy. The show mother spray. Track to love. Nah.

Billie Holiday Blakey Slate Studios Julie Gerner Josh Allen Gonzalez New York City Carnegie Hall Elba Frank Sinatra Jose James Ebony Magazine Sonny Rollins Cosmo Murphy Coline Pain United States Ornette Coleman
Why Werner Herzog loves cat videos

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

14:06 min | 2 years ago

Why Werner Herzog loves cat videos

"Today on studio. Three sixty what energizes the legendary filmmaker Werner Herzog sometimes when I don't know how to order my thoughts, I switched on crazy cat videos and immediately. I'm rejuvenated. We talk a lot about cat videos, the art of narration and his latest movie meeting. Gorbachev. Plus from the first time you heard this song, it was just absolutely mind. Melting. The story behind when doves cry, which prints released prepare to feel old thirty five years ago this week. This is what it sounds like the head on studio. Three sixty right after this. This is scheduled for sixty I'm currently at I'm sitting on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial this first level of guard this Thomas Jefferson's vegetable, I'd like to have the roasted chicken very well done, editing is all about timing. I tried to get a little bit away from the actual subject must get sick of your place, right? Three, sixty with good Anderson. Werner Herzog has made more than sixty movies. They're often about man versus extreme forces, the Amazon jungle in FitzGerald. Oh, active volcanoes in the documentary into the inferno. His latest film meeting, Gorbachev also fits into that frame. It's the story of Mikhail. Gorbachev versus a crumbling political and economic system. Food consensus, Kevin over a six month period last year and the year before Hertzog went to Moscow and interview the very last president of the Soviet Union, Mikhail Sekkei bitch. I'm sermon. And the first term and that you probably met wanted to kill you. Hertzog and a co director Andre singer, combined interviews with lots of archival footage to tell the story of the one Soviet leader almost everybody in America, and the west light even adored, and the film is all held together by Herzog signature narration here. His home village is it looks today. It is hard to imagine that from such a godforsaken place in the middle of nowhere, one of the greatest leaders of the twentieth century emerged. And when Hertzog is here with me now to talk about meeting Gorbachev, sir. Welcome back to studio. Three six eight thank you. Thank you for having me. So you feel three long conversations with Gorbachev. How did you prepare for those mostly reading I did a lot of homework? I read compensates memoirs Rhoda most excellent biography by William helpmann. Otherwise, I arrived without pain, my hands. I didn't have a catalog of Chris that would rectal down. It was just a conversation from men to men carried on by curiosity. Wave. I was gonna lead me or us. Was unknown the film talks about how Gorbachev is beloved and considered a hero by many Germans, and obviously being a German, a west German at the time, you must have paid keen attention to the Soviet Union at that moment. Sure. And among other things when Germans reunification were somehow abandoned, give him up the real real big thing, about reunification, these it came without bloodshed. It came without violence. Gorbachev allowed peacefully his predecessors would send tanks in and, and suppress the liberation movements of countries like Hungary Poland is terminal. You just name, it chuckle Slovakia, take a Slovak, yo cyst that was attitude of the Soviet Ryan and Gorbachev completely different in his approach and is in west Germany had been separate countries. For essentially your entire life. It just must have seend being a forty odd year old man, having never known anything else impossible that this was never going to happen. Yes, I personally believed I would not see during my lifetime something of that magnitude would take much more time history would be slow, but I was surprised. And when the wall came down in Idi nine and reunification happens, as you say, in the film. So quickly crazily quickly. What was your feeling when I heard about the wall coming down? I was in the southern tip of South America, a mountain, and with five days delay through shortwave radio hurt that the won't had come down, and it's this kind of joy in the shadow of elation, his never left me, I was pleased, given the seriousness of the subject by the touches of humor in this film, like. When they're cutting down ceremonially cutting down the barbed wire between Austria, Hungary, and spend a long time showing this bit of the Austrian nightly news that night I'm going to play that clip. Busy plea for the entire world. I n curtain started to be lifted. However, Austrian evening news was curious about the magnitude of the event retail two minutes. I didn't really metric their lead story was about slugs. It's very funny because they advise you to fill up old with beer in slugs, as lovers of beer would crawl it get drunk and you could harvest them in the morning, then on the miscellaneous much later. So the anchorwoman comes to mention that I am curtain. Being lifted. So it points to that sometimes news completely clueless. In other news, the Cold War is over. Yes. Yes. Do you feel as though humor is, is central to your sensibility, as a filmmaker as a creator, I think this human almost all of my films, and I've been labelled as grim teutonic sort of God knows warrior who, who is determined to risk his life in all all this, all this kind of nonsense. So what you spot it is. There's a lot of human gover of, of course, a lot of human other films. I wanna talk more about your narration, and how you do it. Do you begin with some rough draft? Or do you make the film? I know I the Nori I write the take spontaneously during editing and I know here heft to explain something and I write it down. On incessantly and in the editing room. I have very professional microphone, and I speak the commentaries. Right, then and there while I'm proceeding and sometimes I notice the texts overlaps into the next scene. It's three seconds too long. So I would delete one or two words and rephrase it a little bit in speak again and it would fit. That's amazing. So literally, as you are cutting scenes together, you're coming up with the necessary narration, and recording simultaneous. Yes. Exactly. Is that what I do that extrordinary? Well, I realize it audiences like the way I narrate in not, it's not only my voice. It is a text the context that I create the observation said, I make. So I'm writing the commentaries, and I'm speaking them and ended makes a lot of sense and gives a coherence to films that they would otherwise not. What have? And in his someone there, directing you. You know, saying, hey Werner, let's let's do another take that. No with exception of the editor. He is the only one who would tell me the phrase, doesn't sound right? The grammar is a little bit crooked. Why don't you change? So earth of words, his says to me pronounciation of the word should be different in, in English. So I, I do have helped India seek advice. That's amazing. And also, I'm I'm struck by how demystifying you are of the process. There is nothing. Mysterious about filmmaking. It's just professional work period. Here is a great example of that work from your film, grizzly, man. One of my favorites. This is some of the last football shot by the subject, Timothy Treadwell, a grizzly bear enthusiast. It's a close up of one of his bears, and what haunts me is that in. All the faces of all the bears that trade will ever filmed, I discover no kinship now understanding no mercy. I see only the overwhelming indifference of nature. To me, there's no such thing as a secret world of the bears. And displaying stare speaks only of a half board interest in food, but for Timothy Treadwell despair was a friend, a savior. In a way in that makes film, different and unique I Esa filmmaker heaven ongoing argument with treadmill. Sometimes trade will say something very new agey into how fluffy these Baz I in to hug them, and you have to sing to them and, and here on of sudden night. Chime in say here. I differ with Treadwell in my opinion, wild nature is different. It's chaotic and in dangerous and murderous, not fluffy, like involved, his knee movies. So I just have an argument with him. You didn't always narrate your films, in fact, in your early films. There are other people doing their rations. I believe it was, the, the great ecstasy of would cover Steiner in the seventies that was your first first one. Here's a bit of that finished Pessoa Costa sheaf league in his. Emas. He even so what, what made you decide to start doing that? Forty five years ago. I didn't. Yes, I didn't decide it, it was the signature of TV series all the other films have filmmaker appear in the film and giving the chronically, so right? Not only my voice, head to be in a head to be physically onscreen, as well. I hated the beginning. And, and then I thought when the film was finished I should do at least voice myself I felt uncomfortable but I hit the feeling afterwards, that was something good about it. Steiner's Esther training spoon. Sponsored Fatu got. Wow, your voice was so much higher. You know how Americans feel now about Werner Herzog narrations do Germans here. You're germination think nothing special about that. No. Since I speak own mother tongue. It doesn't really stick out like a sore thumb and insurance, of course. Yes. You'll sense that my first language was Bavarian dialect. It's like let's say Texan, drawl, ereck ignites must come from Texas while he must come from Bavaria, right? The earliest one documentary of yours that I can find that you narrated in English was herdsmen of the sun, which is about a nomadic tribe in the Sahara. This is a clip in the Republic of new Shia. The voter behalf gathered for the annual celebration of care covari towards the end of the rainy season in the month of September tribal meetings are held all over the half desert. Now we hear that we go. Of course, Werner Herzog. That's what he does. But when you first started narrating thirty years ago, was there any pushback from US distributors country Lee say so that was very quick. Aknowledge -ment that audiences feel comfortable and they like the way I make things clear. He really understand what I'm saying. Although I speak with the Nexen with a heavy ex and not as heavy as, for example Kissinger, but that's true. That's true to audiences responded favorably. And that's always a good sign. Your voice is part of the attraction ES, India can tell that it's very easy to make satires and to imitate my voice, you see the internet is full of imposed us. Do you know there's a? Actor and writer Paul Tompkins who has done one. Do you know it, let me play a bit for you and see what you think this is him doing the character on Andy dailies podcast? Okay, if you don't mind I've just uploaded this review to yelp. This is the trader Joe's on hype urine.

Werner Herzog Gorbachev Timothy Treadwell Soviet Union Hungary India Amazon Lincoln Memorial Hertzog Steiner Anderson Mikhail Sekkei South America Thomas Jefferson Germans United States Nexen Moscow Slovakia Sahara
Ali Smith's great post-Brexit novel

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

05:38 min | 2 years ago

Ali Smith's great post-Brexit novel

"Breakfast Brexit's Brexit, British people who voted to leave the European New European York. union. Hundreds of thousands of people have taken to the streets of London demanding a second referendum European leaders, say Celtic new deal Brexit in two weeks. Time is now unlikely outcome extensions. The Brexit process to the end of Tober at the latest. Three years ago, the people of the UK voted to pull out of the EU. But since then there's been this bizarre baffling series of parliamentary deadlocks deadlines extensions fast. Go after fiasco, the Scottish writer Allie Smith is writing a tetralogy of novels set against this not quite post Brexit backdrop each of them named after a season the third one in her series. Spring comes out this week. I spoke with Smith when the first book autumn had just been published in America. And I asked her to start with the reading. All across the country. People felt it was the wrong thing all across the country. People felt it was the right thing all across the country. People felt they'd really lost all across the country. People felt they really won all across the country. People felt they done the right thing and other people had done the wrong thing all across the country. People looked up Google. What is e u? All across the country. People looked up Google moved to Scotland all across the country. People looked up Google Irish passport applications. And that is Allie Smith reading from her new novel autumn. So this book has all the hallmarks of great fiction. It has literary loses and ideas, and it's somewhat formally. Experimental has epic timeframe over many decades. It is also a bit. However, as they say ripped from the headlines about which we say ripped from the headlines. It's a funny thing writing books, I've been thinking about writing seasonal quartet as it were for books, which will be called simply names of the seasons. But then go to make up a bigger boot for about twenty years and then couple years ago, I wrote a book, which my publisher here in the UK because I was reading really late to deadline that was far gone by the time I handed, and they did it within six weeks. And then I was like you can make this beautiful a book in six weeks so began to think about whether it would be possible. Do that quartet? I've been waiting to do. And then began to think about what it would mean to have contemporaine oval started writing this novel. And as I was writing it we came up to the referendum here in the UK. And you know, it was really obvious that there was a pretty big division coming an came. And so I asked my publisher in the end could I simply have an extra month to attend to the novel to make sure that the novel, I kind of fell would be cheating novel. If it didn't face a contemporary of the country didn't face it. So this was Brexit referendum happened eight months ago, this book came out five months ago. And then, of course, four months ago, we had our election here states, and you know, in some similar ways, I lots of people in the United States are as upset about Donald Trump being president as lots of Brits are about Brexit, which which I guess is good for you book, sales wise, right? Sales. What what's what's really happening? Here is the sense of division, which we sensed Brexit. And then what's happening in the America adds to this. And all of a sudden division is division which was already world ride is so in view, so made visible so striking. Also when one saw the basic outlines of who voted for whom in this presidential election, very similar demographically in every other way to the Brexit vote. I know and all happening as modem or division expedient political division. She sighs. Your characters in autumn, your main characters Lissouba, th and Daniel embody in various ways, these political currents and struggles. But the book is really about their singular personal relationship now to give a flavor of that and glimpse of their friendship. I would love you to read one of their chats the passage where she's eleven and he's eighty something. And they're and they're walking along the canal. Sure, hang on the verge. Jim cana- Jaas said is a wonderful word a word croon from several languages. Where it's don't get grown. Elizabeth said, they do Daniel said words, aren't plants Elizabeth said. Words are themselves organisms. Daniel said, Oregon news, Elizabeth said herbal and verbal Daniel said language is like pope, e so it just takes something to turn the earth read them up. And when it does up come this. Leaping words, bright red fresh blowing vibes. Then the seat heads rattle the seats fallouts, then there's even more language waiting

Brexit Allie Smith President Trump Google UK Daniel America Publisher Elizabeth EU London Tober Contemporaine Oval Jim Cana- Jaas Writer Donald Trump Scotland United States Oregon
In the Footsteps of Merce Cunningham

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

05:28 min | 2 years ago

In the Footsteps of Merce Cunningham

"Time. I'm courteous. Studio. Three sixty podcast extra. We're celebrating the life and work of one of the great American choreographers. Merce Cunningham who was born one hundred years ago this week he danced starting as a member of Martha Graham's troop and then maye dances for seventy years and embraced innovation from start to finish new dance forms, new technology. New music new collaborators. Win four he worked with Radiohead and Siga rose on a beautiful piece that you're hearing called split sides. Cunningham dancers were famous for seeming to defy the laws of physics leaping high and suddenly switching direction in mid air. When Cunningham spoke with us in two thousand one he was using computers to try to make his dances, even more complex. Take always been interested in movement. There's no reason for that is just it seems to be it should interest everybody. We're we're so involved with all the time. I think of course of animals and birds watching their movements of always been totally fascinating to me. Movement is so much a part of our daily experience that we don't think of it as a thing, we don't even think we sort of do it. But if you thought about it say, how do you walk? How do you just the mechanics, but if we all walk the same why is it we all walk differently and that struck me years ago, and I thought well that was a way to think about movement that we were doing the same thing. But we all did it differently. My name is Daniel Roberts. I have a member of the Merce Cunningham dance company. I always feel that my legs are like. Needles of sewing machine when I'm doing cutting him they have to be very sharp and very articulate, and I feel that the torso has to be free on top of that on. So there's a strain that comes along with doing the work in the technique. And there's a clarity about the work in general, the use of space and the articulation of the torso limbs that I've never experienced before in any other dance form. I'm interested obviously in complexity which is to buy disadvantaged probably because it's made it difficult often for the public to really comprehend live with what we do. I think uses chance to avoid his own typical habits of making movement. And that's what's really interesting because he's even making it difficult for himself. It's not whatever feels natural. It's usually what deals completely unnatural. Chance operations came about in the nineteen fifties. There was wrist of an institute of random numbers where the decided scientists had decided that rather than using logic for numbers they could just as well use chance John cage. Took course, we're using it in his music composition. And I thought it would work with moving. I would say devise you sort of speaker series of movements. But then through chance means in the beginning, it was tossing coins. So that instead of you just using your own what you remembered about how things go you came up with this stunt. Up things which were. Sometimes impossible. But if you tried them, even though what it was was impossible something else came up to had experienced or I hadn't experienced before. I had the opportunity to begin to work with dad's computer it's called life forms, and it has mainly three screens with which you work one is what they call the stage on which you can place tiny figures, which move there's a screen with the larger figure called the figure editor on which you can make movements on the figure then there is a third screen called the time line, which is moving in time. You can put the the body and what say flat on the floor Prome. Okay. Then a few spaces later in the time. You could put it up in the air. Now, it will do that it will rise up on its feet and go up in the air. Of course, you can't do that in the way. It does it. But you look at it. I do and I think oh, but I could do it this way. Now if I hadn't seen this. I wouldn't think that way and and I. My work with it has grown more complex because I see more possibilities all the

Merce Cunningham Cunningham Martha Graham Daniel Roberts Maye John Cage Radiohead DAD Editor One Hundred Years Seventy Years
This Womans Work: Patti Smiths Horses

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

05:27 min | 2 years ago

This Womans Work: Patti Smiths Horses

"I've learned a lot about the records. I love and don't love from classic album Sundays. It's a program of listening events created by broadcaster and journalist Pauline. Cosmo Murphy, which for music fan can sometimes feel like going to church, and that's fitting because they're always held on Sundays at these events. I learned about an album from artists producers and other smart music people. Then the lights went down the phones went off and the audience listened to the album together straight through no interruptions. That's it. It seems really simple. But hearing a record on pristine vinyl through a world class sound system revealed things I never noticed before the experience was eliminating an often moving even when the needle skipped to bring some of that album worship here to studio. Three sixty were teaming up with CAS for a series of stories called this woman's work, highlighting classic albums by female artists. The title. You probably figured out borrows from the song by Kate. Bush an artist we hope to feature in this series. These records represent women musicians at the peak of their creative powers, and whose influences felt all over the musical map. And this first story focuses on one of the most significant albums of the American punk movement. One that fused rock with free form poetry and drew many into the artistic nexus of New York City in the mid nineteen seventies. Here's Colleen this is arguably one of the most arresting opening lines on a debut album. Jesus dad for somebody sends banana Matton it's deliver with unequivocal power. And for many is the first introduction to an artist who become one of the most important game changers of rock and roll amass Lee. Stew. Mrs my oh, Lee belonged to may. Number hearing this opening indictment when listening to the album for the first time in my teenage bedroom. It's through me into the nucleus of Patti Smith's thrilling and scary environs worlds away from my suburban hometown to the dirt the chaos and the raw energy of New York City, and it made me feel like I could do anything. In fact, I moved to the city of few short years later. Punk is built upon a DIY attitude and along with the stooges EMC five Patti Smith is considered by many to be one of punk rocks founding mothers her debut album, horses was released at the end of nineteen seventy five a full five months before the first Ramones album. But it Agneta the punk explosion more impersonal, easy, rather than musicality, the album's sprawling free form music and poetry was the until of the three minute three court sound for which punk would eventually become known as the Patti Smith group. Guitarist Lenny Kaye remembers especially at that time Peng had yet to harden into specific definition. It wasn't say the Ramones template that it would become miss. Mostly an attitude of wanting to assume some kind of responsibility for oneself and. And find your own way. Will return to the show in a moment. But first I want to remind you that you can keep up with what we're looking at and working on by following us on Twitter at studio three sixty show. And now back to our story as the sixties slipped into the seventies. New York City was experiencing an identity crisis and rock and roll was experiencing a spirituality crisis. There was a general cynicism toward hippie ideals and New York City in particular was more adept at celebrating the individual a cohesive cultural center had not yet replaced the unifying force field of the sixties counterculture movement. This was especially true with music is different. Experimental strains began to fan out and spire by other forward thinking late sixties New York acts like the velvet underground and the east village electric duo the silver apples. Around this time. Lenny Kaye was working in a record shop and doing some writing on the side. And he remembers there were few venues for local bounds in new acts to play. But then he saw poster for the New York dolls and welcomed it as a new chapter in the downtown music. Sing. With their flamboyant crossdressing and defiant posturing, the New York dolls set the stage for glam rock, a fusion of the edgy rock and roll of the stooges and the theatrical cabaret scene that was flourishing in Greenwich village's gay community a community galvanized by the stonewall uprising in nineteen sixty nine.

New York City Patti Smith Lenny Kaye New York LEE Peng Cosmo Murphy Pauline Twitter Kate Colleen Stew Bush Greenwich Village Three Minute Five Months
Susan Choi on her new novel, Trust Exercise

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

05:06 min | 2 years ago

Susan Choi on her new novel, Trust Exercise

"Choi her first novels. I read were American woman about a fictionalized Patty Hearst in person of interest about a campus bombing both of which were part of my reading prep for writing my own novel about late sixties radicals her new novel just out is trust exercise about teenagers, and trust and betrayal and Laurie lines between fiction in real life. I was eager to meet Susan Shaw and talk with her about the new book. And when she got studio three sixty more delighted than dismayed to learn that we'd already met on the phone twenty years ago when I was a New Yorker writer, and she was a New Yorker fact checker and to learn that we'd lived a couple blocks of part in Brooklyn for a decade. So the conversation started right off with a pretty neighbor Levi. So Susan the main characters in this novel are students at performing our school in the south in the nineteen eighty s why you attended the high school for the performing arts and visual arts in Houston in the nineteen eighties. So I'm assuming like these kids you two were in the theater department. I was and that the department this feels like a real Gotcha moment. Yes, I did attend at the at arts program when I was in high school and was your experience being this theater student at this performing arts high school. What was your feeling about it? I love going to a theater arts high school, I begged my parents to let me go to this school. They wanted me to go to a traditional academic school where I could have taken all of the AP's, and the foreign languages and actually prepared for college, which I didn't really do. Instead, I went to this theater arts school where I had really a wonderful time for the most part. So in that sense. It's very different from the characters. I'm writing about. So adolescence is intense under any construction, but coming of age being an end lesson going through birdie and being in a feeder program like perhaps your answer like your characters are in so the hormones, plus the voter. Ability, and the ego deconstruction I'd never thought of it as potentially dangerous, but it sounds potentially dangerous. Yeah. It does sound dangerous seems like it should be a legal. I think it's really worth noting that like it's such an intense time of life, which you don't obviously like none of us realize when we're going through that time of life. How intense it is. Right. You don't have the perspective. I it seems like one of the morals of this story is that we don't ever recover from being fifteen years old. I think no matter what sort of a fifteen you had you probably I don't I don't know if I'd say, you never recover. But I think that moment of life is a really really intense and powerful in defining one. I was done with the book by the time, the cavenaugh hearings riveted all of us last fall. But. I was really out of my head. Did you? Well, yeah. It was the sort of moment at which is a nation. We all work back there when back there and thought like, yeah. Wow. I was fifteen months do and it was a really important moment highly relevant now that you mentioned it to how fifty act it reminds you that you were such a different person at that moment if your life, but also that moment of life is so profound and affecting. So you read something. Yeah. So the first excerpt that I'll read is from early in the book, and it's early in the school year for two students at this school, Sarah and David they're both theater students who have been doing all sorts of different things, including trust exercises with their teacher, Mr. Kingsley, and they had a thing franchiser. And that thing hasn't been acknowledged yet. It hasn't been admitted, but it's going to be soon. Entrust exercises one day perhaps late in the fall. David and Sarah were never quite sure they would not speak of it. Until summer. Mr. Kingsley turned off all the lights in the windowless rehearsal room plunged them into a locked lightness vault at one end of the rectangular room was a raised platform stage thirty inches or so off the floor. Once the lights were turned off in the absolute silence. They heard Mr. Kingsley skimmed the length of the opposite wall and step onto the stage. The edge of which they faintly discerned from bits of luminescent tape that hovered in a broken line like a thin constellation. Long after there is adjusted they saw nothing, but this a darkness like that of the womb or the grave from the stage came his stern, quiet voice. Voiding them of all previous time, stripping them of all knowledge. They were blind. Newborn babes and must venture themselves through the darkness and see what they found immediately bodies encountered each other and startled away. He heard this

Mr. Kingsley Susan Shaw Patty Hearst Levi Choi Writer Sarah David Laurie Houston Brooklyn AP Fifteen Months Fifteen Years Thirty Inches One Day
"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

13:46 min | 2 years ago

"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"Three six. On this hour of studio. Three sixty we are looking at dance in a variety of forms. Elizabeth strep is a choreographer MacArthur genius and a defy of gravity. She's also the author of a book called how to become an extreme action hero. Nice. He's as soon as I read about her and her work. I really wanted to visit to see her and action and talk to her about this ongoing risky war with gravity, which I did at the big strep performance space in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Hey dancers. This is Kurt Andersen. This is all the dancers and Jesse know who's running around. Pay attention. When you're on an airplane in somebody's sitting next to what do you do for a living? What what is your simplest way of answering that question go on YouTube? I usually say just look up strengthen U2., and we say we smash into walls dive through glass and fall from thirty feet. So can you give me a taste of of extreme action? Hero dumb. Yes. I can take you into my my Gizmo, whizzing Gizmo, it'll go faster than you can keep up with it. And once it crosses that line. There's nothing you can do struggle. Raj is full of all kinds of gravity defying contraptions. One is kind of beautiful giant yellow hamster wheel that spins around propelled by the dancers were inside. It. Do you feel cable? Okay. We show him. How? Describing with your hands. One of the dancers helped me climb inside. Like to put my foot on the axle, that's it. The key is not to be afraid. I'm letting go just keep putting one foot in front of the other. I never would've thought that just putting one foot in front of the other could be action heroism, but with thirty feet to fall on either side of me, it's all about putting one foot in front of the other part. This is where you go appeal you, okay? Kurt that's been tastic when I was running in her giant revolving hamster, wait, great, Kurt. I really started to feel like a kid again. Like when I'd climb on my parents rooftop or the first time, I jumped off the high diving board into the swimming pool thrilled and scared at the same time what's going to happen on the way down both of us have to break down because the weight the board you have to push back after getting off and finding my feet again. Two of us went looking for a quieter place. Talk Kim, could you still over here? Elizabeth is striking looking she she dresses all in black. She has short dark spiky hair, and she's very skinny and wears these cool yellow glasses. She's like a tough punk. But she has this childlike curiosity. I didn't take dance classes 'til I was seventeen my father who I was adopted very. A young, and he excuse me was an extreme sports enthusiasts like, but hunting and fishing and bowling. And he would take me hunting for ten hours up up in Rochester, New York, but our cottage was in pointed slow the northern shore of Lake Ontario. And so I learned endurance with him. And I learned you know, how to go on the job with him build and how to carry water for him for many hours. And I think that a lot of my information about how much is enough came from my early training with this very working class Mason, he didn't treat you like the conventional little girl. No, he didn't treat me like a little girl at all. And you know, that's question about how many genders are there. And I think as our society advances were getting to understand that there are more than two. I mean, this is completely politically incorrect. But I wanted to play Cowboys and Indians. And I want to be the one with a double holsters I did not play dolls. I got a motorcycle at fifteen and I had my own boat. I went fishing on my own. Own with a a friend made tree houses on my own, and that kind of thing so physical risk and physical robustness were sort of second nature. I was I was curious about it almost in a formal way oddly enough. Although I knew nothing about experimental dance. When I was growing up in Rochester. But I think it felt like that same kind of examination of warm was there any arts in the conventional sense in your in your childhood. Not in my family. They didn't have reliever many books. They read the Reader's Digest. I did have an early talent. As an artist I could draw and my mother took me to the memorial art gallery every week from eight to thirteen just so I could train artist. And they were she was very supportive of my interest in creativity. So you were drawing in in a in a in a and being trained to draw and riding motorcycles and building tree houses kinda pretty much. What you do today? It's exactly the same. It really is exactly the same. I read in your book that when you were kid about eleven you you burn down your uncle's barn. It was my father and my uncles bone had that happen. Happen. I was playing with matches in the hey with a friend to see how big the fire could get before. Like how far could the fire go before? I would be able to put it out, and it probably made about twenty five or thirty small fires each one being put out after I lit in this one episode. Yes, I wasn't planning to. I mean planted went about. Maybe when I mean, not really, but they knew that I had a problem with matches. And what do you think it is about that that I did? And I and I did things like spread my mother's perfume on her dressers to watch like in a wall of flame across the dresser damage. I mean, this is like jealous making because we went away for you know, to go down the beach for a picnic, and when I came back about a half hour later because I forgot my fork or something the entire burn in flames. So big trouble. I I got in, you know, a lot of trouble, but not not legal trouble. The police did interview me, and they were going to send me to juvenile court. But they did not. And it was mostly my father had lot. He'd said take all the matches out of your pocket before we go the Marin, and as I don't have a line to him and in the working class world. That's, you know, an no so his silence was enough to punish me. Really? I couldn't go to. It was a one summer. I was going to go to camp. And I didn't go to camp that was my punishment. So you had your own camp going on? And then all at once did you have this vision of this kind of choreography movement thing. No, not at the not at that time. I I mostly trained as a Cunningham dancer, and in the middle of some of the performances, I would do with my cohorts. I would think what is fourth position mean why doing around germ, why am I in relevant with pasta? And I started to feel as if I was lying. And so I just made a list of everything I would never do again, never doing and say don't steps Lee and started to decide that real movement had to be causal and utilitarian so I picked up objects right away. But it was a really slow journey from my first full evening show, nineteen Eighty-one to now it wasn't a Eureka moment where you said I'm going to do this from now on no I was really more like a pebble pusher like an ant eater with its nose in the dirt pushiness low pebble to the next spot. You talk in the book. About making a real move. What what what does that mean? Well, I still struggle with it because I'm not sure I'm seeking that. It's sort of my holy grail. But I know it when I see it. I know that a real move is something you get hurt trying to stop. I know that a real move is something that you can't make a volition decision about. Once you're in the middle of it falling is a really good example of real move. Because of the fact that, you know, once you let go there's really nothing you can do to amend it until you're you're crashed one of the things you do. The your action ears dancers doing. This performance is go on increasingly to increasingly greater heights, and and essentially fall forwards or backwards onto not that soft looking at from ten twenty thirty feet. Maybe eventually we think we can go even higher than thirty feet. Could it be forty probably? And could it be fifty? I mean, we're thinking of jumping off the ru. Out here. But then the question is probably is a distance that would be too far to fall on one foot. Matt and Mike curiosity is how close can we come to that? What is the experience? What is is? What is the pleasure in letting gravity habits way with you? When you falling that, you feel us on sation, that's indescribable. And I don't think we have cab Larry for it yet. It feels as if you have been let. It feels as if you have been released from the confines of this earth. It feels as if really in terms of superhero, nothing you can't do, you know, when you walk around the next day, you feel you know, I fell from thirty feet. What what have you done? Do you ever think about superhero is? And what superpowers you would wish to have? Yeah. I mean, that's certainly would like to fly but not without the hard hits. Unlike I like the flight, but I also like the failure of flight, I like the drama of crashes, and I love the rhythms that they provoke in both meat and people who witnessed him. And what what that means to them? What it reminds him of? What wa I mean, if I could fly as I of course, have in my dreams, many times I land beautiful in softly. And whereas you you would like to like. Feel the impact of what why is that? I wanna feel everything human has ever fell in terms of physical intensities. On a richer skill. That's off the chart before I die. I wanna know who has felt the most intense physical feeling the there's some way I guess no measure to quantify that. But my my obsession is could I handle that degree of physical intensity? And if I could I mean, my notion of my last moment on earth would be that. I've I'm so used up that Atlanta last breath. I just burst into dos that that would be responsible and reasonable way to exit the earth that I can along be physical because nothing holds together anymore. And I think that falling has beautiful metaphor to figure out. There's a moment at which you would have gone to high, and you would have landed too hard for the physical body to be able to survive. A obviously I wanna come back from that edge and do it again, and again, and I want my dances too as well. But I think to put on at the. Patrick physical event that question has to be poked at a little bit. And it has done some level be answered these young recently former dancers how how do their fellow traditional dancers regard? What they do. Are. They is that difficult. I hear every so often I mean, even critic will say that's not dance, you know, they're violent. She's a massive. She say it is sometimes I will hear things like that. But I think the dancers agreed ambassadors for a new way to approach what physicality and the presentation of the drama of action might end up being ten or twenty years, and I might be wrong. I could be wrong. These ideas might not work. But if they work then I think we'll have a whole new field that could be action hard. Sometimes I think would if dances something you wanna do not watch. And would if that's why modern dances having such a difficult time. It's not just a spectator event. It is not. No, I. Don't believe it is. Thank you very much. Festival. Hang on everybody. He's off. Jackie hang on right on hung out. With Elizabeth scrub in two thousand ten and you can see video of a bit of my attempt at extreme action heroism studio three sixty dot org. And if you think you're more heroic than I am which is a very low bar bit. Streps company is holding open on dishes on January twenty ninth and thirtieth at the strep blab for action mechanics in Brooklyn coming up. Who's with credible boy in costumes for three inch nails flashy smile? A warm Hosie crews got the world today. Twos. Energy master seeing would sing in the whole vibration. The room would just be raised. The

Elizabeth Rochester Brooklyn Kurt Kurt Andersen Gizmo YouTube Jesse U2. MacArthur Williamsburg swimming Lake Ontario Cowboys Raj Kim Mason Hosie Jackie
"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"And this is wanted to know you didn't hear the exact record version because actually was singing along with. No, I love that. It's a special special version in your Berge of once in a lifetime. What additions? Did you do? There were their new lyrics like what what what what's new there that we can hear bread. Some African lyrics to it already to bring a song that is talking about a rhythm called Palo in my country where we dense together. And I said he'll come in Miami. Y lo why wa wa wa wa wa wa by Longo blackbutt owned noon, though, we had greeting you the rhythm of by Longo guy. I'm you know, guy MSN, I'm you know, gonna miss saying. I'm you to John Neidl as the my time this time that I'll I was blown to span on this earth is a given time by the almighty when my time comes. Leave when yours come you. Leave you decide that now is the time in two thousand seventeen thousand eighteen you're going to you're going to do this. Because why what what was it about this album that made you decide to do this? I listened to it back not long ago because I wake up in a couple of days in a row going. This song. Is it gonna leave me alone? One day. It's gonna be coming. I didn't know the lyrics of that. And I'm not what is that by the witness talking to friends, but this is talking at all of them. But I listen to it. But what is it about? So I listened back to it. And then he eats me by listen to it back with all the thing that I've I've been traveling around the world. Listen to the words and emanate. Ooh, this is profound it what you understand those lyrics. They are absurd as they're not really because they are. They're they're easy to understand are a little extremely poetic and almost kind of nonsensical. As it has immense estimate. Emit sense. Everything makes sense to me. Now did you by that time? You surely knew that that Brian had been influenced by west African. I knew I knew I mean, I made researching out a new there are people back in the eighties. Still no doubt even more. Perhaps. Now, the the phrase cultural appropriation exists who says oh, David Byrne. Brian how you stole this music from west Africa. I take it. You don't buy that. As a problem. I don't buy that. Because when Adam was released a mid clear in the press release. What is relation comes from the acknowledge, right? It's not identified about body wasn't like Elvis. At Elvis the songs what he's nam on it got himself rock and roll 'em in. That is not even culture appropriation is face wiping swiping is stealing from people this was respectful in and expressive as long as you are Nola JR. In recognize where that inspiration come from. I don't call it cultural appropriation, a call it cultural expansion, so the the west African influence on the record is that what attracted you to to this album, and and inspired the project remaking, the me, doesn't it was not the most important thing for me. It was the era when the album was released was important because what I feel sometime I mean, I feel the urge of moving, but also I feel a lot of anxiety, and it's just like talking heads. It's put you not comfortably sit-in, and it just like e-, it makes you think. It makes you question. Why am I feeling this fun and then mid researchers realized that that album particularly have been written in the era of Reagan. When Reagan was rigid a war against drug drug, all it also against social safety net for every American mental disease center. Disappear. The thing though, that you see this album and answer that matter as as as making political music because certainly at the time, they weren't that wasn't regarded as what they were doing. I mean hers the clash making political music not talking heads, right? Yeah. But that's what that's what I felt. I hear you. That's what I felt. And listen back today, it becomes a little bit more even relevant because this anxiety. Everybody's living. In is not only adults that I live in the children also fill in it..

Reagan Elvis Longo blackbutt Nola JR Brian Palo John Neidl David Byrne MSN Miami west Africa Adam One day
"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"Awesome. Alexander Lang's new book, the design of childhood is out now. So it's owners and Tommy bizarre, Ian produce that story. And that is it for this. But before we go, there's a very good new movie out called can you ever forgive me? It stars Melissa McCarthy as Lee Israel, not very successful writer, a real person who found a new midlife career as a literary con-artists online. Here was particularly clever. Don't you think it's wonderful. I love his writing and Dorothy Parker's. Well, caustic wit classic. What is my religion? The movie made me wanna revisit my conversation with the real Li Israel. She died in two thousand fourteen I talked to her in two thousand eight and you can listen to that conversation from our podcast feed. Wherever you get podcasts. Studio three sixty is a production of PRI public radio international in association with slate. Our executive producer is Jocelyn Gonzales. Our senior editor is into Adam Newman our. Our sound engineer. Sandra Lopez Saturday. Our producers are Evan Chung. Lauren hanson? Sam Kim Zoe Saunders. Tommy bazaar area. Our production assistant is more again, Flannery. And I am Kurt Andersen thinks and good morning or good afternoon or good night's stalls. Good night air could night noises everywhere. Our public radio international next time on studio. Three sixty. Let's go the searchers is widely considered to be one of the greatest films ever made. But I took my wife to see this movie. All she could say, this is the most racist movie overseen to watch this John Ford's problematic masterpiece, the searchers a new installment in our American icon series next time on studio three sixty.

Ian Tommy bizarre Evan Chung Alexander Lang Sam Kim Zoe Saunders Li Israel Tommy bazaar Dorothy Parker Melissa McCarthy Kurt Andersen Jocelyn Gonzales Sandra Lopez Lauren hanson production assistant Lee Israel John Ford Adam Newman senior editor executive producer engineer
"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

04:12 min | 3 years ago

"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"Thank you. Thank you. It's okay. Mentally unsound. That was in Manchester by the Casey Affleck and Lucas hedges and playing this random nosy jerk. Excuse me, if you saw somebody telling his nephew gonna knock his block up in the street. I think it would take some nerve to step in it would I wouldn't do it. And that was played by you. Yes. Yes. You do that Hitchcock thing. You put yourself in all your movies. Well, I he he was more modest he put himself in movies and strict cameos, you never said a word, and he was usually just he was just a an extra who you noticed most genius in lifeboat where he couldn't appear he appeared in an advertisement in the newspaper famously. No, I've actually had that's actually my smallest role in my three films. I've directed ahead real parts and the other two, but I can see why you would have cast yourself. I mean, seriously like, it's fun. Yeah. If it's a part that I can do it's fun for me to do. And I'm the only one who wants to cast me. So and your writing and filmmaking is highly brilliantly delightfully realistic was that an aesthetic choice starting out or just how you did. What you did? It wasn't aesthetic choice. It was also a, you know, even though I like to write broader stuff and have written more comedic stuff, I certainly gravitate towards what I like to go all tra- naturalism which. Because I I really feel like it gets short shrift in a lot of films and theatre talking to a doctor about anything serious is quite dramatic in a very unpleasant way having your accountant or. Your wife or a husband tell you. You're running out of money is a very stressful conversation watching your kid go into the playground for the first time as can be quite stressful. So I think there's just a lot of drama in real life that get skipped over a lot in in some films and theatre and television, and in any case, whether it's over not that's why often like to go to find the stories that I like to write about as you're writing dialogue. Do you have rules one rule that I have is if it sounds too colorful and interesting, it's probably not too good. I don't like to write dialogue. That sounds good for its own sake or have people speak in ways that they wouldn't otherwise speak. Try to be try to be guided by the way, people really talking. I'm very interested in the way, people speak, and I try very hard to have each character have his own way of speaking. That's not so easy to do since. I'm only one person, but I try and I need to have a really vivid idea of who the person is before. I can write anything really. And if I don't have a very vivid idea for the person as I don't know how they speak, and I have trouble imagining them doing anything. So I'll have to fish around for for a better idea for the character is well, and in theater, especially there are many serious and acclaimed writers who do work that is more self conscious. Stylized postmodern meta do you ever do enjoy some of that work? Absolutely. I love I like all kinds of theatre all kinds of films. There's a distinction between what you liked to watch. And what you can do. I love good action movies. I don't think I could write one I like spy thrillers. I don't think I could write one, you know, there's just a lot. I like that. I can't do or that. I wouldn't do as well as somebody else. There is a lot of overlapping dialogue in your work. Like in that Manchester by the clip we heard also in Waverly gallery, I just like overlapping dial, it's a lot of fun to write. I love the way. It sounds sometime. I feel like it can get to the point where it doesn't really mimic. Real life enough. People tend to when people are trying to talk at the same time. Someone usually gains the floor and everyone else shuts up for a few minutes, but not always especially families. I noticed tend to keep talking over each other even though no one's listening. Mine certainly does and someone like Patti chaffs Q streaming naturalistic writer a lot of his television writing is so naturalistic Marty Marty and all of his television plays and wonderful play wrote called middle of the night. With us..

Manchester Casey Affleck Marty Marty Lucas hedges Hitchcock Patti chaffs accountant writer
"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"And that's it for this episode studio, three sixty. But before I go, I do want to remind you to follow the show on Twitter where you can find us studio. Three sixty show. I'm at b Anderson. That's Anderson with an e and please tweet at us. Studio. Three sixty is a production of PRI public radio international. The signal was nice and crispy, an association with. Are executive producer is Jocelyn Gonzales. Our senior editor is into Adam Newman. Our sound engineer is best ones have it. Our producers are Evan Chung, Lauren Hanson, sham, Kim Zoe. Saunders Tommy bazaar, Ian, our production assistant is Morgan Flannery and I am Kurt Andersen. First time I signed on this phone crazy. It was like, wow, you know, I'm on the. The night called friends tune in daylight. Wow. Italian, Tony, how to how to radio. Thank you very much for listening. Our public radio international next time on studio three sixty. Over sixty year career. Harlan Ellison wrote countless. I find fantasy short stories. Novel TV shows comic books, movies, a huge output. If I were a plumber and you said, how many toilets have you fixed? And I said, ten thousand, you wouldn't say, boy, what? A prolific Plummer supposed to a writer, the late Harlan Ellison next time on studio three sixteen.

Harlan Ellison b Anderson Evan Chung Twitter Jocelyn Gonzales Tommy bazaar Adam Newman Kurt Andersen senior editor executive producer production assistant Morgan Flannery Plummer engineer Kim Zoe Lauren Hanson writer Ian sixty year
"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"And that's it up sodas to three sixty. Our show is a production of PRI public radio international in association with slate. Our executive producer is Jocelyn Gonzales. Our senior editor is into Adam Newman. Our sound engineer, Santa Lopez of our producers are Evan Lauren Hanson, Sam, Kim Saunders, Tommy bizarre area. Our production assistant is Morgan Flannery, and I am Kurt Andersen, our baby boomers, a generation of sociopath. Thanks for listening. Our public radio international years ago, I was very famous actress. Next time on studio three sixty that gave me the experience to write this book about fame and why we seek it just seem Bateman on being in the side and outside the fame how out of control that seeking has become next time on studio, three sixty.

Evan Lauren Hanson Jocelyn Gonzales Kurt Andersen Morgan Flannery production assistant Adam Newman Kim Saunders senior editor Santa Lopez executive producer Bateman engineer Sam
"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"WNYC's Sarah fish, go. You can see videos of one of those young people's concerts on our websites to three sixty dot org are American icon series is supported by the National Endowment for humanity. And that's it for this episode. Three sixty production of PRI public radio international in association with slate. Our executive producer is name, Jocelyn Gonzales. Our senior editor is Andrew. Adam Newman. Our show this week was mixed. Once again by Whitney Jones. Our producers are Evan Chon, Lauren Hanson, Sam, Kim Saunders. Tommy our production assistant is Morgan Flannery, and I am Kurt Andersen. He's tried a number of pathways. None of them have satisfied him. Some of them have been pretty disastrous. Thank you very much for listening. Our public radio international. Next time on studio three sixty in the nineteen seventies some nobody composer wrote a generic song, hoping that somebody would find a use for it someday five years later, a new TV show picnic. The mysterious world of stock music libraries and how library music from the vinyl era became hot among record collectors. Next time on studio, three sixty.

Evan Chon Kurt Andersen WNYC National Endowment Whitney Jones Jocelyn Gonzales Sarah fish Adam Newman executive producer Morgan Flannery senior editor production assistant Kim Saunders Tommy Lauren Hanson Andrew Sam five years
"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"Garden itself and in the orchard blow at three hundred fifty varieties of vegetables and one hundred seventy of fruit and one wonders if any man before had grown so many different kinds of vegetables in one place before thomas jefferson here much cello seventeen ninety four objects for the garden this year snap cabbage cauliflower broccoli turnips thomas jefferson's garden book indian potato incredibly meticulous record of his gardens that he kept for almost sixty years partially spinach station sorrel where would the florida around the house let's look sure foamy walking around monticello is complicated the novelist jamaica can kate has written extensively about gardens and gardening on the one hand i completely and this this sound very peculiar i do identify with him in the way identify with writers on the other hand so much of his life would have involved a great deal of cruelty directed at someone who looks like me let us carla cubbage on those curled like started cucumbers squashes result here to pump the gaden hook has details of the things he planted food he planted but they it looks as if it just forward magically at the table so he'll say peas were planted sixth come to six weeks later ps appear at the table there is no involvement of labor there's no soiling of there's no soil at all it's as if it's eight it doesn't have any evil in it role of the negroes taken in seventeen eighty three the femme book on the other hand is all evil betty hemmings martin born seventeen fifty five bob seven hundred sixty the farm book is very much like the garden book a scrupulous record of jefferson's life at monticello august but instead of the plants and vegetables he keeps he lists the human beings he owns solly seventeen seventy three johnny april twenty four hundred seventy six daniel seventy seventy two molly walking down what jefferson called mulberry row it's lined with mulberry trees unlike the historian to spend their days in utterly charming worlds of jefferson's book collection and vegetable gardens cinder stanton has focused on.

thomas jefferson florida monticello jamaica betty hemmings kate carla cubbage sixty years six weeks one hand
"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

03:22 min | 3 years ago

"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"Mean there are things that now nobody thinks about but then i didn't know i didn't try to make a family thing it did and that was the perverseness of it that families were watching divine now and not caring that it was a man dressed as a woman and a woman that no drag queen would ever to allow himself to look like you have as i mentioned at the beginning exhibit of your work opening at the new museum of a further embrace of by the establishment of john waters tell me about the show while it's called change of life marvin hide from curator's are great title i think since i've i've been involved in the art world for hours of collector but certainly for the last since about nineteen ninety started taking these pictures off the tv screen for myself about stills to create stills from movies that there was no such still it went from that to taking images from different movies than putting them like an storyboards into a new narrative to tell a new movie with other people's images which is what i'm doing anybody can take pictures off the tv screen but this really is about editing and writing and humor certainly putting it together so that's how it all began but they're also from the look of the work which i've only seen in the catalog are really beautiful you know montages thank you and i mean one expects a lot from john waters as work but not necessarily beauty in some row conventional sense well beauty is a word that you know i did a piece called julia that it's a shot of julia roberts a shot of mr sardonicus you know with a strange mouth and i got the idea because i've read an interview with julia roberts she said i look at a picture of myself i don't think i'm beautiful looks like have a coat hanger in my mouth and if you look at a picture julia roberts would not have been following his beautiful in the twenties or thirties and you look at a picture of greta garbo today kids don't understand why people thought she was beautiful what is beautiful always changes i thought divine was beautiful i felt divine beauty to me is confidence and having confidence in style you can be ugly and be beautiful certainly it's about how you pull it off you just have to exaggerate your shortcomings and it can become a style you have to believe in yourself if you think you're sexy somebody else will your exhibited the new museum also includes films of yours that have really never been seen well because they're they're being shown in an art context kind of like a video art in a room these are the earliest films i made that have only been shown once in a beatnik coffee house in baltimore or in a church basement which where we went to the sensors would come to us now you can look at these films today they would never be censored but certainly you can see i lived in my parents house there were filmed in my bedroom divine is in the mary vivian pearce mic stole when we were teenagers but you can see that some of the very ideas that i still use today were in these films catholocism stuff the the borrowing the preparation of other images it's always been something that i have used one of them eat your makeup we have the whole kennedy fascination were divine place jackie the reenactment and it was two years after it really happened so people really figure it was funny and they called this one festival called the not even the police they went worth called the journal revenue so i couldn't charge admission in the church that's a new kind of censorship ruderman calling the pulley very interestingly effectual kind of sense yes it was we passed the.

two years
"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

03:59 min | 3 years ago

"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"For twenty five years john waters has also been creating art based on still photographs and exhibit of which was shown at the new museum in new york in the early two thousands when he dropped by studio three sixty back then i asked him if there was a moment in his childhood when he i knew that he wanted to make movies well i think ours an outsider i i didn't have much choice about that i remember you know kids sit at the top of the steps and listen to their parents talk and i heard my mother said he's just an odd duck and i thought oh that's it okay great now i know you know that's my job in life to be an odd duck so i tried to fulfil that that wasn't a horrible moment when you heard your mother say that no not at all i was glad she recognized it because i never was interested in what the other kids are interested in but i didn't bother me really i mean i wasn't hassled in school really because they thought i was nuts if they think you're not it's a great protection in a way there were scared of you little bit a little bit scared and if you can make the m laugh see i was always against authority though so the bullies didn't wanna beat me up because i could say rude things and were you a big watcher of television and a and a and a patron of the movie theater would did you soak in that media culture very much so i was on the howdy doody show and personally saw clara belle person which i've never gotten over the psychotic clowns escorting people with seltzer water and flooded dubs great fashion sense i i never got over howdy doody i'm here today because of the holidays so i made senior as a little boy watching howdy doody from omaha may have seen you in the audience you might have and it was that really that must have been an exciting moment to see real national television being made for i think too many of the kids it was very much of a disillusion because you came in and you saw there was this tiny little stays reform howdy doody puppets it was a complete completely fake but that was a great wonderful thing to me that i realized it's all a lie and i want to be involved in this i want to be in this magic trick the for sort of what i wanna do forever so i became a puppeteer for children's birthday parties had quite a career when i was twelve years old what were your public characters well they were punching judy because i could have violence and an cinderella i had the two thing but the end i would come out with was hand puppets not a string puppets come out with the dragon puppet and say which is violating all puppeteers come out beyond the stage when the kids see you and i'd say that if the puppet bit your hand to have good luck with third of the kids would start crying and flipping out and the other one's loved it and that's still what i do so you were sort of a postmodern puppeteer well i certainly wouldn't have used the wars at the time i would try to have some showmanship in my shows a lot of the characters in your films are from variously fringy corners of society despised and otherwise but again and again even in your earliest movies you sort of get audiences to love them despite their outsider status in pink flamingos i think if you make you make this hero out of three hundred fifty pound transvestite in fact let's listen to divine from that film vowing to be the filthiest person alive which is one of her ambitions you are no longer the filthiest personal live they are nope is people schefter and they've been liberated attempt to feed my title these are obviously jealous people jealous of our career all of our why else would they find that the filthiest people are everyone knows tightly become my trademark wanted to use it in this way only to insinuate that they're not how could anyone seriously believe that how could everyone be here then to buy the late divine wh what was lovable about that character well this pink flamingos was certainly made at.

john waters three hundred fifty pound twenty five years twelve years
"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

04:55 min | 3 years ago

"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"This hour of studio three sixty we are digging up dirt and reveling in it for instance a few years ago there was an exhibition in new york called swept away at the museum of arts and design every work in the show was entirely made of dirt or dust or trash or pollution smuts we asked henry offered to check it out and he brought along buddy the biggest slob he knows the show that we're about to see is dedicated to quote stuff we leave behind or deem unclean or strive to remove or discard or disguise or hide am i am i making you nervous no no this is like my apartment just makes sense to me that's dave hill he's a writer and comedian who's been on hbo and cinemax and this american life he lives in a pigsty my apartment yeah is is it's not like oscar madison gross actually it's way worse than oscar madison a while back dave had an infestation of moths he bombed the apartment but then didn't bother to clean up after the bombing worse a few months later he had a nasty surprise when he pulled out an oriental rug he'd stowed under his bed the oriental rug was like sort of bubbling like its own ecosystem of like larva and mas in various states of cocoon array or something and i had to take a good hard look myself after that we went upstairs to the exhibition the first piece we looked out was a hazelton sculpture in which the artist had smushed a dust covered cleaning cloth into the shape of a human skull looks really feel like he had a real skull to work with that's what frightens me about it oh that he pressed the cleaning cloth against a real skull to get the shape rate yeah or had one like in the one hand and he was like wait i didn't get that weird knows thing that happens with skulls right give you nailed it mentioning just found this near closet only didn't make it on purpose you'd have to move next we looked at something called a soil ma'am so here's an eight foot by ten foot plastic tray filled with fifteen years worth of soil samples taken from all five boroughs of new york city i was gonna guess what this was dave was unfazed by the cubic yards of dirt before him i guess it goes not saying everything's covered in here this is the theory that i came up with my spare time and then one night i met a guy some sort of epa deniau logist like a public health person so i said tell me if i'm right is everything covered and semen to pieces and he's basically so is that good this is what i've been saying since the eighties no one is safe you can't run from it basically well i wanna rents i need i need to at blue you can't what's that mean ablutions i need to make my ablation 's ablutions is that french how do you spell that we looked at a series of wooden sculptures of crows olive which had been burned to charcoal what's interesting is a at smells right you can smell the fires and some of the charcoal's gotten up on the walls and it's smeared yeah this might be my favorite it did i i set my apartment on fire recently i don't cook that often but when i do i really hit it out of the park when we stood in front of a quilt made from dryer lint he'll got to talking about how it's sometimes easier just to buy new underwear rather than washing old pair but that sometimes in his haste he absent mindedly buys underwear that's not the right size i wear the underwear that's too big and greats emmy and that's what's going on with me right now and can't but can't you just cinch up the waistband i you can cinch all day but it's never going to solve the problem i mean look at it it's a mess you can see yeah that's right there are little pictures of crabs on the underwear that kind of sends a message yeah yeah know who you're dealing with toward the end of the exhibition dave started to reflect on what he'd learned from the show i realized that these things is that there's beauty in the.

new york museum of arts fifteen years eight foot one hand ten foot
"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

04:54 min | 3 years ago

"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"Female centric comic to face criticism take the often mocked comic strip kathy can't believe they put what you said to pay this is a cathy cartoon cartoon copied exactly what you said do you have a day shock let chocolate chocolate there's always been a certain percentage of people who hated my work i'm kathy geiss white for thirty four years i wrote injury the kathy comic strip that ran in newspapers all over the place kathy guys wife also grew up reading nancy i certainly liked that you know it was a comic strip that had a girl's name was it was simple and sweet but nancy was kind of bossy and kind of trickster and add like that when kathy the comic strip launch to nineteen seventy six there is nothing in the funny pages that was drawn by a woman and reflected real women's concerns like office gender politics and the anxiety of buying swimwear especially in the beginning the comic strip syndicate had a hard time i think convincing the newspaper editors that my strip belonged even though at least half the people who are reading the newspapers where women it was a tough sell to sell us trip that was so different and that was so female focused yes guys white stuck to the kind of subject matter she wanted to portray and kathy came one of the most widely syndicated comic strips in the country but unlike kathy olivia james doesn't have to start from scratch she's taking over an existing strip with nancy my god she has such a harder job to have to exactly mimic the style of somebody and put an entirely new twist on it while keeping kind of the same rhythm i think it's just an unbelievably challenging job am i think she's doing a great job if you have a livia number teller to call me i couldn't i couldn't help cheer her on i think the ways in which i'm going to try and keep the spirit of manziel live are in the cleanness of the jokes the simple ness of the lines the problem solving aspect the things i i love but there's some things that you just can't translate one example is like nancy is always solving problems in ways that like we just wouldn't do nowadays good chunk of the problem she solving classic nancy we just use our phones for honestly i wouldn't be surprised if nancy learns to program computer because that's how we still have problems is through technology you make me feel like i just got a notification that somebody liked to post a mind you make me feel like i just got a notification that somebody left a comment and shed might post i love the strip so much that i i want to bring it to a new generation and i want to translate it into terms they can understand fewer jokes about slugger being poor cat guys white has one piece of very nancy escott vice for lydia james she's got a giant job she should buy lots of ice cream that's my advice what you're gonna do today adorable way evan chung produce that story nancy and slug o or played by mary wilson and mike pesca you can hear mike in his regular job on his daily podcast the gist where mary is these producer and on his new podcast upon further review hope i can get slow go to saul are would today hello slug oh did you see that would in the yard oh yes you did i saw you see it well maybe a saw me see it by yang gonna see me and that is it for this week show studio three sixty is a production of pri public radio international in association with slate our executive producer is jocelyn gonzales senior editor is into our show this week was mixed by whitney jones our producers are evan chump lauren hanson sham kim saunders tommy our production assistant is morgan flannery i am kurt andersen is apparently an orphan yet lives in his own home which is in seriously dilapidated condition thank you very much for listening our public radio international next time on studio three sixty when even john waters can't go any lower i mean i never tried the pop pick i knew that i want margarine crown of filth and our filth in its many forms next time on studio three sixty

thirty four years
"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"Around don't compute safe safe safe he called out the drug dealers he called out the users and then he gave us visual check it out yo mtv rats looses hall and i'm going to show you what happens to families one of them members becomes abassid faces i for the curve people like to turn a blind eye to the ugliness that happens out here and he shined a light on it is my obligation and duty to use the medium that reaches out to the people that bring a certain point issue talk to the back up for discussion and that's what we did in british we wanna me on given the same tampa am felt occurred to me the people weren't talking about this type stuff on this level you know remember we're post civil rights generation chuck d reinvigorated the movement see we were languishing things still weren't right in our community but we had no voice we weren't organized chuck d's singlehandedly raise our consciousness and made us aware that the things that we were seeing and feeling we're real i never live i never my phone but i've been doing president.

tampa president mtv chuck d
"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"That. You can hear longer version of that conversation on our podcast screen which you on a subscriber to where ever you get your podcasts. Candyman, sir. Men stop. You're both right news thirties to men in. Hand that is it for this week show. Before we go. I just want to remind you to follow the show on Facebook and Twitter. You can also tell us at either place what you think studio, three sixty as our listeners. Daniel chard and Stefan DWI recently. Danielle like our mother's day show, I was removing and scraping wallpaper from bathroom, and your show made the ordeal much more bearable and Stefan as he prepared to listen to our show featuring the Muppets Angelique kid Joe's talking heads cover, said, I listen to studio three sixty while ironing my shirts. I haven't been this excited about doing laundry and a long time. Thanks, Stephanie. Daniel clad we could provide the soundtrack for your drudgery. Studio. Three sixty is a production of PRI public radio international association with slate. Our executive producer is Jocelyn Gonzales. Our senior editor is into Adam Newman. Our show this week was mixed by Whitney Jones. Our producers are Evan chum, Lauren Hanson, sham, Kim Saunders. Tommy vizier. Our production assistant is Morgan Flannery, and I am Kurt Andersen, even his vocal styles, a so different. He has at least six different voices uses. Thank you very much for listening. Public radio international next time on studio, three sixty he coming flirty was a really difficult transition for me. The writer, Lauren gras on the strange creative seduction of her adopted state. I still even now twelve years later, wake up thinking, oh my gosh, this is my life. I live in Florida. When life gives your Inge's make orange juice art about the sunshine state next time on studio, three sixty.

Daniel chard Kurt Andersen Lauren gras Stefan Morgan Flannery Evan chum Tommy vizier Whitney Jones Jocelyn Gonzales Facebook Florida production assistant Twitter Stephanie senior editor Adam Newman executive producer Danielle Lauren Hanson writer
"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

05:01 min | 3 years ago

"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"You. Jim Lin Yang is the author of boxers and saints and American born Chinese. You can see some of his work at studio, three sixty dot org. I talked to gene for years ago and a couple of years after that. He was named a MacArthur genius and became the library of Congress's national ambassador for young people's literature, which made me want to check back in with him. Hello? Hello, Jean, this is Kurt Andersen. Hi, Kurt, how you doing? I'm great and more to the point. Congratulations. Thank you. Thank you so much. I'm really excited. So what is, what is this ambassadorship entail? Besides I dunno, ribbon cuttings at bookstores and libraries or something. Well, then national ambassador for young people's literature, as opposed that was started in two thousand eight. So it's not very old, and the whole point is to get more kids reading and to get kids reading more so. So Mr. ambassador, how will you do this? How will you encourage young Americans to read more? I really wanted courage kids to explore the world through reading and a want them to explore and three very specific ways. Number one, I want them to explore the lives of people who are different from them. So I want them to pick books that have people on the cover that don't look or live like them to. I want them to pick subject matters books about subjects that they might find intimidating. And my pet project here is to get more kids reading. Stem about science, technology, engineering, engineering, and math. And then Finally, I want them to pick books in unfamiliar formats. Nowadays, there's a huge diversity of formats out there. So they're graphic novels and prose novels and novels and verse in hybrid novels. I want kids try all those different formats and do ten. Have you taken your own advice? Do you? Do you say, oh, well, the these people are not like me, and I'm intimidated by this, but by God, I'm gonna read it. Absolutely. You know, I grew up not liking sports at all mostly because I was terrible at it. You know, especially basketball. Every time I play basketball, the ball would have find some way of hitting me in the head. Well, I eventually got interested in basketball just recently, really and books played a huge part. I started by reading this book called outside the paint, which was about the basketball scene in San Francisco, Chinatown in the nineteen thirties and forties. I had no idea that was even basketball scene in Chinatown in the thirties and forties. It was an amazing book and that led to me reading a whole bunch of other books. About basketball and getting really interested. And in addition to becoming the this national ambassador for young people's literature, you I understand have been, I guess, to continue the basketball idea called up to the NBA that is got a call from DC comics. I have said that before. I've told people that working for DC comics as a bit like working for the. Yeah, it's been a lot of fun. It's been kind of like the the twelve year old inside amuse freaking out. I can imagine the the last time we spoke, you were working as a high school administrator, and you said then that you could not imagine leaving education completely because you're so passionate about it, but you've left education. I did. I left because of superman. When when DC offered me the superman, I just couldn't fit it into my schedule and it was so hard. It was. It felt like it was breaking up with somebody ended up losing sleep for a couple of nights. I lost my appetite. It was crazy, but, but you know, I, I feel like selfishly, at least this ambassadorship is kind of a blessing for me because it gives me another form in which to connect with students. And I assume that you're sixteen year old's who who missed Mr. Yang certainly would understand like what you're going to go right soup. They were. They're really happy for me for sure. Well, congratulations, and it was great to talk to you again. Thank you. Thank you. It was good too. Coming up. Comecon Qods players who get racially interrogated about their hostels they've asked like, okay, well, you the black version of superman, this regime that Persian and I'm like, no, I'm just superman. We've got lots more stories about superheroes ahead in studio, three sixty. Support for studio. Three sixty comes from Babbel offering a language program that uses interactive dialogue and speech recognition technology to teach a new language like Spanish French or Italian babble is available in the app store or online at Babbel dot com. Studio, three sixty. 'cause

basketball Jim Lin Yang Mr. ambassador DC comics Kurt Kurt Andersen Congress Babbel Jean Chinatown Comecon Qods Babbel dot administrator MacArthur NBA San Francisco sixteen year twelve year
"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

02:11 min | 4 years ago

"kurt andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"'cause i was terrified that i wouldn't be prepared and i realized in that moment that in the last many years i've been sort of holding my hands up in defence of what i perceived b perhaps derision of hey be me up scottie but what do they mean what they doing i thought it was pretty good but maybe they're laughing at a better go along with it sort of in my psyche and i've than it was part of me and i sort of that was my response be me up gotta hey get off me what i learned and what i realized in the documentary is hey it's a compliment and i should answer them as such so i should say i would if i could that is william shatner even if you don't know much about star trek you probably know the main villains that kirk in company faced chop chuck these big grizzly looking guys with giant ridges on their foreheads john you host the bad guy in this seeing sounds like he's choking on something but the subtitles tell us that he's saying standby on torpedoes fire the first words of the first star trek movie in 1979 are spoken by a plea ship commandment in cling on john how did this come to be erica okrand is a linguist with a ph d from the university of chicago and as far as i know the first and only certified clingon speaker i've ever met we talked about her book from two thousand nine in the land of invented languages that looks at everything from cling onto esperanto and i asked her whose idea it was to give clinton ahn's these fictional creatures and actual language it was then producers have the third star trek movie they had hired marco grand ling who has a linguist to figure out how to double over some dialogue for the second star trek movie that they had filmed in english in wanted it to be in vulcan so he perform met doubled over for them it worked out war non geeks.

william shatner john marco grand ling kirk erica okrand university of chicago clinton