20 Episode results for "Kurowski"

A Streetcar Named Desire

Unspooled

1:59:35 hr | 1 year ago

A Streetcar Named Desire

"Right now on your Wolf. Beverly Ginsburg is back to give you all the self-care tips you need on the human condition. Parenting your children and yourself available now for more follow at Your Wolf on social media. Happy Listening this episode of unspoiled is brought to you by some of our favorite people they Turner Classic Movies Gentle Turner. Classic movies is now into the podcast game. What's up welcome guys? And they have launched their first podcast. It's called the plot thickens and the very first season is hosted by Ben Mankiewicz. Good Buddy of mine haven. It is titled. I'm still Peter Bogdanovich. It is a seven episode. Bogus about the life and work of the Oscar nominated director writer actor producer. Peter Bogdanovich friend of the show. We had him on a few months ago. And as you know he is the ultimate sinophile living like the Hollywood's Golden Age. And here in this podcast. The plot thickens. He tells his whole story in his own words for the first time ever so the plot thickens is out. Now you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts support for this week's episode comes to us from our friends at rocket mortgage by quicken loans. You know home today is so much more than it was yesterday but rocket mortgage home is still all about you enduring these challenging times. Here's what they're doing. The top priority at rocket mortgage is the health and safety of the communities. They serve so if you need mortgage existence. Their team is available. Twenty four seven to answer questions offer solutions. Whatever you need whether that means saving money on your mortgage or finding a new way to navigate payments from their home doors team at rocket mortgage is with you. So here's what you're GONNA do visit rocket mortgage dot com slash unspoiled to learn more. You can call for cost information and conditions. They are an equal housing lender. Licensed in all fifty states am L S Consumer Access Dot. Org Number three zero three zero is rocket mortgage and thank you for listening. The air is nineteen fifty one. And don't you just love those afternoons when a podcast isn't a podcast but a little piece of eternity dropped into your hands? The Movie Streetcar Named Desire. Hello and welcome to unspoiled. I'm Nicholson an Paul Scheer. And this is the podcast where we watched one film from the top one hundred best films of all timeless to see if they are really as good as people say do they hold up and how they influenced of films. We watched now today. We're talking about a streetcar named desire. But before we get into that just want to remind people that we are still raising money for charity. Goto t public dot com slash stores slash. Unspoiled you can get your very own unspoiled shirt that is kind of influenced by rear window. It's raising money for an amazing charity. One hundred percent of all the proceeds is going directly to that charity. So we're excited about that. So get over there if you can. If you have a few extra dollars on you give something give something. It works out perfectly and also this Monday. If you're listening to this before Monday the first of June we're doing our next. A Spoof Party doing spool party on our youtube channel and it is going to be four none other than the great classic coming to America. I'm so excited that we doing a coming to America episode. You Know My love of Eddie Murphy. So to get to have one of his classes on the show is is really something. I'm looking forward to you know as a matter of fact. I'm going to ask you a quick question right now. If you could pick one Eddie Murphy movie. What would it be to go on the this one? You could only pick one. Oh my gosh I s I feel like there's like three or four in contention right. It has to be coming to America nutty professor Beverly Hills Cop like those feel like the ones that you would that would be in the conversation. I think I would do coming to America honestly for I kinda sidetracked going down the Beverly Hills cop moment. I thought you know what there are. That is a great that is a great like at eighties action movie but there are other great eighties action movies coming to America singular. That's what I kind of think I think it kind of combines the best of everything but we'll see we'll get into this debate. Next week is coming to America. Best Eddie Murphy. Movie ooh Boy who knows and you have a podcast coming out right. Yeah Yeah the new episode of my very sporadic miniseries. Zoom is out and it's all in the history of the divas such a fun and interesting episode to put together. It really goes. I've got clips in their Harkin. All the way back to a colleague Ula Glitter. It might be the only podcast on the planet that has clips from Caligula and glitter. So I'm very happy about divas and the episode called Zoom Zoom by deep dives into different topics and so the diva one was much richer than I ever thought it could be. I am so excited to hear it. And if you WANNA check me out right now My New Youtube show marvel presents. The world's Greatest Book Club with Paul Scheer brand new episodes. Drop every single week this week. We have Yasser Lester on the show. Last week we had Phil Lord who is the Director of Twenty One. Jump Street and the producer of Spiderman into the diverse. And we're just talking about cool morrow books if you've never read a marvel comic book. This is a great entry point. If you're big comic books fan this might be a way to find an artist or a writer that you might not have known and it's all to help raise awareness for small comic book shops and this. We actually have a really cool thing. We started reaching out to these comic book shops. And they're sending in their own videos and this week we went to Smyrna Georgia to talk to somebody down there and it's awesome and that's that so before we get into streetcar. Let's go back to last week's episode where we talked about bridge on the River Kwai another hotly contested film on this list. I talk on this movie Amy. Yeah this is another one that harkened back to I think are most longstanding disagreement on this show which is come on. Is this movie in America movie or is this a British movie which the argument that comes up? All the time and again comes up here. Yeah I feel like this is determined by some vague technicality. That if you ask somebody from the they could probably explain it to you after they researched it and asked like three managers above them. Exactly I really do think it is just like who fights harder or am I going to claim it. And what are you? GonNa do which you're GONNA do. I'm GonNA claim this movie. Go to and blow up my list about it. Yeah well there you go. I mean look. The Joe. Birch says the one thing I want to mention here in the UK it's very well-known film it's on TV regularly the lyrics to the whistle tuners well-known. The Jingle is commonly played by ice cream vans and when I was at school it was a common playground song and everyone knew the Hitler's Bollocks I love it I mean that's the point that came up to twitter. People are like yeah think about it. Everybody really knew how much what those lyrics will really saying in this movie and it was such a thrill for the audience to feel like. You're getting away with something I really love. Hearing everybody's memories of hearing the song you know. Gal Gal Barrel Brick Keegan said he'd don't. My Dad said his high school gym teacher in the nineteen sixties. Had the boys do the whistle from quiet marching to and fro work to do and from workouts? I always assumed that that's also is in the breakfast club that it's like a gym teacher thing like maybe maybe there's a theory that John Hughes's gym teacher used to whistle for him. He'd be from that generation. Oh that's where it comes from. You know. I was thinking about this the other day. Why do I know that song so well? And it's the breakfast club that's all gone engrained into my psyche and I have a different theory about house though. Yeah what about Craig? Falcon Ham pointed out that it's also in Star Trek Seven. Oh well I know that I always know that. Oh either that's really interesting to I. Guess it's sort of the shorthand and you know to certain extent. This movie feels a lot to me like Shawshank a very competent film. That's played a lot that all of a sudden is elevated by the familiarity to it. You know that song. Oh yes the blowing up of the bridge. There are certain elements to this film that I think just elevated just because it's in public consciousness because obviously we liked this movie just didn't think it was one of the best of all time. Allen step in wall the mighty brilliant brilliant critic that we adore so much he was saying you know. I'm beginning to think that I would rather have the great escape on this list. Or if we'RE GONNA stick with William Holden as a POW stalag seventeen. Well Yeah I was talking about the greatest gift the other day when we were doing this podcast. Because there's something about that movie. That feels maybe a little bit more American But also kind of captures A. I don't know a different kind of story. I I still am finding cool. Hand Luke on this list. I feel like I don't understand why we don't have cool hand. Luke on this list do we have any? Paul Newman on this list. I haven't really seen. Paul Newman along close close. We have a Paul Newman coming up. Anna Smith. A myth four fifty. One sheet is kind of fun related to what we're talking about. We've been doing so many Vietnam movies from this list. And so she went back with a lady Liebau and they re watch tropic thunder since it is the ultimate war movie satire film and she said You not only in this. Does she notice the? Ammash the best years of our life but Tom Cruise makes a reference to Dick Cheese. Dicky's the OH. We forgot about Dick Cheese. Oh wow I mean it hasn't come up again but so sad. We have said ten more movies left. So maybe maybe that Paul Newman. We'll say Dick Cheese and make everything right. And finally this is from Thomas Pasco. He was inspired by Evan. Funke's appearance on the GOODFELLAS episode to buy some San Marzano tomatoes and trauma handed a homemade spaghetti. Sauce turned out great after years of failing at bad overcomplicated recipes. This simple one was so delicious olive oil garlic. Oregano and tomatoes Makes ME WANNA make one right now to have you made a tomato sauce and Quarantine? Amy I have I have I have. I had a night where I just had a gigantic bowl of meatballs in a tomato sauce and a glass of red wine and it was absolutely lovely. I think I'm going to do it again because my boyfriend had died. A high decided to give ourselves educational missions during core and one of them is going to try to get into opera so GonNa make a big baller meatballs and we're GONNA WATCH ADA. Oh interesting I love that. Okay well you know. Three give opera in a loud booming voice Last week we asked you to call in with your best Stanley. Cowell ski impression but instead of just yelling Stella because that's been done a million times you'll hear later on this episode. How it's done in a professional setting. We wanted to see what you can be yelling to the heavens something that you want something that you need something that maybe you haven't gotten during this quarantine so here are your best Stanley. Call Ski in quarantine screaming out for something that you need baseball. Charity Disneyland just see galaxies edge for the first time I I live alone on things. All I want a movie theater do you I would. I am so happy that we got one GEO storm in there. Which is how did this get made reference but These are pretty solid ones. Yeah the what about movie theater? Popcorn had me laughing because I have a friend who misses the movie theater so much. She bought this giant they like milk cartons. Full of artificial poppers like seasoning. He bought one of those. It's I mean it's enough for like an entire week at the multiplex. I think making popcorn for audiences and now he owns this giant thing of popcorn butter. And he's like how can I give away to people however I did miss it and I'm so happy to own some. Oh well I mean what does come in like a big giant chunk. It's it really comes in like milk and like you bought a little leader milk. But it's August filled with neon orange butter neon orange powder so just powder so he's drop it on. Hulu Nice all right. How is it good is pretty great? It's pretty great arial. Amy. Let's get into today's episode. It is of course. A Streetcar Named Desire. And you know what Ding Ding on Spool. It Lucy you got some explaining to do. The year is nineteen fifty one and I love Lucy Premiers on CBS the Twenty Second Amendment as ratified which limits the US presidential term to only eight years the term rock and roll is coined by DJ. In Cleveland the oral contraceptive pill is invented. Direct dial coast-to-coast telephone service begins in the US. Popular films are an American in Paris. The day the Earth stood still African Queen and today's film. A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE RANKS NUMBER. Forty seven on the two thousand seven Af. I top one hundred list down a little bit since its nineteen ninety-seven ranking of number. Forty five so very close very close. Let's listen to a clip. Five style system. I was the woman in the best batch. Let's might spend. That goes fast and the hot weather. My Shy I rally something. Touch touched offer amy. Who's in it? And what's it about a streetcar named desire? Oh man this is. The story of fading. Beauty named Blanche Dubois played by Vivien. Leigh our girl from gone. With the wind once again. She is southern. She's feminine. She is used to having men wrapped around her hands. But it is not working. She has been chased out of her hometown and she is now hiding out in New Orleans with her sister. Stella played by Kim Hunter but really worker surely her sister's husband Marlon Brando as Stanley Kurowski. And all hell absolutely breaks in those. The story is of course written by Tennessee Williams. It was first performed on Broadway in directed by Iliad Kazan. Who returned to direct this version with pretty much the entire cast. Except for Vivian Lee in the original cast of Jessica Tandy swapped her in for a bigger movie star. Felt like it of had to and then we got a streetcar named desire. Which one or the Oscar? Well Amy. Let's talk about this movie because I'm GonNa be honest and say I didn't remember a God damn thing about this. I thought I did. I thought I knew what Streetcar About. And I am still working in the glow of being blown away by this movie. I I never realised how amazing this movie is. I WanNa talk to everyone about it. It is really I mean. Performances are amazing but the story. Is We talk about. Melodrama a lot on this show and this is the perfect example in my opinion of how to do. Melodrama it is it is dramatic. It's emotional it's intense. It's it really I wanna live in this movie You Really WanNa live this movie. It looks Oh yeah no. I do agree again that southern share. I just feel like I couldn't get enough of these characters. I mean M. I attracted to Marlon Brando. Absolutely I mean this is like I couldn't take my eyes off of him This entire movie. I'm just riveted to and it's interesting because it's incredibly afford in what the ideas are presenting and they had to really skirt it in this film but yet it works still even though the cut some very big corners. I'm totally sucked and I just want to hear what you think about it. Have you got to watch this movie? Now in the Post Nineteen ninety-three ish world. Which is when they found the stuff that was cut out of it to get this passed and sensors and fifty one. You are seeing exactly. The movie parading. Much Kazan wanted you know. There is a very clear rape Very clear insinuations of all of the sexual heat of much do Blah You're going to see the movie pretty much intact. Except for a couple of tiny subplots cut out so today's streaker. No desire is a streetcar named desire. Ish that is Williams wanted and you know what I love about this introduction of in let alone the fact all of the streetcar named Zito sound like they're like hello. We are theme. Pay attention to what we're trying to say. There really was a streetcar named desire. By the way but it was named after a guy's daughter who was like desert etc is just that image. You you see these people spill off a train and there's this ride a young young young bride and Oliver Friends and she's so excited it looks like she's heading on our honeymoon and then she goes into this cloud of smoke in from that smoke emerges. Vivien Leigh as blanched. And you just get the sense almost like a time traveler you know. Here's a woman who was this young beautiful bride and then boom. This is what happens to that person. This is the future. Can I help you? Ma'am told me today. 'cause street drying desired and then transferred one call sanitary and ride six blocks narrow of collusion. There's your car now. I mean my God Vivian. Lee looks like a ghost right like when she first GETS OFF THAT STREETCAR. I mean the way that she looks. It's like she's a ghost that she's just a hollowed out person and there's something really interesting. They did with the makeup. She's thirty six at the time that they do this movie they hr. And I think what you're able to do there. Instead of taking an older actress you can kind of see the younger version of her because she still is young. I really interesting so you can kind of see her in the past and present. I know it's it's the way your faces frame the way she's lit it. She just appears to me. Damage the minute you see her. You get a lot of information. That's very hard to do a lot of times in a play without making it You know Insane you know like she has a Great Gardens. Look to her in a way. No you're so right like when we look just that first wardrobe. She's wearing everything his diaphanous. You know her her her sleeves are see through. Everything's GonNa go and it floats and she's wearing you know flowers on her hat. She's wearing a veil. She's wearing flowers on her desk. She's so overly feminine when you look at her that first glance like whoa and then it follows her. She starts leaving the cloud of smoke area where she lives to the neighborhood. And you see all these other women who are playing cotton drinking beer and suddenly this overly feminine look starts to look really out of your. She looks like this. This person who just does not belong here with every inch of her. Well I mean at even further and say like she's white in a city of black right like I think the first image of her coming out of the smoke it the you know. Obviously it's a black and white film but you. She is brighter than anyone else around. I think it just it goes to show you. She is not going to fit in here and she's the of weight who thinks being. Polish is being white is kind of racist. Ultra Weight Lady. Yeah I mean I was even saying color wise. Wipe you're right there. Is this high? Falutin air about her and obviously she's coming from more of the old south. I wonder if it's playing a little bit on her gone with the wind persona to a certain degree But she's coming into a dirty New Orleans south But a different kind of south. The dirty south you know the little John. Yeah Cronk the Crohn's south know exactly what you were just describing that idea of like you look at her face and you see two people at once you know the old and the young and the beauty and the aged in. I mean that's just this movie star quality that I think we have when we know Vivian. Lee when she's been the biggest most famous most beautiful southern bell at all times. It's almost like a movie star as she was carries her past with her. All the time. And you can't let it go when you see your in this. I mean it if this had been like unknown actors. I don't know if you get that weight. I was thinking about this in front of the win and I was thinking about it a lot again. This I'm she. Has that strange smile? You know when she smiles she looks like she's seven years old. She has this smiler lake her cheeks kind of turn in and she was suddenly goes from looking like a grown woman to a baby. Do you know what I mean. Do you know this do I do. I mean it has like a little bit of a broken smell back to like Anthony Perkins in psycho like this kind of. There's something not fully connected behind the is but I also think and this is kind of a bigger thought but she looks like pray right. She's she is a bunny going into You know a forest full of wild animals and I feel like so many people try to take advantage of her here even though she is in her own little world but she like I feel like she embodies somebody that I think people think they can go after a little bit and I I feel like that definitely comes into play at the later half of the film but I love that I mean you you WanNa take her in but you also feel like you're smarter than her but then you realize that she's got things going on there so many aspects his character that you're just getting from clothing smiles is it's it's a lot about how she's perceived and I think that Yulia Kazan does a great job of not having to weigh you down with details at first. Let's you simmering. You'd start to make your own impressions of all these people and I think that's a beautiful way into this film. Yeah I mean it's almost like I feel like you can watch this movie. Imagine you're just watching what happened to Scarlett O'Hara Malevich's years later in the gap between that movie came out in this like what happens when it doesn't come back. What happens when a beauty loses a great love of her life? Where does a beauty like that? Go and the kind of femininity you're describing. I mean it's prey but she also makes herself pray. You know how there's like those birds that pretend they're wing is broken and they're like flopping around that like a Fox doesn't go eat their eggs. I mean that's how she's managed to live a whole life except she's doing it to save herself. It is just like oh my gosh. She's definitely playing that game. I mean but I think that idea that you really have to convey that. Because that's how that's what. She's decided her personality is and then when you get her in that Alley with her sister. You start to see oh. She's a little manipulative. She starts guilting or sister she starts. You know having bigger plans this idea of like the southern Belle you see all the machinations begin to happen there and again the characters twisted you. You're okay now learning a little bit more about her and then they bring her to the House and I think the first moment of real conflict is when her Stanley are kind of circling each other. They both are kind of people who are masters of their domain are or masters of how they control people you know to a certain degree and I feel like they. They can see each other for who they are. If that makes sense know exactly and and I love. I love that scene with her sister at the Bowling Alley. Because that's what you get this. This glimpse of WHO? She really is the way she kind of dishes or sister like here. It ended worried about my parents. Just Fine God love you Aligarh. Daylight never exposed of total ruin but he put on some weight. Is it just as plump. As a little poetry. It's overcoming to play the pig are. I wouldn't say it. You just had to work around the hips a little. I wanted to let them. I figure I haven't been on one in ten years. Keller I way now I weigh summer. You left bell read some their died and you left. I love that moment because it has so many layers to it you know. She's reminding her little sister that she's not the beauty of the family. Her little sister is accepting it and being like. You still look really lovely in knowing what's happening noting it. She her sisters on dumb but as this is like this is what it is it in Vivian bragging about how much her beauty has meant her and how she maintained this weight. You get so much character in that tiny interaction and look. I think you're getting all this wealth because of how well this is written. I mean obviously it's Tennessee Williams and these most of these performers including Vivian Lee have played these parts before right. They've all a you know. Been IMMERSED IN THIS PLACE. I feel like they carry a weight with them of someone. Who's done this on Broadway or on the west end for hundreds of performances and so there is something so lived in about these characters so natural about them there is. I mean kind of a one of the stories this is Vivian. Lee had done this character in London and her husband. Laurence Olivier directed it it. Would they had had this like great tempestuous love affair that was winding down when she starts to make a streetcar named desire? And she's really starting in fall apart emotionally but he had directed her in it as playing this fragile southern bell in London for like nine months. Nine months she'd spent being his version of Blanche Dubois and she felt like she knew that character better than anybody better than Iliad. Kazan and La. Kazan was like you're playing. This character. Cut like British person would see her. He felt like Laurence Olivier didn't understand. This otherness of this character made a of a cliche. So they had all these struggles like they both thought they'd new blanche they're fighting for the soul of Blanche and it seems to me that Vivian Lee was very outward in her not anger but her distrust of Ilya Kazan. She's like no I don't. He didn't inform my character at all The interesting thing and maybe this is more gossipy the not but obviously in this film you know Marlon Brando and Vivien. Leigh have this sexual tension between them me. That obviously culminates later in the film but in real life apparently Marlon Brando had an affair with Vivian Lees husband to Livia. Yeah that is that is the the rumor of the time that they and it kind of makes perfect sense to me. Especially the everything I know about Brando. I'm not saying it's one hundred percent the truth but I did read that so I thought that was interesting. I didn't know that I read. I read it interview with Brando where he was saying. You Know Vivian. Lee was really beautiful and the his is a might have given her a tumble. If if it hadn't been for Laurence Olivier we call him Larry Olivier. So maybe that does everything you need. Larry got. Maybe I'm reading that quote wrong. I read that quotas paternalistic like oh I might have given her a tumble but I respect. Her husband do much. But maybe it's like I might have given her a tumble but I liked her husband. Better it depends on. That interview was right. Because I don't think that Brandon would be talking about his affair with Larry in the fifties. I wonder when that's even kind of came up with this kind of the scuttle butt around Hollywood at the time. So you buy it. Maybe Violin would have honest. Marlin is a guy used to bring his pet raccoon two parties at Hollywood and he would walk up to other celebrities and say. Do you have anything my raccoon can fuck so by the way we then New York bad boy of Hollywood? I don't fit here. I'm going to be a real ass. Hey everybody let's take a break from the show for just a second to talk about today's sponsor which is a new spotify original podcast called son of the hitmen. Let me tell you a little bit about it on the morning of May Twenty Ninth. Nineteen seventy nine as he left his townhouse. District Judge named John H. Wood junior was shot dead. He was the first federal judge to ever be assassinated in. Us and at the time it was called the crime of the century. The hitman implicated in that murder was Charles v Harrison. But that is just the beginning of this story. Yeah this is crazy if you are a true crime podcast nut as I assume that many of us are out there. This is going to be your absolute brand new obsession because what is going to happen in this true crime series. Going to blow your mind. I mean when they start doing the present day investigation into this murder. The people who start coming up our people like Charles Harrison who you might know that last name because he is the father of Woody Harrelson Woody. Harrelson's dad is a figure in this new podcast. There's a lot in this whole story that has never been shared emmy before and does about to get crazy. The person is taking you through all of it is host and journalist Jason Kavanagh. He is the guy who's going to be at the helm helping you. Investigate the mini allegations against Harrelson is Harrelson. A murderer is what he calls a Hitman. Don't dump done like this. This podcast go deep and even maybe show connection to the assassination of JFK. Son Of man is a spotify original podcast and you can listen to the series for free only on spotify so check out some of the Hitman. Only on spotify amy. I kind of feel like I have to reveal something to you about myself. Even tell me anything ball. It's a it's a pretty big secret. I I love movies. I don't know if you are at the same way. Are You amy? Just telling me. Do you have movies? I'm I got. I never meant to say this out loud but yes. I totally love movies. Oh my gosh well guess. What amy you are not alone because you know who else loves movies. Oh IMDB yes. I am movies. That's why they are launching. Its first ever podcast movies. That changed my life and this is actually so much fun movie change. My life is a weekly series featuring celebrities and filmmakers discussing movies that inspired them and kind of launch their careers. We talk about that a lot in the show like how you know you see something in these films that other directors were inspired by in their later works. It starts to draw this line of inspiration to final project. I really love how this this podcast bring celebrities to that that point man. I wish that me to be on because if I was on I would absolutely talk about Edward Scissorhands. I think that's the movie that really showed me. Who would director was able to put together directors? And what? They looked like what they did what they brought to a film. But it's not me and I don't mind because I have a lot more cooler cooler cooler guests on. They've got Jeffrey. Right Joel McHale. They've got my girl Judy. Greer FELICIA Day. Kevin Smith. I mean it's amazing and each episode gives fans like you and meet people who love movies. A unique an intimate look honestly into their favorite stars lives through the lens of their favorite films. So if you like our show I think you're gonNA like this show because I think it shares DNA about passion and creativity and also inspiration. We talk about. Oh I wonder if so and so was inspired by this and here we actually are finding out. The actually were inspired by that. And I think it's an intimate look. That doesn't feel like they're just selling the movie that they're making. It actually feels like we're getting to know the person as an artist and a creator movies. It change my life is hosted by the IMDB shows Ian Deborah and new episodes air every Thursday wherever podcasts are found including spotify podcast Google podcasts and IMDB dot com slash podcast. Hey call me movies. Change my life to you know. Come on get amy on their well. Let's talk about Brando in in the way the heat comes in because you know this movie really is a war of you know this white image coming into this dark space and I feel like Brando is kind gray. If that makes sense you know like He. I don't think that he is. It's hard I wanna like. Be careful with my word choice. I think he falls in this middle ground where he may be wearing more of what he does on his sleeve. He is this person but you know. He's this person. To a certain extent. Whereas Vivian Lees character. Blanche Dubois is hiding who she is. So there's this interesting push and pull between them but when he first comes in I said it earlier I just was like you can't take your eyes off him. I was blown away just but all the little things the business doing around the apartment Just I'm just like just totally caught up in him and I can see why but sister is in love with him and she you know she says it she's like you know. I left that behind and I'm happy like sexually. I'm happy I'm here with this man who's like providing for me. She's not slumming it she's just kind of picking a different way to be happy You know I don't know yes. I mean we get to see Marlin from far away right at the Pool Hall. You know bar first thing that we know about him is he's a guy who's starting fights that his wife was like. Oh what a rhubarb. It like okay. I didn't know rhubarb was a was a slang for like what a cool tough guy de. Maybe what of Rhubarb? I don't think I've had rhubarb best an open great strawberry rhubarb. You'll get oh Jim anyways. That's neither here nor there. I have a great Marlon Brando Flavor Jam. But then the real. I mean I don't really consider that the first real shot of him even though it's establishing that he is this physical center of attention masculine presents. It's when they're in their house and you get that I close up of him really a close up of him. Oh my God can you imagine I mean this is Marlon Brando? Like he had been playing this role on Broadway for a couple of years. He'd had a bit part in one. Hollywood movie right before that wasn't that popular. So honestly most of the people sitting down who didn't live in New York and didn't get to see on Broadway. That close of is your first shot ever in your life of Brando and then you're going to wash the whole rest of this movie are you serious. How are you a movie goer in in the year? Nineteen fifty one and you are not dislike immediately throwing yourself off a bridge that this man exists on the planet. You know. He's so charismatic and raw. He'd gotten no buffalo. He wasn't really a muscle guy before this movie but he made himself get really above and he would like work out and lift weights between takes. We'd get extra sweaty so they wouldn't have to use bake sweat on him. Imagine I I don't I don't know if we've been alive for like a star entrance like that. Were like who is this person. And then he's going to go on to get four Oscar nominations in a row. I mean he really does carry so much with them and it's interesting because he's we talked about this in on the waterfront. He's a different type of leading man. And there's something about him that there's a sensitivity but you can also buy an anger like he really is more facile than I think people even know him to be because I think we think of Brando kind of later age Brando but he was able to do so much I think every one of his characters carries with him this sweetness and I think that's the reason why we are. You know you like him to a certain degree you know. It's it's Stella you see why they have something why she may go back to you. Know it's I think that you could cast this the wrong way and make too tough. You gotta find that balance and I mean that's that's a small acting but I also wanted to point out that the reason that he looks so good to is because he's in these FID shirts which was not of the time they had to make in Taylor. These shirts so he was rippling out of these shirts. I mean he really created a fashion a fashion by doing this. This is not what anyone would be wearing in the same way that you would put a woman in a of set or abroad. That would be amplifying things. That's what they're doing to to Marlon Brando. They really are like letting see his body like they really want you to feel that energy when he comes in and then they keep getting him. What is he the very first winner of a Bourbon Street? What T SHIRT CONTEST THEY SHOWER? They can't stop getting him wet. It's crazy like you. Can I feel like you can smell him? Do you feel like you can smell Ho. Yeah I mean. This movie is sweaty movie in in this whole this apartment. You you feel like you can. Everything feels so lived in. I know you talked about the opening shot of Brandon. This close up and this is what the film does really wonderfully to is using the idea of what? The camera can communicate that you could never do on stage. It's the close up. It's the moment later in the play when Carl Maldon wants to look at Blanche's face you you are getting to put people in a place to really see them or be brought into them and they even did tricks with the set. The set gets smaller and smaller as the movie goes on the same set of the kind of pushing in the walls which is great. Because it's building building it's building. You could never do that on stage and so I think we talked about this a lot like you take something that was successful on stage and you bring it over to film but you don't really change anything. I feel like here. Kazan does an amazing job of taking all the benefits of the play but then amplifying them through film for Kazan have known who Marlon Brando was and what he could do and how much he owned. This part is getting to put it on screen getting a hold a camera and be like okay. Now you can really see what I could see what people in the seats could never see at home on on Broadway that that is such power. You could imagine kind of like chomping at the bit. How excited must have been to do it? But he wasn't that they had to twist his arm to direct this. Well yes like right. He had reservations directing the movie because he was worried that he couldn't make it a life for him. You know that he had put it on stage and Broadway like four years before. So how is he gonNa make you feel interesting again? And I think that's why honestly I think that's a lot of he recast handy. You Know Jessica Tandy as the lead because I think for him to make new again he had to take out the biggest piece and put it back in as a new person so it felt fresh was like a different challenge. I mean I honestly think that as much Jessica Tandy not being like the biggest movie star in the world and having Vivian. Lena's I think those are really the two reasons why she was there because by all means she was good I found a clip of are actually On the radio performing it against Marlon Brando right when they're on Broadway freshly-bathed incented and feeding a brand new human being schooled. Press de la also getting somewhere. How do I look look okay him thanks? Looks like my tongue because exploded. Installed was helping. You unpack and thorough. Job Certainly looks like rated. Some stylish shops in Paris. Clothe the my passion. What does it cost for string of? I liked that tribute from an admira mind. Alive Mauritian youth excited admiration. But look at me. Now what do you think it's possible that I was ever considered to be attractive? Looks Okay. I was fishing for compliments. Damn you you can hear a difference in the way that she's doing it. Is I think more confident in the way. She projects like she kind of hides. I think better that that blanche to what is so broken. She's still pretty good at making southern bell work. Geez I think you almost get a little bit more of an arc in her version year where you see the her collapse makes it even right channels fragility from the beginning yet. It's a different way of playing the part. And you know even Vivian. Lee Wasn't the first choice after Tandy though. It was going to be what you call. Olivia de Havilland. She refused doing it so I wonder what that would be. Because again another star of gone with the wind. And You I think he was trying. Maybe he was trying to get this. She's British as well. I wonder if he was trying to really reach outside of the states to kind of get somebody that would have a different take on it so he could kind of work with them on that. I don't know I don't know if we're work as well. Yeah I mean yeah. It feels like the difference between leaning into the baggage of gone with the wind in leaning a half. Step away right. You like if you want this to be. Here is my Great Grand Dramatic VERSION OF STREETCAR. Named desire that nobody in the movie audiences. Cnn It's going to be like my Broadway version. Only bigger you know which is it. Seems like a lot of what he wanted to given that he didn't gas movie star parts at anybody else. Nobody else was a movie. He brought his entire cast of people from the Broadway stage year to do it. I think straightforward and legitimately insincerely. That does change. Would you cast the most famous other bell in history as Herb blanched? Wa? You know. It's like that movie star versus versus like the purity's show but in such a beautiful decision you're casting an outsider to fit in with people who are all together and that's exactly what Blanche's Blanche's the outsider coming into a tight knit circle so it's like all the directors we talk about where they try to recreate something whether it is going to war or you know being mad at the lead actor or actress and getting their heads like he basically did that by bringing in someone who's not even American think come into our tight knit group. We know this. We've all worked together and it creates a friction and I think even if it's the friction of your new it's a friction and and that to me is really a smart choice. Like not the familiarity. It's it it really. It's only one piece that's changed and you have to look at that one piece was Stanley I back. That's an that doesn't make much sense. But because it is blanche it it feels like it was a conscious decision. Now it's true that's such a good point and I was thinking it is weird. That either win win. A major person gets replaced like win. Tandy is out. There is a quiet like blame. Vivian Lee for it when it's Ilya Kazan decision like that's a studio saying she's not a big star. And we've seen that so many times like lead roles recast people who aren't exactly right. I mean it But rarely does it work out perfectly. I think here it may have worked out in their favor. No I agree and I mean also Vivian. Lee is an outcast in this other. Major way you know all of these other actors not only have they been doing the Broadway version together. They're all coming out of this. Like method training. They all believe in doing the same. Kind of acting. You Marlon Brando. When HE GETS TO THE SET FOR STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE. He does what he did on the Broadway thing he he looks around he touches everything on the Hollywood's he sits in every chair. He touches all the walls he turns on the lights. He touches all the drapes. He makes it his own set and then he starts bringing his own stuff to this. He brings like his own props he brings Stanley things bricks condoms which I thought was really strange. Because like Stan Lee. His wife is pregnant. She's not having a baby. So what does he need condoms were? Yeah maybe it's sort of We don't know how faithful Stanley is. It's not like he's an upstanding citizen. You think that he was just one hundred percent in for still. I've read. No I mean I mean no media. Yeah no he literally the literally does things that are not that but it does seem to love her so much but he also seems to me like a guy who could justify just about anything right and look. Let's call of state. He's an abusive husband. We see a Mutt. We see a moment of it with his wife. We see a moment of it with blanche. These are not uncharacteristic things. The key is an abuser right. And at this time I'm sure it's looked at it through a different Lens but this is this this man who is controlling the people around him. And you know culminates ultimately in the ultimate act of control but He you know I think he's. I think what makes him so interesting? What the portrayal makes it so interesting going back to say like there's a sweetness they're like you feel like open. He does love her even though he hit or he does love her though. And that's like that. And that is that kind of cycle of you know. Living with an abuser but he uses upset you know it was but it was my fault and and I think that that's actually brilliant writing. No it's true I mean. He is in abuser. Living in a world where most of the guys are abusive. You know the upstairs neighbor Stephen. Unis he also hits her and when he hits Eunice. It's Kinda considered lake comedy to everybody even Stella who's getting hit by her own husband. She's like ashes at the bar. They're all kind of laughing about it. Don't call the cops. She's she's over there but still like you know in that moment when he had when we do see him hit Selah for the first time in then he realized he wakes up from this kind of few knocked out being thrown in the shower thing. That pain in Marlon Brando's voice. You know the the Stella part of the L. is the famous part but I WANNA take a second. Listen to the up to the stelio these incoming home tonight if he knows. What's good for Donna? She Ain't GonNa talk to you. Need justice caller your down then go to bed so you shut up you gotta get the law woman and then cornerback. Well she ain't GonNa come up and say all you don't hey mixture but still either like all of that side. I mean Vivian. Lee is not necessarily the kind of person who's going to be bringing blanche's condoms to the set. You know this isn't connecting style. But it works so well this clash between styles you. It's so interesting these films. We've been talking from the fifties when you watch the new acting. Go up against the old acting. Sometimes it makes a move out of balance but here. It's exactly what this is you know. Stanley Kurowski is a guy who is raw and everything is coming from his heart and his spiner. I guess kind of his Dick is all you know. Whereas Vivien Leigh's Blanche Oliver Actions are meditated. In a way you know. She's putting on an act. It Isic self-conscious performance in that old style of coming from being a London drained actor and you learn to act and you don't need crutches like the method because you do the work and you show you just make it happen. That's Blanche's and I feel like even here this to acting styles come up against each other when they have that first conversation that we keep talking about teach you teach. English was better than any student. How long are you here for Shack up inconvenient for you? All traveling wave meowed. Yeezy those cats. Can we hear that meow again can? Can we hear that one more time one more time all right? What about four could I go for? Four meows Oh go for it. What does this cat on a hot tin roof anyway? I'm kind of fascinated with this idea of how we all live our lives. I think there are some people who use a mask and some people who don't use a mask and I think in our society using a mask is something that is acceptable not not like a covert math. I'm just so I think there's something really interesting about putting someone who wears a mask up against somebody who is not wearing a mask and I think he wants to re per mask off like you're not this person you're a liar. I see through you and and that that kind of I think we've all had these moments and these people in our lives where you deal with somebody and you're like Oh that motherfucker. They're doing this thing and I know they're doing only everyone could see that they were doing it. I wanted to show everybody that they're doing like along the lines. I don't think you live your life like that but there are those people that can get under your skin. Whether it's at worker to me you went to school with some even in your family the kiss asses suck up. And I feel like that's the relatable thing here with Stanley I'm not saying he's a good person but I think his instinct to reveal her as a really interesting. We don't often see in. You know I think we see a lot ROM coms idea like GONNA reveal. I'm GonNa tell you who this person really is. The bad guy in Aramco China bus. The other you know the other suitor whatever it is you know like I feel like that's where it's been you know kind of it lives now but this is such a dramatic like push pull of no you are. You're you're worse than me. I know it and let me show you. His whole thing is motivated by proving to her that she's a liar. It's true and I think he doesn't understand that you know honestly for a lot of of female history. You had to kind of put on a mask. If you wanted to have a house to live in. I don't think Stanley really gets that. You know that if you want to get married you have to be a big flirt. You have to put on Spell. You have to wear literally the mask of makeup want somebody. I read a book. Where a character referred to putting on her daily makeup as painting a face over her face and I. I love that image. Because it's true you know when I'm GonNa make paint is over my eyes. I paint lips over military painting a different face over your face. That's a lot of the nature of this feminine entity that blanched what lives in. That's just been her nature blanche to why is probably a person who went to the movies? Install gone with the wind and thought that's great. Want to be like her. You know I am like her. I'm GonNa Flirt with men because that's how I get food on my table. That's all I get a place to live. You know that's supposed to be my security blanket and to do that. You have to do things like turn on lights and look at you know. Dopey Carl Meldons Mitch and be like. Oh we've made enchantment at that works on him. It works on people. Well I mean. She doesn't even let him see her in the daylight you know it's funny specific thinking about it. I'm like what do you think is the motivating factor is? Is he trying to just route her out because he knows that she's Congress or is he trying to reveal her as a fraud because he's afraid he's going to turn Stella on him and if he loses Stella then his life falls apart so he's is it? Is he acting out of protection or is he acting out of like a weird moral compass? I I you know because it's sort of like. He has control over Stella. He controls her right. He can get into a fight with her he can cry and call her back show comeback. They can have a kid ups downs like but she's not gonNA lose her but but blanche represents this this force that could maybe upset his control. You're right because there's this whole thing that's alluded to in in the in the movie but we don't get to see it year. Which is Stanley an stella falling in love like we know from what we've heard about blanche that they came from a pretty wealthy family educated. You know I mean one of the worst insults that you hear Vivian. Lee airtel Stella about about Stanley is that he's common because an animal. Surely you can't forgotten that much of our upbringing. Stellar just opposes. Any part of a gentleman his nature. Or you're hating me saying that. Aren't you at all handle has an animal's habit? Even something so be human about him. Thousands of years past him right by there is Stanley was gay survivor of the stone. Age bearing the raw meat home from the kill in the jungle anew waiting volume maybe he'll strike you or maybe grunt kiss you. Ed Cases of being discovered his poor night. You call it this party of Apes. Maybe we are a long way from being made in God's image but stellar. My sister has been some progress in thin. Such things as odd as poetry is news in some kinds of people some tender feelings of heads some little beginning the we gotta make grow and clean do and hall our flag in his dark marched. Or whatever it is we're approaching. Don't don't hang back with Bruce. It's Oh the Dubois family is a family that would look down on a Polish immigrant. They come from riches in so you do think there had to be this moment where he sees. Stella he wins her over with his magnetism he probably knows in the back of a brain the according to quote unquote things Zito. She's too good for him. And he's worried that blanche will be an influence on her reminder. That she's too good for him. He Stella does start ordering him around a little bit loitering abounding. Oh go fetch us this. Which is around blanche too much. I think he's so worried of being reminded that his low will. He's the power in that relationship. He's the high status character and then blanche coming in and immediately like you said that I seen saying you're overweight on the pretty one you you left me. With all the responsibility she takes back the power immediately even though she is lois data. She's coming in hollowed out. Ghostly she looks unwell but she immediately grabs the power there. And what you know. In many respects Stella's the the most inconsequential character in this. But they're both fighting for who has power over her. They're both abusive to To Stella like and it's comes out differently like you know obviously I think Marlon Brando's physically and emotionally abusive Derek. But I also feel like blanche is just manipulating her. Trying to get to come with her. Start a new life because she needs a partner in crime. They're they're both. They're both wrestling for the soul. Yeah and and yet. They're the instead of the soul they're fighting over. Who's in the bathroom too much? Many my God I mean it is definitely the quarantine talking here but the idea of being stuck in a room apartment with one bathroom with your Your sister in her like hot hot husband who obviously WANNA boning all the time. And can't I mean that's got to be part of it. Want to be burning all the time they can't she's there and they don't even have a door they don't even have door. They only have a curtain. Oh my God and and yet like Vivian Leaf Bites at this kind of Ninja Way. You Know Kim Hunter. She wants Stanley to use initials. Be like hey turn that down. Maybe he will maybe he won't you know but just confronting him is the way she handles it. Blanche's like I'M GONNA turn on Roomba music. You don't want me to be here. You don't want me to be like dominating the scene. I'm just GONNA fight this way your. She's is kind of backwards. Ju Jitsu type of strategy. Yeah and I will look. It's a woman who is standing tall to an Alpha male and I think while Stella kind of takes the abuse or accepts the abuse or forgives the abuse however you want to look at it Blanche is asserting her dominance. And that's probably something that Stanley is never had to deal with with a with a woman before and the only way that he can at the end of this play is to physically assert his dominance. Because he can't win. He can't kind of breaker even though he knows you know and and the ending is interesting because the ending of the play You know Stella stays with Stanley and the ending of the the movie big. They kind of changed that and And she leaves Stanley or at least alluded to that. She's going to leave Stanley. I thought that was actually an interesting thing to because we talked about. This like what? Is this play trying to tell us you know what is what is the end result? Those are two very different endings. You know Should Stella spew a Stanley is blanche? Right you blanche's right to Kinda separate the two of them. I mean no Intel. He rapes her and then he proves that yes. He is the monster right but I mean but I also hit some to. He hits her to. There is a part where you can and this is what makes the play. I think so. Tricky you can look at it and be like they're happy he. They're an abusive relationship. We know that we know that these poker nights are going on. We know these fights have happened. We know that. But it's almost like blanche trying to get her out for the wrong reasons using the right reasons as bait right and and that's a really tricky thing. She doesn't really care about her sister. Getting out of this region if you only cares about her sister getting out of this relationship so she can then do it to her. So it's a Stella's is really the tragic character here to me. Yeah I mean and the play ending is just so gut it you know. In the way it's supposed to end in the play Blanche's taken off in poker is still going on and Stella sits in Stanley's lap and she sort of sobbing and crying and he's consoling her but really the last shot as you just has his hand on her breasts. Well Oh and by the way the only reason why the play in the movie change was because of the Hollywood Moral Code Right. They didn't want they didn't want a film to show that The rapists wasn't punished right and and that's an interesting thing because it does change the dynamic of the whole play. There's swimming I think so. Gutting that that in you stopped about it. It's much more of a Tennessee Williams ending whereas kind of you you leave triumphant in the movie or sightly triumphant slightly like. It's so sad that blanche has decided just to step into fantasy permanently. Either to just agree to go away with this man even though she knows she's being lied to. And just make it happen Ed and yet I love that moment when it's the other guys more than anything when the other guys look at Stanley and they see what he's done. It's like Blanche has. He's forced clarity upon blanche just in that he sending her away that she's finally that he's one who's going to the mental hospital but he's seen to you know they see him differently. He's been like the popular guy you get. The census friends have always liked him. That he's been like the fun rogue and the way they just look at him the way Karl Malden looks at him. You know he's he'll never be back. You start seeing the factory like because he's getting jealous and he. This woman is of setting his power balance. And I think you know there's so many great conversations to have about a power and when you feel threatened and you could talk about how we see that a lot right now and politics you can see that so much when when someone is the way that we threaten people and then you know how this. This is a struggle that I think is getting more and more amplified throughout everything that we deal with in our lives is like how dare you offend me. That's not the persona that I'm putting out. Follow me. Don't listen anybody else you know but. I think I want to just go backwards. Second Talk About Blanche in how she even got here. Because Blanche's an duplicitous person right like she became this to survive and in Stanley. It's a little bit more question. Mostly always been like this but we go back to her backstory that gets kinda unraveled throughout the play. Wow I mean aid it kind of keeps on twisting you and twisting twisting when you I kind of hear that are husband committed suicide. You see how much of a how much of a weight she's carrying. This is the Albatross around her neck. I mean she is. She is Completely I think the beginning of the end was that yeah and and I don't know exactly how I feel about the floor touches of US hearing the gunshot over and over again and stuff you know about the movie making us be in her head I. It's weird I wanna be able to just completely go into the fantasy. Maybe just because Tennessee Williams has been done and done and done and parodied sometimes when I hear like the gunshots and the echoes. That signify this memory in this madness that she's got the polka music in the background. I I wish I didn't roll my eyes as much as I do to happen to you. You know I kind of accepted it. This movie does have A magical realism a good term. I don't know that there's some heightened elements to it that make it feel like it doesn't exist in this world and especially the way the end goes down and when you're hearing the echoes that Blanche's hearing and I think they do a really good job and again. This is Kazan. Bridging stage and film by just a little couple of moments in her head. I don't mind I don't mind I didn't mind. The whole thing is heightened and I think if you're on board that train it it worked for me at least feel byles unless the paper you WanNa take you want to land on amy. The plot thickens is the first ever podcast from Turner Classic Movies. I'm so excited. The first season titled I'm Still Peter Bogdanovich. One of the guests actually on our show is hosted by Ben Mankiewicz and the plot thickens is a seven episode. Podcast about the life and work of this oscar-nominated writer director actor producer. Peter Bogdanovich ultimate sinophile and living link to Hollywood's Golden Age. I mean we loved having him on our show And this is kind of peters whole story in his own words. For the first time ever the plot thickens is out now. And you can subscribe wherever you get your podcast and enjoy this special trailer. For the plot thickens they suck up to you but at the same time. They hate you by Donna. I'm Ben Mankiewicz host of Turner Classic Movies. I ever podcast. The plot thickens. I'm still here by Donna. In the seventy s director. Pierre by Donovan saw now he's sharing his truly off the charts crazy Hollywood stories exclusively for TC block thickens. I'M STILL PETER. Down which hosted by me then magazines subscribe for free now on Apple podcast and this a dot com slash podcast to learn more. Did you know that a couple years ago Gillian Anderson? The actress did a short film called the departure. That is about. The last days of Blanche Dubois in her hometown. No yeah a lot of it is online here. We can here. Here's a scene. This is blanche to Gua at the Flamingo and the local cop has come to tell her that he knows all about herself. And the Kid Superintendent Graves Great View. He's had a call from the mother. You pupils seventeen year old boy. I know many such individuals stop at no idea. The Superintendent knows you. You've had these. You're no stranger to the problem of praise is that not just the awfullest. The saying you'RE UNFIT BLANCHE. For your position morally unfit how perfectly absurd. I don't think so. The boy will testify by the way also talking about an issue that feel so relatively new movie in this play is so old like a teacher and a student and scandalous nature of that I I love that that she did a Prequel and I love. I don't know if you ever saw the sequel where she becomes a An alien investigator really good a really different. Very very wow yeah. We don't know this backstory when you have scenes like the one where the newspaper collector shows up there at her house the teenager who she winds up kissing and that scene is charged with so much a uncanny electricity. When you don't know that she has been accused of of abusing her young students. It seems like such a surreal senior. Here comes a young man. Who's just like more beautiful and young and just drawn to him and she won't let him go and it's creepy but you don't know the whole story. Let's listen to a little bit of that and this scene was so hot at the time that they cut off the phrase on the mouth. They thought that was too much. Anyone ever tell you you looked like a young print radio nights do over here. I WANNA kiss you. Just one so sweetly on your mom. I mean okay like I is a child Molester. Or is blanche a person who misses her young husband that she fell in love with when he was seventeen. Is it about? The husband is a debate like what is happening or she just like an attack. Animal like Stankowski. Is She just attacking prey? Like you know she finds somebody weaker. Manipulates THEM NOW? I don't see the upside of manipulating a seventeen year. Old boy like that only seems like a downside where I see the upside of manipulating Karl Mauldin character. I see the upside of her trying to get her out. But I don't understand that maybe you're right. Maybe that seventeen year old boy was some. That wouldn't question her that she could maybe go back to youth and I mean it depends on how mentally unwell she is. I mean at that point. She really faded is she. Even you know I don't know and I think she for that breakdown at the end to occur. She's got to be close. She's got to be close to because that breakdown is she's she's on the precipice at least in this play or the film version of this So I think that. That breakdown is more believable. So maybe she's just that's a fantasy that she may be thought he was him. I didn't think about that. I think you're exactly right two zero in on the power she has. Here's somebody like Stanley. Thinks he's too smart to fall for her flirtations. Unlike his Buddy Mitch and this teenager is just he has never seen a human being like this. She asked him to let her cigarette and he says thank you. He thinks her for letting her own cigarette. Iv that is the spell she puts on this guy she's like it's like he stepped into another world and let us go back to her husband. We talked about her husband in the movie. It's a little more vague But her husband did kill himself because he was gay and in the in the film she said that she kind of made fun of him for being too sensitive do you think that she also made fun of him for being gay like she basically bullied him and that's killed himself like. I don't I'm not I haven't read the tax so I didn't know if that was more implicitly If that was more explicitly kind of mentioned yeah I think so. Yeah I mean what she tells what she tells Mitch. In the play is that she came into a room she thought was empty but it wasn't empty and that there are two people in it and one of them was the boy she married and the other one older man that she thought was his friend made. So there's definitely a shock in a in a revulsion in her voice. At that moment it was interesting to Hays Code. They thought the solution was that they would make the other person in the room and older woman and so they were trying to convince Ian Zandi go with making here have had an affair which absolutely changes it. Then it's not. It's not as I mean the to me. It's like the A I. I don't think we were as aware I. I'm just going to say culturally aware. Maybe personally people were but the idea that she would be braiding. This person as if I could do anything about it like you know an and I think that idea is so you just feel for this husband that we never meet like just being humiliated. You know there wasn't a team but he wasn't a man he wasn't he didn't you know like and but it seems that that caught up to her to like it seems like she realized that was wrong like the same way that like. Stanley is outside pleading for Stella. To come back he realizes what he did was wrong. But you know skeleton killer self where Stanley might become a blanche if still did killer you know what I'm saying like there's something interesting because they're both abusers this is the battle the to Stanley's just one wears me. No more Daphne clothing well. They're both pretty safer. Think about all of the cuts the Hays Code especially Joseph Breen. Who is in charge of at the moment? Wanted to do to strengthen bizarre. It feels like they didn't understand this story at all. I mean a lot of Elia. Kazan's letters Tennessee Williams. Letters are still around. You can read them and they are just outraged. The Hays Code wanted to cut the rape scene. And they're like what you can't do that. They wanted to cut out the entire idea that Vivian lease a blanche had slept around. Which was insane. Kazan wrote this letter. He was like for the life of me. I do not see what can be done about. Blanche's promiscuity it is the story of the play and for Christ sake she pays impey's impey's what more do they want it. Then she in any added you know. Tell Mr Bean that Christ didn't condemn the Hor- you know or move away from her. He said let him throw the first stone and he just was furious he was like he wrote at the end dino. I don't think the COA can be applied mechanically without some imagination to a stage masterpiece that has won every prize in the theater world. I almost wonder if that defensiveness why this play opens up with a card saying it won the Pulitzer like you're about to see some shit. Go Down it won the Pulitzer it feels did. Wasn't that such a strange choice. We have not seen that in these adapted from a two things. We'll see it in the trailer that the like you're a stage winning thing but to start the movie like yeah I you know. I can't imagine this going down smoothly at the time you know especially talking about something like African Queen coming out the same year African Queen. We've already watched it on the show and it's so Tame and obviously that's more of a comedy but it's playing with you know these kind of characters but when you put that film up with this you're why I mean it seems so progressive. You know this movie is dealing with very heavy things and as far as I'm concerned at looking at the the the depth of this list. It's one of the deepest things that we've done as far as like moral ambiguity right there. You know. We've talked a lot about moral ambiguity in war but here in interpersonal relationships. I I I can't none no other movie that we've watched really comes to mind. That is this kind of media to be. Well what about this character and maybe that characters and so bad and maybe this is. There's a lot here I can't imagine that you can't have you distillates so walk. This in the benefit is that it's a renowned play if this came out cold I- People's minds must've been blunt would be blown. Yeah I mean. Isn't it fascinating that to have? Audiences think about their behavior in their own lines in codes about morality. You have to take a story so big. It is almost like war Ito. Are you willing to kill a person on the battlefield? Who are you in war? Who Are you? If you're prisoner-of-war those heightened stakes are happening here. You know most of us aren't going to worry about molesting young boys or being raped by your brother-in-law you know these are not common day occurrences the although they do occur. God Oh but the core of that idea you know you take this big thing and then you find your humanity in it. Because you've made this epic larger than life kind story. It makes me think about why love Charlie Kaufman fields. You know they they. They tell the worst parts of ourselves in ways we can relate to you them all out of proportion yet. I mean these dramatic. Big Moments are so important and this play ends on a pivotal scene which is also impossible. Get through the Hays Code. Which is the rape. We've talked about this rape a few times but I love to kind of get your your opinion on it because it is less than how the play portrayed it but it definitely allows you to understand what you're seeing but the hays code. They did not want this year and Kazan the rape of blanche by Stanley is pivotal. It's an integral truth in the play. Without which the play loses its meaning. Which is the ravished moment of the tender the sensitive the delicate by the savage and brutal forces of modern society is a poetic plea for comprehension. No one I read that as a I don't see it exactly like that. I don't know that to me puts a whole different perspective like it seems to me like that's more kintu a blanched into the seventeen year old child right like she like she you she. You know ravished this tender sensitive delicate or you know whatever this young boy who didn't really understand what was going on you know but here I feel like it's much more of a POW it's like I can't control you. I can't stop you so the only thing I can do is literally like control you. I mean this is I mean eat has a very obviously a big conversation about rape. But it's a but it's like there's something about it I like. I don't want to say I don't think that she is this innocent. I think it's actually more interesting that she isn't that innocent like I don't think that she is You know tender and sensitive and delicate. I think that it's more speaking of like this. A part of like why abuse happens. It's like you`re. He's being threatened by her. It's like to a certain degree to you. I mean that feel writer. I don't know I mean I know moping of a big Pandora's box here but yeah I mean that language sounds like the way blanche would describe ourself. You know may herself always like this sensitive victim at the center of things? That's how she would say issues trying to convince them. That happened. Which doesn't work still doesn't believe it. Which is another wrenching thing. That but Stella's has a newborn Stella's like I literally gave birth. I just literally birth. What do you want me to do? I can't leave the man who is supporting me a yeah I mean. It's strange like the way this scene plays out. It almost feels like the next step of him. Just being mad at all the insults right. He has that that speech where he is disfigured. That she has been calling him a polack the whole time and he's like. I'm one hundred percent American and he's offended and he gets angry and he smashes the table it here. I don't know the way the scene plays out. It's strange because it starts by her being like. Can you please move so I can get by? Which is one of those in this jockeying for power things that they do the time you know. She tells men in the table. You don't stand up for me. Oh you know and insanely is like no really. Don't stand up you know. They're always fighting over. Who stands aware who moves in does what they here. He seems so offended by the idea that she is accusing him of wanting to rape her that he has to Raipur to prove that he wasn't the person who was going to rape her. Or like. Or if you think I'm GonNa it's not logical to keep hearing if you keep calling me a Nazi I'm just going to be a Nazi right right. Yeah Yeah it's like you've you've made me this way. I'm only doing this because you force my. Yeah it's A. It's bizarre. Logic enemy speaks to Stanley's character to like he can't. He can't get one over on her. He can't like the only way he can do. It is by physically. He's much and I think the way that you're talking about him always being what having assured off seeing his body seeing buffy is like if she's a shell he is a pack sausage. Like you know like he is like you know he is fully there. And there's no there's no defense for her you know Yet mental right like he is heavy and wet and she's Air and light voting through. And Gosh I mean the one of her last lines is don't please don't get up. I'm only passing through. It's like her. Life is just as ghost like vaporous than from the past Ito. This that you can't even hold onto it. I mean it almost feels like she's representing very much. The death of the south you know of this idea of gentility like it was dying in then gone with the wind. Gyna- tried to make it back for better in a lot of worse. A lot of worse evidence still dying you know and here when she talks about watching watching it die you know. She gives that speech. You know that she's lived in a house of death in a house. Went dying old within remember the dead men crumble and fade regret recrimination? If you done this that wouldn't have cost me that legacy and other things. Such as bloodstained pillow slips to sit here she is a death was closed. As you are an opposite is desire. How good you wonder. How could you possibly? What from bell read before we lost battery was a cap. They young sold Saturday nights. They were going to get drunk on the way back. They would stagger on the my lawn and call. She's the last of her kind except for her sister. Stella and she's already kind of said you know well I guess Stella's mixing DNA with these stronger people. You Know Stella survives. Because she's mic DNA with this Polish Person. Very Weird and eugenicist this death of a way of being a think after the rape. That's it she's done like I mean she's not dead but she is checked out of this reality she is not here no one should stand up for because she's no longer a person and you know so maybe in that sense too it's like it is this ravage. Schmidt this this kind of Year once it comes to force then that then you have you know. It's sort of like the idea that she or he radicals her like He. Basically you know he can't do it verbally. He can't can't figure out but if he can foresee just go over and I mean this is a boy so much. I'm Kinda wrap my head around and talking about so But it's like but like that idea is really like really daunting and really something that I feel like. I've seen society all the time. You know the the use of force over people that you know. Don't have the same brakes as you. That don't have the no are not treated the same way but this we come back as all this time. You know we see it in the news right now like the use of forces is something to eradicate life and it's not always it is right but it's also murder it's also you know trailing the wrong person threatening the wrong people standing your ground. All these things You snuff out a life because you are threatened. And that's something that is I mean. We are living in that right now. Like three cases in the last two weeks. You know that our national news it's like and there will be more if you're listening to this two years from now. It's you know it's this idea that you know when you are threatened you use ultimate power and you destroy somebody and that is media. I mean that's why I've just never seen it kind of articulated as well as this. You know. Now that's such interesting because you're right like Stanley Wood frame. This as I am standing my ground she came into my house. She is drinking my liquor. She is using my bathroom. She's taking my wife away from me. I hear her telling my wife. I'm not good enough for her. I am standing my ground against this person threatening me. I feel threatened by her so the only way I can defeat her is through force power And that's you know and we live in a country that you know in a world that I think often sees that at. Wow yeah this is not even gotten deeper for me. Maybe I'm reading into it too much. But that's where. I'm at so amy. I actually is a good place to kind of bring in a Tennessee Williams expert Right now to kind of talk to us a little bit more about what is behind Tennessee. Williams this is actually an interesting guests. He is comes out of the Improv Theater. And he does An improvised Tennessee. Williams play and this is not like what you would see on whose line is anyway It's much more rich and truthful to Tennessee Williams. So please welcome Brian. It's tell me a little bit about Your Theater Company. you're improvising in the style of famous playwrights. And just a little bit more about that. I worked with a company called the Improv theater. And we've been improvising. Full length plays in the style of Tennessee. Williams since about two thousand three and Williams is one of the playwrights slash filmmakers that we do these improvised pastiches or homeless to We also do Shakespeare. Dickens twilight zone Filmar Jane Austen. There's a lot of different styles that we do but Williams has been a consistent crowds since we started doing it. And we all continue to love it here. What do you think it is about Tennessee Williams style? That is so interesting to an audience. Because he really is one of those. You big its genre. You know exactly what you're talking about when you're talking about Tennessee Williams. What do you think pulls people in? I think it's the characters and the dynamic between the characters so we're excited when an outsider arrives from somewhere else the way that blanche arrives into New Orleans appearing out of the mist with her suitcase. We know that she's a fish out of water and something's GonNa Happen when her particular chemistry butts up against Stanley Kowalski's and he uses that Dramatic tension in a number of different plays the way that Reverend Shannon is an outsider. In night of the Iguana were interested in these different types of people. The physical meets the spiritual and people who live with a large appetite for different things but what they are hungry for may not be the same things and how do they coexist in the world. I love that idea and I feel like to improvise in the style of Tennessee Williams. You really have to get familiar with. You can't just be like oh I saw once or I I get the gist. How did you kind of immerse yourself enough to feel like you? You can get his style in his voice and the characters like what did you do. It's Kinda like a Grad School class in Tennessee Williams which never ends so we keep reading the plays and looking at that short stories and reading the phones There's one called cried the Fox which ties right into that idea of that person who's trying to escape somewhere or on the run which blooms himself did a lot in his life when the pressure came down he would pack it back and split and then his agent had tracking down the directors working with had to try and track him down. You understood what it was like fugitive. Can I read just the first four lines of cried the Fox? Oh my gosh would love it. And I think you'll see how it connects to blanche. I run cried. The Fox encircles narrower narrower still across the desperate hollow skirting the frantic ill. I love that I didn't know about this poetry. A you know he such an interesting figure because I think most people really only think about streetcar and I wanted to get your take on that. Like is that a fair. Is that fair because you know in your opinion like? What's your favorite Tennessee? Williams piece of work. I love night. It'd be a terrific film to But the high stakes at the beginning. You know bland gets off with their suitcase and is able to sit down and have a lemon coke with chip ice. Reverend Shannon is like clawing his way up this hill the busload full of Southern Baptist women screaming at him to come back because they want to go home and he's just deflowered a sixteen year old girl. Who's on the tour as well so it starts there? Yeah you've been one more crazy. I mean they`re. They're German tourists running around with inflatable pool. Animals marching through this hotel. It is not a realistic play right. And I think that's one of the things that people overlook they think of him as being kind of in the American religion tradition of cause and Marlon Brando. But he is firmly planted. In the tradition of being American poetic non realist there is so much richness to his writing and he explores this idea of what what happens fragile characters when they come up against bullies who went to control them and ultimately destroy them the way that Stanley does that to blanche and the paper lanterns such a great symbol of Beauty. Getting just crushed in the In the rush to dominate. I think the reason why Tennessee Williams kind of stays so relevant is because the idea of a bully or someone that is having power over you is something that's not going away. I'd argue now. You know we're in a time where our politics is. Fueled by bullies are Internet relationships are fueled by bullies we are you know regardless of the interpersonal relationships that that's never stopped but bullying culture. I think has become a little bit more prevalent. It's part of human nature. Unfortunately and you're right with there being more and more outlets for it. They're this whole pack mentality of of seizing on vulnerability and then using that to decimate somebody whether those are Internet trolls or whether that's in the political arena. It's acceptable in a way that hasn't been for a long time now and it's it's really disturbing. Williams is a good person to look to for that because an key felt like an outsider. So much of his life for being gay and not really being able to come out early in his career and writing. These plays about these Characters on the fringes that aren't really understood and Don't really have room made for them in the culture. When I was doing short form Improv you would do these Janica things. And you're hitting the very base level of what all these Jonah's are you know whether it's Mamat and you're just saying fuck allot or you're hitting this. This moment of recognition but to improvise a unique fully realized peace and to be committed into this world. What are some other structural tropes that you kind of find in Tennessee Williams writing you know You use to kind of help guide you. As you're you know. Improvising something that is more full length on the stage One of the things I did early on. I've been the director of record for a while now Over ten years I can create a couple of new mikes One is crisis so cool. T reminiscent innocent outsider a seduction and event in the secret. I love this having those things floating around out there and then the other one that For second acts because the second acts often have an event of something. There's big daddy's birthday party poker game. Maybe there'll be big dinner like The way that Amanda Wingfield is planning that big dinner in the Glass Menagerie. And if you look at this pneumonic of Eight you get An accusation the way that Stanley accused Blanche Get a confession. Bleach has a couple of those in streetcars to contest about Bowie. She confesses about the death of Allen and her cruelty Hope one of the things that makes Williams watchable is that you're still rooting for them. And you're still hoping that these characters will somehow make it through this thing and then event as I mentioned so that would be ache as my second pneumonic. I love this I you know. I know. It's kind of taboo to a certain extent to talk about. You know an improvised scene. Because it's sort of like there's a moment where you were there and and kind of hearing somebody talk about a great improvise. Seen is like listening to somebody's dream but this what you've done is created. Something really fantastic. I think that's really you know has a lot more weight. Is there a Tennessee Williams? Play the you created that you look back on and you go. You know that that one actually the I'm the most proud of that that just you know like those do you. Jeff one that kind of jumps out at you remember. We did one at the road. Stage in two thousand eighteen That was set in a Hawaiian resort with an orchestra conductor and his best friend. Who's a music critic? He's now at the end of his rope. He's in this resort with his friend and He and his wife are on the verge of their relationship completely falling apart because the secret back to secret. That's come out is that He's never really thought that she had the talent to perform at the level that he works at So they're they're marriages in in a crisis. What makes the whole thing kind of blow away out of control is These TO CHURCH LADIES. Show up on this tour. We're really drifters and they're trying to get free hotel. And they're claiming to be able to perform Really just miracles. They both seem stigmata. And they're they're really interested. Mostly in having a great time and drinking Tequila and partying this character named Boy Tommy who they convinced to get naked and dance around for him at the swimming pool and You know there's that wildness that goes with it and unpredictability. That made it really good but some of it. You know from being performer juicy characters. Just really fun characters to play E Patterson you might know from Vice Principals and righteous gemstones and Gary Coleman play the to Bible Ladies and they're just hilarious. I love that I love. You can really see. That feels very much. So like Tennessee. Williams apiece. We spend a LOT OF TIME TALKING ABOUT STREETCAR. I WanNa know what's what's fascinating about streetcar to you. One of the things I love about it is how close it gets to working out. Doesn't have a line something like sometimes there's got so quickly when yes Mitch. Mitch's there with her and she's Oh this is gonNA work. I'm at a guy he's never gonNA learn about my past. I'M GONNA get a fresh start. It's GONNA be okay. And then Stanley in his predatory bully nature pulls it all apart but those moments of hope that awkward dance between mentioned Blanche's so beautiful and the the stuff with the lighter on the doorstep and the other thing that I've I've is people's People's flaws keeps going back to abusive Stanley. And you just Kinda okay. Well I guess they're happy but what a price to pay there's a realism to it. I think you know a lot of the Times. I experience the most anxiety retroactively. Like what if this happened instead of that and you get a glimpse of that moment. I think this play and film. You know you you said you see the crossroads and they miss it. They could have gotten off this ride. And I think there's something vicarious or I don't know if it's shot Freud to be like you're getting to watch other people you know. Oh no they didn't get out of it. There's there it's like a horror film like you are living in this moment of watching the downfall or you can you can look down on them in a way but you also support them. I think we see ourselves in these characters to a certain extent. Yeah I think that's absolutely right. And that moment to with the young boy at the doorstep where she kisses him yeah and the what is of what if she just kinda wraps her arms around him and pulls him insides. You know what what's going to happen with her writer. In that moment you know and and all the trouble that she's been into four that we know about so yeah that's a nail biter moment. It's funny that you talked about it. Only because I I just watched Tod Browning's Dracula with my five year. Old Wow which when she loves. He loves to empires And I was looking at how the the lighting and the kind of gauzy fabric that wenches wearing and yours in the film were reminding me of of Dracula. The number of different ways the that whole element which blanche brings to the to the movie. Because she's living in Gothic all and it's interesting because he could also view Stanley as a vampire kind of sucking the energy in life out of these people like you know it's like by keeping them under their control that idea of like the traditional vampire as you under a spell and you know and and really is only serving self-serving spell Just kind of power him. I loved this conversation with you You know the the show is Tennessee. Williams unscripted And just tell us where we can find you where people can See the show or whatever like how can we find you improve? Theater DOT COM. We're showing shows that we have done in the past on twitch so there's underscore TV channel on twitch. So we actually showed that William show that I described in that might be archived there on twitch. I can send you a link to if you want to. Let's put it up on our show notes. That's perfect immobile. Tweeted out and make sure people find. We are live improvising on twitch Fridays and Saturday nights through June. And we're doing Jane austen. We just finished our Williams run but people wanna see the company's work. Yeah that's up and running Friday and Saturday why I love and I think what this conversation would so of fascinating about. It is the care and the pride that you take in the work and that you are actually getting something that feels you know that it is of this. You know whoever the Creator is And I think that's something. That's so kind of amazingly special. And when you see Great Improv. Like this you can't you can't beat it and it's one of those things where you can't believe it's improvised and so. I tell everybody go check out your twitch and then hopefully at one point People can see you live and in person again as we all. Just wait to find out when that day will be but thank goodness for For twitch and and Youtube live and all these amazing things because I think in a weird way people are getting to experiment and see things that they wouldn't normally get the see or you get to expand your audience to It's really kind of a bummer of time for live performance but also kind of an amazing time as well. Yeah it's it's expanded our audience. You know we we also about three years ago And that's one of the shows that's GonNa be rebroadcast live on the improve TV twitch channel the show we didn't also we're also teaching to at our school is active and oh well students. New Zealand and Canada and East Coast did or taking Improv Shakespeare. With me right now but Probably teach Tennessee Williams coming up as ING. Oh I love this. This is great. Well thank you so much. End Up pleasure talking to you. Thank you for having me amy. You actually brought Brian to our attention of so bum that you are not there for that. That discussion did you see one of these plays I have. I used to be a theater critic and I love it. I mean I guess. It is sort of literally. There's been so much Tennessee Williams perfume in the air that it's fun to go back to the original to kind of kind of cut through all the vapor you know and see where it comes from see what inspires it. There's a whole history of melodrama. Be As we're talking about. How how the Tennessee Williams in this of the world won't die. Have you ever heard about the Tennessee? Williams screaming Stella contest. No I have not heard all of our people calling in at the top of the episode which is amazing. I have not heard that there was another contest. The thirty second annual Tennessee Williams festival has been going on this weekend in the French quarter. The event takes place every year to honor the late playwrights. Birthday now one of Williams's most famous works was a streetcar named desire. And arguably the most popular part of the festival is the shouting contest. Take a listen. Wow well by the way I wanted to talk about that scene. It's such an iconic scene. But I feel like it's just it doesn't feel as conic in the movie or maybe I just have been used. I was like. Oh that's there it is. There's that scene it's like. Maybe how everything's feels like. The most memorable moment is sort of you know manipulated in a way. Obviously there's been parodied and people have done versions of this tennis again You know this is also is a somebody that we've talked about being a controversial person but ever hear Woody Allen impression of Blanche in sleeper. Who are you miles? Blanche Blanche do blah. It means white words is like sleepwalking. We can't upset could be fatal. We're GonNa do you read street counting desire? Just play along with another injection. Physical beauty is passing a transitory possession but beauty of the mind and richness of the spirit and tenderness of the heart. And I have all those things are taken away but but grow increase with the years. Strange that I should be called a destitute woman when I have all these riches locked in my heart. Go with that okay. Well if we're talking about the modern more You know I like to torture you by finding songs that reference the moving that we knew it turns out. I mean I'm going to go on a limb and say that more people especially more big people have reference Streetcar Named Desire. Than any other movie that we've done on this list besides like Dunkel. Yoda goodfellas that gets. That's all the time there's a lot of Scorsese. Go velos Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Godfather. But the list of people who have named Streetcar Named desire in their song is crazy. I would like twelve people you. Let's start with kiss. We got some Elton John in the House. Got Some with passion. The Cross screaming actions beat for thirteen. We brought the streetcar named desire going. We got losing opposition in the game of life standing firm foreign land. Jump the gun out. The frying pan into the transformative goes a six pack and a Streetcar Named Desire. You keep going keep going keep going me. Sure I'm not mining these so go ahead. Okay here's the Bob Dylan Steve. That's number one. There's native connor but that one. Listen listen to that one. How ABOUT BRIAN? Ferry stree- I feel like I'm wearing your patients. I'm here I'm here. How about panic right? I you know I can't stop. How about low Wayne? Point because of course we have to give some props to Saturday of that one because she doesn't technically say but it's sad day. I mean who else has the sexual animal? Passion Worthy of Marlon Brando. Nobody nobody nobody I. I will most of the songs though. It seemed like they are really talking about the meaning of Streetcar. Named desire or so. They've got it all wrong and maybe they haven't watched the movie. Maybe they haven't listless episode yet. Which is of course. They haven't but I but I did. WanNa play you one last one in this is a twist on it by a the beloved nineties band best known for runaway train soul asylum. All right now. Let's hear bus named desire combined boy. Oh Boy Well obviously is the movie or play or piece of work. That's launched a thousand mildly. Okay songs But But how is the response to this? This came out. Everybody loves it in. There are no better news. Of course I imagine everyone you know they got all the Oscars Right. This is this is like a home. Run hit. Yeah everybody got on the esker except Marlon Brando. Who Lost his Oscar do none other than Humphrey Bogart for the African Queen? Wow that's fascinating those that performance. It'd be put them together and we talked about it earlier. Like it doesn't necessarily doesn't necessarily go together but wow I'm blown away by that. I did want to play if you don't mind. Carl Meldons Oscar speech just because it me laugh forever is combination and he's accepting it in person time coming down the aisle and I haven't been here very long so is being moved to the center of the State is not been here long but I can tell you how I feel. Thank you let me just set the stage as are about to hear and play. He's so great because he has just been brought to Hollywood to do this movie. And because of this movie he is GonNa go on and he's GonNa work with you know Ilian Brando again on on the waterfront. But he's so green that he walks up to the Oscar stage and he goes to the wrong. Microphone Love It. You're say Paul. When I was watching this movie I thought God I would give my left arm to see this with John. C Reilly as Carl Maldon because they look so much alike. I looked around in John. C Reilly has been in a streetcar named desire but he played Stanley interesting. I buy that though. I can see him do they. I mean when I saw true West on onstage. He can do that you know he can do that as well. I I really got very heavy. James Franco bribes from From Marlon Brando in this I was like oh I feel like I see similarities. And they're acting style here You know better was wondering who would be a good modern day Stanley. That's you know you know like my head. I don't know. Did you have anybody in your mind that you could see. I mean we'll when I I was I when I watched this movie immediately just started texting my friends pictures of Marlon Brando and being like I'm losing my mind it's a it's a be reminded again of what how hot and magnetic he was and we were. We were like who who is our Brando and I remembered you know there's this old G. Q. Photo shoot where they dressed address. Elba up brand in the wild ones. They put them in a striped shirt and they put him in jeans an automotive cycle with the hat. And I've never forgotten that images is in my brain because it is such an attractive image. I feel like we've kind of been missing out on the extreme sexy Idris Elba roles. I wish we could have gotten I but even so Marlon Brando's one of a kind but I would love to see dislike. Maybe I'm just saying I WANNA see yourself and wet t-shirt. Forgive me no I would love to see it yourself but I was thinking that Sharon stone be really interesting as blanche. Oh yeah she's such a good actress she is and you know who else? I Adore and I don't think it's enough credit is Sienna Miller. Oh yeah she's fantastic to talking about Ryan Philipe as the new standard quality who knows This is a been a really interesting conversation and just before get into the biggest question of the podcast I wanted to see like are we always behind the Times about what audiences can accept right because this is a pretty heavy play Pretty heavy piece of work. Coban calling play movie But yet it was like when you call it a piece of work real work the real piece of work but it's like it winds up Academy Awards. It's a huge critical hit and at the time it pushes so many boundaries but yet we always go back to comfort. Food are we they. I'm just interested the guy when I hear. This movie was so overseas. Are we ready? We were ready for this back then. We were ready for this but we always be kind of always sneak back in. I don't know we'll see that can be able to see that and I think the resounding answer is a lot of the Times. Yes they want. They want things to be more challenging. I think this is that beautiful mix of challenging and entertaining Which is always a tricky thing not to feel like it's preachy. But you you definitely watch something. That's incredibly compelling without it feeling like you've been lectured at you know then amy. It opens me up to my final. Well my final of two questions Is There Simpson's and you don't even just say yes. Just play the Goddamn clip. We know there's a simpsons. Oh well yes but there's not even like a simpsons clip. There's the simpsons episode one of the most famous of ever streetcar named Marge in this episode. Where Marge is realizing? She's kind of Stella Intermarriage. She's bored. She wants to do something that makes her feel alive. And so she performs in the Musical Streetcar. A curious reworking of streaker can and I want to play a couple of different clips really fast just from the production within the production. There's this entire episode is amazing. Since I can't play all of that because we'll get sued. I just WANNA play the springfield. The article adaptation of. Oh Streetcar since it is the closest what we're talking about. We're going to hear the INTRO Song we're GonNa hear. Ned Flanders as Marlon Brando. And we're going to hear the beautiful altro. My name is blanche to walk. I thought my life would be a Mardi Dean party a faded Southern Day Don. I'm collecting for the evening star. Come here hear me L. You put through hell then. I have always depended on the kindness of strangers. You strange chip from Patchy that is amazing and I guess the final question is does. This belong on the list absolutely. And why is it in the forties? That's my big question absolutely agree with you. This movie belongs on the list and I think it should be in the in the twenties. It's it's such an iconic thing but it also like I said I think it's one of the most complex pieces that we've done on the show. I agree I mean. I think this movie is perfect. The only thing that I would change about this movie is we get a shot of Stanley's bed and there's a saxophone by the bed if this movie just as Marlon Brando playing the saxophone done number list but now I know. Amy might have an issue with the fact that We we talked about this earlier but as we go. I just want to say like you know obviously Blanche was aged up. You think that she should have been not casting this movie. Oh Wow cool years thing. It actually is a movie about a girl who's a little who's old and her Ed. So it fits. She's supposed to be old in pretty and she's old. I'm pretty. She's not supposed to be nineteen. Now she's supposed to be a nineteen year old hotshot Scarlett O'Hara then yes. I would have an issue with it but it fits the put on like other movies on this list. Point taken all right. Let's talk about movie for next week. Amy We actually have a really fun. Big One As Rafi lists wrapping up We are getting to some of these bigger ones on the list of people have been asking for and just so you know we are going to come back. I know a Lotta people have been tweeting. Like what are we going to do when it ends? We got plans hang on. We'll talk more about them soon but always dependent on the kindness podcast listeners. Oh by the way as we say the PODCAST. Thank you do apple podcasts? For giving us a nice little feature as part of their movie fanatic section last week Apple. Podcasts gave us a little bit of love and we appreciate that so much But let's talk about next week's episode. Amy What is it? It is thought that the later on her who I am so excited. Just recently rewatch bladerunner. Maybe it was before seeing the sequel to blade runner and And again I felt like I enjoyed it in a different way and We'll be watching. Which cut you WANNA watch. Do we went out God. There's so many of them got man. Watch what what when you got like? I say try to avoid the original cut. Like let's see they'd get like you can get the director's cut in there. I think that would be The way to go Lena. Let's do this first call in A. We lost our this year and he has that you would full speed. I think to honor him to start off our blading episode by just having everybody else the listeners. Put that speech back together. So give us a call. Do the Rutger Hauer speech. We're GONNA do a power a super rucker. Was You. Call it a Ruckus thon Yeah a rock record jam now. We're GONNA do that so give us your speech Our phone number is as always seven. Four seven six six six five eight two four. That is seven four seven six six six five eight to war and make sure that you follow us on instagram right now. We have a brand new instagram page. Unspoiled POD WE are verified. You'll know we the little check mark next door name and we've been kind of trying to have some discussions in the comments section on our instagram. So jump in there every day. We're posting one of the classic. Kim Trucks all images that she's created for the show so we'll have a little bit of time usually catch up with that. But but we are also posting new images moby having conversation fair so visits there at unschooled pod on instagram. All right amy. We'll see next week four later A.

Marlon Brando Vivian Lee Stanley Kurowski Vivian Blanche Vivien Leigh Hollywood Director Amy America Blanche Dubois Jessica Tandy Kazan Oscar Tennessee Williams Iliad Kazan Stella spotify Laurence Olivier
Mere dost bada hsa karte ho | Yakshi Yash

Yakshi Yash Podcast | Teri Dosti

02:29 min | Last month

Mere dost bada hsa karte ho | Yakshi Yash

"You made a coffee hot button to do bottoms up in the third quarter pilot locally becky. Moderate who get bob maria. Who but her soccer. The whole booking marie hookah but the whole deal mitchell by gamal mozelle without a tiger mall but gamarra hookah but on a soccer the whole mature by mater. Mazach were not chartered to who john party. Lewinsky johnnie logo key. Those ready asami signaled it could perhaps go goose records on husker loose roku asana river care. Komal kalibbu ziggler in congo zika. And he gut on sca. Ub could mahyco oscar uab criticism who eke be another kurowski. Us read goal. I'll call me by mohammad. Kim marie hookah. Her soccer is the cna. Some job is local muslim charge. Arkit megani men bello law some jal gheorghe gonesse gherman beloki gibney body all game midday. Those could put me leave the to made it bills meet at least to. They always the taiko. Don't monday coca the who. Which below casare thousand vicki barker which by luca toggles goes in dickey buttock on johnny kirk. Sag hill mahal bookie modern hookah but Soccer the whole look up. Nick could keith. quarterback husker army assault there too.

bob maria marie hookah gamal mozelle gamarra hookah Soccer Mazach john party Lewinsky johnnie Komal kalibbu ziggler oscar uab kurowski Kim marie hookah becky asami Arkit megani mitchell gherman beloki gibney sca congo mohammad
The 73! Edition

The Promised Podcast

1:00:37 hr | 3 months ago

The 73! Edition

"This is one. This episode may contain explicit language. Come to the promised. Podcast brought to you on t. Lv one the voice of the city. That was just proposed as a possible venue for the twenty thirty six olympics which will be the thirty sixth modern olympics now that the international olympic committee just decided that the thirty fifth olympiad in twenty thirty two will be in brisbane australia. The twenty thirty six games are now for bid. The proposal was floated. in last. week's berliner morgenpost in a column written by franck koale ski a lead organizer of the two thousand and eighteen european track and field championships in berlin and ricard ming. The president of the german olympic association. The two men began by observing. What maybe obvious that berlin could not host the twenty thirty six games because berlin hosted the nineteen thirty six weeks which were by then german. Chancellor adolf hitler and held in stadiums festooned with swastikas. You may remember. There was some unpleasantness back. Then so berlin is out or is it. Kurowski wrote quote so why not send a completely new strong signal of peace and reconciliation in twenty thirty six a signal that does not hide from history but takes up the responsibility that comes from it. It would be such a signal. If and israel apply together more precisely berlin and tel aviv with the sailing and surfing competitions on the eastern mediterranean but also with other sports such as beach volleyball in israel's lively metropolis as a clear signal of how responsibility arises from obligation visit vision. Nothing more admittedly germany is in the middle of a pandemic faces a challenge in leadership in the federal elections and is currently quite a long way from long term plans. Israel's current policies are hard for the international community to accept and there are no credible gestures of reconciliation with the palestinians on the horizon and yet berlin tel aviv in particular to liberal and pulsating metropolises could stand together for a different spirit for perspective gets us beyond the present. This could become clear in the application process. Which will take a few years. We can give the world a sign that it is possible to learn from history end quote within germany. There were those like minister of interior horse z. Hopper who said that under no circumstances could germany possibly hold the centennial of the one thousand nine hundred sixty olympics back in berlin quote. It cannot happen end quote reporting on the idea. Here you wrote dryly noted that quote the last time. Germany hosted olympic games in munich in nineteen seventy two when eleven members of the israeli delegation. Were murdered by the palestinian terrorist organization. Black september and quote the q. E. d. motherfuckers was not spelled out explicitly clearly implied by the writers idiot. The municipality of tel aviv has not yet replied. Formerly though rumors on the street are there are people working for the city to the idea seriously arguably nothing catchers the spirit of this city. We love so well. Tel aviv off. Oh better than being seen in an admittedly happe- scheme as the proof that while nazi germany one by far the most medals in nineteen thirty six eighty nine medals to the fifty six that the runner up united states to comb. It did not win history itself because this city tel aviv is as alive as any city anywhere in the world has ever been. This is a very special episode of the promise. Podcast i am recording on yomas karen on memorial day or to be more specific memorial day for the fallen soldiers of the wars of israel and victims of actions of terrorism who according to the defense ministry now number twenty three thousand nine hundred twenty eight this in the one hundred and sixty one years since eighteen sixty a bit over an hour ago there was the two minute siren when most everyone and everything in the country stops and now families are at cemeteries visiting graves of people they love and then just a few hours. We'll have that miraculous impossible. Moment of transition from morning to celebration of the seventy third independence day of the state of israel and rather than talking about the day to day stuff that we usually talk about stuff that really matters but still the stuff that koala please ask. These calls vanities and vexations of the spirit. We decided instead to each of us. Share a bit about your mood about israeli independence. Day kind of from our family to your family as you'll hear and kind of significantly won't here for some of us. This was cinci and for some of us. It was hard to try to figure out what we have to say about this amazing complicated inspiring and vexing place. You can hear this in what ohio has to say and i guess it is. They're in a different way. In the fact that sally ended up not saying anything at all though she planned to and she got sick to but still for her independence day is a whole nother thing. It's a whole nother thing. If you are a palestinian citizen of israel complicated in ways that. I'm pretty sure. I don't fully understand but god. I wish that i did for me. I have a lot of complicated thoughts about this complicated place but bottom line. I am intoxicated by israel in love with his end for me. Know matt's mood is pure celebration of something that still seems like a miracle nested in a miracle enveloped by a miracle. You'll matt's mood really is one of my favorite days of the year alongside susan's birthday and the girls and the boys a day. When i am amazed at my luck to be part of this story between our little stories. What a country. Maybe the most straight up way ever they'll be classic songs from the classic israeli songbook done by people than the people who made them into classics. If you know me you know that. I love covers. Because covers our immed- rush a learned commentary on a song you know at the same time both tribute and subversion what my kids are doing to what my parents and grandparents did it start issuing and it's a constant source of inspiration and optimism. And you hear that in these songs. So let's start by listening to this. Tish you mid sir zora. Good loyal you know you. That song is zimmer noga or as we usually call it hot dish marco lee by sarath haddad. The words to that song or by the poet racquel and it's been set to music several times. That tune was written in nineteen sixty seven by shmulik kraus and recorded just recently bus. Hurry todd and now listen to our genius researcher and conciliatory ameet ashkenazi. So some of you here on the podcast crew know that my family is a bit like fourth gump for some reason or another they pop the background in small weird ways in different corners of this country's history is the point. It begins to feel uncomfortable. When i share a with knowing the others it just sounds like i'm grasping for ways to make whatever it is on the agenda about myself though i swear to god it's all true or so i've been told they heard for example about my grandfather's friendship with moshe dayan whenever my saba would come around to visit with enduring fan or colleague he'd yell to the general moshe with the patch on i've brought guests. They heard about my other grandfather carrying explosives. That blew up the not jacko bridge in luxury. operation showed the brits. These crazy. jews aren't fooling around. This is not exceptional in any way one way or another everyone in israeli the protagonist of the small countries history history. That's barely begun in historical terms independence day however was never really a big highlight in my store calendar. My imagine memories were always rooted in another national date november twenty ninth or as we call it in israel coffman november. This of course is the day that the un voted to approve resolution. One eight one. There was supposed to establish two states in palestine. One for the jews. One for the arabs across for celebration for some tragedy for others it. Nonetheless represented a culmination of a decades long effort by zionist leaders to gain global recognition of this marginalized peoples rights and need to build a refuge a place to prosper without fearing persecution. Great something new out of many things old. They represented all the things. Diplomacy could be and do for our people and independence that was fought for with mundane and grand politicking that took facing offices and corridors committee meetings and votes in contrast independence day was often the show physical strings. I remember as a child watching planes flying overhead in tel aviv. a spectacle covering for israelis perpetual fear. This could all go away in the second november twenty nine. Th is the mark of a wholly different kind of strengths. Intellectual institutional one that's rooted in the belief that we are part of the world community dependent on it and three engagement and talks with its leaders and representatives. We could create a better reality for people that nineteen forty seven suffered a great loss on a few years prior. This belief was nothing short of a miracle. It's time november. Twenty nine th was the culmination and beginning of another story to when my grandmother arrived in palestine with her younger sister lily in nineteen forty four. The bureaucrats in the mob billion camp wanted to separate them. South lilly had lost their mother. In a ghetto of sorts in romania. Where jews were sent to die of hunger and disease their mother got sick and refuse to eat so that she wouldn't have to see her three daughters die before her so when their father so a chance to save them in a special operation rescued jews from the ghetto in nineteen forty four. He sent them away charging myself to take care of her younger sibling lily. My grandmother used to say was much more delicate unlike herself. Wild and unruly girls always got by and no concern for thirty so in stuff that disembarked the ship and found out. She was going to be forced to abandon her sister post. She simply refused to leave the camp. She will so stubborn they had to bring in. Henrietta sold herself after an unsuccessful negotiation. With my grandma relented and set her and her sister lily to an agricultural boarding schooling mcbeal leeann softer stay together. May grandma was a beautiful woman. Smart and elegant. She came from an austro-hungarian family. That owned their own factory synagogue. She would travel to vienna with her mother. Oftentimes by dresses and visit the heart of the empire that my great grandfather had fought for in the great war. Emperor francios name was always mentioned at home decades after the habsburgs were gone all that european grace and glamour had not gone unnoticed by the boys even when she was putting the strange land in the middle east orphan getting lessons from show on how to fight with sticks for the ghana as his family owned a nearby orchard but for one reason or another over who suitors. She ended up choosing another holocaust survivor. A skinny boy from poland. Who lost everyone about. His brother. Went through death marches and live to the horror of the camps and yet having reached palestine was over. He managed to stay the funniest person in every room for the rest of his life when they graduate from deal mice after inside the moved into a small shack veteran well not far from tel aviv and started a new life together on november. Twenty ninth nine hundred forty seven. All the friends came to the check to hold their hooper as my grandfather broke a glass thinking of a world lost and a new world waiting knowing my grandfather and his polish friends. I'm sure they got stupid. Drunk as soon as his bond with my software was pronounced and while dancing ensued but then just after midnight their personal independence became that of an entire. People ascribes erupted the around them with a voice in the radio announcing two new states should be established in palestine. my grandparent's lives were filled with sorrow and joy as our everyone's but despite the healthy went through they created a family. They took part in creating a country. They traveled the world and opened their homes in the hearts to people from all over even from germany especially germany where they returned almost every summer. I often asked them. How can you go there. Speak german be friends with the people that have done this to. My grandma would always answer. We have to live our lives. Free of the trauma suffered you are only revenge. If you days ago. I called my five year old niece south though was still around. She was born but she wouldn't let my brother named the kid after her. The winning stint with the name after a soft as younger sister. Young really is just as headstrong as grandma. But for her independence is just an abstract notion and natural state. She goes with my mom to demonstrations she listens to her. Give speeches about how we need. Independence for everyone who lives in this place where he probably her women. Wage p t shirt. Whenever i talked to the kid imagine my grandma looking at her with love through teary eyes knowing that her little lily is protected. She's free to live her life to the fullest in a statement. Soft and saba could only dream of standing on that fateful november night. Kabbalah kabbalah dot com Baggage lupin open source. That song is delivered. Salam aleikum performed by neta barzilai and once again haddad. That's almost. I made famous by hedera amrani at the hebrew song festival in nineteen seventy eight. And now here's alison back in the old country. There was always something very special for me and for most american jews. I suspect about the holidays of thanksgiving and the fourth of july after all those other holidays the religious holidays. Lovely as they are ten to remind us of our differences. We celebrate our religion our ethnicity our tribe in those holidays we invite people to celebrate them with us but always there are insiders and there are outsiders. they're the ones who belong and there are the ones who are just visiting celebrating the country. Our national holidays are americanise was for all of us so i feel the same way about israel's independence day. Let's leave aside for a moment. The historic political complications for palestinian citizens of israel also. Let's leave aside the issues of the ultra-orthodox. Both groups have for their own reasons. Some problems celebrating the existence of a jewish state but for the majority. The jewish israelis who live side-by-side in communities when we observe religious holidays russia's. Shawna passover poor him and every week shut. We do it in very different ways for some of us. Those days revolve around synagogues and family meals others head to the beach to the coffee shops on nature hikes or on trips abroad but on independent state. We all come together. We can invite each other over to our homes for a barbecue. We gather in the parks for picnics and almost every city or town worth its salt. Does its best to put on a big celebration that includes everyone in my diversity of nana this means not one main stage to put on a show with musical performers but multiple stages all over town. They're called bamut in the citywide yomata smooth festivities that i've attended every year for the past twenty four years. That's where i've lived since my first born son was one years old so i know must have celebrated. You'll not smooth. In the four years that i lived in israel before i had children but like many things in life. I have absolutely no recollection of what it was like before. I was a mother for so many years the night when things change over from the sad. Mournful yomas zeke around memorial day celebration to yachtsman. Festivities was a familiar routine. We would watch together as a family. The national torch lighting ceremony on television. And then the parents would bundle the kids up and head out to the stages. Sometimes it was a very pressure. Filled rushed affair. One of our kids might be singing her dancing on one of those performances but most of the time it was trying to hurt three kids in huge massive crowds each of which wanted a hotdog or philophical or an ice cream from a different foods. Stan wanted some sparkley overpriced toy. Another we had to check the time at the performance they wanted to see was at the right ban. Stand at the right time we needed to keep the kid who wasn't into crowded concerts entertained as well and of course we had to watch the fireworks for the decades before i moved to town in the mid nineties. The events in china were along. The town's main street but the year i arrived was the year of a wave of terror. Attacks for a decade. Those festivities were moved to the large park in town where the festivities could be fenced in for security purposes. That was actually a great deal for those of us. With little kids they could entertain themselves on the jungle gyms and playgrounds in the park. The evening would end with the headline performers in the big amphitheater. Those didn't take place until close to midnight. Though where i had to stay because one of my kids really really really wanted to see the pop star of the moment perform often. I had another younger weary sleeping child on my lap in short it was an annual parenting marathon. That left me completely exhausted which wasn't super convenient when there was a family barbecue to prepare the next day at least independence day was a holiday. So work wasn't involved then years past and things to do. My kids got older and it all started to change and evolve i. The older two children became teenagers and made their own plans to attend the festivities on independence day. Because of course there's nothing more une cool than walking around with your parents right. So i was left with the youngest child. I could more easily cater to her. Needs do what she wanted to do when she wanted to do it. I was able to relax and enjoy walking through the crowds. Seeing everybody i knew orthodox non orthodox friends neighbors fellow parents often having reunions with people that i hadn't seen in weeks or sometimes months. I have a facebook post. I wrote from that time to children down one to go and then again as things do that one finally went a couple of years ago. Number three was also ready to do her own thing. The moment i had waited for arrived. And i had that empty nest mixed feelings. I felt liberated and bereft at the same time. So it happened. We watched the ceremony on television. And all the kids headed out. I was still there at home. I thought oh my god. I don't have to leave the house if i don't want to do. I want to. I thought about it. It turned out that the answer was yes. It wouldn't have been. You'll not smooth without that event without that community. Touchstone crowds and all also. The singer. new read garon was giving a free concert two blocks from my house. I wasn't going to go so there. I was in the smaller crowd. Not in the big amphitheater. Not eating junk food but surrounded by all the other older folks who's young birds had flown the nest enjoying the songs that we heard when we were younger while our teams were heading to the amphitheater for the latest wrapper or pop idol. without us. i listened to garon soaring voice. Sing out the wistful lyrics of her big hits and i was glad i was there. Had i known the pandemic year that was yet to come. And how i would so miss. Being a part of that crowd of my friends and neighbors i would have savored it even more Fem- beyond valid in baocai seen bay on holidays in bayon gash sham sham. Yami awfully imsa zipper by cooler. Chevaux kula chevaux very in law a mother imama schmidt Neil The common shutting things. That game look ganey. Does any en any shampoo. Coolest show. that's on is called hush avila performed by eliade it was i made famous by einstein. And ha- hello not grow him in one thousand nine hundred sixty seven and now. here's don. I was almost eighteen. And i've been volunteering for two months on a religious kibbutz with the rest of the younger dea contingent to the mahone the major k. Whose lawrence the institute for youth leaders from abroad my image of kibbutz before i arrived had been of a glorified upstate new york. Summer camp where we would re sculpt ourselves and build our bond with nature through the physical labor of working. The land kibbutz was the backbone of my fantasy of israel. And i was thrilled to temporarily be part of this utopian society with its athenian style democracy it strict equality and it's equitable appreciation for all forms of work but work was a problem. Yama moods my. I in israel was a glorious spring day in early may but most importantly for me it was a day off from work in fact it was the only day off from work i would have in months other than chabad. Which was mind-numbingly low key determined. As i was to prove. I was not a spoiled american by never complaining. I consistently scored the very worst job assignments and the pleasure. I felt on your mouth. Smoot was in direct proportion to the misery. I knew i would be experiencing. Otherwise what ra- my jobs. I separated nuts and bolts into two piles of nuts. Another of bolts. I pulled rocks out of the ground. I had three glorious days driving a tractor pulling a hay baling contraption in a field of green that sat along a high ridge with a spectacular view of the galilee. I worked by my lonesome. I could feel my skin turning bronze. And i've never been happier except for the mucus running steadily down from my nose and the tears pouring out of my eyes. The kibbutz doctor asked me if i had hay fever. Yes well maybe. That's why you turn into a snuck factory when you're bailing hay and i thought hay fever. Hay hay fever. Hey i get it but this was the best job. I'd had on kibbutz and i wasn't going to give it up for anything. Last came to a crashing halt. When i broke the hydraulics linking the tractor to the hey baylor. It wasn't really my fault. Because i couldn't see the boulder. I drove over because of the tears and snot flooding down my cheeks. What was my fault was that i hadn't understood the hebrew instructions and i was bailing hay at the wrong end of the field. I moved onto the night shift and the chicken house from eight. Pm to six am. I caught fleeing chickens by their legs. Lifted them in the air upside down and stuff them into tiny cages to be sent to their deaths as they shrieked pecked and crap all over me. I could still feel the chicken eggs pulsing in my sleep and my palms. And you can guess what i was dreaming about. I did this for weeks. So i was ecstatic to be awake in the daytime on your mood. Hiking up a mountain with my friends. Following dusty pads line was scrub crossing and re crossing a stream and slipping in and our small spring soaking ourselves splashing each other drying out in the sun. We sang our camp songs. Our hiking songs are seventies top hits and we helped each other as we edge sideways hugging the mountain walls with our backs. Stronger leaner fitter. We were laughing and flirting. We were off the kibbutz and in the sunshine with on fire spring fever. I was darling behind with a friend. A girl not a girlfriend but who knows and we found. Our path embraced by toll branches in full flower. They were forming an honor guard on either side of the road. The branches reached higher as we walked until they leaned over to touch one. Another forming an archway a natural canopy pregnant with pink and purple blossoms. It lasted for thirty or forty yards and we stopped and stood still and looked out in wonder and for those few moments. The colors filled. Our is all seemed right with the world. Here was connection to nature not revolutionary. Perhaps but in its own. Way unutterable romantic at the end of your matz mode. A stormy argument ensued about how long we would need to keep volunteering volunteering people cried. You mean free labor. Nobody even talks to us here and it was clear to me that i didn't fit cubits life and it didn't fit me and even if i didn't want to work the land. The country was beautiful and it was hours and i would have to become independent of my old fantasy of israel fast forward to ten years ago when she iran. I took our friends. Newly-arrived olean from ethiopia to the celebration in rabin square for their first joe. Not mood in israel. We went through security checks and ran the gauntlet of kids spring. Everyone was silly string and shaving cream. We watch the dancers and singers in front of giant screens filled with their own gargantuan images. I loved fireworks. And i wanted to dazzle our guests with no-holds-barred display at the very end of the night. When it was done they seemed on a state of shock. What did you think i asked. This was impossible to imagine the fireworks. You mean the police. The police any theo. Pia if the police are in the vicinity you must be on your absolute best behavior and never call attention to yourself in any way because the police are not there to protect you but to seek victims for random arrests and shakedowns or worse to overhear criticism of the government and hall you in as a subversive but here the police are letting young people run wild having fun in a public square this i could never have imagined. So if my maiden smooth liberated me from old illusions and utopian fantasies and if for decades felt for the tortured conflicts palestinian citizens of israel feel on this day for my ethiopian israeli friends it mark their independence from dependent on the good graces of others graces. Which have so often failed us and failed to be good and independence from fear of the authorities because in israel we are the authorities with all that entails our state is imperfect hardly utopian but it is fearless and it is our own yama smooth. A mayor san me sure. Sure shot all this has least Style same the blah shaw. That song is chill. Chenine performed by jane gordo with easter l. Gory on it was written by the poet. Moshe door and the music was written by yosef. Dr it was first a hit in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven which was the year that yusra el gory owned. I started singing with vm. Daursky as do the team. He was almost eighty five. And the version that you heard singing with their own tone of jane bordeaux and now here's a hod before i'm israeli or ju- russian or iraqi or even an american. I'm an immigrant and that means all kinds of things but but mostly i walk this world. With a sense of acute existential otherness. My parents emigrated to israel when they were children. My father from iraq. My mother from the former soviet union when the three of us emigrated to the us. When i was just a baby they became immigrants twofold. When we moved back to israel eight years later i became an immigrant threefold grandparents from one place parents from another i from a third and from nowhere at all immigration from one set of signs symbols and values to another makes one acutely aware of the fact that none of these are obvious nor a priori when we lived in the us. I went to a neighborhood public school in brooklyn for two years and as you do in american public schools every morning. The kids in my class stood up by their desks. Put their hands to their hearts. Pledged allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and sang the star spangled banner. First grade me. Somewhat unsurprisingly took issue with this. I wouldn't do it. I wouldn't sing the anthem. Why i answered when the teacher asked because i'm not from here and neither are my parents. I'm not an american rayleigh. Okay the teacher said when she figured i wasn't going to budge. Then you can turn around the other way facing sideways from everybody else and sing the israeli national anthem while we sing the american one. If that makes you feel more comfortable. Perfect i probably said grinning. Thank you before. I knew it next morning came around and it was time for my moment. I was so excited to follow through with my little act of defiance. Everybody got up from their seats. Recited the pledge of allegiance and got ready to sing the star spangled banner but only when they began singing. Did i realize that well. I didn't know the israeli national anthem. I had lived in the us for all the conscious years of my then very short life. So i had never had a chance to learn it. But in that split second dawned on me that if i don't know it then neither does. The teacher let alone any of the other kids. They don't even speak hebrew. So what did i do. I improvised and when i say improvised i mean i saying the first hebrew song that popped into my head and that's how i ended up singing in an income obama every morning for two years until i transferred to a different school where they didn't sing the anthem in the morning. When we came back to israel in the summer of two thousand and six i enrolled into another neighborhood public school and israeli one this time and an israeli schools. They sing the anthem only at ceremonies not every morning so by the time a civic holiday rolled in i was already a few good months into school when we were asked to rise from our seats in the music of for began playing. It dawned on me for the second time in my then still very short life. That i didn't know the words to the song so i just didn't sing along but as the kids and teachers around me saying i realized that i didn't feel any different from the way i felt when everyone was seeing star spangled banner back in. Ps ninety three on bedford avenue. This to wasn't really my song but there was no other to replace it. No other place to tell myself. I belong to just that sense of not belonging so i recited n income obama in my head as i still do. Sometimes when a was starts playing by. Now i know the lyrics. It's just out of sheer instinct. I think that in that moment. I realized that i can never really be completely of a place in the sense that i can't fully identify with it no matter how hard i try and that's a privilege i don't have to assimilate reprieve my loyalty to anyone in order to be accepted for all intents and purposes. I'm just israeli enough to be cosmopolitan but it's also a curse because walking around in this world feeling kind of stranger no matter where you go is not easy. It's also the reason. I don't like your not smote or don't really cheer for the national soccer team. Also because it sucks or feel any sense of pride in the israeli flags start plastering every corner of public space every year. The second pessoa or sing the national anthem when he plays at ceremonies or attend those ceremonies for that matter. When i don't have to in this sense of this place but in so many others it is completely my place my only place. And that's the reason why i still get teary eyed. Every time i walked past customs only after a stopped me for being brown and through the large doors into the arrival hall had been glioma airport because i remember my grandmother standing right beyond the barrier that i could just barely see above holding their arms out and waiting for me every summer when we came back to visit. And it's why there's a cafe bar and restaurant in my neighborhood where everyone knows my name and what i like. It's why road the same bike route twice a day every day. For seven years through high school in my military service which were coincidentally right across the street. And why i can never leave the house. In sweats even. When i'm just popping down to get something from the kiosk. Because i always bump into someone. I know and maybe that chance encounter turns into a project or a night out or chip to the beach and right now. I'm planning to leave this place my place in a few months. Leaving impacting my whole life into a few suitcases. Digging the love of my life by the hand getting on a plane with a one way ticket and fucking off across the atlantic for who knows how long and i'm scared shitless not because it's the wrong thing to do right now. I know it's the right thing but it means leaving. And i guess that that hurting so much the thought of leaving even though i know i should means that maybe i am kind of of this place in some ways after all i nina cirque du da shot a sound shallow ninos. Da guess league own. That's on is london performed by cola hockey team as lee. It was first written by our stein. And it appears i on her record london in nineteen nine and now here is. Miriam her slug. There's a cliche about landing in israel. About how the passengers always applaud. Yes many do but passengers clap on. Lots of flight landings. It's understandable. Travelers are happy to reach their destination. And they're relieved that the descent through the clouds didn't end in a fiery crash. The wheels hit the tarmac. And yeah they clap not me. I'm not that sentimental and as for being safe well. I don't think we're out of the woods until the plane comes to a complete stop and by then everyone's on their phones or lunging for the overhead compartments now when you fly back to israel from the united arab emirates has. I did this past sunday. The three and a half hour flight path takes you through cloudless skies over fourteen hundred kilometers of saudi desert. It's all craggy sand with hughes that range somewhere between ten and a color my eyedropper graphic tool calls rosy brown the wilderness is interrupted by infrequent haphazard towns or villages few and far between connected by single snaking road after so many years of seemingly unsolvable conflict an israel bound civilian plane flying freely over. Saudi is pretty mind blowing but then again you have just been in dubai an emirate bursting with marvels of construction and engineering a steel glass and concrete metropolis conjured in the grandiose imaginations of the real estate titans of an absolute monarchy. The uae has a ministry of possibilities of virtual ministry created to develop proactive and disruptive solutions to tackle critical issues. The emirate of dubai has the world's tallest building and two massive artificial islands in the shape of palm trees. Mega-projects fitting for a strongly centralized regime led by powerful ruling elite of often visionary shakes and shivers de tocqueville the deepest of delve into democracy and monarchy says the virtues of an autocratic regime. Such as that of the uae are heroic. It's the right system for those who wish to attempt great takings and leave and immense mark on history who aimed to give a certain loftiness to the human spirit. This very impulse to renowned and glory is what made the abraham accords possible. A sweeping executive decision by the shacks in charge meant. The country went from being anti-israel. Too pro israel virtually overnight paving the way for a truly warm peace at the government's electra. Hip youth downtown. We find impressive. Young emirati the women in black hijab and a by the men in white kefiah and robe studying hebrew developing cross cultural. Meet up apps and dialoguing with israeli visitors. They are fully on board this new national project of peace in contrast to buys bewildering tangle of urban highways the uae's metaphorical road to the future looks to be an autobahn of friction. Free planning and execution sound familiar. I i no not really. Monarchy is foreign to israelis sure the autocratic infants has some traction in israel. Where benjamin netanyahu's supporters sing bb l. Bb king of israel and. Let's not forget the scholar. King david ben gurion of the early or it's centralized arbiters of culture and language but the country remains at heart a profound experiment in relatively egalitarian. Collectivism the jewish streams of return and rebirth and autonomy and agency collide with the reality of wars and regional threats economic disparities ethnic divisions. And perhaps the greatest test the parallel aspirations of palestinians. Today at the right and also unripe age of seventy three hours. Democracy may seem threadbare it most certainly is at the moment but by the tocqueville's calculations we're still doing okay. He says a democracy spreads arrested activity through the whole social body a super abundant force and energy that never exists without it and which however little circumstances may be favorable can bring forth marvel's now that does sound familiar. The israeli road ahead and democratic journey is anything but smooth. It has always been and forever will be a dense tangle of crossroads after flying over the saudi desert. You enter jordanian airspace. At the pointy elbow of the jordan saudi border and it's mortagne in rosy brown but here there is no human settlement. It's barren soon you're over. The west bank over mountains and wadis there are streams of akim as the psalm describes it moisture and because of that there are clouds through these cotton balls. You see the land articulated into hills and crevices browns and greens settlements and villages and roads. You fly over atara and rwasa and a tear. It and own safa and halamish and abboud jewish and palestinian of dreams and potential conflict. You see what you're pretty sure is the all too sensible geometry of modine maccabim route with jutting and early neighborhoods and just to confirm that you are indeed now back in israel proper you make out the unmistakable. Contours of the benjamin highway interchange soon. You even see the mediterranean and the distance and the flight descends. You are coming back home to arguments and complaints to dreams and hopes to pushing and helping to a resurrected language to the vegans and the messiness and the soldiers and the protesters the and the dreamers to your family to your history to your future. You are so glad so enormously relieved to be home that this time when the wheels hit the ground you actually clap. Shane yellow I have so day so the neck matting lack that the not dummies. several john locke cloth. Keep the michelle. Gosh no be spat up Elbow colin smith. Shallow me leave them money. Sky marsh- morales avenue. That song of course is abani d. performed by neta bars eli. Cohen won the eurovision contest with bonnie be in nineteen seventy eight. It was the first time that israel had ever won this important important contest. The words were written by a who'd minora and the music by rate here sh. So now it's time for me. I was out for a run that turned into a walk. Because i pulled a muscle in my calf and i didn't wanna make it worse but i also didn't want to give up on the exercise and sharov a heat wave just broken and it was cool and bright so i went down from independence park to the thai at the boardwalk and walked north figuring. That i'd go to tell barrack where the taylor ends and then walk back and when you go up that way the c is on your left and on your right is what used to be the stay dove airport that closed down last year. And soon it'll be a new neighborhood. It's already being surveyed but for now it's just an empty expanse huge empty lot and across it i could see a neighborhood called lamad. Just the hebrew letter lamad and nobody knows why the neighbor it is called lamad asking the architect in the city. And they'll give you an answer but it won't be the same answer as the last architect and north of lamad is another neighborhood called no phayom or see views which makes sense because until the high rises of the new neighborhood. Go up on the runways of the old airport. The c is right there ready to be viewed and i figure walking walking so instead of turning around and coming back on the boardwalk just the way i came when i get to the top tell by roy how cut to the right and walk home through these neighborhoods because while i think i've been on every street south of the river in tel aviv. Jato these neighborhoods to the north of the river. The places across the rubicon is one of my friends. But i don't really know them at all so tell cut inland on a path that i follow until i reached the first road and i turn right now going south in the general direction of home though right away i'm lost wandering through streets. I've almost never heard of before and you can't really get lost anymore with a phone in your hand. I say to myself that. I'm going old school and that i won't pull up a map unless i get really out of hand. Lost the streets in though phayom and lamad are named mostly after jewish musicians and poets and painters. I come i to a traffic circle. Named gustav mahler square all the circles here are called squares. And then i walk one circle over to arnold schoenberg square. The two are connected by marc chagall street. And then i go down amir gilboa street. Amir gilboa is a poet who wrote a poem called you talk about the sacrifice of isaac that starts leaf notebook. Shush toha julia. Yod emmy the aba. The at dawn the son strolled in the forest together with me and father and my right hand was in his left. If you go down on mir gilboa street you come to yona wlac square named for the brilliant tortured queer feminist poet who died of breast cancer when she was just forty one and whom. My girl is taking a course about this semester. A whole course just for her and who wrote a poem called hebrew that in translation starts about pronouns and sex. English leaves its options open in practice each. I has all the options. You is he or she. I is sexless. There's no difference in all things. Are it not man. Not women no need to think. Before relating to sex hebrew is a sex maniac hebrew discriminates four and against is forgiving and gives privileges from universal square. I walked down yasha hyphen street past arthur. Rubinstein around george gershwin square. Sorry iran no square for you over to isaac singer street then across einstein street. I don't know the violin. Maybe and then. I am at the corner of isaac stern and yuda army high streets where they've just built a fancy big tower and i wonder if the polish born violinist who grew up in san francisco and the german born poet who grew up in jerusalem. Ever had a chance to meet safer at this expensive high-rise in lamad built after they were both gone. They probably did stern who played in israel dozens of times. Maybe hundreds was just three years older than me high and the two men died on the same date. September twenty second one year apart. I'm a high. I in two thousand and then stern in two thousand and one. I'm high has a poem called hukou nominal herod late marriage and he writes that he can feel the date of his death contracting towards the date of his birth quote as in the history books. Where the pressure of history has brought those two numbers together next to the name of a dead king with only a hyphen between them and amici goes on. He says quote. I hold onto that hyphen with all my might like a lifeline. I live on it. And on my lips the vow not to be alone. The voice of the bridegroom in the voice of the bride the sound of the children laughing and shouting in the streets of jerusalem in the cities of huda and quote and this poem is on my mind while i keep towards home now on a long stretch of shy agnone street. When song comes on the radio that i'm listening to and it's called amos speaks manned by yoshi or yo- high bloom partially bloom. Says how for the video. He and his manager decided to this song to photos by alex. Lavar who's one of israel's great photographers and who each week publishes an are. It's a picture of a stolen moment somewhere in the country usually in tel aviv. And he's been doing this for forty years when the video was done. The song match to picture after picture by lieve ach bloom posted it on his instagram and on youtube and on instagram one of the first comment was a short sentence from someone called at mickey dot yet why. At and it said just quote my twin sister. And i are in one of the last pictures. End quote and blum wrote back right away saying i know exactly which one d m me. The picture comes three minutes and nine seconds into the three and a half minute video and it's one of six year old identical twin girls wearing identical polkadot bathing suits sitting on a low wall on the tel aviv. Boardwalk across from beta oprah arms around each other's shoulders smiling huge smiles showing identical gaps where to frontier are identically. Missing on youtube under the video at just the same time a comment appeared that says quote hideyoshi extraordinary in special singer that you are. I am the mother of the twin girls in the video. For your wonderful song. You managed to make the picture of them a hit and now you've their faces onto the musical. History of israeli music may be blessed. You supremely deer and talented man with great respect gala. The ema of vicky and mickey end quote and while i'm walking home. Mickey kovalski comes on the radio joining yoshi and she says quote. We were very small about a year. After we came to the country we live nearby. A tiny apartment with many people. We hardly had any money definitely not for luxuries and that was the world that was our paradise. These where the happiest years of my life. It was paradise. I had my sister. We were in israel. We were at the beach this year. We're celebrating thirty years since her. Aaliyah the aliyah from the soviet union. We didn't need anything more than that. And what you see in the picture are two girls who are just as happy with their lot as anyone in the world a few years after the picture was taken my parents saw it in some calendar and they bought a single copy. That's yellowed a lot. Since then we went on and life and my sister moved to another country five years ago. My twin sister moved to america to san francisco to get her master's degree and i stayed. Here were separated by fifteen hour direct flayed. And i miss her every day. Every hour the day we separated in the airport was the saddest day of my life. The saddest day of my life. And i have known a bit of sadness. Yushi song is about that. Is i interpreted anyway. That in the end the dearest thing is time time with the people we love and quote and i'm listening to all this and wondering how it is that this story somehow matters to me. I mean how is it that it feels like it somehow. A story that. I'm somehow part of a sister missing a sister and missing time in a picture from thirty years ago of a place that i know well just a minute away from the bar. My boy serves drinks in these days in video of a song. I'm wondering how all this somehow means something a lot to me. Somehow there is a lot that i love about this place about having a life in this place a lot. A lot of the things that. I love most about living here. Come down really to the hyphen. The hyphen that hold you to high in isaac stern together and somehow some alameda both of them the hyphen. That makes the history of this place. Somehow my history and that makes this place my place and that makes hebrew my language awful accent or not and that makes every crime and corruption banality here somehow my sin and also makes every gold medal in judo or physics or god knows what somehow my prize this is the hyphen that makes mickey's and vicki's and galas story. Also alex vox and ulysses and somehow amazingly less my story to its at hyphen. I hoped more than anything to give to my kids by having them grow up here and now that they've grown. It's that hyphen. That they keep giving back to me in ways that i never knew to imagine as say when the girl recites yona vala from memory like she did the chabad dinner before last so with amy. Hi it's that hyphen. I hold onto with all my might like a lifeline. I live on it at asthma summer.

israel tel aviv berlin germany palestine olympics franck koale ricard ming german olympic association Chancellor adolf hitler Kurowski berlin tel palestinian terrorist organiza yomas karen defense ministry sir zora zimmer noga marco lee sarath haddad shmulik kraus
Hamtramck Now And Then  Episode 3

PodcastDetroit.com

27:19 min | 5 months ago

Hamtramck Now And Then Episode 3

"You're listening to the podcast detroit visit. Www dot com tested dot com for information. Welcome to hamtramck now and then you podcast to the hammock historical museum. I'm greg kurowski. The executive director of the museum and with us today as jell cashew to is the chairman of the board of the friends of historic hamtramck which owns and operates the museum and today we have a special guest with us. It's free aunt her chin ski. Who is the author of the new book. Detroit's loss poll town and to subtitle little neighborhood that touched a nation. It's a fascinating story and brand also little hall. You would attracted you to this topic in the first place. How First of all. Thanks for having me. New nurse podcast. This is awesome. I you know. I went down with my husband to a estate sale in Indian village and it's in. The story is kind of in the prologue. But i was really drawn to the stained glass window and i felt like i couldn't leave the state sal without buying this window. I don't know what it was like an other worldly poll to this window and what really drew me was The middle part of it said god build a his holy temple and it was just beautiful stained glass very old and so i went ahead and bought it and when i took it to a stained glass curator guy that would help me restore it. He well they told me when i bought it from poll town church and i didn't know what poll town was right and so when i took it a saint glass guy. He's like you gotta figure out what churches came from because that would just be interesting. You know he takes stink. Lhasa churches all the time at detroit for him. That would be a really cool thing. And so I went home. And i just became obsessed with this story. I was up till midnight looking at pictures and going through the internet and Kept seeing all of the photographs of protests and just it was just it just took swept me up and it started to transform me and a just was caught up in it and so i was determined the next day to go and get a book called Poll paul town community trade and so the library had it my library in rochester and the same day. When i woke up the record came which is our piscopo. Newsletter occupational diocese michigan and. I go to the church. So i get this record. Every it's like a quarterly thing. And i usually don't really read it. I pick it up and maybe glance at a couple things and but this time i opened it up in there as they There is a story about a woman who had passed away and When i went to go pick up the book about whole town it was the same woman who had died. It just seemed to so there were a lot of different coincidences. And i just was pulled to it for the passion out of my heart actually at the bad junction And i don't think it's a very emotional story for one thing and you know. This is a very powerful story poll town. Of course the neighborhood that was demolished to make way for general motors plant in detroit and hamtramck back in one thousand nine hundred eighty one and it displaced was something like fourteen hundred homes and several churches and some businesses saint joseph's hospital. My mom actually worked there at that time and it was this place so it had a big impact on a lot of people's lives and it was very controversial at that time so one of the things that struck me about your book is there are books about poll found. And there's been a lot of material written about it but yours is a little bit different. Years is more of that human angle that really showed the impact on the person who lived there just the overall view of it and you know the statistics. Statistics are in the book. But there's much more to it than that to you. Got a lotta people quoted in there who are residents there who lived through the experience at that time. I how did make contact with these people and second you know what was your reaction to their response after all this time. Well i wanted. That's the thing as i wanted this this book to be an oral history of that neighborhood. That don't don't you say it's like a love letter to the neighbor niche Love letter and it was like a prayer and And i didn't write it for myself. How could i have royds. I wrote it for the people that went that and for even if they're passed away i still wrote it for them and so I wanted it to be an oral history. I went through face. I use facebook a lot to track people down gene still Who was one of the ralph nader lawyers. He was the one who encouraged me in the beginning to do something. Because i kept calling him and asking him questions about the neighborhood and about the protests and as he was right there you know he ran into the church when they were tearing it down and he hid in the closet and it was taken out in handcuffs amazing stories just all these stories and so but i wanted not only capture its last moments i wanted to capture its birth and and it's adolescence and everything i wanted to as as you would a human story I would go to sleep at night. And i would feel paul hotel because i was listening to so many stories of these people and i could. I could felt like how wonderful that neighborhood was. At one point you know it was in its prime and you know the children would be playing and and the candy shops and the sausage kind of draws you into it at this story itself yes it does because there's so much pain that went through you could. They kept protesting even when they knew that they were going to lose even when they knew they were losing and they do. The church is gonna come down. They went and beat up an oldsmobile. Front of the gm headquarters you know and they made sure they did it right at the prime news. Time and Just as a retaliation and counter protest is what the news is calling it and it just and they only did that to show people watching at home. Look when there's an injustice keep fighting you know even when you're gonna lose and you know it because sometimes the powers are just too powerful for the little guy you know and you know they did it for to inspire people and that is the kind of inspiration that we need today you know. We need all in all time. But i think today this year if you know all kind of came for me kinda came full circle that way so that conception church was really at the core of this for for a long time. It's this process. Went on and you have a lot to mention about the pastor there at that time it sounds like he was a very interesting person and really involved in this and deeply emotionally attached to this as well to tell us a little bit more about him. Yeah father care savage I would go to sleep at night. And his i would see his face and if gene step helped me get motivation to do this father care so much. Did you know in some sort of weird way 'cause I was actually died shortly after this occurred right. Yes like Five months to the day. So he i go to sleep. I would see his face and so and that's the other thing. I would have dreams where he would show me. Immaculate conception he would be walking me through the church. And i have never even been there before and he was. I had this dream where he was walking through on a top lay level. I didn't know that the choir was up there. Just weird relationship. Yes so that's why. I say at the beginning. You know this was an other worldly pull for some reason. I really felt like this was something i had to do. As a calling. And you know being who i am you know who thinks about these things in a broader sense than i really had to do it. You know i couldn't put it down. It was something. I just. I would leave the subject and i would go do something else and then something. I'd be like what what happened to this. And i would go back to look up all this stuff and then i'd get sucked in again. I just saw. I think i need to just sit with us for about a year. Study this thing. So that's what. I did what you could feel that in the book hundred strong emotional attachment to you or your strong emotional commitment on your part to and that's kind of what separates for me from the typical kind of historical recount of an issue or neighborhood or something like that you can tell when the person is emotionally committed to what they're doing and that really comes through here. Will you disappointed at anything that you came across other than the you know the outcome of what happened there. Ted no know you. Did you expect something that did not occur or your reaction from somebody that you didn't Well yeah i mean. I think that My observation is that. And i i. I know what happened. And i know how the world works. And i know you know everybody was trying to cover their butts including gm and coleman young and but i think for for gm who kinda they have that plant there which they're now calling factories zero which to me is their way of getting further away from royal towns in the pull town name instead of doing that if they accepted the fact that this happened and made immense publicly apologize. Perhaps you know that would make them look so good but see corporations. They don't see that it's like a paradox. They can't see that if they just accepted this thing that they had done then at all would be good if they could just make a memorial or do something and want to. They really don't want to be associated with that if they draw nearer to that and said you know what we did this and we're not the same company that we used to be roy because they're not you know they they've grown we've all grown and They could put a memorial upper publicly apologize. Write a letter to the polish community. you know it's okay. Forget them you know. They wouldn't stop. Buying cars would probably buy more. You know and it's you know it's it's hard to believe but it's really been forty years since this whole issue took place and But it's still strikes. A lot of narrows was people still a lot of connections to that community and another thing that people tend to forget to is that actually only portion of whole town was taken for that plant. A lot of it them. A great deal of it was left but that kinda wizard died. Basically to the area there now is pretty much pretty empty. Pretty wide open. And it's it's you would think it would be ripe for redevelopment being that soul well located in central detroit. So would you like to see anything like that you know are have you seen any interest in redevelopment over there i don't know i mean i drive through this area i would. I would like to live here. Is it just feels good there. And i told you this before that the energy down here in hamtramck and and that could the energy. Here's really good. You can feel it when you come in draws you. Because and i think it's because there's so many people different people living here and they're all peacefully living here and you can feel that it's in the atmosphere and Yeah i mean. I don't know like tom all it has to. He wanted to build like a whole to strip lake greek town. And i don't know about that. I mean i wouldn't want to tackle that kind of maybe good. I don't know i do. I do you guys have alone. Yeah exists here. Still i think on on top of that though mentioning the sort of diversity here. I think that's why a lot of people flock here from from around the world like we just. We just had a a news team from from france. Come here and do a documentary about about living here and just the different people here so i think it like i said it draws people from from all over the world are wondering how so many different people coexist together peacefully and you can feel in the energy telling this nice. Just feel so good area absolutely so when you when you talk where you live your neighbors. Are they still familiar with the poll town. Experience in all that is registered with people heard about it for tm at the time You know my in-laws are polish. And they grow up around him trimming my father in law for at one point. His mother lived in talent but move So no. I mean. I don't have any personal connection to an all. This is completely an adoption. Means i did. Not i don't have any genealogy or any ancestors that came from paul town. But i adopted it as my own my own child but you better a real connection with it yeah. I think people people do that with with this area in itself with traffic and the whole thing. You know it's like you you come here and even if you don't live here you know you kind of make your second home or you know if you do come here and move it here. You know you kind of adopted as as your hometown you know. I think that's common. Yeah yeah. I think it's rather interesting. You know it's it's a different experience from from living in other places that like i've always said you know there's there's really not too many places like him traffic the the sort of melting pot. The that's pulled on was like going going through the book you see just a bunch of different people. It wasn't just one group of people you had everybody. You know all all different kinds of people living living in that area and coexisting. So it's it makes it. It makes it really interesting and you seem to catch that sense of neighborhood to reflected in some of the photos that you have in a book as well which are similar to hampshire amick and the tight knit neighborhood. The very close houses the neighbors who know each other very very well the local businesses that are known to the people so well and it's kind of. It's kind of moving to see that and to see to see that old neighborhood like that. Yeah yeah i know. I wanted to capture everything especially some of the buildings the architecture you know you won't see those again. I think the where the women lived in the that worked in a cigar shop or factory. They're building had these little florida lease on it little details like that. You just don't see on buildings that are built nowadays and so i wanted to capture all that and collect collect all and collect as much as i could and really honestly the another whole book could be my journey with this really truly. No i mean i. I met so many awesome people and were you surprised by anything surprise i well. I was surprised that i coming into it. Because i sort of have that audacity where. I think that i'm interested in the story. So i thought that people would want to share their stories and want to be interviewed it. I think i took it. Because i was so new at interviewing people. Some people like you know. Pulitzer prize winning photographers and things like that did not want much to do with me. Because i'm just this little new newbie. So but they were all very nice and and that was to me. It was kind of like wait a second. I began just back up a little bit. You know you can't expect people to want to share with you all the time you know but on but you know terror yamasaki. I went to his house. I hit. He invited me into his house up. North and i had. He gave me coffee and we talked. He told me beautiful stories about his father and but he didn't want me to interview him but we could have talked all day. It was a flowing conversation. But i was. That was the stuff. I was surprised that they could talk to me all day. But they wouldn't want me to interview them. So i needed to build up more trust because they were out there so much already and i totally get that you know you're so exposed sort of want control over some things put out there. You know what i mean so f- got it. It's okay it's still cool. Is this your first book. I self published one of my novels. But i've been publishing articles poetry short stories. Things like bath for about six seven years now. So this is your first venture at the history living history my first book of nonfiction and i have come full circle because i was a history major wrong so to be in the archives again and now i'm writing articles for metro mode for historical historic preservation and And that i'm in the archives. The it's awesome the actually using my degree. You know well you struck a very good balance though. That's what's really kind of struck me with the book to 'cause there's a lot of facts and figures in there but you're not overwhelmed by them. This is that human side of the story is what really really shines through an makes this book standout. It's a very very well done So is that encourage you to try some more on this topic. Sure yes. I i would. I have a couple ideas already good. So they're very weird science to figure out how i want to be avenue to hopefully publisher. Will you know. Jump on board so But yeah it's i can only do what my heart tells me to. Do you know what i mean. If my heart's not into it. I i can't do it. Well was difficult to right. No good the growth. I started researching it in august. I think gave me the book deal. So i started. I thought okay. I'll research beginning of the year before the snow starts a phone and it was due in february. That's the wanted that was pretty pretty scheduling. Yeah yeah so. He said you know you might need to extend now. I'll shoot for that. He might stand it. Because i just didn't know with stories like this where a lot of people have died and because i wanted it to be an oral history. I didn't know how hard it would be. Defined right. And so. I spent september november october september number going through the archives and then when the snow started to fall i sat in my house that i wrote and so and then it hit you so i couldn't I wanted to visit care. Savages grave samara. I told him and come back and bring him flowers in the spring. And i could do that. You know and but you know what's weird if you don't mind me telling you a little story really quite another weird one about cup final I went to his grave when i was tying up the story. And it's in the prologue. How i had a hard time. Finding is great because it was all grown over with me. An hour and it was freezing is the day. I came to integrate the so called that day and So i was ready to give up and finally found his grave and it was totally covered in grass. I spent some time with my boots. Like just trying to move the grass away and so in august or In august when i was handing in their the final draft after the game he edits and everything. I called the cemetery. And i'm like is there something that you can do. Can you lift the graver cleaned up or something. And they're like. Oh yeah no problem. We'll we'll do that so a month. Went by never heard anything and taking a walk at night. All of a sudden i just feel father is presence and i'm not into that night i could feel like i could just feel him is weird so the next day i got up and the cemetery emailed me and said they had lifted his grave. And i just thought. Wow you know like i just felt such strong presence the night before and so i don't know maybe he was saying thank you for well. Is there anything you'd like to add any points you'd like to stress other. We'll be talking about where to book is available for sale here so no i just. It was A beautiful storing. I was. I felt very humbled and honored to be able to tell the story. You know not being polish. I feel very honored. The everybody and everybody shared their story with me. That did i was so touched by that. You know the people that welcomed me into their homes and into their time and let me interview them. That was really sweet and gave their pictures there. There was a lot of work to wasn't it. Yeah gantry savia so you. You mentioned that you could write another book. Are you planning to do another book on poll town or are your other ideas. Just something completely different. Something completely different i. I could try to write something about the journey of poll town like how it transformed me as a person and the story of all the people i met. And just the crazy coincidences. It was really like a spiritual journey for me and You know like. I said it was a calling and i had a strange so at that could be book but i have other books about historical things michigan history and things like that. I would love to write wonderful. Well we hope to see more of them to the book. The book is detroit's loss poll on the little neighborhood that touched the nation by preemptive richard ski. And it's available here at the traffic historical museum. I have to put that first.

hamtramck detroit hammock historical museum greg kurowski board of the friends of histor piscopo saint joseph's hospital royds paul hotel gm coleman young Lhasa strip lake greek ralph nader paul town rochester Detroit michigan facebook Ted
Hamtramck Now And Then  Episode 6

PodcastDetroit.com

30:15 min | 5 months ago

Hamtramck Now And Then Episode 6

"You're listening to the podcast detroit visit. Www dot com tested dot com for information along everybody and welcome back to ham traffic now and then the podcast hamtramck historical museum which we do in cooperation podcast detroit. I'm greg kurowski. The executive director of the hamtramck historical museum. And i'm here with joe. Course you joe hello hello. Has everyone doing today. Joe is the chairman of the board of the friends of historical half the organization that owns and operates the hamtramck historical museum today. We're going to do part two of our series we've been working on. How did we get here. This is a look at how hamtramck came to be the town that it is today. It's an incredibly complicated fascinating story. Turns and many many directions what we're gonna do today is look at a critical formative period of between one thousand nine hundred and nine thousand nine hundred and at our first installment. We kind of looked at who all i'm champion at. Its name being named after colonel. John amtrak and the villa the Township days when we went out to the detroit river very much remote from what hamtramck is today but it is part of a heritage. Now we're going to physically and Just kind of zero in. What traffic is closer to today. How we can closer to be what we are in this period and just to settle the stage a little bit. We're talking about nineteen hundred to begin with which is an Kind when the just before. The village of hemp janik was formed and there was a community. Here it was part of hamtramck township but it was developing. Its own personality. It was a group of stores. Saloons in houses and farms. That were clustered. Mainly along the railroad tracks over at the south end of where all hampshire is today overabundant michigan central railroad tracks and the tracks. And i forgot who grand trunk those two railroad so the railroad tracks to interrupt just seattle. I think anyone that knows him. Traffic knows the railroad tracks. Stranger scare me. we'll do we'll do. We'll go off at ten okay. So so we had. These group of houses and businesses clustered over. There did the a couple of businesses open and period to the white lead paint company Which was different many years and Russell auto works or whatever it was in a There was another factory there as well to direct me radiator company was over there as well. Now now greg not again interrupted that the those were were they part of the same like i guess. Parent company acme lead paint and acne radiator. Or were they were they. Two separate entities were separate entity. Okay so So we had these different businesses opening up over there as well too and I think i may be mistaken. The radiator company was not act me. I have to check on that but it we should. They were industries studying over there too. And this is one of the town began to develop its personality and they began to see themselves as a little bit different from hamtramck township and certainly not a part of detroit and at this period to and for years prior to this we saw the city of detroit growing and next thing portions of traffic township bit by bit by bit and moving in the direction of where we are today and folks were living here didn't like that. They didn't feel that they were detroiters. They felt that they had their own community here. So they got together and this is a time when whenever were civil hundred area the figures actually very for that period but there were several hundred people living in the area and they had a call together especially community meeting that was held over at holbrook school which incidentally is still functioning as a school today. Which is really remarkable. When you think about it that you can go in the room where they met after one hundred to more than one hundred and twenty years and and kind of get a sense of what these people were here and they devote decided to create the village of hamtramck. That's actually a legal process that it's you know you have to. It's done by the state basically but you have to have an election here voter the people here and determine if you wanna create the village in present it to the state legislature which is approval for that to happen which the state legislature did and in one thousand nine hundred one. The village of hamtramck was officially created the village. We don't know this is one of the mysteries of hamtramck to exactly how the borderlines of hamtramck would determine the the original village borderlines were not quite the same as the city. Bordered that we know today. The original borderlines Stretch little bit. Farther west of the railroad tracks were cited. How and a little short on the east side of town. But they did incorporate that as the village and they held their first election and august. Nineteen hundred are nineteen. I'm sorry nineteen o one august twenty twenty six zero general election and They had their first Village council meeting in august. On ninth nine hundred. One and answered harris was elected as village president winston named. That's not familiar anymore. Not not not many many years. I've never heard it but he was. He you know village president and The elected village council and started on the path of developing as village. At that point they had no real idea of what the future held. But let's take a little bit of look at what they had around them. They we were as i said. Basically the cluster of buildings at the south side of town clustered around the railroad tracks. Joseph comp was the main street it was unpaved There were no sidewalks at that time. none at all and There was a big creek. That ran down holbrooke Which later became homework avenue. And that was a pretty large one it was at the bottom of a ravine about twenty feet from what we know and in the winter people would fit. I mean in a suburb people with fish there in the winter. Ice skate there. Yes i don't want to stray too far off topic but with the with hobart creek They're actually still stories around town from what we've heard anyway that if you're in a certain basements on holbrook that you could still hear the creek running. The we've heard that story we've never been able to verify it. We don't know frankly if it's true or not that's one of the things we'd like to investigate further and see if any of our listeners know please contact us. We'd love to be able to actually hear that. Yeah yeah that'd be great also would truly We know that there was a bridge over. Hoboken cornered avenue at that time too and North of holbrook there were a few sparse buildings and there was a voice farm at the north end of town and farms around us so it was pretty pretty rural. Very very countrified And a quiet community now. Obviously no street lights nothing. No no real police department or anything like that or police force. It was all township oriented at that aren't sell but once they got the got. The village formed the out. new village. officers started the process of they'll get community and establishing Really all the infrastructure that you need to have a growing community. It's interesting to read the village council minutes from that period as we go forward here of how they become you know. Initially it was very very simple. You know we're just gonna Look at things. One of the first things that the authorized was to have maps drawn up at a new village and things like that. It's unclear as to where the actually met but apparently there was a a building on. Joseph compo were were eventually village hall was built over at greyling street but the also at one point were operated out of a house on joseph coppell as well too because they we know the record. Show that the eight dollars a month in rent for this house. Steve's for the council so but the the issues became more complex as time went by because we started looking at getting a water system and extended into the village from the city of detroit meter project now as the water system. We have actually wooden log waterpipes here at the museum would that have banned. They would use that would have been with originally went in at that point Prior to that there were wells in fact they addressed the council city. The village council addressed the issue of open wells that had to be covered as as time went by but they started getting bids for a needed to take out a bond to pay for the project and it was a very major project to do that and that occupied a lot of their time for several years that as well as getting Electricity into into town originally they had gas lamps for the council chambers and the Work on getting electrical system extended into traffic at least more thoroughly and the Also looked at sidewalks. That was a big issue for them because there were no originally no sidewalks and they did stay put again a combination of cement and wooden sidewalks and they were very specific what they wanted in terms of what kind of what you could use for a wooden sidewalk with dimensions would be what kind of supports they would. Have you know the hell fighters supports could be replaced. Part of it really pretty amazing. He got involved in wooden sidewalks. What what you're describing actually kind of it. It almost reminds me of like a movie. Something you would see like in the old west with the little farming towns are little mining towns. That have you know. Just a a dirt road main road and the the wooden plank sidewalks right where stores and banks and you know saloons and stuff would be. That's kind of what. I'm envisioning at this point so i mean knowing him traffic now and then thinking of what it was. Then it's like it's almost mind-blowing. I mean it's been a long time so obviously things are gonna change but it's kind of. It's kind of interesting to see him traffic in that light. It's a different world traffic if you actually went back to that time and even later in one thousand nine hundred eighty s if you stood on joseph coppola looked around your you would have mutant recognized nothing. Nothing that we know today right. I mean there is just amazing. The transformation that really heard we'll get into that little little bit later as the remarkable transformation that occurred right at this point in a early nineteen hundreds. Nobody had any idea of what was on the horizon. We never expected what would happen to come along so So they went forward with their. You know step by step becoming more of an advanced town in the if you look at the invoices for the bills that would pay month by month They would get larger just about every month because they were getting more and more services looking at more more things the Brought in a police officer. And who actually works. Ten hours said the looks like six days a week. Yeah but he had a even worse he had a split shift eight. Am til two pm and then four till whatever so basically lunchtime so they paid them like forty five dollars a month so we're talking big money so So you know it was growing and just becoming more of a developed town as they started doing these things lot of technical issues. They hit to deal with the terms of financing. These things getting to bond stunt getting loans from the detroit. Thanks and to deal with other issues to they're very interesting to including smallpox which broke out at one point and how the The hired a health department officer for this Village and the wanted to make sure that they could stem that kind of like you know we think pandemic sir are something of to gay not at all even back then they will have to deal with that of situation the outside poverty and people that the by the village to provide assistance for so the at the dress. Those kind of things so But things started to change again In one thousand nine hundred seven When a major event occurred and that was the establishment of saint florian church in hamtramck there. nine thousand nine hundred seven. The archdiocese was looking at all the old town neighborhood. Just south of hamtramck about a mile mile and a half south and looking at the neighborhood there and the community they could see that it was growing The growing north towards the suburbs as we were called back then traffic was considered a suburb and the archdiocese. Figured there were going to move in that into martha half traffic and so on one thousand nine hundred eighty eight is had established saint stanislas parish And could see that there was still going to be a bigger demand so they keep to hamtramck asked local residents if he would likely polish catholic church here and interestingly they said yes we would like to have that even though there was not a great number of polls at that time so in one thousand nine hundred the safe lorient was established and the originally masses were held on a storefront on joseph koppel and shortly thereafter in nineteen zero. Nine section of land was donated to the new parish and it was located Where of course the churches today and in that year the The of the building was built to house a church in school combination. That was very common in those days where you would have won florisa church and one four served as a school. You almost always had a skull. What the church. But that's that's the school church combination. Where is actually where the school is right. Okay that's where the building that became ham sandwich. School is but at the originally it was established whereas the church there was a steeple onto building and those days and it was It was modified in years to come Air but in nineteen fourteen. The parachute had grown enough. Obscenity grow pretty quickly not not greatly at first but enough nineteen fourteen in jumping ahead a little bit. They built the foundation of the big church which was known as the basement church that became and that nineteen twenty six to twenty eight. They built a picture of it right. But in these days in one thousand nine it was still at school church nation but seemed flooring it would become one of the two key anchors in the history of the history of ha- city of hamtramck and dodge me and of course there's the other one but they were the two really most important social and economic forces in hamtramck at that period and provided a lot of we'll see as we go onto the further chapters when we when they played much much bigger role in the history of hamtramck right so So the new be the village growing some other industries. Were starting to. I the as well too. Because of those railroad tracks and A started opening up in here and so it was starting to develop is a real community. More houses were coming in not a lot at first but The worst starting to move in this direction and growth rate was starting in one thousand nine hundred ten of course the whole world changed because june of one thousand nine hundred ten john and horace dodge came to hamtramck and the dodge brothers. Of course were Built parts for henry ford and they had a factory in downtown detroit which was over. The building is still there. It's right around the corner from the greek town casino and it's still there. But that speech there was much too limited for them and they were growing rapidly and they had bigger ideas as well to keep the hamtramck because traffic was a village outside of detroit so the track tax structure was different in texas where lower. There's a lot of room to grow a lot of empty space. And then of course is those railroad blinds right. And now henry. Ford had just opened up his factory over in highland park about a mile mile and a half north of amtrak ideal. They could build. If they build the factory and hemp genomic they could slow right on a railroad track and ship it up to the phone at four plant and ten minutes right for them. It seems like it made sense absolute sensitive if you do a google satellite map of the four plant. What remains in highland park. You can see the railroad spurs to this day that still go into that ford plant and they connected right down here. so june. Nineteen ten the dodge brothers spice of land. She immediately started building. Buildings and by november of nineteen ten. They're producing heights parts for him. Before a lot of people they get confused. They started by building parts not by building cars but by building parsons shipping them to him before they actually had a pretty good working relations with ford. He liked them And the pretty much like him at the beginning at least because ford for all his faults near many He really would recognize people of quality who produce quality work and he was not hesitant to work with them to you know use houston to the best. He could his business and he worked out a good arrangement with them and they became very wealthy very quickly. This is pretty good yet. Guys who really started out making bicycles. Yeah well The the way that they from what. I remember reading any way was that they Basically paid for the factory with money that they made from ford that stuff that they made off of the their parts but they were actually investors in the company. So i think from for what they were saying. In the book i read henry. Ford was upset because he they basically used almost his money to build the factory and him traffic so compete against to compete a stuff. Yeah so yeah. It's it's interesting. they're there they were very interesting. Very interesting is truly of course they had a big fall out of style went by actually henry. Ford bought them out for was something like eighteen million dollars. Cash right back in nineteen thousand eighteen. Yeah you can imagine the amount of money that would represent incredible so but anyways they came to started building the factory and the put out a call for workers and that call course was answered in an incredible way. Thousands of people started flooding to traffic mainly polish immigrants. Who came here To get the job. And henry. Ford's i mean i'm sorry in the dodge brothers factory and by this time About twenty two other factories were operating in hamtramck. Now they had village have traffic was Almost the same size as the what would become the city. That's two point one square miles. Actually two point zero nine four. If you wanna get. We should get technical dodge brothers there you go. Wow so that's a small area and we're by. We were getting close to being surrounded by the city of detroit. Osset highland park of course us and they're pretty much the same sizes. We were at that point that they were the phenomenal growth as well With all these people starting flooding in here and this led of course to our great transformation of the village of hamtramck. That's gonna we'll take that as we go into the next segment more But we could already see the what was happening by. Nineteen in this period and the village people who really a real concept of what was going to happen. Nobody nobody had imagine what what's going to happen with the rate growth. That was coming. This was still that quiet. Little village a little farming village and it was At that point still largely under the control of the germans the german immigrants had originally immigrated here and the center power at the time and for years still some years to come with german. Saloon served most of the business actually for but we can determine you know. Officially they did their meetings at the city council chambers but a lot of the real power and the real things that were done with done in the saloons which was also set a pattern that we are going to see more of in the future as well to which still i think is something that happens til the stay closely mostly much. Maybe not as much now as it did that. Then because that's pretty much dan But saloons we'll get to that as well but they played a major role in hamtramck history. The bar scene wasn't just the bar scene. You would find him more towns. It was a center of power and there was a breeding ground for politicians including mayors of trying to make a number of them actually got that because of their association with bars and so they always were traditionally a an important part of the community. Not just as a nightspot fun place. Right so We had saloon. Was he one and once she Was located over the viaduct. This today on ios of right around there would have been right like right next to it. And that was the real center of power for many years and Munching your and the german constituents are about. The politicians really ran things from that area there More development was occurring as as village v. matured and grew and became more sophisticated. And it's this also was A transitional period starting the fringes of and was. This is kind of hard to express what they were not sure what was going to happen. The obviously expect what was going to happen and they didn't have any kind of procedures in place really for dealing with what was going to happen. And that's you became a really critical factor in the formation of hampshire especially in the next decade in the next two decades though that was tie in all the that was the time to win e credible changes were occurring and was totally overwhelming village. And what they were trying to do right now. Do we know when when the first poll started coming over. We don't you could trace the polish history. Of course you know eighteen fifties and things like that not the hamtramck but to detroit right rank but we don't really know exactly when they started settling in hamtramck itself. You know where we are Dick there you'll see occasional polish names mentioned back then right but the majority of them at that time and we're talking to one thousand nine hundred nineteen period the majority at that time. We're still the german names once. You're still in charge there right. I think we we had mentioned did a previous podcast about looking at a school board minutes from or we'll tell township school board minutes from eighteen ninety eight and i think also they were. They were all the way up through nineteen twelve or so. And if you look i mean as you really saw pretty much german names. I don't even think. I saw one polish name even even going through nineteen ten. This pretty much was a german. A german enclave. Which is it's interesting. You know and you could still see little remnants of the german history german past. You know it's you know street names and and not necessarily businesses but more more along the lines of like street name stuff like that jakup and gamer. You know. I think a lot of the streets are actually still fairly fairly german. Who truly when they were going to do a program on a history of hamtramck street names as well too. Because that's really fascinating right so so you know what we're doing here is we're kind of setting the stage of what's to come and the pieces are starting to fall into place and it's got a lot of drama to it because again you have that anticipation that something is changing. But you don't really know exactly what and don't know to what degree it's going to change and nobody was a cube stressing that point that nobody really could imagine what was going to happen in terms of the the growth of the community and the the phenomenal thing you know. We have photos of him from nineteen twenty. And you can see just rows of smokestacks in the factories and to think that just a decade earlier. a lot of that was farms. Yes nothing and kind of the way that i view it anyway is really without the dodge brothers. Traffic would either be a party trader. Would still i mean. Obviously it wouldn't be a farming community because we're in the middle of the city. But you know without. I think without the dodge brothers hamtramck still there would be no we. We would have been absorbed have been known movement to form through a city which occurred later so This is really amazing. We're standing on the precipice right now and we're looking ahead to it and that's what we're going to address and i next. Keep an eye on those dodge brothers so we will be back as we continue this series of several more products. And for now though. I just want to thank all of you for tuning in. And don't forget to visit the hampshire historical museum at nine hundred fifty five joseph coppell right here in the heart of traffic and you can learn more about us museum. I've podcast. We're going to our website at www hamshaw the history dot org and you can follow us on facebook and instagram social media. And of course we wanna thank podcast. Detroit who really are responsible for making this allowing this to happen and we really appreciate all the help they've given us from establishing this so stay tuned.

hamtramck hamtramck historical museum detroit hamtramck township village council greg kurowski joe hello John amtrak hemp janik Ford holbrook school president winston Joseph comp hobart creek joseph coppell Joseph compo legislature joseph coppola
146  That Old Man and the Sea

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

1:22:19 hr | 1 year ago

146 That Old Man and the Sea

"Hello and welcome to misinformation and a Trivia podcast for ladies and gents who love Cool Trivia and sticking it to annoying teams at pub quiz. Virtually we're your hosts. I'm Lauren Julia. Hey Joel High Lord. So we're recording on Easter Sunday. And tomorrow is is Dingoes Day. We're going to be posting a photo of US For Dingus Day. But it's not. It's not quite the same. This year for Dingus Day. I'm sure the Dingus Day parade was cancelled. And I'm I'm sorry for all of those those Broadway area felonious who have to drink side instead at ten. Am on a Monday. Actually it'll probably be the exact same as usual but last week you did an episode based on a request from a listener and we also had. We've had a couple of requests from people which we are more than happy to do if we can. I mean you know sometime. Sometimes it's really like how much mental exertion where we have to spend at the at that moment in time. Yeah I mean you know. Sometimes it's that's going to be a real bummer. Or we don't have enough time to do like the history of plants. You know like that kind of thing that someone is asked for plants but like sometimes. The topics are too broad yet. Lake like there are times. I've been like World War Two hour episode on World War Q. How happy I mean. Even even Ken Burns hasn't really tackled. World War Two. I mean he did the Vietnam War and that was still like an eleven part right so you know little Ola. We can only do so much but I will say this request that we got was I was like yeah absolutely. I'm GonNa do this so today's episode is called that old man and the Sea Ernest Hemingway so Here's thing full disclosure. I have never read and Ernest Hemingway Book Novel Short Story or Poem. I have never had any interest I was. I'll even in the course of researching this episode. You couldn't read a poem. Well okay I guess. I read like a couple of line poems from like the websites that I saw about him. Like you know he said this Blah Blah Blah I've never had any interest. Even though I was I was a very bad English major in College. I did not care to read. The classics and in fact didn't read a lot of my like nineteenth century British novels. But that's neither here nor there we're gonNA talk about Inter Ernest Hemingway. The man. We're GONNA talk about his long and storied life And I'm going to give summaries of each of the the hits his excellent the novels. So do you recommend that everybody start this episode with an alcoholic beverage? Yes I would I would recommend Preferably Rum and Maybe a cigar Aware like Like one of those roll neck white jumpers and grow a big white beard. So so so what do that. He's one of those things at least one of those things. Go ahead and do that. Get real rip drunk because that's what Ernest would want it so to begin with Ernest Miller. Hemingway was born on July twenty first eighteen hundred nine in Oak Park Illinois which is a sub- suburb of Chicago. Shout out to Chicago He was the second of six children. His Father Clarence Edmonds. Hemingway was a physician and his mother. Grace Hall Hemingway was a musician Both were well educated and well respected in Oak Park and later Ernest. Hemingway would say that he disliked his name which he quote associated with the naive even foolish hero of Oscar. Wilde's play the importance of being earnest. More on that later. Okay Yeah Yeah. So whatever hemingway's mother frequently performed in concerts around the village and as an adult? Hemingway professed to hate his mother. Although biographer Michael Reynolds points out that hemingway mirrored her energy and enthusiasm so he was more like his mom then he would have liked to admit and there really isn't any like. I don't know why he hated his mother so much. I don't know he seemed to really have an issue with women which you'll see later but of all. The family spent summers at Windermere on Walloon. Lake near Petoskey Michigan and Hemingway's father taught him to hunt fish and camp in the woods and lakes of northern Michigan as a young boy and these early experiences in nature instilled a passion for outdoor adventure and living in remote or isolated areas. This was something that kind of carried with him. The rest of his life. So like Mark Twain Stephen Crane Theater adviser and Sinclair Lewis. Hemingway was journalist before he became a novelist after he left high school he went to work for the Kansas City star as a cub reporter and although he stayed there for only six months he relied on the star style guide as a foundation for his writing quote use short sentences US short first paragraphs US vigorous English be positive not negative. I is all that. Yeah yeah his writing style is and we'll talk a little bit about it but his writing style was very like short clipped. He didn't use a lot of flowery language it was like he likes to use the word and instead of commas so a lot of his descriptive sentences have and ant amp so it's a very like truncated And it's it's later read is kind of like masculine. This like Dj drawing declared of sentences and so that style of writing is specifically hemingway ish and it's been copied and parodied ever since you know. He started writing. But that's kind of like you. Can I D? A having way sentence no problem because he had a very distinctive way of writing so in December of nineteen seventeen. Hemingway responded to a Red Cross recruitment effort and signed on to be an ambulance driver in Italy. After having failed to enlist in the army because of poor eyesight this was obviously during the first World War in May nineteen eighteen. He sailed from New York and arrived in Paris. As the city was under bombardment from German artillery. He literally like got off the boat and it was like Komo mummum and he's like seventeen but he but he loved it. Oh He loved it oh he loved it. He's such an Adrenalin Junky. So that June he arrived at the Italian front and on his first name. Alon he was sent to the scene of a munitions factory explosion where rescuers retrieved the shredded remains of female workers. He described the incident. His nonfiction book called death in the afternoon quote. I remember that after. We searched quite thoroughly for the complete dead. We collected fragments on July eighth. He was seriously wounded by mortar. Fire having just returned from the canteen bring chocolate and cigarettes for the men at the frontline in Celta Diabe and despite his wounds. Hemingway assisted Italian soldiers to safety for which he received the Italian Silver Medal of bravery and he was still only eighteen at the time so he saw a lot of shit before he turned eighteen basically so he later said of the incident quote. When you go to war is a boy. You have a great illusion of immortality. Other people get killed not you then when you are badly wounded the first time you lose that illusion and you know it can happen to you. He sustained severe shrapnel wounds to both legs underwent an immediate operation at a distribution center and spent five days at a field hospital before he was transferred for recuperation to the Red Cross Hospital in Milan. He spent six months at the hospital where he met and formed a strong friendship with Chink. Dorman Smith which was a nickname I had to make sure that Chink Dorman Smith was nicknamed not recently and he was not. He was apparently stationed in Africa and because he had specifically we'll say kindly weird looking face. Apparently he looked a lot like the local antelope which was called a chink. Kara a long nose and protruding eyes so they called him Chin Kara and then he was just called Chink so he was friends with him for decades and he also shared a room with future American Foreign Service Officer Ambassador. An author Henry Serrano Villard so while he was recuperating he fell in love for the first time with a woman named Agnes von Kurowski Red Cross nurse and she was seven years older than him by the time of Y. I thought you were just be like she was seven. She was seven years old and this is where his life turns a dark turn. No she was seventy or senior. Who said here's older totally safe by the time of release returned to the United States in January of one thousand nine hundred nine Agnes and hemingway had decided to marry within a few months in America however in March she wrote that she had become engaged to an Italian officer. And do you blame her. I mean come on the Italians Am I. Right so biographer. Jeffrey Meyers. Gumbo in biographer. Jeffrey Meyers stays in his book. Hemingway biography that Hemingway was devastated by Agnes rejection and in future relationships. He followed a pattern of abandoning a wife before she abandoned him so instead of instead of like taking it and learning from this experience he decided to Take that pain from that rejection and really try and punish every woman he gets into a relationship with for the rest of his life so he returned home early in one thousand nine hundred ninety two a time of readjustment Before the age of twenty he had gained from the war immaturity maturity that was at odds with living at home without a job and with the need for recuperation so in September. He took a fishing and camping trip with some high school friends. The back country of Michigan's upper peninsula. The trip became the inspiration for short story which was called big two hearted river in which the semi autobiographical character of Nick. Adams takes to the country to find solitude after returning from the war. Most of his books are if holy if not in part like thinly veiled biographies some where he is at the time so a family friend offered him a job in Toronto with nothing else to do accepted so late that year. He began as a freelancer and staff writer for the Toronto Star. Weekly and he returned to Michigan the following June and then moved to Chicago in September nineteen twenty two friends while still filing stories for the Toronto Star Also in Chicago. He worked as an associate editor of the monthly journal called Cooperative Commonwealth. Where he met novelist Sherwood Anderson and they became friends and they were friends for a very long time. So when Saint Louis Native Hadley. Richardson came to Chicago. To visit the sister of Hemingway's roommate. Hemingway became infatuated. He later claimed quote. I knew she was the girl I was going to marry. Hadley who is red haired with nurturing instinct was eight years older than Hemingway. He really had a thing for older ladies. So despite the age difference Headley who had grown up with an overprotective mother seemed less mature than usual for young woman. Her Age Bernice Kurt. Who is the author of the Hemingway? Women Claims Hadley was evocative vagueness but that headley had a childishness agnes lacked the two correspondent for a few months and then decided to marry and travel to Europe and they wanted to visit Rome but Sherwood Anderson convinced them to visit Paris? Instead which would become very influential. He wrote letters of introduction for the young couples they could settle in. They were married on September. Third Nineteen Twenty. One and two months later. Hemingway was hired as a foreign correspondent for the Toronto Star. And the couple left for Paris of Hemingway's marriage to Headley Myers claims with Hadley. Hemingway achieved everything he had hoped for with. Agnes the love of beautiful woman a comfortable income a life in Europe however headley was clearly more malleable than Agnes would've been presumably given her childlike nature. So she was kind of like a substitute for Agnes like willing to do what Ernest wanted. Yeah Fly ables pliable exactly so in. Paris. Hemingway met American writer and Collector Richard Stein Irish novelist James. Joyce American poet who would become kind of father figure for Ernest and other writers The Hemingway early Paris years was quote tall. Handsome Muscular broad-shouldered brown-eyed rosy-cheeked square-jawed soft voice. Young Man So he was. Can I tell you stone Cold Fox? He was good looking and he was. He was pretty handsome like until like his his death like he was a handsome guy. He was like you know. I love a square guy with a beard and Ernest. Hemingway I mean come on. He's a square guy with a beard but he was clean shaven while he was in Paris he and had lived in a small up in the Latin quarter and he worked in a rented room in a nearby building. Stein who is the bastion of modernism in Paris became Hemingway's mentor? And godmother to his son Jack She also introduced him to the ex Patriot artists and writers of the Montparnasse. Quarter who she referred to as the lost generation. A Term Hemingway popularized with the publication of the sunrises so this idea of the lost generation is basically all of these people who were affected by the First World War. They were young. They kind of came of age during the first World War and they were lost because the world is so different now and a lot of them tend to especially if they were of comfortable means traveled to different parts of the world and just kind of like try to find a place for themselves So it was kind of Romanticize as the lost generation by Gertrude Stein subsequently by hemingway a regular at Stein's salon. Hemingway met influential painters such as Pablo Picasso Joan Miro and one green and he eventually withdrew from Stein's influence and their relationship deteriorated into a literary quarrel that spanned decades so they got into a tiff and then they stop speaking for a very long time. the movie midnight in Paris. Yes with Owen. Wilson was is. I thought it was surprisingly good. And it was a very great job of describing that period of yes I bought it on. Dvd when that was still like a thing but Yeah midnight in Paris. I am certainly not somebody. Who wants to promote a woody allen film but it's very good and it does really. It's I mean it's good bit of magical realism. It's well acted and Corey stoll plays young Ernest. Hemingway and you know Corey. Stoll is like a bald actor and he was like a piece but he does a like a phenomenal hemingway impression. It's amazing so it's worth watching and Kathy Bates Plays Gertrude. Stein which is like the best casting. It's worth watching for the good casting decisions and like just like really solid impressions. That don't turn into like weird. Yeah Harry's of like you're not it gives you like a good idea of who was around then and it like if you're a visual person like being able to see these actors playing the people and then have that impress upon your brain. Yeah who was there and what they were known for. Yeah because right now like you think of all these these artists and writers and things they're kind of like larger than life and you can't really imagine these hugely influential people in their fields like hanging around and chatting and like getting drunk and like spending time in Paris it's a good illustration of that for sure. I highly recommend. Cb CAN STEAL IT. Get it for free. So as rebound met Hemingway by chance at Sylvia's Sylvia Beach's bookshop Shakespeare and company in Nineteen twenty two and the tour to Italy and nine hundred twenty three and lived on the same street in nineteen twenty four. So they were very close in. Hemingway recognized and fostered young talent Pound unfortunately introduced hemingway to James. Joyce with whom? Hemingway frequently embarked on alcoholics sprees. So if you said named to is in Hundred Twenty. Two got to insufferable male writers who've gotten together in the twenties and just got hammered together. I would absolutely have guessed hemingway and James. Joyce you would have gotten one absolutely and it's true they did they would just just absolutely get hammered together. So I mean woody. Nato however during his first twenty months in Paris he filed eighty-eight stories for the Toronto Star newspaper so yeah very productive. He covered the greco-turkish war which he witnessed the burning of SMYRNA and wrote travel pieces such as tuna fishing in Spain and trout fishing all across Europe Colon. Spain has the best then Germany so he wasn't just covering conflicts. He was getting them to pay for his like leisure activities. Yes exactly he wasn't stupid. Also oh here's another thing. I mean. He filed eight eight stories in twenty months. He wrote so fast and they'll be more like about how quickly he wrote. But I think this had a lot to do with like how he had a you know just a a base knowledge and journalism and it was just used to filing stories very quickly but his books are not long and they are. They were written so fast. Like I can't imagine writing that fast even with like a computer like just like physically writing that quickly anyway Also during this time he described the retreat of the Greek army with civilians from east th race so hemingway was devastated at this point on learning that Hadley had lost a suitcase filled with his manuscripts at the Guardia. Leon as she was travelling to Geneva to meet him in December nineteen twenty two. Yeah the following September. The couple returned to Toronto where their son John Hedley? Nick was born on October tenth nineteen twenty-three during their absence Hemingway's first book. Three stories and ten poems was published To the stories that contained were all that remained after the loss of the suitcase and the third had been written early the previous year in Italy within months a second volume which was called in our time it had no capitals little lower case. Everything in our time That was published a small volume included. Six vignettes in a dozen stories. Hemingway had written the previous summer during his first visit to Spain where he discovered the thrill of bullfighting. He missed yeah. He really loved bullfighting. That's nothing he missed. Paris consider Toronto Boring and wanted to return to the life of a writer rather than live the life of a journalist. Hemingway Hadley and their son who was nicknamed Bambi returned to Paris in January. Nineteen twenty four and move into a new apartment Hemingway helped Ford Maddox Ford at at the transatlantic review which published works by pound John Dos. Passos Baroness Elsa von. Freytag lowering. Hoven which you may remember from my episode on Surrealism Yeah Like News writer And also Gertrude. Stein as well as some some of Hemingway's own early stories such as Indian Camp Indian camp received considerable praise. Ford Maddox Ford Saad. As an important early story by a young writer and critics in the United States praised Hemingway for reinvigorating the short story genre with his crisp. Steel and use of declarative sentences Six months earlier hemingway had f Scott Fitzgerald and the pair formed a friendship of admiration and hostility Fitzgerald had published the Great Gatsby the same year. Hemingway read it liked it and decided that his next work had to be a novel so with his wife. Hadley Hemingway I visited the festival of San Fermin in Pamplona Spain in nineteen twenty-three where he became fascinated by bullfighting. As I mentioned before it is at this time that he began to be referred to as Papa even by much older friends. Okay Hadley would later recall that. Hemingway had his own nicknames for everybody in that he often did things for his friends She suggested that he likes to be looked up to. She didn't remember precisely how the nickname came into being. However it definitely stock. He called himself. Papa everybody called Him Papa. Whatever a few days after the fiesta ended on his birthday July twenty first he began to write the draft of what would become the sun also rises finishing eight weeks later a few. Yeah a few months later. In December nineteen twenty five Hemingway's left to spend the winter insurance Austria where Hemingway began revising the manuscript extensively. Pauline pfeiffer a friend of the family and a journalist herself join them in January and against Headley's advice urged hemingway to sign a contract with scrivener's scrivener's was an American publisher. Baked Bagel New York City at actually still exists in a certain way it later merged into Macmillan and then it turned into on a Simon and Schuster bought Macmillan and so it's part of China Simon and Schuster He left Austria for a quick trip to New York to meet with publishers and on his return during a stop in Paris. He began an affair with pauline pfeiffer. I Know Papa. He's incorrigible so let's talk a little bit about The Sun also rises so I just hit a button wrong and here okay Okay so the sun also rises epitomized. The Post were ex Patriot generation. It received good reviews. It's recognized as hemingway's greatest work to some Hemingway later A- Wrote to his editor. Max Perkins that the point of the book was not so much about a generation being lost but that the earth abides forever He believed that the characters in the sun also rises may have been battered but not lost so the plot is basically about thinly-veiled hemingway protagonist. His name is Jake Barnes He's an American journalist. Ex Pat who falls in love with a promiscuous Englishwoman. Whose name is lady Brett Ashley during a visit to Spain amongst bullfighting jealousies etc etc. There are lots of other characters who are basically as friends at the time and they all have affairs with or are in love with Brett. It's like pain and suffering and love and joy and you know like the darkness of being young and not being home and all this stuff. So that's the sun also rises Jake Barnes Lady Brett Ashley. Bullfighting bullfighting Spain. So back to hemingway his marriage to Headley surprisingly deteriorated as he was working on. The Sun also rises in early. Nineteen twenty. Six Hadley became aware of his affair with Pfeiffer who came to Pamplona with them that July so he invited him invited her to come with him and his family like NBD. Like don't even worry about it. Like HEAVILY BE COOL. Police coming to whatever like it's happening so on their return to Paris Headley asked for a separation in November. She formally requested a divorce and they split their possessions while Hedley accepted Hemingway's offer of the proceeds from the sun also rises. She got the proceeds for it. All right They were divorced in January. Nineteen twenty seven and Hemingway married Pfeiffer in May so he took no. He didn't wait on that. So Pauline pfeiffer. She was from a wealthy Catholic Arkansas family. She had moved to Paris to work for Vogue magazine. She was a writer. He seemed to have a thing for since after. Headley seemed to have a thing for like lady. Journalists and writers. Shield him I don't think so I think she was. She was around his age appropriate. Age Appropriate Lady So before their marriage hemingway converted to Catholicism for her and they honeymooned on Legrand Roy which he where he contracted anthrax so what. Here's the thing about Ernest Hemingway that you're catch. You're going to catch this. He is probably the most accident prone gentlemen of the Early Twentieth Century. That you will ever hear up. He gets beat up so much. It's crazy so he contracted anthrax which is just like what so he gets anthrax in France and then he was planning his next collection of short stories which was called men without women surprise surprise that was published in October. Nineteen twenty seven that included his boxing story which is called fifty grand Cosmopolitan magazine editor in chief. Ray Long praised fifty grand calling it one of the best short stories that ever came into my hands. The best price fight story. I ever read a remarkable piece of realism by the end of the year. Pauline who was pregnant wanted to move back to America and John Dos Passos. Their friend recommended key West so they left Paris in March. Nineteen twenty eight. Hemingway suffered a severe injury in their Paris bathroom when he pulled a skylight down on his head thinking he was pulling on a toilet chain. Yeah how hammered WASI super hammered. He had to be This apparently left him with a prominent forehead scar which he carried for the rest of his life when a knife fight known from Ole fighting. Not a more MAC himself in the head with a window when he was drunk Was obviously when he was asked about the scar. He was reluctant to answer. Like just make like just make a belie clearly. You have plenty of terrible things that are happening to you. So after his departure from Paris. Hemingway lived in a big city so hemingway in pauline travel to Kansas City. Where THEIR SON? Patrick was born on June twenty eighth nineteen twenty eight In the winter when he was in New York with Bambi about to board a train to Florida he received a cable telling him that his father had killed himself Hemingway was devastated having earlier into his father telling him not to worry about financial difficulties and the letter arrived minutes after his suicide. It's awful so he killed himself over money. Yeah so. Hemingway realized how badly must have felt ever her own father suicide in ninety-three three and he commented quote. I'll probably go the same way. Yeah it's crazy. So upon his return to key West in December hemingway worked on the draft of a farewell to arms before leaving for France in January. The completed novel was published in September. Nineteen twenty nine in Spain. Mid Nineteen twenty nine. Hemingway research is next work which was called death in the afternoon. He wanted to write a comprehensive treatise on bullfighting explaining with glossaries appendices because he believed bullfighting was of great tragic interests being literally of life and death so a wealth arms big one is basically the story of Ernest love affair for Agnes von Kurowski except in the book they do get together and she gets pregnant and they fleet of Switzerland only for her both she and the baby to die in childbirth and then the last scene is like ernest is like walking through. The rainy. Streets of Switzerland goes back to his hotel room. So farewell to arms is basically about Agnes and Ernest There was a movie made with Sandra Bullock called in love and war which is basically like a weird combination of a farewell to arms and Ernest. Hemingway's like story of Agnes. It did not do out. That was like two thousand two so during the early nineteen thirty S. Hemingway spent his winters in. Key West Summers in Wyoming where he found the most beautiful country he had seen in the American west and hunted deer elk and Grizzly bear. He was a big hunter. He was joined there by does Passos and in November nineteen thirty after bringing those passes to the train station in billings Montana. Hemingway broke his arm. In a car accident The surgeon tended the compound spiral fracture and bound the bone with kangaroo tendon He was kangaroo. I don't know it's it's you know. It's the West Montana. People probably had like a kangaroo farm you know. I don't know. He was hospitalized for seven weeks with pauline tending to him. The nerves in his writing hand took as long as a year to heal during which time he suffered intense pain because they put an animal tendency now right so his third child Named Gregory handcock. Hemingway was born a year later on November Twelfth. Nineteen thirty one in Kansas City. Interesting Story About Gregory Hemingway. So Gregory was a was a trans woman who lived there. I'm going to refer to them as they They live their life as a man and a woman Calling themselves Gloria when they lived woman and actually had gender confirmation surgery in nineteen ninety-five allow but it seemed that they had a lot of conflict with that Towards the end of their life they presented themselves as Gregory as male and in interviews and things was presented as male Even after they had had the gender confirmation surgery so it seemed that they had had like a real struggle with that throughout their life and it was kind of a scandal sort of in the eighty s and ninety s But they died a believe in the early two thousands From a heart attack or something like that But yeah that was an interesting story because they lived as a man for most of their life but definitely had some conflicting gender issues. So that was interesting. Pauline's uncle bought the couple of house in key west with a carriage house the second floor of which was converted into a writing studio and while in. Key West Hemingway frequented the local bar sloppy joes. I've been there. It's a dive. That's kind of their thing. Sloppy joes like this is. We're heading. We hung out and drank a ton of booze And it's a cool place and also sloppy. Joes has a live cam where you can go to their website and just like look at the bar and see people like hanging out also there's an ernest. Hemingway look alike contest and key West every year in August and they haven't sloppy joes in Ernest. Hemingway lost the very first. They also have they have this great and it's all for charity like it's all like raise and every year. They raise money for different charity. But they do the running of the Papua's which is which is which is a marathon through us. So it's all of these these hemingway lookalikes running through. Everyone has a beard and a Cuban hat and cigar from their mouth. And there are. None of them are healthy looking. So they're all like running through the of Key West in August and it's called the running of the poppas look it up online. It's such a cool thing. They've been doing it a really long time. I think they've been doing it since the seventies I want to say but a friend of mine. My friend rich went last year because we I used to joke. Because he's such a handsome guy. We used to joke. That rich looked exactly like hemingway and I told him about it because when he was working at the museum. He's a conservative and I told him about it. I was like you should do this and he did like. They chartered a boat and he did like some like fishing on the coast and they stayed in Key West and he. He went through he through the first round as a first time. Papa so yeah. He sent me some pictures. That was really cool. He said he had like the white sweater with the roll neck and he like even did a brief impression. That's another thing. There's like a performance aspect to it. It's great key. Us is the best so anyway. So he's in he's in key. West now hangs out at sloppy Joe's. He invited friends to join him on fishing trips. And not an all male expedition to the dry Tortuga Meanwhile he continued to travel to Europe and to Cuba and although in nineteen thirty-three he wrote a key west quote. We have a fine house here and kids are all well Biographer believes he was plainly restless. So in Nineteen thirty-three Hemingway in pauline went on safari to East Africa. The ten week trip provided material for Green Hills of Africa as well as the short stories. The snows of Kilimanjaro. And the short happy life of Francis mccumber. Their guide was the noted. White Hunter Philip Percival. Who had guided? Theodore Roosevelt on his nineteen o nine safari. And during these travels. Hemingway contracted amoebic dysentery. That caused a prolapsed intestine. And he was. He was evacuated by plane tonight. Roby and experience reflected. In the snows of Kilimanjaro. On Hemingway's return to early nineteen thirty four. He began work on the Green Hills of Africa which he published in nineteen thirty five to mixed reviews again. Green Hills of Africa is just like a vaguely semi autobiographical story of him. Being in Africa Hemingway bought a boat in nineteen thirty four. He named it the Pilar and he began sailing. The Caribbean in nineteen thirty five. He first arrived at Amini where he spent a considerable amount of time and during this period he also worked on to have an have not published nineteen thirty seven while he was in Spain. The only novel he wrote during the Nineteen Thirties so to have and have not The book is about Harry Morgan. Who is a fishing boat? Captain of Key West who turns to a life of crime after the depression hits He smuggles people in illegal cargo back and forth to Cuba. And it's basically tells. The story of the haves who are wealthy yacht owners affected by the economic downturn and the have nots who are poor residents and minorities living in Key West. So that's to having to have not. That's all about key west and Cuba great. He loved Cuba. Oh you love Cuba. So we'll talk about Cuba in one thousand thirty seven. Hemingway left for Spain to cover the Spanish civil war for the North American newspaper. Alliance despite pauline reluctance to have him working in a war zone. She's like you're getting older. You have kids. Let's just stay in Key West. And he was like no. I love it. Your new spark kangaroo like maybe take it easy. Never takes it easy. He was joined in Spain by journalist and writer Martha Gill Horn. Who had met in Key West a year earlier Like Hadley Martha was a Saint Louis Native and like Pauline. She had worked for vogue in Paris. of Martha Kurt. Who who wrote the Hemingway Women She explains she never catered to him. The way other women did so. Martha Gal Horn is a pistol. Like she I mean. She wasn't like innocent in this whole thing because he definitely had an affair with her but she was like it seemed like she was the only woman in his life gave it back to him as good as he got. You know what I mean so late in nineteen thirty while in Madrid with Martha. Hemingway wrote his only play which is called the fifth column as the city was being bombarded by Franco's forces. He returned to Key West for a few months back to Spain twice in nineteen thirty eight where he was present at the battle of the ABRO. The last Republican stand and was among the British and American journalists. Who are some of the last to leave the battle as they crossed the river? Wow so he was like in though she act like he was in it so in early. Nineteen thirty nine Hemingway. Cross to Cuba in his boat to live at the hotel. Ombudsman dose in Havana This was the separation phase of a slow and painful split from pauline which began when Hemingway met Martha Gal Horn. Martha student soon joined him in Cuba and they rented a Finca via which is lookout farm. A fifteen acre property. Fifteen miles from Havana Pauline in the children left hemingway that summer and if the family was reunited during a visit to Wyoming when his divorce from pauline was finalized he and Martha were married on November twentieth. Nineteen Forty Cheyenne Wyoming. So again divorce. The woman He was with and then quickly turned around and married the woman he was having an affair with some Hemingway moved his primary summer. Residents to Ketchum Idaho and moved his winter residence to Cuba. He had been disgusted. WanNa a Parisian friend allowed his cats to eat from the table but then he became enamored of cats in Cuba and kept dozens of them on the property One of them called snowball. An all white cat is the ancestor of a lot of the cats. At the Hemingway House in Key West. Which I've been to the Hemingway House is a very cool place. If you are allergic to cats you should go nowhere near. There are a ton of cats there. The whole place smells like cat which is not my favorite thing. But it's very it's funny because it's it's a historic home like you go on a tour. You can't like just walk around the house. You have to go with a tour guide. You can't touch things you can't like all these rooms are like coordoned-off but all these cats are like like sleeping on the bed rubbing their top things rubbing their butts on things getting their nasty little. Toby means all over everything So I don't know how the museum workers there I don't know is key west like key. West people are like Matt's fine but it is kind of funny because there are like a lot of somebody cats like you go into the gift shop and you want you go to like those little cubbyholes. Keep the shirts and you go to grab a shirt. But there's a cat sleeping on the pile of shirts in the gift shop so but almost all the white cats or at least a good portion of the white cats at the Hemingway House Key West are descendants of snowball. They had six toes and they have six jobs. Yes yes so back to Martha Gal Horn. She inspired him to write his most famous novel. For whom the bell tolls which he started in March of Nineteen thirty nine and finished in July nineteen forty. It was published in October. Nineteen forty and it became a book of the month club choice. Sold half a million copies within months and was for a Pulitzer Prize and quote triumphantly. Reestablished Hemingway's literary reputation in the words of a biographer Myers. So for whom the bell tolls graphically described the brutality of the Spanish civil war. It is told primarily through the thoughts and experiences of the protagonist. Whose name is Robert Jordan. Who is definitely ernest? Hemingway it draws on Hemingway's in the Spanish civil war as a reporter for the North American newspaper Alliance so Jordan is an American who lives in prewar. Spain and fights as an irregular soldier for the Republic Against Frank Francisco Franco's fascist forces ooh He falls in love. The broken Spanish woman named Maria he heroically saves a bunch of people during a skirmish but is mortally wounded in the process and the book ends with him bidding farewell to Maria and his comrades as he plans one last ambush against the fascist forces. It's basically war porn. That's for whom the bell tolls. It's basically Hemingway's experiences like thinly-veiled experiences in the Spanish civil war. His protagonists teams are just such like good masculine. America's boy named Yes shake hours. Yeah Rob Jordan. Yeah it's a lot of like short masculine names. So in January nineteen forty one. Martha was sent to China on assignment for Collier's magazine and Hemingway went with her sending in dispatches for the newspaper PM but in general he disliked China Two thousand nine book suggests during that period he may have been recruited to work for Soviet intelligence agents under the name agent Argo but soon has not been proven They returned to Cuba before the declaration of war by the United States that December when he convinced the Cuban government to help him refit the Pilar which he intended to use to ambush German submarines off the coast of Cuba. He was like I'm GonNA can kill a bunch of Germans with tiny boat drunk. Quasi at this point you can probably guarantee super drunk like he's basically drunk all the time so between May nineteen forty four March nineteen forty five. He was in Europe traveling around when he arrived in London he met Time magazine correspondent Mary. Welch with whom he became infatuated. I know I know. I Know Martha had been forced to cross the Atlantic in a ship filled with explosives because hemingway refused to help her get a press pass on a plane and she arrived in London. Find him hospitalized with a concussion from a car accident she was as you can imagine super unsympathetic and accused him of being a bully and told him that she was through absolutely finished. The last time that Hemingway saw Martha was in March nineteen forty-five as he was preparing to return to Cuba and their divorce was finalized later that year. Meanwhile he had asked Mary Welch to marry him on their third meeting. Dear read it. My parentheses forty two wife parentheses forty-three F is mad at me because I made her get on a plane. Filled with explosives. Am I the asshole? Yeah Yeah so Martha was like you know what that's it I'm done and then was like done. Martha was ever. I mean Sh- good for her. She should have married him in the first place. But you know no. Nobody's perfect all made that mistake. We've all dated that guy. So Hemingway accompanied the troops to Normandy landings wearing a large head bandage according to his biographer. But he was considered precious cargo and not allowed ashore. The landing craft came within sight of Omaha beach before coming under enemy fire and turning back so he was like there that her the storming of Omaha Knew Him. They knew who he yes point. Having the guy with the big bandage he was in a car accident. Got a concussion. Hemingway we like. Oh my God. So Hemingway later wrote in Collier's that he could see the first second third fourth and fifth waves of landing troops lay where they had fallen looking like so many heavily laden bundles. The flat pebble stretched between the sea. And I cover so late in July. He attached himself to the twenty second infantry regiment commanded by Colonel Charles. Buck Lanham drove toward Paris and Hemingway became defacto leader to a small band of village militia and Rambo. Outside of Paris a biographer remarks. Hemingway got into considerable trouble playing infantry captain to a group of resistance people that he gathered because correspondent is not supposed to lead troops even if he does it. This wasn't fact in contravention of the Geneva Convention and Hemingway was brought up on formal charges. He said he beat the rap by claiming that he only offered advice. My God so he drank four bottles of Ryan and he was like we're going. This way is so on August twenty fifth. He was president at the liberation of Paris as a journalist. Contrary to the Hemingway legend he was not the first into the city. Nor did he liberate the Ritz there? But he wasn't like running around saving people's asses he did love the Ritz. Heo He loved the Ritz in Paris. He visited Sylvia's Beach and Pablo Picasso with Mary. Welch who joined him there and in a spirit of happiness he forgave gertrude. Stein sounds more. Like Gertrude. Stein forgave him. But you know whatever so they're friends again thankfully On December seventeenth nineteen forty four. He had himself driven to Luxembourg in spite of illness to cover the battle of the bulge as soon as he arrived however Lanham handed him to the doctors who hospitalized him with pneumonia. He recovered a week later but most of the fighting was over so he missed it because he was sick in nineteen forty seven. Hemingway was awarded a Bronze Star for his bravery during World War Two. He was recognized for having been quote under fire in combat areas in order to obtain an accurate picture of conditions with the combination that through his talent expression. Mr Hemingway enabled readers to obtain a vivid picture of the difficulties and triumphs of the front line soldier and his organization in Combat. So he is like at every war. He's in every conflict. He's like in the shit he loves this. This is his favorite thing besides women. Besides women like he's bad at women. Hemingway said that he was out of businesses. A writer from nineteen forty to nineteen forty-five during his residence in Cuba and in one thousand forty six married Mary who had an ectopic pregnancy five months later. The Hemingway family suffered a series of accidents and health problems in the years following the war in one thousand nine hundred five car accident. He smashed his knee and sustained another deep wound on his forehead. Mary broke I her right ankle. And then her left in successive skiing. Accidents A nineteen forty seven car accident left Patrick with a head wound and severely ill. Hemingway sank into depression as his literary friends. Began to die in one thousand nine hundred nine William Butler yeats and Ford maddox Ford in Nineteen Forty F Scott Fitzgerald. Nine hundred forty one. Sure what Anderson and James Joyce in Nineteen forty-six Gertrude. Stein in the following year in nineteen. Forty seven Max Perkins Hemingway's longtime scrivener's editor and friend During this period who suffered from severe headaches high blood pressure weight problems and eventually diabetes much of which is the result of previous accidents and many years of heavy drinking nonetheless in January nineteen forty six began work on the garden of Eden finishing eight hundred pages by June During the postwar years he also began to work trilogy tentatively titled The Land The sea in the air which he wanted to combine into one novel titled The Seabrook however both projects stalled and biographer says that Hemingway's inability to continue was a symptom of his troubles during those years. So in nineteen forty eight. Hemingway and Mary Travel to Europe staying in Venice for several months while there. Hemingway fell in love with the then nineteen year old Adriana Evonne cheech so he was forty seven and she was nineteen. What could possibly go wrong. my F- boyfriend forty-seven M is totally willing to leave his wife. Am I the asshole? So apparently they're their love. Affair was never consummated. They had a platonic love affair. Whatever that means This inspired the novel across the river and into the trees which was written in Cuba during a time of strife with Mary and published in Nineteen fifty two negative reviews because people were like all right. Alright like okay. Ernie we got it So the following year furious at the critical reception of across the river and into the trees he wrote the draft of the old man and the sea in eight weeks saying that it was the best I can write ever for all of my life. So the old man and the sea became a book of the month. Selection made hemingway an international celebrity and won the Pulitzer Prize and may nineteen fifty two a month before he left for a second trip to Africa. So the old man the see. What's it about. It's about an old man and the sea. The end no. It's a little bit more than that. It is about an old unlucky man named Santiago who dream whose dream is to catch a giant Marlin basically. So he goes out. He manages to catch one line one day but he isn't strong enough to pull it into the boat so he struggles with it for like two days and then when he manages to kill it start for home a bunch of sharks come and eat it up and then he drags the carcass home and falls asleep in. So that's the end. That's the whole fantasy it's very has elements of Moby Dick. It has elements of like a man coming to terms with like a and death and all of this stuff so dreams deferred that kind of thing in one thousand nine hundred four Weiland Africa. Hemingway was almost fatally injured in two successive plane. Crashes in as many days so what happened was he. Chartered a sightseeing flight over the Belgian Congo as a Christmas present to Mary and on their way to photograph Murchison falls from the air. The planes struck and abandoned utility pole and crash landed in heavy brush. Hemingway's injuries included a head wound while Mary broke two ribs the next day attempting to reach medical care and Entebbe. They boarded a second plane. That exploded at takeoff with hemingway suffering burns and another concussion. This one serious enough to cause leaking cerebral fluid has had a dozen concussions at this at he he is just his brain is they. Don't let you play sports. Yeah let alone like go into two. Successive plane crashes. It's crazy so they eventually arrived in Entebbe defined reporters covering the story of Hemingway's death. That's how bad there's almost God there were like. This guy totally died so when he got there he briefed the reporters and spent the next few weeks recuperating and reading his eroneous obituary as my death have been strongly exaggerated exactly Despite his injuries hemingway accompanied Patrick in his wife. On a planned fishing expedition February but pain caused him to be irascible and difficult to get along with as you can imagine when a brush fire broke out he was again injured. Sustaining second degree burns on his legs. Front Torso Lips left hand and right forearm. So I I laugh but it's like this is like the worst possible thing he gets so injured. He's slowly recuperating he says no no. No I'm going on this fishing trip. I promise that I would go. He's a dick the whole time. A bushfire breaks out and then he just burns like most of his body's so my mom always said that my grandma always would always say that God protects babies drunks and apparently hemingway was not included in that. Know exactly. He wasn't dying yeah. He didn't die he survived. No you're right. You're right and he was probably drunk. Who's pickled from out burned? Broken messed up awful so months later in Venice. Mary reported to France. The full extent of Hemingway's injuries right ready to crack disks in his back a kidney analytics after a dislocated shoulder and a broken skull. This is just from like the recent accidents. This is not like historical accidents. This is like just what happened to was beating him up. I don't know like maybe it's these women were like that's it. I'm done Ernie. Don't you remember you were driving? Aren't Ernie you're you. Were so drunk you got to recall. There wasn't even home at all together yet. So these accidents probably precipitated the physical deterioration that was to follow so from here on out. Ernest is just not doing great. After the plane crashes Hemingway who had been already a thinly controlled alcoholic throughout much of his life drank more heavily than usual to combat the pain of his injuries. So and Tober of nineteen fifty four. Hemingway received the Nobel Prize in literature. He modestly told the press that other writers deserve the price but he gladly accepted the prize. Money a biographer says. Hemingway had coveted the Nobel prize but when he won it months after his plane accidents and the ensuing worldwide press coverage. There must have been a lingering suspicion in Hemingway's mind that his obituary notices had played a part in the academy's decision because he was suffering pain from the African accidents. He decided against travelling to Stockholm instead. He sent a speech to be read which he actually recorded in his own voice later and I listen to it and his voices and of course like this is older technology so there tends to be kind of attentiveness to early recording stuff as you probably know. So I don't know how accurate like the tone of his voices but it's interesting like you see pictures of him and you imagine him having like a very well. You always imagine like major male figures to have like a deep rich voice commanding. His voice was kind of high. He had like a real flat midwestern accent. And it was just kind of like. Oh Hm that's Hemingway How about that? Not exactly like imposing so. I thought that was interesting. It's out there if you look it up. It's like. His speech was like thirty seconds. Long like not even. It's just a couple of lines so from the end of the year in nineteen fifty five to early nineteen fifty-six Hemingway was basically bedridden. He was told to stop drinking. To mitigate liver damage advice he initially followed but then obviously disregarded in October of Nineteen fifty-six he returned to Europe during that trip. He became sick again. It was treated for high blood pressure liver disease and arteriosclerosis in November nineteen fifty-six. While staying in Paris he was reminded of trunks he stored in the Ritz Hotel in nineteen twenty eight and never retrieved upon reclaiming an opening the trunks. Hemingway discovered that they were filled with notebooks and writings from his Paris years. So excited about the discovery when he returned to Cuba and early nineteen fifty seven. He began to shape the recovered work into his memoir which is called a moveable feast by nine hundred fifty nine. He ended a period of intense activity. He finished moveable. Feast scheduled to be released. The following year brought true. At first light to tw- two hundred thousand words added chapter to the Garden of Eden and worked on islands in the Stream. The last three restored in safe deposit box in Havana as focused on the finishing touches for a moveable. Feast Author Michael Reynolds's claims that it was during this period that Hemingway slid into depression from which he was unable to recover. That's when he slipped into depression I know when he's like at his most lake reductive. Yeah so his Finca VIGIA became crowded with guests and tourists as hemingway beginning to become unhappy with life. They're considered a permanent. Move to Idaho. So in Nineteen fifty-nine. He bought a home overlooking the big wood river outside catch him and left Cuba. Although he apparently remained on easy terms with the Castro government telling the New York Times he was delighted with Castro's overflow of Batista on July Twenty Fifth Nineteen Sixty. The Hemingway's left Cuba for the last time leaving art and manuscripts in a bank vault in Havana. And after the nine hundred sixty one bay of pigs invasion to think of the GOP was expropriated by the Cuban government. Complete with Hemingway's collection of four to six thousand bucks. Wow yeah he read and wrote a lot but he read a ton he like. Had this crazy I mean obviously had this crazy huge collection of books that was clearly like not all four to six thousand bucks was clearly not all of it. He continued to rework the material that was published as a moveable feast through the Nineteen Fifty S in mid nineteen fifty-nine. He visited Spain to research. A series of bullfighting articles commissioned by life magazine. Life only wanted ten thousand words but the manuscript grew out of control. He was unable to organize his writing for the first time in his life so he asked author a e. Hochner to travel to Cuba to help him. Hochner found Hemingway to be quote. Unusually hesitant disorganized and confused and suffering badly from failing eyesight. He then travelled alone to Spain to be photographed for the front cover of life magazine. A few days later the news reported that he was seriously ill and on the verge of dying which panicked Mary until she received a cable from him telling her quote reports false and route. Madrid Love Papa. He wasn't fact seriously ill and believed himself to be on the verge of a breakdown feeling lonely. He took to his bed for days retreating into silence despite having the first installments of the dangerous summer published in life in September nineteen sixty two good reviews in October. He left Spain for New York where he refused to leave Mary's apartment presuming that he was being watched. She quickly took him to Idaho physician. George Savvy met them at the train so at this time. Hemingway was constantly worried about money and a safety. He worried about his taxes and that he would never return to Cuba to retrieve manuscript that he had left in the bank vault and he became paranoid thinking that the FBI was actively monitoring his movements and catch him as a matter of fact the FBI had in fact opened a file on him during world. War Two When he used Pilar to patrol the waters off Cuba J. Edgar Hoover had an agent and Havana. Watch him during the nineteen fifties. So he was not like this was not the paranoid. Delusions of a dying man. This was like basin truth by the end of November. Mary was at her. Wit's end. Savvier suggested that hemingway go to the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota Hemingway may have believed that he was going to be treated there for hypertension Myers writes that. An aura of secrecy surrounds Hemingway's treatment at the Mayo but confirms that he was treated with electroconvulsive. Therapy as many as fifteen times in December nineteen sixty and was released in ruins in January nineteen sixty-one so awful so he was back in catch him in April nineteen sixty one three months after being released from the Mayo Clinic when Mary Found Hemingway Holding a shotgun in the kitchen one morning. She called savvy heirs who sedated him and admitted him to the Sun Valley Hospital from there. He was returned to the mail for more electroshock treatment. So I know he released in late June and arrived home and catch him on June thirtieth. He then quite deliberately shot himself with his favorite shotgun in the early morning hours of July. Second Nineteen Sixty one. He was sixty years old. He had unlocked the basement. Storeroom guns were kept on upstairs to the front entrance foyer and shot himself with a double barrel shotgun that he had used so often. It might have been a friend in the half in the House on Ernie. I know right so. Mary called The Sun Valley Hospital in Dr Quickly arrived at the House determining that Hemingway had died of a self inflicted wound to the head. Bernie skirt writes that it did not seem to her unconscious lie when she told the press that his death had been accidental in a press interview. Five years later. Mary confirmed that he had shot himself. So there was some confusion at. I like that. It was an accident that he like was it suicide. Family and friends flew to catch him for the funeral. Officiated by the local Catholic priest who believe that the death had been accidental and ultra boy fainted at the head of the at during the funeral and Hemingway's brother Lester wrote it seemed to me. Ernest would have approved of it. All he has he is buried in the Ketchum cemetery So an interesting thing about Hemingway's behavior during his final years and apparently had been similar to that of his father before his father killed himself. So the idea is his father may have had the genetic disease haemochromatosis whereby the inability to metabolize iron culminates in mental and physical deterioration. Because it's like building up in your brain your brain and your blood and everything Yep So medical records made available in. Nineteen ninety-one confirmed that hemingway had been diagnosed with Chroma and early nineteen sixty one. His Sister Ursula and his brother Luster also killed themselves and his granddaughter killed herself to like thirty five years to the day he died. Yeah Jeeze Hemingway's health was further. Compromised being heavy drinker for most of his life. As you can imagine. So a memorial to hemingway just north of Sun Valley is inscribed on the base with a eulogy. Hemingway had written for friends have several decades later and that is best of all he loved. The fall leaves yellow on cottonwoods. Leaves floating trout streams and above the hills the high blue windless skies. He will be a part of them forever. So that is my very long but crazy story of of Hemingway was wonderful. Thank you. It's interesting that we can associate him with so many places usually you're like. Oh yeah main. That's Stephen King. Oh yeah the wild west. That's Larry mcmurtry but like with Hemingway. It's like you have Cuba and key West and Paris and Spain in Idaho and why like just so many so many places and they're all very like very strongly associated with him. Yes Yup absolutely and there's so there's a lot there's a Ernest Hemingway Museum in Cuba and there's an ernest hemingway the hemingway house in Key West. There's I think there's one in Idaho like it's it's all like he spent so much time and had so much impact on all of these regions and wrote about them in central ways that yeah he's associated as being like truly like a global icon of literature so so a little bit but not much later actually not that I think about it My Quiz today is called the importance of being earnest a quiz on Oscar Wilde and his contemporaries West number one this first novel of Oscars was reviled by contemporary reviewers. Who called it unclean poisonous and heavy within the thick of moral and spiritual putrefaction modern critics however has said it is one of the best novels ever written in English with one author calling it an arresting and slightly camp exercise late Victorian Gothic. What does this novel which has been copied parodied and made into plays musicals and movies since nineteen ten question to this? American artist and friend of Oscars was active during the gilded age and spent most of his time in the UK. His most famous painting from eighteen. Seventy one is officially titled Arrangement and Grey and Black Number One. But you may know it as something more maternal. Who is this artist question number? Three speaking of wild quotes complete this now common line frequently and Aronie Asli attributed to Oscar Wilde quote the love that dare not blink blink blink question number four. This Irish playwright has regularly been rated among British drama tests second only to Shakespeare and he has had extensive influence on generations of English language playwrights. His major worked include man and Superman pygmalion and Saint Joan and has a theater festival every summer in Niagara on the lake. Who is this giant of Western Theater? Question number five speaking of Ernest this British actor starred as Algernon in the two thousand and two movie adaptation of the importance of being earnest and was a huge hit in the US in the late nineties. Early two thousands with roles in my best friends wedding an ideal husband and the next best thing. Who is this handsome actor writer and singer question number six? This Irish and distant relation of Sir Arthur CONAN doyle was a friend of Oscars and actually married his childhood sweetheart during his lifetime. Who's better known as the personal assistant of actor Sir Henry and business manager of the LYCEUM theatre but you know him for his influential horror novel of the dead which he began only weeks. After Oscar Wilde conviction of gross indecency and was influenced by the novel. Carmella by Sheridan left new. Who is this bloody writer? Question number seven this wild play which starred Sarah Bernhardt and was the toast of Paris and London is about the titular stepdaughter of Herod anti-us who to her stepfather's dismay but mother's light requests the head of John the Baptist on a silver platter as a reward for dancing the dance of the seven veils. Who is this Biblical woman who is not related to the cured? Italian meat product question number. Eight true or false. Oscar Wilde lived openly as a gay man neither married nor had children question number. Nine Oscar was part of this late. Nineteenth Century. Artistic and literary movement centered in Western Europe which followed aesthetic ideology of excess artificiality. The movement was characterized by self disgust sickness at the World General Skepticism Delight and perversion and employment of crude humor and a belief in the superiority of human creativity over logic and the natural world. Today though you might use this word to describe a particularly rich piece of chocolate cake what is this movement and Finally Twist Question Number Ten starring Jim Varney as the titular within one how many ernest movies were made altogether. We'll give you a minute to think about it. And we'll be back with your answers. Son Is Battle is slow so by workday passive last winter time. You know Bob Bob just put over talent. I think I'll just call it down the door. Donald but now I am going to get every single Oscar Wilde question wrong but I feel really good about the gym Varney. Oh great good. I'm so glad in fact. I think I was doing research for this and we should probably do it. Oscar Wilde Episode. Because he had a really interesting life and it's actually quite sad but anyway question number one this first novel of Oscars was reviled by contemporary reviewers who called unclean poisonous and heavy with a mythic odors of moral and spiritual putrefaction modern critics however said is one of the best novels ever written English. One offer calling it interesting and slightly camp exercise in late Victorian Gothic. What is this novel which has been copied parodied and made into plays musicals and movies since nineteen ten? I'm going to name the only other work that I feel confident in the title of besides the importance of being earnest and that's the picture of Dorian Gray it is the picture of Dorian Gray so Picture of during gray Doreen Gray is the subject of a full length. Portrait and oil by Basil hallward and artists impressed in infatuated by Dory's beauty through Basil Basel. During meets Lord Henry Wotton and as soon as thrall by the aristocrats hedonistic worldview that beauty and sense you will fulfilment are the only things worth pursuing life newly understanding that his beauty will fade. Dorian expresses the desire to sell his soul to ensure that the picture rather than he will age and fade the wishes granted and Dorian pursues liberty in the life of varied amoral experiences while staying young and beautiful all the while has portrait ages and records every sin when you say Sinn Sewell on the back of my neck stands up like sense you will. You don't like it the way I say sense. You will not thing Harry's something bad gross. Well I don't think I have to say again during this quiz. So you're safe okay. Question number two. This American artists and friends of Oscars was active during the gilded age and spent most of his time in the U. K. His most famous painting from eighteen seventy one is officially titled Arrangement in Grey and Black Number One. But you may know it as something more maternal. Who is this artist James Whistler yes James McNeill Whistler and of course the painting is his Mama was mother's mother Yup So the story Whistler's mother is a model apparently failed to appear one day according to a letter So whistler turned to his mother and suggested that he do her portrait I but in his typically slow and experimental way that proved to be too tiring so the pos was adopted it took dozens of sittings to complete because he was definitely very like meticulous It became very popular in Whistler. Did his part in promoting the picture and popularizing the image so it became popular partially because whistler was like promoting it He frequently exhibited it. Authorized the early reproductions that made their way into thousands of homes It is now housed at the Museo Dorsey in Paris said that. A lot of Wilde's witticisms were I said by whistler so they hung out they were like to dandies about town And at one point Oscar Wilde said something like Oh that was so funny whistler like I wish I had said it and I guess Whistler said Oh you will Oscar well like you're GonNa say it and it's going to be attributed to you because people know you as a writer so question number. Three speaking of wild quotes complete this now common line frequently and eroneous attributed to ask her wild the love that dare not blink. Blink blink the love that dare not heaps on just keeps living. Keep on truckin. No it is. This is usually interpreted as a euphemism for homosexuality. It's called the love that dare not speak. Its name okay okay so this was actually the last line of a poem by Wilde's lover. Lord Alfred Douglas which was entitled to loves a written in September eighteen ninety two and published in the Oxford magazine. The Chameleon in December eighteen ninety four it was mentioned at Oscar Wilde gross indecency trial and Wild while it is normally interpreted as even for homosexuality while denied that it was He is more like a Greek platonic thing That they may have been just because he was trying to defend himself in his trial. So there's that Question Number Four. This Irish playwright has regularly been rated among British dramatists a second only to Shakespeare and has had extensive influence on generations of English language playwrights. His major works include man and Superman pygmalion and Saint Joan and his other with theater festival every summer inaugural like who is this giant of Western theater George Bernard Shaw George Bernard Shaw preferred to be called Bernard shot. He lived to be ninety four and he wrote sixty two plays which is crazy The Shaw Festival Inaugural Lake Ontario Canada is the second largest repertory theatre company in North America. It produces plays by or written during the lifetime of Shaw as well as some contemporary works Also the GINGELL theatre group founded in two thousand six presents works by Shah and others in New York City that feature the humanitarian ideals that has worked promoted it became the first theatre group to present all of Shaw's stage work through its monthly concert series called project. Shaw shovels great. I used to go every summer. My parents were taking their as my for my birthday which shows that I was very cool teen But yeah it's IT'S A and they have great three theaters and Niagara on the lake and they put on greenhouse question number five speaking of Ernest this British actor starred as Algernon in the two thousand and two movie adaptation of importance of being earnest and was a huge hit in the US in the late nineties. Early two thousands with roles in my best friends wedding an ideal husband and the next best thing. Who is this handsome actor writer singer? Is it Rupert Everett? It is Rupert Everett. Do you know hold Rupert Everett is. He's sixty he's sixty. He's still can I tell you though? He's still super gorgeous. Oh my gosh. She's still got As a matter of fact Robert Everett has always had an affinity for Oscar Wilde telling the media that he's had a fascination with the playwright since he was child He actually wrote and directed a film based on the final years of wildlife which was entitled the Happy Prince which was released in two thousand eighteen I always suspected that him coming out as gay damaged his career. But apparently like after like the Rupert Everett like craziness in the early two thousand like he was in that music video with Madonna like got to be close with her. And all this stuff you remember that. Apparently he's still like working pretty regularly. He's mostly working in the UK like theater circles. He does a lot of theater and he does some TV and like know serious stuff but he's fine like he's doing okay But I cannot believe he's sixty. I am made of dust like do you remember when I mean he must have been then? He was in his thirties and early forties. But you know you you. Don't you think everybody's like twenty movies anyway? Great actor okay. Question number six this Irish author and distant relation of Sir Arthur CONAN doyle was a friend of Oscars and actually married his childhood sweetheart during his lifetime. He was better known as the personal assistant of actor. Sir Henry Irving and business manager of the LYCEUM theatre but you know him for his influential horror novel of the dead which he began only weeks after Oscar Wilde's conviction of gross indecency and was influenced by the novel by Sheridan left new. Who is this bloody writer? Bram Stoker Bram Stoker. Bram stoker was deeply private man but his almost sexless marriage intense adoration of Walt Whitman Henry Hall Caine and Shared Interests With Oscar Wilde as well as the HOMOEROTIC ASPECTS OF DRACULA have led to scholarly speculation that he was a repressed homosexual. He uses fiction as an outlet for his sexual frustrations in nineteen twelve. He demanded imprisonment of all homosexual. Authors Britain it has been suggested that this was due to self loathing to disguise his own vulnerability. The original five hundred forty one page type script of Dracula was believed to have been lost. It was found in a barn in north western Pennsylvania in the early nineteen eighties. It consisted of type sheets with as many revisions and handwritten on the title page. Was the words the UNE debt in all caps? We know how it got there. I don't I don't think so. I didn't see it. But the author's name obviously was shown at the bottom as Bram Stoker and author Robert Latham remarked. The most famous horror novel ever published titled Changed. At the last minute. The type script was ultimately purchased by Microsoft Co founder Paul Allen but they just found it so wild okay question number seven this wild play which starred Sarah Bernhardt and was the toast of Paris and London is about the titular stepdaughter of Herod antibodies. Who to her stepfather's dismay but mother's delight requests the head of John the Baptist on a silver platter as a reward for dancing the dance of the seven veils who was this biblical woman who is not related to the cured. Italian meat product. I don't get that reference at all. I'm just GONNA say candied okay. It's solemn like Salami. I tried to give you so okay. Salomone rehearsals of the play starring. Sarah Bernhardt began but the play was refused a licensed by the Lord Chamberlain's since it depicted biblical characters Saleh may was published jointly in Paris and London. Eighteen ninety three but was not performed until eighteen. Ninety six in Paris during Wilde's later incarceration west number eight true or false Oscar wilde lived openly as a gay man and neither married nor had children. I got married. I'm going to say I'm going to save false. He did not live as an openly. Gay Man ended not get married or have kids. You are correct He was married to constance. Lloyd who gave him two sons. Cyril and Vivienne. Vivian is spelled V. Y. V. Y. A. N. apparently is a Welsh name. Vivian however it is kind of a trick question because he definitely had open relationships. Young men during and after his marriage which obviously became was his downfall According to Vivian Holland's account in his autobiography. Which is called son of Oscar Wilde? Oscar was a devoted and loving father to his two sons and their childhood was a relatively happy one. Although after eighteen ninety five when wilde was convicted of the charges of gross indecency and imprisoned constant changed her surname and those of her sons to Holland and then she forced wild to give up his parental rights. And Vivian. Neither Vivian or Serail. Ever saw their father again so question number nine Oscar part of this late nineteenth century artistic and literary movement centered in Western Europe which followed an aesthetic ideology of excess and artificiality. The movement was characterized by Self Disgust General Skepticism Delight and perversion employment of crude humor belief and superiority of human creativity of illogic in the natural world. Today though you might use this word to describe a particularly rich piece of chocolate cake what is this movement Nah I don't have the right answer. I'll just say hedonism you're very close. It's called the decadent move. How so the term decadent basically means decline Then it was adopted as meaning moral decline specifically Why do we use it for food now? However probably because you know this food is so exceptional so splendid that the person indulging in it feels that tastes too good to be morally sound which is like all right anyway and finally starring. Jim Varney is the titular ernest within one. How many ernest movies were made altogether? I'm GONNA say eleven. Oh you're so close. It was nine so between Nineteen eighty-seven and nineteen ninety eight. They were ernest goes to camp. Ernest Saves Christmas Ernest goes to jail. Ernest scared stupid. Ernest rides again. Ernest GOES TO SCHOOL SLAM DUNK ERNEST ERNEST goes to Africa and Ernest in the army ernest. I know the first five were feature films although they were B movies while the last four were direct to video there were three more that were scrapped. Okay which is crazy The character's full name was Ernest P Worrell and he was portrayed in a bunch of commercials. Tv show which was called. Hey vern it's ernest as well as the forementioned movies And Jim Varney was the voice of Slinky Toy story one and two before he died in two thousand of lung cancer so that our Ip Jim Varney who apparently also this is interesting. Jim Varney apparently had a photographic memory. So he would do like he started out in like local television just doing commercials for local businesses and he would do like twenty five commercials today because he would just read the script once and then insert the different companies and products in where they needed to be so he would just like run through ton of of takes like perfectly because he remembered his lines no matter what so he was really like. That's kind of why? He was so ubiquitous because not only was the character like people loved it and they like really caught onto it but he was like he worked like a devil like he just was super professional and just got shit done so. Rip Jim Varney and the Ernest character So that was earnest and Ernest. Wonderful thank so Yeah Police Review and Subscribe China. And tell a friend. Well see you doing podcasts. Cleaning Your House looking out a window just like me like I'm doing that so Thanks so much for listening. You guys get you next time. Bye Earnest's milling. This is GONNA take fucking forever. GonNa be able to do this. Okay get together. Lt Yellow leather alright earn.

Max Perkins Hemingway Hemingway Hemingway Hadley Ernest Hemingway Ernest Grace Hall Hemingway Paris Hemingway House Key West US Africa Hemingway Key West writer Hemingway House pauline pfeiffer Cuba Spain The Hemingway Agnes von Kurowski Europe
Episode 206: Who's Your Granddaddy

The Way I Heard It with Mike Rowe

1:22:35 hr | Last month

Episode 206: Who's Your Granddaddy

"Guys it's mike rowe. This is the way. I heard it episode number two zero six. It's called. who's your granddaddy. Not who's your daddy. Who's your granddaddy for the record. This is rhetorical question. I'm not asking for an actual answer. Vis-a-vis the name of your grandfather either. Maternal or paternal. I am instead posing a broad based query designed to make you consider the impact of grandfathers on polite society in general and specifically share with you. The impact of mine on me apologies. Incidentally for the sound quality my trustee microphone officially craft the bed and it is no longer Interfacing the way it's supposed to with garage bands so you're hearing me on the On the microphone from my computer. I hope you don't mind point being this rumination on grandfather's regardless of what it sounds like is preceded by the true story of a master sergeant in the air force who spent the first part of his career yelling at his recruits and the second part becoming a famous artist. This man. This master sergeant voice like a hammer reminds me a lot of my own grandfather. A man named carl noble coral noble was not in the air force and he never wants raised his voice. At least as far as i know but like this particular master sergeant this man known for screaming at the top of his lungs by some and painting pretty pictures by others. This guy reminds me of my grandfather because my pop was also an artist different kind of artists but an artist nevertheless of vocational artist whose work not only inspired dirty jobs but the micro works foundation which delighted to report is about to enter its thirteenth year and announced. Another round of work ethic scholarships and give away a million bucks later this month. That's neither here nor there tend with this episode regardless of the audio quality was to interview my mom who knows more about her father than i do but unfortunately peg euros a bit under the weather today so my conversation unfolds once again with my old buddy chuck who if the comments are to be believed continues to amuse many of this podcasts regular listeners based on the conversation that chuck and i just had i believe he will do so once again. Forthwith it's episode number two. Oh six and it's called. who's your granddaddy. And it all starts right now and buy right now. I mean right after. I tell you about me undies for the record. That's not a sentence. I ever heard my grandfather utter. Nor is it a topic that my pop would never publicly discussed. Partly because men like karl. Noble didn't talk about their underpants. And partly because me undies. Weren't around when carl noble was hard at work making civilized life possible for the rest of us. They're here now though. And they are for the record the only underpants i wear on. I'll tell you. Why like most of the jobs. I know me undies. Do their job out of sight out of mind. They're not in it for the glamour. In other words yes me undies can be had in pretty much any color design and any size. But that's not why i love him. I love him because they get the job done. With the level of comfort you simply have to experience to understand. They are in other words ridiculously unbelievably soft. And you are hereby invited to see so for yourself. First time purchasers get fifteen percent off and free shipping more importantly if you're not completely satisfied for any reason with me on these they'll refund or exchange your purchase. No caveats no questions problems to get your fifteen percent off your first order and free shipping. Go to biondi's dot com slash mike. That's me undies. Dot com slash mike. This is the way i heard it. Chapter twenty eight. Keep your voice down. Bob had a voice like a jackhammer and when he raised it recruits in the barracks at elson air force base awakened as though a shotgun had been fired over their heads. Rise and shine dirtbags. Everybody up everybody out. let's move it. As the young men sprang from their bunks. that occurred to bob that he'd been yelling at recruits. For as long as he'd been getting crew cuts the work of a master sergeant in the air force. Bob's job description basically came down to yelling. Come on ladies. We're out on vacation. Let's get the lead out as the airman prepared for yet. Another five mile run. Bob looked through the frosted windowpanes of the drafty barracks and watched. Yet another sunrise light up the snowcapped mountains behind moose creek the early morning rays illuminating the distant clouds the mighty for tree standing along the riverbank like emerald sentinels the massive boulder in the middle of the rushing stream where the grizzly bears perched waiting for the salmon on their way to spawn. As always bob pause to let the image burn itself into his mind's eye then he did something rather unusual. He quit at thirty eight years of age. The master sergeant vowed right then and there to leave the air force. Stop yelling and get out of the cold. And that is how. Bob became a famous tv star. Actually it wasn't as easy as all that it never is. Bob had no experience in front of the camera and his road to stardom was paved as such roads often are with rejection and frustration. But bob also caught one lucky break a very lucky break in the form of a net kowalski. I saw him perform in a workshop in clearwater florida years later. She recalled their first meeting. I was in a deep depression. She said grieving. The tragic loss of my oldest son watching bob perform changed everything. It wasn't just his talent. It was the way he made me feel. He just lifted my spirits and radiated equality that i knew america was starving for an that wasn't an agent or a manager but she knew what talent was when she saw it so she proposed a business relationship. Bob agreed and in less than a year. Not only did the retired master. Sergeant have a hit show. He had the number one program on the channel. Eventually he had a body of work that all but eclipsed anyone else's with four hundred episodes under his belt and that was how bob became famous tv star. Actually it wasn't as easy as all that it never is a net had no experience managing talent or selling tv shows. She waited through countless knows before finding a station manager in virginia. Who was willing to put bob on the air. What's that happened. It really was as easy as that. Because a net had been right all along. Bob had a certain quality. American seem to be starving for funny thing though in an npr interview in two thousand sixteen twenty years. After bob's untimely death at the age of fifty to a net described bob in a way that shocked listeners. She called him a tyrant. You don't believe that she asked. Do you really think this company would be as successful as it is if he didn't insist that everything be done a certain way. The interviewer was speechless. I don't want to leave the impression that he was rude or nasty and that added. He wasn't but he was very disciplined. Very strict believe me. It was bob's way or no way at all. Npr's audience might have been surprised by nets frank assessment. That wasn't how they pictured. Bob being at all. But if any of bob's old recruits had been listening they wouldn't have batted an eye. Oh no tyrants would have summed up their former master sergeant nicely then again. Imagine the shock they had gotten years earlier when the man with the crewcut. Who'd screamed at them around. The clock had suddenly popped up on their tv screens with an afro the size of a beach ball and started whispering it a voice so soft you could call it. Soporific about fluffy little clouds. Happy little trees and friendly little boulders. To help mr grizzly catches lunch and are busy little stream. They would have found it confusing yet. They're sergeant was the very same man annette. Kowalski had discovered in clearwater florida. Giving painting lessons to strangers in a hotel conference room. The soft spoken art teacher who communicated primarily with dashes of titanium white smidge is of cadmium yellow and touches van dyke brown such was the color palette of the man who pulled a net kurowski from the depths of her crippling depression. The man who lulled millions of viewers into a hypnotic stupor every week on pbs. The master sergeant. Who let his hair grow out and vowed to never again raise his voice. You might not know him by name. But i bet you've seen the joy of painting a little program that lives on forever in reruns. Thanks to a man who spent the first part of his life screaming at thousands of recruits in the air force and the rest of it whispering ever so gently to millions of mesmerized viewers a beloved artist. They bob ross a bob. Ross wasn't just an artist. He was a magician. A magician who could turn a blank canvas into a primeval forest or an angry ocean right before our eyes his secret. There was no secret bob. Ross worked without a net. He showed us exactly what he was doing. And in the process gave me and millions of other viewers the opportunity to follow along. Step by step odd thing though whenever i tried to paint my own. Happy little bushes. The results were neither happy nor bushy. Odd because the artistic gene runs in my family. My grandmother's sister. Betty was terrific painter. So to is my cousin nancy. She didn't start till she was in her fifties but once she discovered her talent she never put down the brush several of her paintings hanging in my home today to my i. They're every bit as good as anything. I've ever seen on the joy of painting but without question. The most skilled artists in my family was an industrial artist. My grandfather carl noble electrician by trade. Pop could repair anything. Didn't matter what the it was a broken watch a faulty furnace. A busted engine. He would either fix it or build a new one from scratch. Pop never made it past the seventh grade but he was plenty smart. He was also patient though. I never once saw him. Read the instructions to anything. He just seemed to know how things when i was still a small boy. My father showed me a bronze plaque in the church. We attended the same church. Whose basement would become a permanent home for troop. Sixteen pop had built much of that church and the plaque inside. It reads in honor of carl m noble humble servants of jesus christ who through the years has given himself to the program of christian education at the kenwood presbyterian church look at that son. Your grandfather has a plaque in his honour. Who else do you know with a plaque. My grandparents were our next door neighbors. We had the only two homes at the top of a hill tucked away in a corner of baltimore county mom and dad and my brothers and me living no more than one hundred yards away. From nanna and pop. There was room for a cornfield. A pasture where mom kept her horses and a big garden up by the woodpile off to one side at the of a very steep hill thick with pine trees. You could just hear the traffic flowing off an exit ramp from interstate ninety five. My mother told us that the sound was the ocean and for a while there. We believe her until a truck hop the guardrail. One day in came halfway up the hill pop built the stable where mom housed her horses. He'd built the family room in his own home. We gathered there for every holiday every birthday every other occasion worth celebrating in the summer of seventy five when my mother started to feel claustrophobic and are modest farmhouse. My grandfather built her family room to along with the patio. His addition to our house was nearly as big as the house. Itself had been every day that summer pop woke up clean and came home dirty. That was his way on any project. He started clean and dirty and somewhere along. The way thing was built were a problem was solved but this project was different. This work was magical because it unfolded right in front of my wondering is where there had been grass. There was suddenly foundation where there had been empty air. There were now walls and a roof then there were windows and a fireplace and then in a twinkling the summer was over and my mom had a family room of her own. I studied pops every move on the construction site determined to follow in his footsteps. I became his apprentice that summer and loved odd thing. Though none of the work we were doing made sense to me and things were no easier in school in woodshop. I made a sconces that look more like an amoeba. Pop nodded when i showed it to him and applauded my creative design in metal shop. I made a steel safe. Didn't quite close. I'd also put the hinges on the wrong side. I got an f. And this time i asked pop if he thought the handy gene might be recessive he laughed. There's nothing magical about what i do mike. I'm just using the tools i was given. You can be a tradesman to if that's what you wanna be heck were all tradesmen. The trick is to get the right toolbox. Was that the best advice pop ever gave me. That's hard to say but without question it was the best advice i ever took something very strange happening on this podcast last week. Along with hundreds of five star reviews received a mountain of letters asking if blue shoe the official sponsor of that last episode was okay with the amount of innuendo and double entendre. I've been incorporating into each of their commercials. Some of you asked me if blue was up for that level of silliness others wondered if blue which delivers the exact. Same active ingredient in viagra. Cialis chewable tablet was hard up for a spokesman or adverse to taking a hands on approach to the way people in my position wax on about their product. But the truth is i don't really know only know for sure is. Blue is back to sponsor this episode. And i'm not about to stiff them because as i've been saying from the start bluetooth makes it hard really seriously hard hard to ignore an offer that allows you to try a month's supply for free. Just pay five dollars shipping. Handling free in. Your package will arrive in no time. Which means gentlemen. Your package will arrive in no time. That's blue dot com promo code r. o. w. e. to receive your first month for free now. Then where worry i yes. A conversation with my mother. Wait a minute mother. No no. I am not sadlier. Your mother's and you're stuck with me. It would have been great if we had your mom here today but that was our plan. My my just got off the phone with her she's she's sick in bed. Not what he's got some sort of flu obviously. She's worried to death if she went to the doctor. She took the cove at rapid test. It's not that. I don't know what it is this just some crud going around. My dad was sick a couple of weeks ago. Now my mom is sick and and you're sick. You're dealing with this. You still have this headache thing. i do. Yeah i'm hoping it's going to be gone in a day or two but yeah it's been. It's been over three weeks going. What is going on at almost everyone i know is dealing with some kind of infirmary. Well i don't know let's start with yours hauer. How're you doing. how's your knows. How are you breathing. Are you recovering. That's what the people want to know about louis. Listen to this. it's it's it's a little better every day prior to the surgery which was an open steptoe. Plastic not bore you with the details of my of my odyssey but three weeks ago on the second of june. They open me up. Put the septum backward blonde. My right nostril which was one hundred percent block. does now one hundred percent open my left nostril. Interestingly which is going to be blocked out right my left nostril was always about forty or fifty percent blocked. No sorry forty or fifty percent open. now it's about sixty percent open and he says it's gonna get better as the swelling goes down but if nothing changes from this point on good god i air getting to my brain i. It's it's like. I've had more like three cups of coffee. I'm jacked up with the air. It's great it's amazing. How did you ever jog in the past. With one of your nostrils completely blocked. I was a mouth breather. I was like fifty percent of the rest of the country. According to james nestor. Who's written a great book. I'm just digging into called breath So many people are mouth breeders and you can get used to anything like a frog in boiling water. You know i remember. We had a A coach in high school had his run around the soccer field and he would make us take a mouthful of water before we ran and then come back and spit out the same amount of water because he wanted us to breathe through our nose you know. And he didn't want us to achieve Because the air you know that gets into your lungs the comes through your nose. It's it's filtered it's humidifier wide. It's a completely different substance really. It's a vent than the air that goes straight into your lungs through your mouth so many health issues. You can walk it right back to the quality of the air that you're sucking in and if you're sucking it in through your mouth it's just not being filtered or humidifier so it makes a difference. It makes a difference when you eat when you can't breathe through your nose guy chew with your mouth open like an animal you you snore. And it's not just your nose right. This is your your nasal cavity is this is. It's an area the size of a man's fist and it's behind your nose in your eyes your cheeks and it's your sinuses. They're huge than they believe the size of your head. It's it's bigger than a man's fist. Probably more legs grapefruit immensely phrase. Why it's not that big. It's long but it you know what number it's big i know. What do you from me west. God made me. That's that's that's true enough since we're talking about my nose. I we should mention and queue. It up sean Song oh yes you have it. I just wanna play a few bars. I off handedly. The couple of weeks ago. When i was in the middle of this nightmare of recovery. The first three days were awful. My nose never stopped bleeding. And i was so strung out on hydra code on that i was loosening and i didn't know i was hallucinating until i saw until i heard the sound. My dripping blood made the third day when it when it fell shoe right. It was landing into tissue. I was holding in front of me. Was like eleven o'clock at night and each drip would go. How good got him bleeding to death. And the only reason it's not running out of my nose like a faucet is because these two splints are in my nose and around. The splints is all of this. Awful hardened snot mucus just disgusting. And i jokingly said to you as we were talking about this ordeal We were talking about sad songs that we can ask. Somebody oughta write a sad song about about my nose. That wouldn't stop bleeding and somebody did play a few bars. Would you can. Raising lashing against my window pane ocean knows the sweet. But it's all in my hand. Faulty septum pugs is looking i. I can't lie down on a group trip. Warring on its version is floor when they pulled the plug. Three from my nasal cavity. I went sailing river so the song is called a river of blood it was written by a A listener of the podcast. Obviously but also a guy we know named sean mccormack collaborated on than just a list of the gas. Well i mean but he's still listens even though we have been working together recently he He wrote a number of these stories. He collaborated on a bunch of them. His name sean. Mcchord and i guess we just caught him with some time on his hands. He turned that thing around and a couple of days. Listen he it was amazing. How fast we were actually recording the next episode Which was last week's episode when we both got an email. That said challenge accepted because as you recall. You said somebody should write a a song about this ordeal. And he you know and he did. Yeah that's sean. You know what we'll play the whole thing at the end just so you can listen to it. I'm not saying it's terribly good. But i will say it's terribly clever. He did it real quick. You singing all the parts. Yeah and it's you know. I mean i don't know how many bela celebrities now officially have a song written about their bloody bacchus but I gotta think it's a short list and it's an honor to be on. Thank you sean will you know. And sean in his own. Right is a bolus celebrity right He he was on broadway and wicked broadway. Titanic he really loves to do upbeat shows. It seems ahead him He produced a show. You narrated yes out now about the back in two thousand seven two thousand eight. He was the voice in my head during after the catch. The talk show after deadliest. Catch where i are with the captains and we talk. He worked for the production company. That oversaw that and he sat in a truck and he was the guy who told me you know. I'm wearing the ifp and it was that kind of setup back then very annoying. I i hate that your thing and i used to take it out all the time. Because i don't i don't like producers telling me what to say but he was such a nice guy We stayed friends and he's been a he's been a real help on this podcast so you know what we'll have him on our plan by the way to the extent that we have one is to is to finish talking about each of the chapters that are in the book and will be on doing that in a month or two and then i'm kind of interested in going back to the beginning and looking at some of these older stories and bringing in like actual experts like people who can really talk about the subject matter because people seem to enjoy these These these this unpacking. If you will the way the way i talked about the way i heard it which i guess we're about to do right now as well but so you know. That's that's kind of plan. We have dozens and dozens of stories. We can talk about an. I'll probably start writing some new ones too at some point and who knows where it will go. Yeah and one. More thing about sean. People who follow you on facebook will remember a few years ago. The girl scout who you are charlotte who again. Sean has a kid named charlotte in the girl scouts. Charlotte wrote a blisteringly honest review of all the cookies. She was selling in an attempt to be honest to her customers Some of the some some were very complementary but some were just brutally honest tag along as you can have them then. So i i posted a review on my facebook page. I think seven or eight million people saw it and they wound up going to her website and literally tens of thousands of boxes of girl. Scout cookies were ordered. Charlotte wound up becoming like a mini celebrity. And it was so interesting. You know when when suddenly you're this girl selling cookies and all of a sudden you've sold more cookies than anybody else. well you got some blowback right. So shelly she was getting a lot of crap at school from people who you know girls can be mean is. Some girls were jealous. She was interviewed on like on good morning. America and in fact. She's a chapter in a book. Some guy just wrote a book on honesty and charlotte charlotte's in this chapter is that right. Yeah and the whole story. I'm in it i was. I was gonna write the four for the book. But i didn't have time. But anyway that sean he got a cool daughter who sold a jillian cookies and And apparently when he sits around with nothing better to do he'll write a song about my bloody nose so how much we can life get. So bob ross. Why bob ross. Bob ross reminded me of my grandfather. And bob ross. Did the most deceptively hypnotic. tv show. I had ever seen i. I used to watch the joy of painting when i was a teenager. I was very young before. I knew i was going to be in tv and when i look back at that show. I didn't understand at the time. Why i watched it. There was a man who whispered with an afro who painted. And all i knew. Was that watching. It lowered my blood pressure and interested me in a way that i couldn't quite articulate and later after he died the joy of painting came back in a big way and i found myself watching some of those shows again and realizing oh now i do know why i watched the show. Every episode had a beginning middle and an end every episode started with a blank canvas and ended with a work of art right and there were no mirrors. There were no tricks right. there were no cut aways it was. Pbs there was no commercial so you got to sit there and watch magic happen. Yeah where there was nothing. Suddenly there was something and along the way we had this reliable narrator named bob. Ross who just kind of whispered and just kind of took you through the process. And i just found the combat. I've obviously are not alone. This was an immensely success very popular. Yeah right but not popular for any reason that any tv executive would every ten duplicate would ever green light right. The incredible popularity of that show happened. Not because of anything. Bob ross did but in spite of everything the industry did to get in the way of of shows like this and people like him. So i wanted to somehow write something about this and of course thanks to google you hop online those around and the next thing i i learned i stumbled across this. Npr interview and heard that he was a a a master. Sergeant in the air force. You know and. I just thought that was insane. And then when i heard a net kowalski talking about the fact that many people described him as a tyrant and that he spent the first half of his life yelling. I thought oh my god. Are you kidding me. This guy that. I watched that helped put me to sleep. That performed a magic in a whisper on. Pbs was a master sergeant yelling at recruits. It was just too good and once you get that palate in front of you. Well i can't paint for crap. But i wanted to write something that hadn't been written before and i wanted to try you know. Make it as interesting as i can. But as i wrote it i realized that there's so many parallels with my grandfather that i didn't know what to do in the story about bob ross. Couldn't make that point. But it's in the book. Because i can make that point sir the book and that's that's what i wanted to do. So you intended to write a story about bob. Ross where you ever concerned about the fact that maybe not a lot of people know bob. Ross i was initially but then talking to you and talking to the other people that were involved in the podcast and then just doing my own nonscientific straw poll right. I couldn't find anyone who didn't know him. And by that. I mean not. Everyone knew his name. But when you describe a white dude who whispers that has an afro that paints even people who didn't watch the show right and you can't help but even stumble across the thing. I mean it's literally been on the air for decades and everybody has pbs. Whether you watch it or not you know you have to go past it on your way to espn or comedy central or wherever you go. And so he just became an inescapable unavoidable part of the tv landscape. So the story isn't about really ta bob. Ross it's about right. I've seen the man who paints yet didn't know his name right. I remember the afro. And i think for the majority of people all that kind of lines up into some version of familiarity. But i didn't talk to anybody who knew that he worked at allston. Airforce base right air force. And i i had never seen the show and I remember we discussed. What's more famous. Because we're always like well. What is the actual. reveal bob. Ross or is it the joy of painting right and they were kind of a toss up because it really was the the afro the beard and the painting a white dude with an afro and a beard who was painting and whispered and whispered. Yeah right who never raised his voice you know. I didn't realize at the time. But i called the story. Keep your voice down in part. Because i never once heard my grandfather raise his voice and the the parallels between bob ross and carl noble. My granddad The parallels between an artistic approach to living whether it's painting writing singing or fabricating building with lumber and steel and dirty jobs in many ways is a tip of the hat toward that level of craftsmanship. And artistry a different kind of art of vocational art. As i mentioned right look. It's easy to look back. You ask me why. I wrote the story and i would love to tell you because i wanted to very cleverly right about my grandfather without invoking his name and using a different form of art to make the points i wanted to make. That's not what happened. I wrote the story. Because i thought bob ross was interesting and then later you look back at it and you realize oh. Peel back enough layers in. There might have been something else going on there. Will there's several things. I want to talk to you about in terms of the the grout of this particular chapter and the first of which is that he was you credit him as being the perhaps the greatest artists in your family but there were others. You have an aunt and you have a cousin in particular and his ira call. There's a certain picture that your cousin own edgy. Oh right my cock. Yeah i it was my cousin. I believe it was a rooster. Well potato potato Friends of the facebook page will no doubt remember this. We auctioned off a picture of a rooster that my cousin painted that and gave to my mother or show to my mother and i loved it and i said you know what i would love to own. That and nancy sent it to me. And at that point this portrait of a rooster became my cock and i had it hung proudly on the wall. Well hung you might say oh dear and um because Eight year old deep down and because we were raising money for micro works one year. I had a video of myself doing something. And somebody noticed the rooster in the background and made a comment about my cock and i. It got me wondering how much money i could get for my cock you know. Could i part with my cock really became the existential question and isn't always an if i were osh auction off my cock. What can i get for it right. So these these questions were all articulated on video along with some equally silly and childish innuendo and the conversation that that arose around. My cock was mind. Boggled wound up auction. The thing offers something like thirty thousand dollars and got all kinds of attention for nancy. Talk about an artist. Chuck okay so my cousin. Her name is nancy. Fine shameless plug goto nancy. Fine arts dot com. You won't see my cock there but you'll see what she does she she paints in the plein air style so she does a lot of painting outdoors and she paints scenes of nature. They are terrific. But here's the thing about nancy. She never picked up a paintbrush until she was in her sixties. How does he paint before that idiot. She didn't she didn't paint. I don't even know if she knew she could paint. I don't even she just one day. She picked up a paintbrush and got busy and magic. The blank canvas filled with something. That looked an awful lot like what she wanted to look like and he had this gift. This rooster she painted. Yes nominal. it's it's an. I mean it one at at it actually won second place in a big prestigious art fair at the state fair where people come from all over the place crazy thing was. She entered it in the portrait heart. Yes i remember right. So everybody is is painting these amazing portraits of people and cheap paints a rooster and still. It comes in second that good she. She'd have certainly one the animal category if they're worse than to say. But anyway you know i mean. Obviously there's a. There's a a straight line between nancy. And bob ross. Both are artists move. Could create magic right in front of your eyes. My aunt betty could do the same thing although i didn't know her as well. My grandmother had her paintings all over her home in baltimore and now. I'm delighted to tell you that. Nancy got a big commission. I don't think i'm allowed to say. From whom but a big company who saw my cock as brought to life by my cousin reached out to her and now lobbies are filled with artwork. Really yeah no she has a she has a career. She noticed a hundred and forty. Wow that is something that he's having a hell of a run. She knows she must be i. I don't wanna say. I think she's probably closer to seventy than sixty what. She didn't pick up a brush until she was in her sixties yet. Early six. I think she was sixty when she started to paint. But you know what else she did last month. Jets gade no better. She sold my parents condominium related issues. Well she's in real estate she. She's been a real estate for like forty years. So my mom. Who is recuperating right. Now as we've mentioned he is over there in the In the home into which she and my dad have moved but she sold their own their condo for them. This is the thing about art. So many great artists do it as a vocation and so many others do it as an avocation. And i'm honestly not sure where the best art comes from. I mean if. You're an artist by vocation. That's all that you do. And maybe you're successful and maybe you're not but to me. I've been more interested in art as a he and to see that. Hobby get out of hand to see the hobby into a vocation or the avocation turned into the vocation. That's interesting to me. Do you remember at overly senior high. The art teacher there. Who kind of looked a little bit like bob. Ross yeah i do. I can't remember his name. Which is terrible. But i took a photography class with him and he made me appreciate history and photography. I couldn't believe how excited. I was to look at a black and white photo from the civil war short. He sucked us in and did this monologue similar to the virginia madsen monologue. What she did for cabernet in his right. Oh he did for me with a black and white photo from the civil war like this is. This is exactly what it looked like. Everything is in the exact place. It was on that moment of time that but it's like looking through a time machine and he excited my imagination so much that i really appreciate it and this was just with photography but then one day i saw what he did for fun and he painted pictures and this is what really makes me go. I can't believe that. I mean this is like true art where it just. It almost looks like a photograph of a of a A horse-drawn carriage and people on it and everything was so real. It looked like a photograph. And i am like you're teaching photography at our high school. What yeah no. That's hyper realism. Where a painting looks so much like a photo. You can't believe it's not a photo right. This is why great teachers always come at history in a different way yeah. History by itself is a non-starter as we look. That's why we did six degrees. If you don't know chuck and i worked on a show last let last year called six degrees where we try. And it's a history show for people who would watch history shows well art history isn't really art history. It's history with art in it right music history or music appreciation really isn't that it's it's history seen through music right. That's how you make history interesting. Its days and dates and the unpronounceable names of dead people. Who don't impact you anymore. If you if you can find a way to make it truly relevant so look art can be a very powerful way to make people care about history. And that's why. I think everybody should take art history. You can turn your nose up. Added laugh at it and dismiss it. as whatever. but there's art histories important music histories important histories import. But in this day and age the history channel is down to an h. for god's sakes histories tough sell and when you find people who can make anything interesting right anything. That's what this podcast is about bob. Ross made me care about something. I i didn't care. I didn't hear about right. And most artists can do that regardless of their medium. Mike cousin did that. My grandfather did that. Y- let's move onto your grandfather right now. Because there's there's a great turn of phrase that you use in this chapter where you say where there was nothing but air. There's not walls where there was just grass. There's a foundation. It's where he built this addition to your house. Which happened as i like to say. Bc before chuck before we met. But tell me what that was like because you said you apprenticed with him under him. Figured out that you didn't know which end amer to hold a success. The cards i thought i was dealt The feeling of watching building appear seemingly from thin air is really no different than watching a blank canvas suddenly become not blank so then summer was like an episode of the joy of painting. Only it was the joy of building and protracted. You know it doesn't happen as fast bob ross. In in the course of a half hour could do this. Miraculous thing builders take longer my grandfather. It is not an architect by training. He never read the instructions to anything in his life. As far as i know he just had the the chip that i often talk about that allowed him to build or repair just about anything so when my mother decided that she really needed a kitchen that functioned like a kitchen. He went over to make her new kitchen and then the more he thought about it. The more thought well it might as well make it a family room and as long as we're going to make it a family room. Let's put a fireplace and we're gonna put it in a fireplace. We might as well put in a big bay window that faces out toward the pasture. So you can look at the stable. I built for three years ago. Where the horses that you love live and so suddenly. It became a real project. The family room that my grandfather put on our house was about the size of our house. You also put on a patio porch roof over that so for me a kid who was pretty sure. He was going to follow in his grandfather's footsteps. This would've been nineteen seventy five. So i was thirteen and i tried to make myself useful and i think i was to a degree. I could run here. Run there get this. get that. Hold the thing while he hammered. Here's your coffee pop. Here's i was. I was underfoot but he really made me feel like i was a full on apprentice in reality. My grandfather's real apprentice on that project was my dad. Was your dad. I knew it. Yeah my dad strong back. My grandfather was strong himself but this was a job and two men did it. Two and a half men. How did they get along. Two and a half man right. yeah by. They got along great. I i don't know of anyone who held my grandfather in higher esteem than my dad. And that's saying something. Because i don't know anyone who didn't hold my grandfather in high esteem. He was a michelangelo of the trades. He could build fix or repair anything and that summer. He proved it right in front of me and by the way. My dad didn't get that gene either. The handy gene is recesses but hang on. I think it's worth noting to that. Your grandfather is not your dad's father. This is your mom's father correct so that makes it even more interesting when you say that. No one held him in more esteem than your father who this was his father in law. Oh yeah your dad's father in law not his father so i think that speaks even even more to just how appreciated he was. They were dear friends and my dad just had so much admiration for my grandfather and you know i think grandfather's in general have been arbitrage out of the familial conversation. Assuming we're even having one anymore you know. The the lack of fathers is still headline news and the devastating impact. That's had on our society. I don't think any reasonable person disputes it but the impact of grandfather's has been largely forgotten. Because if there's not a father in your life there's probably not a grandfather. There might be some times. Grandparents are raising kids all too often. In fact i was. You wanna talk about privilege. Real privilege the greatest gift i got was not just growing up in a family where my parents loved each other and love their kids. It was growing up in that environment right next to grandparents who loved each other so i had this debate. This double dose of i guess security and certainty and my father was able to use my grandfather In many ways as an example of what to do of how to be a man of how to live of what decency meant and he was a living breathing example. That was right next door to us. The fact on top of being such a a morally upstanding man the fact that carl noble was also bob ross. In his own way the fact that he was able to pull off magic tricks every single day he wakes up clean he comes home dirty and somewhere during the course of the day. A problem is fixed. A situation is corrected and you could point and see the results of that That's amazing chuck. It was never lectured to me. Nobody ever beat me over the head with it. I just grew up watching a master my grandfather working on all kinds of projects whether it was digging a spring seller or a stable or running Pipe out to connect into the city sewer line in order to get us a working sewage. I mean one thing after the next after day after day and there with him always was my father. Being the apprentice years later said to me at some point was a conversation. I was being interviewed and she was with me about dirty jobs and gave some about what dirty jobs was how it happened. And she said well. That's one way to look at it. But from my perspective this was just michael's attempt to channel his earliest memories which consisted of watching somebody who knew what they were doing assisted by an apprentice. That's what michael's doing. He's cast himself in the role of an apprentice and now he goes around the country to work with people who subconsciously his grandfather. So you were playing your dad on dirty jobs. Essentially that's right. I never thought of it that way until my mother casually Informed the audience or your mom is good at doing. That isn't she. She will put your ass on a couch before you even knew. You were in assuring office. Oh my gosh you know i have. I have a memory of you telling may about. I ask you something about your mom. And whether she had ever punished you or anything and you said something like she didn't really need to. He goes though the big effect that she had on me once was with the bb gun. Do you know the story. I'm going to tell god yeah. I desperately wanted to be begun. My grandfather lobbied for it. My father lobbied for it. My mother didn't want me to have it. I mean it's classic. Christmas story stuff they riley. Yeah you put your up crossman Bb begun a very powerful one. When i was twelve and i was out back It had snowed there. Were there was a bird in the mulberry tree. I wasn't even really trying to. I don't know what i was doing. I i had this gun in my hand. And i didn't even lift it up. Didn't even aim. I just from the hip pointed up there. I squeeze the trigger down. The bird fell out of the tree. And there was a red dot right in the center of its chest and Yeah my mom walked over looked at me looked at the birds actually picked it up and held it out to me and said here you go. Big hunter walked away and My relationship with guns which i still cherish and my relationship with animals which i still enjoy was never quite the same. That is to that that is a. It's that's the story that i mean you. You must've told me that story thirty years ago. Thirty five years ago. We were still both living in baltimore at the time. I think my mother actually got that style of parenting from dad. My mom really never raised her voice at her kids. I never heard my grandfather raise his voice ever. And that's what i meant earlier by cautionary tales and examples in parenting. My dad was long on telling me the right thing to do and the wrong thing to do. He had a propensity to to lapse into a lecture from time to time over because he wanted his sons to behave in a right way. And and you know. He got impatient with sometimes said. Look because i told you so. It's wrong because i'm telling you it's wrong. And that of course for a kid is not persuasive at all but what my dad was able to do thanks to my grandfather is constantly point to him. One time i drove in the winning run in a pivotal baseball game. In little league i was probably sixteen and i was so full of myself. After the game we all went out to shakey's pizza. And somebody asked me to describe the moment and i did. I describe it. No i put myself. I was the conquering hero. It was it was three to i fouled off a couple of balls and then i drove one deep deep deep to centerfield and the winning runs came in. I mean i really just was so enjoying explaining how i drove in the winning run and my dad what he wanted to say was hey self-praise stinks and you're embarrassing me right now by patting yourself so hard on the back instead all he had to do glance over at my grandfather and say let me ask you something. Do you think your grandfather would ever talk about himself. The way you just talked about yourself. It's his version of big hunter. Right when you're surrounded by examples that you can point to to back up your dogma to back up your lecture then you don't really have to lecture. All you have to do is point to the man who's walking the walk. All you have to do is point to the bird with the red dot in his chest. You don't have to hit me over the head with it. You just have to take a little sarcasm and shove it up my ass right where it belongs. She's she she's still good at it by you. Know yeah she might i. I called her this morning. And i said look we want to talk about your dad on the podcast. I i really want to drill down. And i wanna talk to you about pop and i and i wanna get your your feelings. You know as as my mom but also as his daughter and help me bridge this weird space between education and wisdom art and building and painting all these things and she said well michael. You know that does sound like a pretty interesting conversation I m running a fever. And the cough is troubling. But if it's important to you. I suppose i could just hop on if it's important like she was so brutal that that ever tell you. The yogurt story doesn't ring a bell. I'm sitting in front of the fireplace in the family room a couple of years after it was constructed. The bay window is there. The view out to the stable is there. The brick patio is off to the right. It's a beautiful room. And were sitting there. And we're watching television and i'm hungry and i walked over and this is what frozen yogurt had become a thing and i got some frozen yogurt out of the fridge and i grabbed. I said hey mom you wanna frozen yogurt and she said oh yeah. I'll take one while. There was only one so i took the yogurt and i and i grabbed a couple of spoons and i walked over and i put the john henry. When i said there's only one we share it she says oh no no no no no you have it. You know what honestly. I didn't even want one. I just said i'd take one because you know we could eat it together. I'm like well we can still eat. It gets us. No no no you have it you have it. I'm fine so i opened a yogurt and start eating it. And we're watching this We were watching all creatures great and small which she loved. I was one of our favorite books. One of my favorite books do james. Harriet and they made A series out of this on pbs. So it's entirely possible that the joy of painting right had been on an hour so we're watching all creatures great and small sitting in the family room that i helped my grandfather and my dad build and i'm eating a frozen yogurt and i'm pausing every thirty seconds to say. Are you sure you don't wanna bite. Are you sure you don't want some now. i'm fine. i'm fine there. We sit watching all creatures great and small. And i'm enjoying this. Dan frozen is delicious by the way. And we finally get to the bottom of this thing. There's one spoonful left. And i scoop it out and i handed to my sit here. Just take a just take a bite of it. It's so good. she goes. no no. i'm telling you. I don't want it and then i take it and then i eat it. And then she reaches over and she takes the empty container and says to me. I'll just lick the lid and proceeds to lick the lid. That's my mother sitting there in her new edition and watching her favorite. Tv show letting me all of it. I'll just lick the lid big hunters who god and i think about it. You know what. I'm glad she's not on this podcast. Today she brutal. Hey you know what. She's about two thirds of the way through her third book. And this too is is jermaine and i say this as a guy who you know. My job is to try and make everything. Relevant no matter. How irrelevant might same. But it's not irrelevant. My mom wrote her first book at eighty right. Eighty my cousin. Nancy painted her first painting at at sixty bob. Ross yelled at the top of his lungs for the first part of his life and then just decided you know what. I'd rather paint painting. He goes to clearwater. Learns how to paint turns out. He's got it to now. He's teaching classes. you know. it's amazing. How way leads on the way and it's way it it's even more amazing. I think about why we do the things we do. And how we're influenced. And you know you and i obviously having this conversation without my grandfather. Dirty jobs never would've been a show without my pop micro works wouldn't exist today. We've helped twelve hundred people learn a skill than actually in demand. Does that happen without my grandfather. No no it does not. I have to pause. Because i'm going to pee. My pants go hell. We'll be right back. Well that's that's a level of candor I don't know if you get another podcasts or not. I don't know if when chuck comes back if he's actually going to edit this out or not. But to the extent that i have any training in any vocation for me a big chunk of my life has been spent making sure that dead air isn't there and so the responsibility of talking to you for roughly two minutes while chuck urinate is not something that i'm really troubled by in fact it's the only thing i am any good. I learned that skill if you can call it a skill at qvc cable shopping channel which some of you will recall. We talked about detail in the early part of the book. Now as we approach the end of the book and try and somehow unite all of these themes together through a conversation. I find myself really unable to have the conversation. I thought i was going to have. I can't have it with my mom. Because she's under the weather. And i can't have it with the producer of this podcast because he's urinating and so rather than a conversation it's simply a monologue an opportunity to fill in two and a half minutes of dead air while i wait for chuck to come back now. It's possible that chuck was not only urinating. It's possible he's taking care of some other things in there as well in which case this could turn into a five minute vowed of free association and if that happens well i'm not going to panic and i wouldn't blame you for hitting that little button on the app that allows you to jump forward fifteen seconds to see when or if chuck will ever return when or if mike will ever stop talking. These things are all shrouded in mystery because they live in the future. The past might be the coin of the realm vis-a-vis the stories. I write in the book that you're currently listening to but it's the present that i'm desperate to get back to and that of course can happen until chuck returns which i'm pleased to say he has. Yeah i can answer both questions. I'm back and What was the other one. Would you say it's good to know you do hang on every word i say. Oh my gosh. i don't know what happened there. Man but i just. It's too much water. After too much. Coffee i guess. I don't think we really have to take a deep dive on white. People need to urinate. You know it's obviously tied to intake garbage in garbage out. I just. I'm gonna cut all this out by the way. This is never gonna make it really. Yeah yeah why. Would i do that. I don't know. I wanted to let you finish your point. I didn't want to just get up and walk away like i did. I think last week or the week before which was a leaf blower wasn't that wasn't what the leaf blower was it. Look part of what. We're doing full disclosure. We're desperate to figure out why people listen to this podcast and no i. I'm really curious. I'm not sure. I'm not sure if they want to hear from personal people in my life. I'm not sure if they want to hear stories about famous people. I've never met. I'm really not sure if it's two dudes talking if it's a hangout. Thing if people are i honestly don't know why people are listening to this and i. It just seems like a sensible thing to learn eventually. If we're going to keep doing it don't you think i suppose so. I mean we. Could you know. This is just a suggestion as we. We could listen to what people say. No you can't trust them. They say they enjoy The stories they enjoy hearing more of you think it's access to to your storage. Do you think people care. They say they do like. I say i'm reading all the reviews. That's it yeah. That's yes it's so hard guys to figure out what went to believe you. Look i say that. With with great. Respect every show. I've ever worked on his program by the people who watch it. I take viewer feedback. Really really seriously but you also know how i feel about focus groups. I hate them. Isn't that interesting. I hate for i. I i hate them. Because focus groups are really good at eliminating terrible ideas and brilliant ideas right what they leave you with the soft squishy crap in the middle and that's why most tv is awful. That's my most newscast derivative. That's why so much music sounds the same at all gets focus group and then you have people working really really hard to try and please an inherently fickle group of people that you guys the listeners. The thing is it's not that you're fickle. I don't think it's that you don't want to be pandered to you. Don't wanna feel like you've been focus groups and now you're being fed this thing that people desperate to make money selling need you to like and so there's a constant balance i think and trying to figure out what is entertaining. What is worth knowing. What is listening to. I asked myself the same thing. Why do i listen to the podcast. I listen to. Why do i watch the tv. I watch it's almost always because the people responsible for making it don't seem to care too much about what i want right. The not desperate first and foremost to entertain me. They're more interested in entertaining themselves. And that's usually fun to listen to and watch usually the last five minutes of this. I don't know some people might be shaking their heads right now and saying mike. You guys had put a glass. I'd asleep honestly and others might be saying that was fresh new and honest more event. Chuck should pee more often. I like it when chuck's not there. You know what i'm gonna do right now. i'm gonna read you. I'm going to read you a a five star review or this is from nurse. Toni t. and he writes a disaster averted astounding. I never would have believed that. I would thank someone for almost causing a driving collision. The day has arrived. I was listening to these spirited discussion between mike and chuck about fred king as i returned home down a rural road from my overnight job. The topic shifted to a discussion of the man's antics in a restaurant. I had tears pouring out of my eyes and was laughing hysterically at the descriptions therein. A problematic point fifty five miles per hour on a winding road. I wrestled the car away from the ditch while gasping in laughter. Thank you for finishing my work. Day in one of the most memorable ways possible and i look forward to the next conversation. Keep up the work for exclamation points. Toni t. bo. Thank you nurse. Toni t. that's great to know. I'm glad you're still alive. I'm gladdy safe for my gosh. Chuck say say rural road again for me road again anyway. I guess that's just a long way of saying there's no accounting for a for taste. Which if i dare to bring this back to the topic at hand ought to be somewhere near the headline for all things artistic. What makes bob ross is paintings good bad or indifferent as beauty really in the eye of the beholder. What makes art art. What makes art valuable. I didn't want to part with my cock wanted to raise money for the foundation. And it's something like thirty grand. I felt like you know something. That's i can get it on cock if your car can raise thirty grand. Then yeah you do that right now. So i did that for those of you who think making it up. I'm not google. Mike rowe rooster. You'll see the cock. I'm talking about and look at it and say look that's a cock- i could have got my hands around tied. I know whatever you don't. Don't don't go micro roca hawk. No don't do that. don't do that. Mike rowe rooster. Yes you wanna google. Oh god it's too late. No it's the white bear problem. We talked about a couple of weeks ago. Oh yeah that belief that was last week. I think it was just one week ago. Don't think feels he's amerigo but don't think of microscopic don't hey what about your grandfather. What about lou rulli and what about. I mean not to make this all about you but you know a lot of those reviews mentioned you and people are asking me questions about you. What makes you tick. And i don't wanna put you on the couch. I met your pop and your pop was as interesting as my pop but in a completely different way. Totally different way lou. You don't his middle name was no rosen. Bush louis rosen bush. Raleigh now demands an answer. Why on earth was his. What his name. Be rosen bush and He was famous for if you asked him a question. The same question more than once. He'd have a different answer every time he asked him but the one that stock was that His his father was Was a drunk and had two best friends named liu and he and he wanted to name his son after his two best friends. But he could name louis louis so he took one of the guys. Last names rosen bush. Well you're a up. I remember thinking the first time. I met him this. This would have been dangerous young man. He seemed like all harmless. By the way most grandfather's do but Unlike my grandfather who who never raised his voice who kinda dedicated his life to a mix of family charity and church. A man who wound up as i mentioned in the book with a plaque in the church he helped build you know your your granddad. A different legacy. He was a musician and a soldier. And frankly a bit of a shift disturb philip. Yes he There are stories from before. I was born where you know he was. He was playing music every night. He wanted to come out to california and you know try his luck in the entertainment industry but world war two stopped him from from that and he served instead. But there's a there's a great story that my my brother and sister tell about when they were kids before i was born there. They're older nine and eleven years older than me and they were staying with my grandmother. One night and pop was out playing music as he often did. He played the drums and he sang. Had a beautiful voice begin. The begin was his signature song and he fancied himself a band master and He liked to drink. You like to smoke. You like to sing and i think he liked the ladies a little bit. I think your and my my grandmother might my my brother and sister say they remember being awakened by my grandmother. Put into the back of a station wagon and driven to a place you know. This is like in the middle of the night like one two. In the morning they were drive to. She would find my grandfather's car wherever he had parked and he's clearly it's it's passed. He should have been home by now. He played his sets. It should have been home. But he's not she would places open nothing right. Yeah that's right. She would find his car and then move it three blocks away and then bring the kids back home so that when he came out of wherever he was he could not find his car. The one occasion. I remember you telling me a story about your pop You were like the human remote control before there were remote controls yet. there was a There was an occasion where you guys were sitting around and Patent came on george c. Scott yes tell me that that famous blood and guts speech at the beginning while at the beginning of the movie you know jordan. Scottie stands in front of a giant american flag and he delivers this tremendous blood and guts speech. That is based on what he actually did. He famously says in there you know the job is not to. You know to be a poor son of a bitch who died for his country that your job is to the other poor son of a bitch to die for his that outright and was delivered what june fifth right before Righty day june fifth before d day. Right so so. I'm sitting there on the floor. Because i had to be near the tv to change the channel was time and patent comes on and my grandfather sorta shoulder and says hey and i go. Yeah he goes. I was there for this this for the speech you know. He's giving the speech. And i go really. He's like yeah. I'm like okay. What do i know. I'm like seven eight or something like that. I know years later when he Passes away. I'm going through his effects. He had he had he had a purple heart again. If you asked him how to get the purple heart he'd have had like seven different stories. but But he you know he was injured and so i'm looking through his affairs and it says you know the day that he was drafted into the army and it says I come this one section. It says july six nine thousand nine hundred forty four arrived normandy. France and i thought it was interesting because that was exactly one month after d day. D day of courses. June sixth nineteen forty four. And so i go wow. He arrived there and One month after the action and then went all the way to berlin and then cut to that summer after he's passed and i'm reading a historical novel about d day which has all these fake characters but it also has real characters like patent and there. There's a big chapter that talks about patent. And how he was a decoy. In england he was his job before d day was to be seen everywhere in london on the town eating not training doing everything but looking like a guy who was about to invade europe and that was the whole point so that i turn the page and i see the chapter says july fifth nineteen forty. Four patent arrives in normandy. I go son of a gun. He was telling the truth he actually was in patents army and he was there for that speech. It's so funny man. You know when you're pop was over there doing that. Mine was in dc and My mother writes about this in her book and some detail the the dread the fear that my grandmother had that by the my grandfather was going to be called overseas to fight. But he wasn't he was called to dc instead because he was an electrician. Wow and they were desperate for tradesmen. They were desperate for skilled. Tradesmen because so many had already enlisted so many had been drafted so many were over there you know and the homefront was in a real state of while it was bad you know there. There were in structural problems. But there were. There were just daily. Probably couldn't get a plumber. You couldn't get an electrician. You just couldn't find these. These people to take care of these very very basic needs and this of course was happening all over the country that can't happen in dc. You know so. He went down there to work on. Government buildings running electric literally keeping the lights on so this is probably a pretty good place to start to land the plane. But if you want to draw a crooked line from a blank canvas on a show called the joy of painting to my backyard in one thousand nine hundred ninety five when my grandfather turned that blank canvas into something useful and beautiful and good even as my mother would sit in the fruits of his labor just a year or two later in shame me by licking the lid thereby driving me. Further and further down whatever path. I was going the fact that somehow or another dirty jobs gets on. The air and micro works comes out of it and now i'm sitting here with you as the country truly is in the grip of another skilled labor shortage. Were not at war. In the way we were in one thousand nine hundred forty four forty five. But we've got a real problem in our country. The infrastructure thing is headline news. Not that anybody knows what infrastructure even means anymore the way it's been defined but our workforce is a mess and it's out of balance and we need electricians again. We need steam fitters pipe fitters carpenters. We need heating and air conditioning guys. It's the opportunities incredible and the thing. I would love to to do right now. If i could somehow go back in time. If i could somehow have a moment would be to sit with my pop and get his take on the state of our labor force and the shortages that are going on right now and just his. His thoughts on micro works in general. I i'm i don't really know what else to say. Except for the fact that history really is a wheel and it just spins and every time something feels new. It's not you know it's just another version of a thing that a couple generations ago. People endured a labor shortage or an infrastructure problem. Whatever it is you know you play the cards. You can as best you can. And the fact that micro works is a thing the fact that we're about to award another million dollars next month's to the next generation of electricity. It's the fact that your grandfather was over there with patent when mine was down in. Dc running electric and somehow we get to sit here and try and make that make sense through the lens of my cock and bob ross. How did that happen. Somebody's gonna play that sentence back and say they did it again they. They came up with a sentence that never before this the world. It's been articulated and there's gotta be some pride in that large. I dare say. oh yes. there's there's plenty of it. Well listen gentle listener. Thank you so much for listening and Keep in mind if you'd like to hear this chapter and all the other chapters in the same place. This book is available in audio version as well as in the book version At places where audio books books are sold could said it better. If you're worried about my mom hop over to her facebook page said get well soon. She loved to hear from you She's going to be fine. I'm sure i'm going to try and get her back. You're on the podcast next time Well she doesn't shame or humiliate me for asking. No no michael. You go ahead and do the podcast. I'll be fine. It's it's just a low grade fever with persistent cough. I'd love to try it like. Yeah you know what let let me give it. A shot is it. Okay would it be okay to podcast from a warm bath. Because that's where. I need to go now. No ma'am i'm good. You did. You need to big podcast. Her and you do the same gentle listener. We'll be back next week. No promises no guarantees. Who knows what chuckle do. Maybe it'll be another five minute. P maybe he'll edit it in maybe edited out now. My p is definitely gone. It's not gonna live nece for sure. See we'll but you know what we're gonna hear here now. River of blood listen again. Nobody's going to be offended if you don't listen to this. But i want you to hear it because we live in a world where a guy with a bloody nose can throw out. He'll for a song and get something back. Something an awful lot like this. I can hear the raging hurricane lashing hard against my window pane. The ocean knows had sweet. But it's all in my head fixed my faulty septum. They gave me pause. I should have kept him now. Looking down at my wind lease see. I can't live down. I'm sitting up in bed drip drip drip drip drip drip pouring on. I upper. it's the scarlet version of old knows When naple the two plus free from my nasal cavity. I went sailing. Nana rivera and as i say long rivers flow carries me when no one wants to go. It connects me to great suffering as through history. Lee i only experience of being dismembered by your syrians and being crucified with spartak on the road into role. But here i am just sitting in my home in a drip drip stati drip drip drip. Pouring on my upper it's scarlet virginal when they pulled the plug free from a. I went sailing. River a river blah a want you be protected from genghis khan tarintino pull the plug spree from nasal cavity when sailing outta river. I would say a rib

bob bob ross carl noble Bob Ross air force sean nancy carl noble coral noble micro works foundation buddy chuck biondi elson air force bob perform mr grizzly van dyke brown kurowski clearwater
Motor City Hypnotist Podcast with David Wright  Episode 37 The Secrets of Scheduling

PodcastDetroit.com

32:10 min | 9 months ago

Motor City Hypnotist Podcast with David Wright Episode 37 The Secrets of Scheduling

"You're listening to the podcast detroit network visit. Www dot podcast. Detroit dot com for more information in this episode of the motor city. Hypnotise podcast We're going to be covering the secrets of scheduling online now. I don't know if it's not even online just the secrets of scheduling I'm not even sure if their secrets. Necessarily but i liked the alliteration so stick around because we're gonna talk about scheduling. How can help you and improve your productivity and as usual. I'm giving the listeners. A free hypnosis guide stay tuned ready for the motor city hypnotist do on rights originating from the suburbs of detroit michigan. He is hypnotized thousands of people in all over the united states david. Alright it's been featured on news outlets all across the country and is the clinical director of an outpatient mental health clinic located just south of detroit where he hopes people daily using the power of it. Noses welcome the motor city. Hypnotist david all right Going on people. At as david wright the motor city hypnotist. We are back again with another episode of the motor city. Mantas podcast we are here. You're watching on facebook. We're here live in the podcast detroit northville studios with today's jamie. Thanks for stopping in. Oh my god. Thanks for having thanks. Yeah then what you do. I appreciate it. It's awesome jamie's in the booth and We're doing a podcast. So it's good friday evening. Let's say that. Let me tell you where you can find me. My website is motor city. Hypnotise dot com on their. You'll find the podcast page with all of my episodes going back I think around like thirty four today so a lot of episodes look back on so take a look that we've had some a lot of stuff over the last four or five months so take a look find an episode and jump in Also on that page on on the website you will find my shop page with all of my mp3 products E books other things that would be useful for you so check that out as well. You can find me on social media on facebook and youtube at motorcity hypnotist and also on twitter and instagram motor city hypno- and if you would like to contribute to the show you can find me on patriae on. Patriot is a creator site where people creators post their creations and fans of the show can contribute to help support the show financially. And if you do so those of you who are watching live or can see it on facebook you can get free coffee mug and a shirt go along with that again a minimal contribution but it does help me to run the show and bring you good content so check that out if you get a chance and as usual on every episode. I'm offering a free hypnosis guide. And as i've done the last few shows and take a look for these couple links because i know the last podcast. We talked about procrastination. And i offered a link to the book called the end of procrastination stop postponing and live a fulfiled life. A lot of podcasts. From last time what was taken from this. I really recommend this book and a lot of information was taken from it. I'm going to leave that link in the show notes as well and also the free hypnosis for confident download that will be in the notes as well so a lot of free stuff All you have to do is just check out the show notes. Look for all the free links. Take a look things and yeah find something you like and download. That would be fantastic for you. We before we get to winner of the week which was going to jump right head there. Let me tell you are sponsorship this episode of the motor city hypnotise. Podcast is brought to you. By banner season online marketing a saturated and people rarely open their emails. Are you in sales or does your business market to customers. How do you connect with family. Friends and clients banner. Season takes your marketing into the real world by delivering kindness and thoughtfulness directly to your clients physically. Imagine the excitement of your family friends and customers as they receive personalised cards and gifts in their mailboxes. Go to banner season dot com forward slash fantastic and begin today to express kindness and actions with others again. That's banner season dot com forward slash fantastic And that's link will be in the show notes while if you want to look that up against a great program for me. I kind of a settlement dates on there and they just kind of automatically happen throughout the year. And i don't have to think about it which is perfect for me. I don't have to catch it and think about it and forget it. That's always good. Yeah yeah because i would do that would tend to forget so. Yeah check that out. Great program and again as always. I like to share with you than i am an affiliate or connected with that a program so it doesn't affect you but Just so you know. I get some benefit. If you go there and sign up and use that service so i would appreciate it. It is time for our winner of the week. Yes so i We have a lot of winners of the week. That deal with animals. And i know jimmy you do. Your your animal podcast. We do animal talk. Animal talk yeah. And i actually did last time because i to ask a question about my dog. Yes yeah hopefully. We helped well somewhat. 'cause i oh what who's the guy's name I can't think bryan bryan as he said if he's eight years old habits are pretty instilled by the. Yeah yeah so. I'm sure we could work hard. But it doesn't happen very often long story short people. I i may have told the story of Prior podcast but My my dog got a whole whenever he gets a hold of a tissue or a paper towel he turns into a totally jacqueline hyde. He's never been aggressive. He's never i with anyone. Children adults anybody but if he gets a paper towel or tissue hell hunker down and guard in growl so i tried to challenge them up and take it away and he bit me. Oh yeah which again. Never happened before So according to what. Brian was saying you know. It's not worth the fight at that point because if you're going to challenge them you're going to lose is pretty pretty much what he said we're going to give clinics it all right. I mean it's not gonna hurt him. So what's the big deal so after that long tangent. Let's get back to our our story today. Which is about pets. And that's that's how we got on that subject so let me just read a little bit of the of the beginning of this article every day. Pat snus rescue dog brady puts on a show for her. Just the thought of my head. I wonder if she's a patriots. Fan for a tampa bay fan. Now i don't know anyway before she gives them a meal she says circles and he dances around around Then the mixed breed pups sits politely until she puts down his bowl and says okay so the story goes on the owner. Pat smith is seventy one. And she's a resident in grand ledge michigan which of courses in our state She's a retired middle school math teacher. And the whole point of this is that she's a senior citizen and she has. She's been in this program where this adoption agency pets for. The elderly will put out their rescue dogs to senior citizens and they will pay for the services as far as veterinarian bills food while they give them financial assistance with grants Since its inception in ninety two pets for the elderly has paid a portion of pat adoption fees for nearly one hundred thousand seniors age sixty and up from more than fifty shelters in thirty four states. Now the group is a learning shelters of a new option to help cover the cost of routine veterinary care surgeries pet food grooming an in home visits in which shelter employees check in on senior citizens. Caring for adopted pets. Everybody's getting looked after. Yeah i mean like they're taking the they're covering the whole thing Susan cr- kurowski executive executive director of pets for the elderly said. She hopes more shelters will apply for grants to help keep pets in the homes of the seniors who loved them. The goal is to have at least one participating shelter in all fifty states by the time the expand program officially launches in january of two thousand twenty one. She says that pets for the elderly was founded by the late. Abram cats to help seniors feel healthier and more connected through pets. Abram cats yes. Abram abram have cats hats k. Probably she founded the dog show. I shouldn't say that the story does mention dogs. They could have other pets. I don't know for sure mention any other dogs. It's a big cat lower looking for an easy life prison although keedy underlings with you so cats founded Pets for the elderly. So i thought it was a great story just elderly people and and pets need to be placed and they help with the cost. It's just it's just a great thing overall the out the senior citizens when the pets win and it's good for everyone that's wipe pets for the elderly. Is our winner of the week done. Yes another animal story. But that's cool so it's cool story the link to that story. I will leave in the show notes as well. You guys can read the whole thing. It really is a nice story. Yup back to it so we're talking today and i called the episode the secrets of scheduling and even said in the beginning. It's not really a secret. But since i liked the alliteration i just use the word But we're going to talk about scheduling and this fits into the last couple of podcast. We did regarding procrastination And you can look those up over the last two episodes Before this one shall th the whole purpose of this is going to sound very simplistic in very cliche. But if something's not scheduled it probably is not gonna get done in. I asked i asked this question on my clients. Lot clients are feeling overwhelmed. They're feeling behind. They're feeling like they're they have a million things to do and they feel like they're never getting ahead and ask the question. Why do you think you struggle with getting things accomplished. Why why do you think things are are. It's like a treadmill and you're just never catching up Or you just constantly feeling overwhelmed. And most of the time they just have too many things. I too many things to do. And i just can't get them all done and when i asked the next question i almost everyone will. We'll just look at me. But i'm like. What do you schedule your day in. Most of the time the they'll just look at me and be like No not really so my point. I'm making that if if you if you let your days take you. Chances are you're not gonna get a lot of things done your victim to circumstance your victim to re. I always call us the reaction. A reaction versus being proactive. If you just react to situations throughout your day that's where it's going to take you. That's what you're going to be focused on is putting out fires quote unquote. So we're going to talk specifically about scheduling an and i know it sounds trite and cliche. But i'm gonna tell you how this can help you feel less anxious. Feel more in control have better confidence and just feel better physically. Even so a lot of this information. That i'm gonna share and i always like to give credit when i pull some information from somewhere this from xabier dot com and there's some good information on there is some of this information is taken from them. So the whole point. Is that if you schedule your day. In and i'm going to i'm going to back up a little bit. I'm going to give you a scenario when we were kids. Most of us would think or believe Man it'd be great. If i didn't have school i could just sit home every day and just do whatever i wanted and there was twenty twenty. Then there's twenty twenty and they got their wish. They did what i did. I tell man that's sick days. you're on the head. You listen to the elton john album over and great in most of us would think every day like that would be great in. And i can tell you that yes. It might be great for a day or two. Maybe even a week. Or i could timeframe could be different for you but eventually without a schedule or without a purpose to your days that you're you're gonna start regressing and having these feelings of of either boredom or lethargy or or just feeling un productive and that's just human nature what we need to have something to focus on to accomplish so the point. The reason i'm bringing that up is that most of us would think well you know scheduling is kind of i. Don't wanna have a schedule because then it just kind of locks in it makes me. It makes me obligated to do these things that might be that kind of the point. That's kind of a whole point by scheduling something. You're locked into it just like his kids by having to go to school every day. You're locked into that schedule. And whether it and i know most kids would would not agree with me but without that structure. The kids are not going to do well with whatever they're doing well jamie's attention and they are not right. Yes and and now just seeing what's going on now how difficult it is for kids to be home and and try to learn online without that in-person It and it's and it's even has to do with environment sitting in your room the same room that you play video games in or watch netflix. It's hard to make that mental switch to say okay. now. I have to be serious into school. 'cause that's not. That's not the environment you do school in. Yeah i know jamie of jimmy. You teach high school right. Oh my god yeah. I can't tell you how many because school starts at seven thirty my take attendance so they gotta turn their cameras on for. Attendance is like half of them are like still in bed. Oh yeah they just rolled over flip. Their camera on boy related quickly. Yes i'm sure it does so. Let's come back to the point of having a purpose and a schedule because this this will enable you to feel like you're accomplishing something. Whatever that is to my clients were feeling overwhelmed and anxious and stressed out in like. They're on a treadmill. It's important that you be able to focus on accomplishing things. That are important to you. So i know there's numerous books and articles probably hundreds of them on how to schedule or having a perfect schedule. Now this is all comes down to personal preference and every individual is different ideal with clients every day. Everybody's different so. We have to take different approaches. Depending on who you are in everybody's gonna have different strengths and weaknesses regarding how they work on a schedule but history general has shown us that the most most productive people most productive and successful people have adhered to some sort of schedule. They've locked schedule and and they've they've been successful because of it. So winston churchill is a great example. I've used him before. I can't remember for what but unsure. It was a great example but he had hit a specific habit every night he worked late into the night and then he broke up his his day with whiskey. Naps which sounds which sounds great. I try to teach high school. I'd like to try really quick but but even even saying that it's like wow he would just nap and drink whiskey during the day. He must have been how to get anything done but for him he worked better late at night. That's where he worked. That's when he worked things done. So the point being there's no one-size-fits-all for anyone as far as is scheduling. But i do want to bring up and and this this kind of can give you another example of what happens Those of you. Who are married. Those of you have partners. Whatever it is you. You've probably had this conversation a- a million times you get home after work. It's evening maybe four. Thirty s five ish. Hey what do you want for dinner. I don't know what do you want. Why don't you pick and then that person names three things and it's no no it doesn't matter how about this whatever it doesn't matter how about this what we'll know you just pack and you pick it and they're like no i don't like that. Yeah are you know. And that's what you feel like sometimes because this is just roundabout an. I'm not kidding a lot of times this. This might not happen in rapid fire succession. But you'll your watch and his half hour forty five minutes later and you still have been eaten yet and hour. Now you're really hungry in and that's just a simple thing of saying if what what if dinner was already scheduled you already knew. You didn't have to ask rather discussion about it. You already knew what it was going to be an. And i don't care if it's i mean i would say i would want something healthy but but even if you say okay thursday night. Dinner is at six thirty. And we're just gonna get mcdonald's what if it was planned you wouldn't have to think about it you would just say. Oh that's what we're doing and it avoids this whole back and forth. So so as i get into this more and more you can see how this can pan out and other areas as far as taking that mental strain off of yourself of having to think about it so i'm just going to list of a few famous people who stuck to very rigid schedules. And that's how they weren't john milton. Benjamin franklin immanuel kant. Kurt vonnegut maya angelo. Beethoven mozart charles. Darwin charles dickens. Thomas mann trajkovski franz kafka picasso. All of all of those people's of those people stuck very regimented schedules. And that's how they got things done. That's how they became successful and they were very important. I'm very important any leather bound. So let's talk. What how how how you can put this into effect in how this might work for you. So i go to the dinner thing. Imagine that you had an. I'll go back to this. And i'll connect this with the school when you went to school. You never had to worry about what you're going to eat. There's a menu and get menu at the beginning of the week. And you know every day. What's for lunch and you know you know i remember. Friday was pizza day. I think because. I always look forward to friday so but you already know you already know what the beginning of the week every day. What you're going to have for lunch. Think about doing that at home. Just like you would at school when you're a kid so every night for a week. The dinners are scheduled. Maybe even you post it. So it's on the refrigerators. Everybody can see it so there are no questions. Think a much time that would save you because now if you know what your menu is this this and see how this connects to a lot of other things. If you know what you're eating for the week then prior to that we you know exactly what you need to shop for as far as shopping list and what you need to get then you also know what times you're going to schedule these dinners based on on on your home schedule. Say say what night you have. Your kids have a soccer game or or school activities. This is all planned out ahead of time. So those nights you complain around those activities no one exactly when you're going to eat instead of doing it on the fly and trying to make it up as you go that. That's much more stressful. So i'm gonna tell you certain ways to schedule your time and these and again these are all different different ways to do it. But we're going to find the one that works for you. So the first one is called the time blocking method time blocking it simply means planning out your dana advance in debt dedicating specific for your tasks so that would be like okay from nine to eleven. I'm i'm at work. And i'm working and that that's one of my worse. Things are going on and then from eleven to noon. That's one. I'm going to eat lunch and then from noon to five. That's what i work and then from five to five thirty. I drive home. Five thirty to six is just a time to sit around and so you block blackout your and blocks of time in in those blogs of time to do the things. You're supposed to be doing that now. That that's a very general way to do it because you can say yes. I'm at work from nine to two whatever nine to five if you have a nine to five job or whenever your work schedule is but you could take this even further and say at work. What are your responsibilities during that time. So you can break these blocks down in a much smaller segments as well to you just you just block out time. And it's important to have time for to be proactive for example. Let's say you're at work. And you have specific times to say from nine when i get to work at nine pm for for the first hour. I'm going to answer emails and that's locked into your into your schedule. That's what you do when you get there and that's the same thing every day. Now say that something else comes up that has to be done. You have to be to have what we call reactive blocks that that sometimes things come that you have to take care of right then. It can't wait emergencies. And i'm not saying that life threatening emergencies but things that after be done so you want to make sure that you have that you have allowed some time to kind of cushion that in case that time gets interrupted that you can make it up. So it's like You know interruption. Well i mean think about kids at home. How many times are they interrupted during the day when they're online i mean it's gotta it's gotta be constant a so setting up those blocks of time and then having those cushions for those reactive blocks that you have to take care of things so forcing yourself to lock yourself into that you kind of know what to expect every day. You know what your schedule is going to be. There's a product productivity guru. His name is cal. Newport in he swears by the time blocking methods stating sometimes people ask why. I bother with such a detailed level of planning. My answer is simple. It generates a massive amount of productivity. A forty hour time blocked workweek. I estimate produces the same amount of output as a sixty plus hour work week pursued without structure. So really what he's saying as he can get more work done in forty hours of structured work then he can't sixty hours of unstructured it just kind of makes sense it does. Yeah i mean if you're focused on what you're doing and sticking to that schedule you know the second method is the most important task method and we've probably we've probably heard this this in so many words the the the most important task method is just taking on the most important thing that you have to do. I now i know some of us as we address in the procrastination episodes some of us like like to put off the the the hard thing or the most important thing because sometimes it's a little bit more involved it. Yeah it's it's a little bit more effort involved in the most important thing so we tend to push that often to the easier things. I however the most important task method is that you just know that it has to be done. Get it done first so that that that mentally. It's off of your list if it's just cleared up so what you should do is rank drew tasks by order of importance. They're scheduled the first thing in your day. And then you work and the most important to the least important that way of things. Don't get done. It's not something that's important as something that you need to get done James clear is another author that i follow. If you do the most important thing. I each day. Then you'll always get something important done. I don't know about you but this is a big deal for me. There are many days. I wasted hours crossing off the fourth fifth or sixth most important task on my to do list and never got around to doing the most important thing so the most important thing the most important thing method the third method. Is that what we call the pomodoro method. This one is kind of it. It's it's a little odd. Because i don't i don't think people think of it says. I don't think i've ever heard a term for it but it's working in short massively product productive bursts so and then giving yourself a break so say that you set a for twenty five minutes and you work just just you. You work hard for twenty five minutes until the timer goes off. Then you take a five minute break. Then you reset the timer and do it again. And then you can make these these sessions. They call them as long as short as you want. But but again we wanna put some time into the working part of it so that you get the things done so this technique allows you to accomplish a lot over the course of a day but still have these breaks in between to just kind of mental take a break or physically rest so see short contained breath of work which short breaks in between and some people swear by it. A guy named paul clip. Who's the president of lunar logic. Says you might think a person could do sixteen of these cycles a day. I'm lucky to get more than two and a day without interruptions but in those fifty minutes. I get more done than i do in any other seven hours of my work day. At least in terms of advancing the most important aspects of my projects so again. That's another way to do it. And the fourth one that we're going to look at as the ninety minute focused sessions so this one is based on the whole concept that our bodies have what we call ultra radiant rhythms. And when i say. I'll trade ian it's l. u. l. t. r. a. d. i a. n. l. trillion rhythms and cycles where we're cycles between being really energized. In being tired and this happens many times throughout the day so the idea here is that you worked for ninety minutes rest for twenty work for ninety rest for twenty and the basis behind this this approach. It's thought is that you're taking advantage of when your body is energized and your mind is focused and it's an again what the research says it's the natural rhythms of your body. So most people try to work consistently all day and then typically and for those of you were those of you who work nine to five. Usually get that crash about two or two thirty. It's like you know it's just like all of a sudden you're just exhausted and you're just crashing so what you do you turn to either like energy drinks to try to push you through. Kobe makes me nervous when i drank it. Yes it does so working in these ninety minute bursts than just taking breaks in between again allows you to maximize your your production when your body and your mind are in the most positive state. That's the thing about that one. So these are the these are the four ways and they're they're many other ways but he's before i wanted to focus on as far as if you if you a schedule and if you put this into place you follow that schedule. Your stress level is going to be drastically reduced your stress levels going to be reduced. You're going to feel like you're accomplishing something. You're going to have less anxiety because you don't feel like you're constantly running in circles and not getting anything done in. It comes down to just organizing and making that schedule and following it and it really it. It's amazing because if you can do this you're taking the pressure off of yourself. You go from trying to put out fires everywhere to just following your schedule. You can just look at a piece of paper and say okay. This is what i'm doing now. i don't have to think about it. I just do it and then move onto the next thing and structuring it. That way i. I'd never say i'm always careful saying guarantee but but i do assure you that if you structure and schedule your time. You're going to be able to get things done more effectively and with less stress so our next episode. We're actually going to match. You're gonna take you through an actual hypnosis session online or during the podcast. Now i will say. I'll put the disclaimer now and then next episode. Don't listen to it while you're driving you're driving or if you need to be alert or be or if you're at work somewhere That probably isn't a good thing. Just love more. Lift driver demographic portland drivers. Don't don't listen while you're on a forklift or driving a vehicle or operating a train. You know anything like that. But we'll talk about that on next episode so next episode. We're going again. I'm gonna show you what a live had. No succession is like in. Walk you through it. In the meantime change your thinking. Change your life laugh. Hard run fast. Become i will see.

detroit jamie motorcity facebook bryan bryan jacqueline hyde Pat snus Susan cr kurowski Abram abram keedy michigan david david wright motor city jimmy Pat smith grand ledge five months forty five minutes
Jill Karofsky

Two Broads Talking Politics

20:28 min | 1 year ago

Jill Karofsky

"Hi this is teddy in. You're listening to Joe Cross key on to broad street in politics. Part of the DEM cast podcast network and Are you listening. Hey everybody this is so fi from two broads. Talking politics part of the Democratic family of podcasts and I am joined today by the second in Broad Jill Kurowski. She is running for the Supreme Court in Wisconsin in two thousand twenty. Welcome thank you. Thank you so much for having me on our our really excited to have you. So can we just start off sort of talking about you. Tell us a little bit about who you are and kind of your career to this point in what made made you want to run for the Supreme Court in Wisconsin. Sure I'm running for the Supreme Court on Wisconsin because we have got to get our court back on track. I've spent the past several months traveling all around the state and I hear the same thing from people that are really concerned by what they see on the Supreme Court. And what they she are judges justices who make decisions before anyone ever walks mystique Prima court chamber justices who do not follow the rule of law. Uh Justices who are more interested in protecting corporations than they are in protecting our air and water from corporate pollution and all of that feels like corruption to people. So I'm in this race. I'm offering my experience my values and my energy and bringing that to the rest. I'm going to bring that Wisconsin Supreme Court because these elections matter and they have huge consequences so as far as my experience. I'm the only person in this race. Who is or who has has ever been a trial court judge and tried to court judge and Being County right now? I heard over seventeen hundred cases last year. I'm in court every day. I see how the law impacts real people. I know how important it is to treat everybody in my courtroom with fairness and dignity and respect I know following the rule of law is of the utmost importance and when I'm looking at a document like the constitution I need to interpret it with today in mind because of twenty wanted twenty experience as a prosecutor I was a prosecutor for many many years again. Here indeed. Call me I know how I know how to be smart on crime. I I know the importance of protecting individual rights the rights of witnesses and defendants and victims and members of the public and. I've also been a victim advocate. I was was Wisconsin's first. Violence Against Women Resource Prosecutor. And I was the head of Wisconsin Office of crime victim services where I helped victims in every single county in Wisconsin constantly get the hulk on the services and the support that they needed as their kids was winding through the criminal justice system. So that that's the experience that I'm going to bring to this race and Brindamour court that's awesome. I WANNA follow up a little bit. you mentioned that you have been prosecutor in. I know that recently in the Democratic primary some people have maybe seen that as a negative thing for other candidates particularly Kamala Harris I was wondering if you could expound a little bit upon on what sort of the pet your past is a prosecutor helps you bring to the Supreme Court sure other prosecutor. I really focused on crimes were women and victims and people in need had been hurt by someone else. I specialized in cases of domestic abuse and Child Abuse Sexual Assault from child sexual assault and sold Those are the types of cases that I was involved in largely that specialized in. I'm I think that it gave me a perspective of making sure that everyone's voice was heard criminal justice system if you are a big crime. You're almost sometimes now. They czar forgotten. We don't their voice is not heard and what working on those cases taught me was how important every single person voice is and Komo justice system And then I was able to take the work that I did as an assistant. Da and and springboard. Off of that. When I went to the Wisconsin Department of Justice was of violence against Women Resource Prosecutor in the head of the officer? Crimes that conservancy. So I'm wondering if we can talk a little bit about some of the issues that maybe people are concerned about. You had mentioned people being concerned about judges who are coming into the Supreme Court with their minds already made up up sort of. How do you approach a case to try and avoid siding on something particularly when it's like a high profile case before it gets to you sure and you know I am the only person this race who has trump line you digital experience? Because I've been a both a prosecutor her because I am a trial court judge right now so every single day what I do is look at the facts of the case I looked at the law And I do my best to apply the law of the facts of the case fairly on partially without fear or favor and I do it over and over over and over and I often rule against what my own political or personal views are. And I'm the only one in this race was able to offer example of one and I have one I do. I do it sometimes many times in a week but that that experience is so important for someone who's been ultimately let me be in our Wisconsin Supreme Court because I can see how the law impacts people look. It's not the laws some esoteric exercise if you are a crime victim victim and it's not an esoteric exercise if you're in a divorce and someone telling you how your property is going to be giving alker where your kids are GonNa Sleep tonight and it's not an esoteric exercise if you are a landlord or and or a ten and you're involved in an action and I see then I feel and I hear how the Law impacts real people and that's the experience that they have on our Supreme Court. I'm wondering if he could talk a little bit about an issue that it has been really important to a lot of the voters than I know which is Voter registration there's a big Judicial fight happening in Wisconsin right now over Whether or not we should purge some voters from the voter rolls why do you think about that case. And what do you think the right outcome is. I want to be careful all of this case in particular because the way that it's going now I'm elected to the Wisconsin Supreme Court. There's a chance that they might be one of the justices who will decide on that case. So I don't WanNa talk about. How would rule or what I think should happen? I will say this that. I think that the right to vote is the cornerstone one of our democracy and I believe that anyone and everyone is eligible to vote should be able to both. I definitely agree one thing. We often talk to candidates about is what it's like particularly candidates who have children what it's like running for office sort of in in the real world They knew you have two kids You have a daughter in college in the Senate High School and you are running for office As as a mother as sort of community members to could you just talk a little bit about what the experience of running has been like for you and for your family. Yeah absolutely absolutely I mean. I talked to my kids about this all the time and I tell them that they are are true warriors and if you think about who gives up the most one apparent runs for office. It's their kids and my kids have been great. They are incredibly supportive. They understand why this is such an important election and they Are just with me one hundred percent. I'm very very lucky. And what I say to them is is that I'm doing this for you. And because of you and I could not do it with our kids see. What's going on when I talked to my kids about running for the Supreme Court? I said to them what are you. What are your concerns and my kids are concerned about guns on them? They don't want to go to school anymore. For Code Red Drill they want to go to school to learn like kids Nihal all public schools wonderful wonderful concerns and my kids want to go to school tomorrow and they're they're concerned about the climate crisis they understand Dan with the status of our planet is right now they understand science they understand that we're in a predicament and we need to figure our way out of it they also can see corruption. I'm a state in the federal level. And they're looking to the grownups in the room to solve these problems. And it's the least we can do for all of our kids purpose to try to solve these problems. I'm we'll see I'm other. It's it's busy new. My days are busy I am I am in court. I had two hundred ninety four cases. I think calendar this week. I am duty judge Dane County next week which means I'll have a very busy week and I'll be available. Twenty four seven to the police officers and being county if if they need a warrant like campaign after work and campaign on the weekends and it's. It's a very very busy busy schedule. I wouldn't didn't do it if it weren't worth it. If I didn't think it was hugely hugely important and there are many many times when a little tired and I will go somewhere where where I will talk to somebody or I will read something and I am just invigorated and energize. Because people around the state understand why this race is so important and we're on our campaign we are gaining more and more supporters every single. And that's just that really. Is there really early booze. Louise me when I'm feeling tired. So Wisconsin is a pretty big state. I've driven up to the apostle islands and it's bigger than people think And there's a lot of different types of places in Wisconsin A lot of very rural areas a lot of very urban areas like where I live in Madison an and Milwaukee and Green Bay Claire and so. I'm wondering if you can talk a little bit about having to travel around the state sort sort of. What is your impression of the voters across the state? Sure so I was. I was born and raised in Wisconsin. That I grew up in south central Wisconsin. My mom was mayor the city. Yeah I grew up in when I was growing up until I watched her. Medical Service is super cool She brought emergency medical service and she brought buses into town and the first time I walk into a courtroom. I was only plan and I went in there to change my middle name so I could be named after her and my dad was a local pediatrician when he retired. The first thing he did was he opened up a free clinic so he had access the medical care because he knew if he did not open up clinic. They're going to be some teenagers. Who wouldn't have access has to medical care any other way so my my parents always taught me the importance of public service and taking care of people in my community and being born was born and raised in Wisconsin? I traveled all around the state and the time I was I was really little. Heaven for me is being anywhere. Outside in the state of Wisconsin. I love traveling Ramstad. I always have. I worked at the Department of Justice for many years and I was traveling around the seat every single week and I love with the state has to offer. It is beautiful from from the forest up. North to the lakes The Mississippi River to the Wisconsin River to the farmland Down where you and I live and the urban areas to. It's just a really really pretty state and I always get excited. When I get up I got to drive? Drive all the way up to ask men in October when the weeds were changing and I have seen some of the prettiest sunset. I drove one night Over who AU clair. Just as the sun was setting and it was just the most gorgeous sunset I've ever soon Lebanon taking videos and pictures as I've been campaigning to remember. There's some of the beauty of this team. So and people are are great everywhere I go. They said they're energized about our campaign. They understand why it's important they. They want their voices to be heard. They don't want corruption in the court system and they're energized to do something about it on February eighteenth and on April seventh. Follow up question and this is a special question. I only ever ask people who are running for office in Wisconsin or working in Wisconsin. I'm obsessed with Wisconsin and I think it's it's amazing. What is your favorite part about living in Wisconsin? My favorite part about living was from Wisconsin. The people they're the nicest Kinda people and I am struck by everywhere I go people. Who are you know? Pay My gas and someone's checking me out and ask me on my or I'm walk into a room of people I don't know anybody and people are very very. I've been making phone calls all throughout the state many many times a week and people are just nice on their kind of big hugs. Were good people. I agree but I would 'cause mid mid West Nice I think what they call it. Yes it is so go to another state or another part of the the country. You're you're really. My brother lives in Denver and he came here for Thanksgiving a couple of years ago. We got up one morning and he went for a run just around around my house and he came home and I said how you're wrong so there was exhausting and putting me in what was so exhausting and he said every person I saw said hello to me. You're good morning it was really lossing. That doesn't happen where I come from. It's true that's so funny because my husband and I moved here almost six years ago from Ashikaga and we had lived in New York City prior to that and when we moved here like for the first month every time somebody would say. Hi How you doing. Hi How's it going. We we would just look at each other and go. What is wrong with these people? Were right in our city Abu running and I'll say hi to everyone and no-one taught me and I think what's wrong what did I do but it's very very funny but it's it's true. People people are very very nice in time so your primary is coming up. Pretty quickly. The primary in Wisconsin is going to be on February W.H. Eighteenth what is your focus moving into this last month and and sort of. What can people do to help you right now? Right before the election the primaries February eighteenth and we like I said we have some great momentum in this campaign we have had two hundred individual. Donations embraced over three hundred. Fifty thousand dollars. We are running a strong statewide professional campaign. We have endorsements from justice. It's Rebecca Dalit. Wisconsin last three democratic governors over two dozen. Legislators we have bipartisan support from judges and from easy as and from sheriffs and we have support from local officials from every corner of Wisconsin. We feel really good about the primary but we need people able to get to the poll. We also need people to get on board on our campaign gree- have a website. It's chill for justice DOT COM. We you have a facebook page. We have twitter page. We have an instagram page as well so if people are willing to get on if they would get on any of those social media platforms and share those and get their friends to share those if they would talk to their friends about the importance of this race talk to their neighbors about the importance of this race yet. People the Paul get people to vote till is there anything else you WanNa make sure that we talk about you know. I talked about a little bit about the experience that I have. I talked about my values growing up in In Middleton Wisconsin. My mom was mayor. I just love people to know that my kids tonight both went all went to public schools. We've had wonderful wonderful teachers. I've talked to my kids about the importance of women's rights and worker's rights and civil rights and human rights. You mentioned my kids are concerned about gun violence and the climate crisis and corruption. And we need to do something about those things so in addition to experience but I talked about an those values. The other thing I'm bringing this race is as Mel Energy. I was a state high school tennis champion. I was a division one athlete in track that can cost country finished the ironman triathlon. Two Times and now can run fifty mile ultramarathons. I have never been out worked outhustled and there is no way in this race. I I'm going to be at work or out hustle. We really need people to get on board now. We cannot accord ten more years of Dan. Kelly on the Wisconsin Supreme Court he was the last Guy Spout Walker appointed and he was appointed even though he had year-old additional experience but not Walker are put him on the court to carry the water of corporations of the wealthy and the right wing special interest and Dan. Kelly has done that. He has not spilled a drop of their water and having Dan Kelly on the court until twenty thirty. We'll be very very bad for Wisconsin. So the primary EST February eighteen please get on board general election as April seventh. That's the general election in the State Supreme Court race. It's also Wisconsin Presidential Primary Mary so we should have high voter turnout but we need to make sure people vote all the way down the balanced that didn't happen twenty sixteen and we paid. We paid for that so we need to make sure that people all the way down the ballot in twenty twenty. I just want to let people know that the next time that we're going to have a chance to elect the Supreme Court Justice and Wisconsin is twenty twenty three so this is our chance to make a difference on our Supreme Court and I cannot emphasize enough how important importance races. This court is going to hear cases about GERRYMANDERING BECAUSE WE'RE GONNA redraw legislative lines after we also let our senses April. This court will likely hear cases Acacia about women's access to health care which court is very likely to hear cases about how we're GONNA keep our air in our water clean what's Wisconsin's response GonNa be you to criminal justice reform to gun violence. What's what is democracy on the state going to look like all of those issues are going to land at the doorstep of our Supreme Court who we have on our court matters? These elections have consequences. Please vote Joe for Justice February eighteen and again on April seven. Well thank you so much for joining me Gel. I'm excited to vote for Rebecca Daulat. And she won a now. I'm excited the vote for you and I'm excited really excited to see you. Bring back the rule of law to the Wisconsin Supreme Court. So thank you so much for running And thank you so much for talking to me and listeners should be going to your website and if you live in Wisconsin police consider volunteering and helping Jill's campaign out. So thank you thank you so much. Thank you for listening to two bras talking politics. Part of the dim cast podcast network. Our theme mm song is called. Are you listening of the album elephant shaped trees by the band. M You Nuri and we're using it with permission of the band. Our logo and other original art work is by Matthew Wetland and was created for use by this podcast. You can contact us at two broads talking politics at g mail DOT COM or on twitter or facebook. Look at two broads talk. You can find all of our episodes at two broads talking politics dot com or anywhere podcast or found.

Wisconsin Wisconsin Supreme Court Supreme Court Supreme Court Prima court chamber prosecutor State Supreme Court Wisconsin Department of Justic Wisconsin Office of crime Joe Cross Jill Kurowski Dan Kelly Wisconsin Presidential Primary twitter Middleton Wisconsin facebook Wisconsin River Dane County Kamala Harris Department of Justice
Wicked Detroit

PodcastDetroit.com

30:29 min | 4 months ago

Wicked Detroit

"You're listening to the podcast detroit visit. Www dot com tested dot com before information. Hello and welcome again to hamtramck now and then. The podcast of the hamtramck historical museum done in cooperation with podcast. Detroit i'm greg kurowski. Executive director of the hamtramck historical museum. And here with me. Or i am with. Joe is joel kosher. To who is the chairman of the board of directors of the friends of historical hamtramck which owns and operates the museum. Joe hello. how's it going. Everyone good We have a special guest today. mickey lyons who is a Hamtramck resident and a member of the board of the friends of historical hamtramck and also an author and has got a really cool book out of one of the. This is one of the history press. Books sodas a sister company of arcadia publishing and it's called wiki detroit and it is wicked. Indeed it's a really cool stories so let's start a little bit by. Tell us a little bit about wicked detroit. sure so. The book is essentially a series of mini biographies of some of detroit's most notable if not detroit's best historical characters so there are ten chapters. Each chapter covers one person who is well known to some in the history of detroit but not necessarily widely loved. I'd say a lot of people know the folks that you have in your like joe's of compo they know the name and and cadillac has They know the name but they really don't know who these people are. They really don't have an understanding of them and they may not want to. It's so colorful absolutely. You know they say. Don't meet your heroes for share. Yeah these the fellas and they are all men Interestingly enough there's a fellow named tobin buke. I think pronounced its name right. Who wrote wicked women of detroit and so the books came out round about the same time so we ended up doing a lot of cross promoting together and everyone just always assumed that i the woman was tobin who wrote wicked women took. The man was mickey wrote wicked detroit opposite so yeah i mean these these figures these. These heroic story names that we hear cadillac. Compo woodward are not exactly the way that we would necessarily like to picture them. I think of this group here. Who is your favorite. Who did you find him. The favorite in the sense of who did you find most interesting Well i definitely had some favorites. I would say the pub owners in the brothel keepers. Were my favorites zone. Patti mcgrath a bit about as well as billy bush. Aw who is known as the foisted foist because he lived and ran a tavern and brothel down in the first ward and he was very heavily involved in politics and essentially called all the shots. Now this was the early part of the twentieth century. right late. Nineteenth early twentieth. Century for billy bichon Usually only one in a book that i have not heard of before. Yes all them to be fascinating. I came across him because first of all. He's in john. C lodges autobiography. They swam in the detroit river in the same swimming. Hold together as kids and also because of a common misconception in in reporting through the twentieth century in detroit was that billy bouchon ran the bucket of blood tavern when in fact billy bichons tavern was at Bogan and atwater and there's a photo of it that was that was labeled at the time of billy bush ause in clearly labeled at bat Atwater whereas a friend and political ally of his Named jim nettles actually ran the bucket of blood. Saloon that was in black bottom. So jim nevels ran. Essentially the the ward. Just up the road from billy bichons and he ran all the black janitors and the city of detroit and he told them who to vote for. So between billy bush lodge nevels they pretty much strong-armed. Everyone within several mile radius into voting. How they told them to. You know that's that's sort of the interesting thing about about the saloons and the bars of that time was it. Seemed like you know. I think i don't think it's much like it anymore. But it's like they were just big hubs for for politics and you know and getting votes and you know like you're in the book mentions that People would be on ships or they'd be away then they come back and say they're living at a tavern or saloon and they would vote in that that that would be where they're where their address would be would be to salute so it was really interesting. It's something i never really had thought about. Yeah there were a lot of people living in theory at Billy bichons and petty mcgraw's taverns so they'd have somewhere to vote but it worked both ways so if you came back and back in the nineteenth and early twentieth century the saloons were really the center of of public and domestic and private life in that you. If you were in on a ship a merchant ship or even in the navy and the coast guard you would have a room whenever you wanted it at billy bush ause and when you got off off ship off duty you would cast your check their. You would keep your belongings there. He would keep an eye out on your stuff he keep. Keep your dog for you while you were gone so it it definitely went both ways you know and he did all this for them with the understanding that they would vote how he told them to and they sure did. I'm always interested too in the story of joseph campbell. She is such an incredibly interesting character. And i noticed you have a photo of even of as great over at elmwood cemetery. Yeah i was. I was always fascinated by the story. Because i grew up catholic as many hamtramck residents ten and the fact that he was excommunicated and died excommunicate where all of the rest of the compo clan in mt elliott in the catholic cemetery. He was the only one of quite a few people. That was excommunicated by father. Gabriel rashard in part for desecrating graves. And also because he was a freemason and compo one rashard sort of battled till the end of their days against each other although chiampou outlived or chard by a good for thirty forty years. Yeah so You know you can go and visit his grave which is actually a very modest surprisingly so it is. I think i think someone told me that. He when he died he was the richest man in michigan. Yeah and it's a simple stone. Slab freemason symbol is still there cool. Now let's talk about our favorite on greg. I have to say. I came across the story of patty mcgraw here in the museum because we have had any mcgraw's violin right to his old old news boys so i don't know maybe you should give us a primer. I heard the story from you first. Patty was active in hamtramck and nineteen twenties. Through the prohibition era on he was very beloved citizen and hamtramck at time he helped establish the how traffic goodfellas which provided gifts for poor kids at christmas. Which good fellows still do to this day. And he took in straight animals he sponsored sports teams. He was everybody's friend and he ran the biggest whorehouse in the whole area. But that didn't stop him. From being a very upstanding citizen that people really liked and He did operate his place. Deal his place over which was on the railroad tracks Around klay avenue. Which is the the building gone. It was torn down to make way unfortunately for dipoto implanted gmt. But i got to see it just before it was demolished. I wish i had that that time. I wish i could gone in there and really seen it. Because i heard there were still a piano in there. I would love to have gone into what he was legendary. Because his the place on the railroad tracks and the guys would come from toledo and port huron arrived by train and he added said out. Set up in sight like a An assembly line. You went off to the right. You enter the bar. You went off to the left. You went up the stairs great so you tell us about his end though. Okay so well. Part of the interesting thing about patty. Is this sort of dichotomy of good guy bad guy. He was nominated for carnegie medal of something or other philanthrophy because he was an avid fisherman in an avid boater. Especially on the st clair flats out by carson's island and he kept fishing people out of the river and saving them from drowning. As far as i can tell these we've got at least eleven documented cases with names and ages of people falling out of boats. Apparently it's a little treacherous over there. People falling out of boats and patio and grotto diving in them out dusting offsetting mouth. There was three in one year so he had a place out on horsens island and he was with at his at the time. His believe his second. Common-law life Drinking with somebody's his first common law wife. It had not ended well on. He ended up being sued by her family because they thought he poisoned her exonerated for that but he was drinking with some friends and there was an argument and patty. Mccraw was standing up. I believe to change a light bulb which you do when you're drunk. In the middle of cheers i recall standing on its share and his buddy just walked over him to him and whacked him with another chair and he just died a bunch of legal cases because the guy murder him did he. Not what was this turned out. He had a weakened heart probably caused by considerable alcohol consumption so so his friend was cleared. But it's just such a perfect end for patti mcgrath is was it a five. Did he die. Was he killed dozen. That doesn't matter out the way he would have wanted to. I think it's kind of one of his life in general be you know what it was. You know his death being a mystery but he also from from the book. I read that A woman that he lived with. I don't if it was his wife but he was also a. I don't know if he was under investigation for killing her but she died somehow and people like her family actually thought that he killed her. Yeah so this was many his common law wife was. I think technically married to someone else this whole time but it was okay. Because he was too. She died very suddenly and the entirety of her estate which was pretty substantial. Went to him and he bought himself a new house. I think out in. Boston edison And minnie's sister and her husband were absolutely convinced that patty had poisoned her And that he had also somehow beaten her to death so we weren't sure exactly which one of them was but they were convinced that he had killed her and they even had her body zoomed But all the charges were dropped or made to go away some way or the other. Yeah i think it's interesting. He operated his place. All through prohibition and did just fine but when prohibition ended he'll close it up relatively quickly saying there was just too much competition. Yeah yeah nope no place for the old country for old men. I guess but but i like to drive by and you can go to that spot. One of the things. I like to do is make touch. History actually go to the actual place and right next door to that is the just discovered the the old sugarhouse which undoubtedly supplied material for his bootlegging operations for sure it's so conveniently located on the railroad tracks a ton of smuggling by rail and people don't talk about really they like to think of the romance of of bringing it across the river and boats or across the ice in cars but really it was a lot more practical to do it in bulk by rail. What are the things. I really liked to book in which you pointed out there too is that this is not a mean book. This is a book that kind of these really funny stories but some of them are kind of funny. They'll have these corky sites to them and that's reflected all through the book. They're strange karen. That's a lot of that. Yeah i tried to find something good in all of them and managed to with nine sadness out. What what what kinda stood out to me was. It seemed a lot of A lot of those guys especially in the early days it seemed like they just they just gathered land even if they didn't own it. It was like okay. Well that's my now especially cadillac reading about him. Which i didn't didn't know much about him except for a little bit but when i read that i was just like. Wow it's fried. Yeah it's kind of mind blowing actually corruption not new conduct from our founding fathers indeed. Yeah yeah i mean he sold this idea of detroit now that we look at it utterly unbelievable he tells these stories back in france about how you know detroit the land of the rivers and the straits is is just this paradise. Where you can grow the best kind of bordeaux wines and and you have these beautiful amazing magical citrus orchards that sprout up from nothing miss and they produce fruits that will cure the ra- the bite of a rattlesnake. You all of these crazy wild things that he says can be found here in detroit and and oh and something else about you know. It never ever snows way. He was around today. He'd go very far. he'd be selling. Yeah selling cadillacs. So is this your first book are you have you done. It is my first book. I have been working on another ma book for longer This is so this is only about one hundred and two. I don't know because twenty five pages and that the book that i've been working on for longer that is still in progress is an academic Valenki study on the history of prohibition in detroit. That's that's a fascinating topic. It is a tough one research. Everybody's grandfather's cousins roommate's brother ran booze for the purple gang. The purple gig obviously had about two million members. Yes yes did nothing but hang out at every bar and basement in detroit. Yes this is true. I've heard that they were everywhere but The but it's a fascinating topic because detroit was so key. In prohibition yeah being located in canada and and hamtramck of course played a big part of that as well to the hammock. Stuff is just fascinating to me. You know. hamtramck prohibition history has is. I'm you know greg several books. It's pretty a pretty interesting truly. So so how did you get interested in history Before we been open today tell us a little bit about yourself. I i'm a writer. Based in detroit. I live in hamtramck and have for about six years now as far as getting into history. It's kind of an interesting thing. I went did my undergrad at st in english literature And i was gonna write about nine. Shakespeare and renaissance drama in ireland. Then i went to boston college and did a master's study or masters in irish studies there and then did phd work Have not finished. The dissertation in nineteenth century british women's literature and aesthetic theory and got a fellowship to a library at university for the fall of two thousand thirteen. Which meant i couldn't teach that semester which meant i lost my funding so was like what i'll move back to detroit and you know figure it out from there. I'm sure i can finish the dissertation from there Got a job within a week of coming back at the detroit. Bus company knows their new tour director. Who so directed the tours at the detroit bus company and i always been in love with detroit history and always wanted to come back. Just didn't know exactly how and this was a really great way in. It gave me sort of a crash. Course because i'm researching and learning and guiding all these tours right off the bat and that led to the prohibition history Because it started. Just as i had to research enough to do a tour and i found you know. No one's really writing that much about it a few years later i understand why because it's impossible. Prove anything yeah. Yeah that's the hard part. Shirley really is. Yeah because if you were if you were a really successful speakeasy owner. There is no record right because you didn't get caught and often. I know what i research. I find conflicting information and some of it will be completely opposite of what the person said right right trying to sort that out and it can be really really difficult. Yeah yeah but it's detective work in. It's a lot of fun to be to and you get to find some some fun. Cool interesting facts that others don't and you can maybe change people's opinions. One of the chapters in the book is about william cotter mayberry who has a terrible terrible represent reputation in part because his immediate predecessor was great hazen. Pingree it's really hard to come up after hazen pingree but also because there was a detroit i believe he was a detroit news editor and he was sort of the mickey rooney of his time. Talking about how you back in the old days things were so wonderful but he had this sort of very facetious snarky writing tom. And because he wrote so much about detroit in the eighteen. Eighty eight thousand nine hundred. Nineteen hundreds people after eh. Who wrote in the forties read his work as if it were simply straight fat. Because they said well he wrote for the detroit news but he was a columnist and he was giving his own sort of you know sepia tinted memories and also his own very very specific slant and his own you know idea of what was proper and who he liked and he didn't like mayberry and so everybody who talks about mayberry now is for the most part using as account of may vary. He's maybe not such a credible source. Yeah sure yeah. We encounter though ten stuff going through all of this researching the various things so so so. What's next on your list. The is this a what will of library a little bit on the air. On your prohibition book yeah so the prohibition is is like i said it's a full length academic study. So it's it's going to take some time. And i do work full time to you. Know it's grabbing in fits and snatches. I can once that is finally out or while that is happening. I do also have a blog. Called at prohibition detroit dot com for awhile there because i study so much Detroit bar history For a while there. I did a challenge where i was trying to tend bar at every one of detroit's former speakeasies that we can prove and this came about in part because i was freelancing as a writer for a while and also bartending and ended up just picking up shifts here and there at different bars. So i've got i think almost a dozen of men and only just like a couple ago really. There's still that many left though. I yeah in in detroit proper again and and you know it's like when people say what's the oldest bar in detroit's like well you know nothing's been continuously operating since nineteen thirty three before nineteen thirty three so Bars that are in the same building that they started in Continuously operating at least since during prohibition in some way or another we can prove that they were a speakeasy I think there's about ten or eleven of them and you know that that includes the. Dac really doesn't alcohol. during prohibition. i'm not so sure about this. This is a good thing members legally could if they had michigan has all these weird loopholes but club members had purchased the alcohol before prohibition started so of course they filled their basements and had the stock. Well they could do that. Yeah right yeah. I think it's at the corner of van dyke and jefferson. That was yeah was famous one at one point. Yes and i trusted gosh. Not this last december but the one before i guess segment with wd iv on that it was the I'm drawing a complete and total blank on it. It was a famous speakeasy. It was one of the best most well known. And i am completely blanking out on the actual name of it. It was run by a couple of brothers that were famed across new york and florida and metro detroit. One of them later went on to found blossom heat in saint clair shores But yeah and and it was very swanky so it was very much. Like most people think of speakeasy high class palm trees. Piano music cooper full of champagne from windsor secret hiding places. You know secret things that you press in the door to let to be lead into secret rooms. Yeah great place. So are you still doing these tours. Sprint with the pandemic now we heads I was doing them once a month with the detroit. Bus companies still But and we actually did. The tour stops at the intersection of planes alvin to discuss patty but they are definitely on. Hold right now So hopefully once we get through all this. You'll be able to resume that. Because i want to go. That's fine. you know a lot. A lot of towns are able to do walking tours of history and because detroit is so spread out. It's got to have a car or bus. So yeah but is got an amazing history to can compare what him traveling the whole world in two square miles part of it. Thanks so that's good so looking ahead of the ideas of future works you out of this. Yeah well future books couple in mind. irish history in detroit. Because i got to put that degree to work somehow or other outlets interesting topic And there's there's some really interesting stuff that i don't think we fully exploria but right now. Currently at my other current side project is detroit drinks history which is a website and cast that explores detroit's history as seen through sort of the the drinking establishments and the characters as well as drinking law. So it's topic x. In detroit history as seen in relation to alcohol so some blue and and baseball games and the linda. la c. and baseball games who beckoned this is included traffic. Or is it. Just strictly detroit. I'll do hamtramck and highland park fisher as we. You know so many things that were involved in this too. Of course prohibition was so in a huge issue here kodaly nordby ninety nine percents of the people who and with two mayors who went to prison and we're entity heroes didn't we even had there were officials that were coming from from detroit to actually party. You know if you wanna call it that party in traffic during prohibition so that goes to tell you traffic was was like the wild west. Yes it was called the wild west of them. In west people journalist back then a of cross history with that. But it's a fascinating topic and you've got a really good handle on that too. Thank you could be looking forward to that to me too. It's been it's been fun to research and develop great so Joe any comment. Yeah i actually. What's what pulls you into to researching the guys that you that you wrote about in wicked detroit. Oh man that's a good question You know some of them. I had known from the start. I don't think you can write a book about wicked people in detroit without the founding father cadillac of wickedness. The others were. Just you know. I've always had a soft spot for the bar. Owners of the brothel keepers. So that's where patty and billy made in there. We all do right right. Living in hamtramck s. I do their to compos in their joseph campo and daniel compo his grandson the others just sort of filled it out. You know you can't talk about woodward and if you're talking about what word you have to talk about william hull who's the general who lost detroit in the war of eighteen twelve so organically sort of all kind of flew flew together like that in now. You mentioned daniel combo. He was he was actually a really interesting to read about two. Because i really didn't know much about him at all and it was he actually ran. What was it the hamtramck race track which that was down on was that been van dyke in jefferson area a towards that way yeah deficit marlboro. So down in jefferson chalmers. Okay yeah and you can still see if you're in jefferson chalmers. The entrance to marlborough street is a boulevard because that used to be the entrance to the racetrack. We're gonna i love seeing all those ghost signs of old architecture still around joy and occasionally. We'll go hunting for a hamtramck count ship remnants. It's pretty awesome. Yeah that's cool. I'll get up to come with us. I mean we've said in previous podcasts. Are so many things out there so many buildings just little little things that most people nowadays you know they wouldn't even think about you know there are all the missiles sites from from the cold war era. I mean obviously they don't have missiles or anything now but you know just going there and being like okay. There was a missile right here. Just in case something happened with with the soviet union. Then it was. It's really interesting to to see stuff like that and just go around and you know as as we drove around. We've we've see old buildings and you could tell that their banks just by the way that they're set up and you drive around detroit you'll see probably thirty one thing that we kinda focus onto is that you got. Look yes. Take a look. You'll find all kinds of little treasures. I think we're going to wrap this up as we get to the end of our half hour here so Thank you first of all for coming today. And your book is available here at the museum. And at barnes and noble and i think he's a costco and every place else kellyanne arts center next to the museum and so check it out folks. It's really a good read and thank you for tuning game in. And don't forget to visit the museum or at nine hundred to five. Joseph koppel and the heart of traffic and you can learn moral bother us on our face on facebook and our website which is hamtramck history argon. You can follow us. Facebook and who is with the podcast which is continuing on this episode. Seven as a matter of fact and we wanna thank podcast detroit for making this possible to. We really couldn't do this without them. We really really appreciate all the done. So we're going to wrap up this edition. We will be back again with another one new one next week.

detroit hamtramck billy bush hamtramck historical museum billy bichons patti mcgrath patty greg kurowski joel kosher board of directors of the frie Joe hello mickey lyons board of the friends of histor tobin buke Compo woodward billy bichon billy bouchon bat Atwater jim nettles jim nevels
Braiden McKee and Shawna Kurowski of Arizona, Mother/Daughter Duo talk about being Present Moms.

Hey Moms in Business

21:15 min | 6 months ago

Braiden McKee and Shawna Kurowski of Arizona, Mother/Daughter Duo talk about being Present Moms.

"Hey everyone welcome to moms in real estate. This this week's guests are brandon mcgee and shana koralski and they are errors on. Anita's yeah we're going to hear today. How britain almost got out of the business. But shauna wouldn't let her. That's right so i can't wait for you guys to get to know. These faith filled women. So let's get started. Andrew paseo industry forty thousand dollars in predominant. In one of the conflict between leaders hoping their businesses they are passionate about educating encouraging. Our next episode starts now. Hey hey hey sean. How are you guys. Great how're you doing good. I'm really excited to talk with you guys. So give us a little introduction about yourself and my mom shot at and we are a mother. Daughter will update here in the northwest valley. And we got about the same highway and got together by. Actually go and You wrote the at the same time. I started and then On a year and a half after we decided she joined or fit and work. Why did you decide to join forces. Well was kind of like the driving factor behind that so when ronnie great situation and honestly the people that was running without that brokerage ardent Gonna make it and then nothing has my personality and trying to like an all ages. Like a buyer's agent or like all these different things just weren't and but apparently nothing was working important for her there. Yeah i just feel like. I just didn't feel like they believe in the like no. I wanna were people that i like and i trust and my mom has never been. How go like okay to actually doing that so i think we need to work together. I love your mom. Kept on my mom. no no. we've met a couple mother daughter duo but not a ton of them. So that's really cool that you guys can do that. And i think it's so awesome when someone tells you you can't do something then you're basically like whatever i'm going to do it anyways and like don't listen to them because it's hard if someone tells you you can't do that you know it's a dagger and we get that story several times on this show where people who are amazing real estate agents. We're told you're never gonna make it. Yeah and not like being one can be like look at me now. So is that the story. When is that the time. When i quit now. That was a couple years in have been so we went to school together. And i had the she started real estate. And then i realized that you know my business. I don't do my business every single day. I don't get paid and it would be me the freedom that i wanted and when she came to me i was like yeah. Let's do it. Let's let's try to do that. So we bird play along a couple years and you know we were really making that we wanted and you know. She was frustrated because she had any other family and You know are an interesting because our our places in life or so different. I have grandkids. Now she's my oldest and jefferson mine are and you know she went seeing. The result may tolerate the love. And so we have to build a. And it's gonna. It's gonna come issue than i can't do anymore. She came to my husband. Is she like i you know. I think i'm going to quit and were like no. You're not you know you'll have to push through because we had so much time and energy at this point and i was like you know you're doing this and you're building and you can't the results you always think. Oh it's going to be next month. It's going to be next month and then when it's not gonna be more like exactly like women's that when's it going to finally happen and i told her i said look everybody would do. And let's just keep should keep doing it and you know let's do another year and fewer were at and she had her best year ever. That's awesome. I love how you said. Let's give it another year. You didn't say let's just try one more month or one more week or whatever you know another year and that's their attitude you have to. You can't stop kristen. And i have literally seen thousands of agents come and go out of this industry and there are many were were like more like especially a member. What was her name that she she so she so successful now but it took her months and months. We're like girl don't quit. You're doing all the right things. Sonia oh yeah manda. We're like don't quit. You're doing all the right things. Don't quit don't quit. It's going to happen and she just felt like giving up and you've got to have those people around you say you're either you're you're being a weenie. You need to do those things these things are. You're doing all the right things. Don't quit right when you a. You're so close right and so it's like ryanair like if you can just push through that usually you'll see the rewards but we have all felt that like. When is it going to hop like. I'm so sick doing these things and nothing happening. I mean that is that is definitely a hard feeling to push through earlier. So where did how do you. Guys keep each other accountable. What do you mean are you just. I mean like i don't know. Tell us how you dynamically work together to have we. I think we all had a really good relationship. I think that carried over into our business you know and being family you know what you back from each other you know and it's like we find out who these working we'll be like only. I just tried to this work. And you know we're talking every day though all the time about what's going on and you know we knew showing together we have you know. Say you in place that we don't ever go alone You know it's usually then she'll spend a lot of time together. We do have weekly meeting where you know. We get together the beginning of the week. Michael what are you working on. What did you have. Were you traveling. You know what. What do we want to focus on this week. And then what's your schedule. Look like yeah. Kristen has been one of my biggest encourages. All feel like what i'm doing is worthless or something or maybe i'll just have a day where i'm like i'm so ineffective chevy like nope and she'll pick me right back up now. Same y'all have those days. i think. Text you last week. I was like. I'm such a loser. And if i don't get to it right away she'll be like m. i. Liz now you can like hit the message. Someone doesn't respond in like exclamation hard question. So i like to. I don't stop people but when they don't respond all a whole that question mark like you do you see what so. I know that both of you are women of faith and when it comes to like that time when you feel like quitting the way that i think about it is the only reason why i'm feeling so bad right now is because i must be close to breaking through because the devil likes to whisper lies to you know so i always think that when i'm not always i try to remember when i'm super frustrated that i must be close because i'm so frustrated. I feel like crying absolutely. Yeah i would agree with that. I e because now that i that experience i mean almost a month after i had going to be done. I can't do this anymore. You know i have not only my business but in my life like mine and not you know With my family or whatever like. I'm not doing that on my master i saw people had been watching my social media. And like been my. Oh you know. Ridden in the real her. We do something we're going to like. I had no idea they never been anything until that way. And then it was like all the worst filming. And if i had quit i would've never known i would've been like oh you know what people You know early on. They were right now. I should have listened to them. Yeah they were and here. We are so you guys speen. Both natives is is most of your business from your sphere of influence or are you also getting it through social media. How does that go for you guys for both of us so you talk about your first because she also for me. Yeah like like. i'm on instagram. But if you agree upon something is going to be heard yet go. Media is a big portion fears. I probably win it. I feel like. I'm maybe want to help work on social. If that makes sense they. But powell working connected i mean i am a millennial snow that just wear mike. People are for the most part And we have You know we have art hiding that we've done and there's a big portion of it but we also do. We knew on my generation as well. Oh awesome yeah. That's good and you guys are gone. Yeah very challenging. Turn challenge everything about real. Estate is really challenging. It's it's i've been in the business now for twenty years and i was actually talking to somebody the other day. I can't believe i'm in the business for twenty years. I didn't think i would do anything for twenty years but this business is so fantastic. 'cause you can reinvent yourself through time and you're different seasons of life and who you're working with. It's an awesome industry. I agree. I really really great things for so many different. I was just having a conversation with another mom. That's going to be on the podcast. And i was like i love. How can meet you at different seasons in your life. We talk about it all the time. But and i love it. It doesn't have to look the same for you as it does for me as it does for her like. It's different for everybody so it's so cool. That's right so frustrated. When i hear stories like yours brayden where you you go somewhere. And they decide in a week that according to your personality you're not gonna make it now. It would be different if you were like refusing to do anything but this this industry literally you could have any type of personality except well. No you can. You can also have an asshole personality. Lots of them. Yeah right yes there are. And i wanna hear about your policy in a minute but don't ecology because everyone needs to hear this wise words spies words but you know every single personality will do well if they tap into what god given talents they have right. I just can't stand it when somebody says oh you know what your personality is not right. You're never gonna make. That's so stupid. Yeah all right. let's let's client. Policies weavers started so. I have a very strong personality and bring much more reserved for rated sometimes like my mom back but you know it is who i am so i just told her i said look. I said you know we're gonna have no apple policy and if somebody threw out to be at whole we're done because you know if you think about it. We weren't working with people. They're taking time away from our families and you know other things that we want to be doing according to help our clients but if they're going to be an asshole you go out hall agent that they didn't happen and you know what we just decided. We're not headed you. That we're not gonna sell the situation where we're like. Oh my gosh. I can't wait your transaction to close and be done with this person because no way going to be happy situation the highest. It'd be happy we're not gonna be happy and then every time you look back on it is is going to bring up the emotion and they experience all the way around. It's not what we want to have. There's not so well in the beautiful thing is like you can still get paid off that asshole when you referred to another asshole. The book in the making free. Yeah i can remember. I think it's a really hard lesson to learn. Especially when you're new and you're really trying to make ends meet because chuck and i made that mistake for sure. Not only did we work with them but sometimes like years later when they would come back to us and say hey. Can you sell our house. We would look each other and be like he wasn't that bad he wasn't that bad. Oh yes he was because we decided to work with them again. It was hell. it was awful. Yeah well. I think that where my experience comes in because i dealt with them through my life and i can recognize it a lot sooner now you know and i just say this is not this is not worth it. It's not worth any amount of money. Yeah i agree so tell us what is definitely a lot of people that are in that same spot that you were you were are ready to give up and you decided to push through. Like what advice would you give to somebody. Who's definitely like. I don't think i can do relatively. I've been working nothing's happening. What would you tell them quick. Just don't quit. You have to let you probably can't see it. But i have all behind me. That it is literally tiled titled. Don't quit and you know that kind of been my mantra. Since i was young. You know I i wanted for my life. And i said this is going to have. I'm just going to keep pushing through data and you have to believe in yourself now. You know even nobody all you have to know that you can do it and if you keep working at you will get there and i think what are the biggest things with realty why. It's so hard is because like you said angela. Anybody can make it this and there's different ways to be successful and sometimes you have to week. It's not like success. You just do one thing and then my gosh you know you you over the door and then she passes right there you keep working and keep trying and figuring out what works for you and what works for me not worth for you right so would you have to keep going and believe in yourself and you'll get there. I think one of the biggest things that kristen and i have learned over the years is that one of the most important things about getting through those hard spots. Are the people that you surround yourself with. You've gotta find you've gotta find people who are resilient when you can't be resilient they're resilient for you and i think people just totally underestimate like when we my husband has all the time like when we have our kids we like. Be careful who your friends are. You know it's so important to choose your friends and we we do that and we get to adult and we forget that even one toxic person in your life can can make all the difference in the world. It's so i mean. I can even just when you're around somebody that you're like. I don't want to ask them how they're doing. Because it's going to be this. Yeah so yeah sure. I have family members like that too. Okay so i won't tell is braid in your favourite china liar. I have a favorite six kids. I have a favorite. And i declare it to people but not in front of all time. The is my favorite oldest daughter. There you go. You're like no the siblings. We'll be watching this. We're not doing that. My gosh my favorite. Because she gave me grandkids. Now there you go. Yeah are all of your kids married now. Great is the only one married and then she has. She's my oldest of. Here's my two boys neck. And i don't know if there's anything bylanes out there boys all of my boys. They're twenty five twenty one sixteen once ten. So who cares those talk. Your friends are they. I don't know what i know in night christian women. Yeah and i've been. I've been praying for my boy. Since i got saved when i was little like thirty. I was like thirty. And i was like i'm asking for their salvation lord and then christian spouses. Those have been big prayers for my kids. Were young it will be getting married. My youngest daughter is going to get married march fourteenth similar. What's okay so tell us tell you to a round things out a little bit. Tell us what your future looks like. What do you guys striving for how we would definitely want to potentially brother team. Were not very. Can that down the road you know growing team. Yeah you'd just having people physicians and they're not really works for them and they build the mac And i mean we would actually really like to potentially move out of arizona really. Yeah where am and. I would to go somewhere like navia little bit smaller young like a small community. Where would you go now. brought Stood at the east side visit. Is i love for everyone on hunting over there. Yeah i'm a native in. I left and i went to las vegas and then i went to huntington beach and i was like i'm going back home so that way but it is. It is nice out for me. I never understood why anybody lived in arizona entirely left and then all of us announced on. Maybe okay i lived in pennsylvania new jersey iowa illinois north carolina eight places in florida colorado and arizona by far is the best place i've ever lived. Wow don't go deep not going to happen anytime soon. Oh you got little kids right. Yeah so i want to thank you both for your encouraging words. Yes and next week you guys. We have a lauren who is also on the west side more and went and she is actually resenting really cool that i want to talk about with her. Next week is in two thousand and twenty. She said i'm going to build a team. And she went from her to twelve people in twenty twenty which is not allow. When you start to start to build a team that is one of the hardest. Things is defined agents to join your team in to get into that recruiting role. So she's going to share that with us and then also after about eight minutes. We're going to be on clubhouse so if you guys wanna head over to clubhouse we have shit show moms that. We're launching a show i. It's going to be judging show mom's the first time for sure so. Thank you guys again. And i really appreciate you coming on so much.

brandon mcgee shana koralski Andrew paseo northwest valley shauna manda Anita kristen ronnie ryanair sean Sonia britain jefferson Kristen brayden instagram Liz powell
NPR News: 04-14-2020 1AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 1 year ago

NPR News: 04-14-2020 1AM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Shay Stevens. Governors from Delaware to Rhode Island. Say they're working on a joint plan for reopening their economies Connecticut Governor Ned. Lamont says it'll be a measured coordinated. Effort have a face that we share establish the same protocols. We know how we're working together and get that information up to a down to Washington so they can coordinate as well. I mean we're going to be thinking about the mix of antigens and probably the low infection areas in terms of testing and probably the antibody testing those areas worth more prevalent so we can put together a system that allows our people to get back to work. Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolfe says. The Group of Eastern states are taking a page from a group of West Coast Governors who've decided to take matters into their own hands responsibility for closing the state down. I think we've probably have the primary responsibility for opening up. The president trump says the decision to restart. The economy is his to make trump plans to make an announcement Tuesday on members of a task force to do that. Npr's Joel Snyder reports on the pushback. That trump is getting from some of the nation's governors at the daily White House Corona virus briefing. The president insisted that he has the authority to decide when and how to get the economy going again when somebody's the president of the United States. The Authority is total trump. Said he would rather work with the state saying guidelines on opening the economy would be issued soon but he asserted the federal government has the absolute power. The president has repeatedly stated his desire to get the economy going again but mostly democratic governors on the East and West Coast banded together and separate regional agreements to coordinate any reopening and legal scholars say the President's Constitutional Authority is limited Joyal Snyder. Npr news less than one week. After dropping. Out of the Presidential Race Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders joined Budget Joe Biden livestream video to endorse the presumptive Democratic nominee more from NPR's Haas Mukalla Sandra's headlong said he would support whoever won the Democratic nomination. But this makes it official. We've gotta make trump a one term president and we need you in in the White House so I will do all that I can see. The Joe Biden told the Vermont. Senator that he'll need him not just to win the campaign but to govern. Sanders reminded Biden. That it's new secret. They differ on some issues but their campaigns had been talking for a number of weeks and now they're setting up joint task forces to deal with policy priorities where they can find common ground such as the economy education and Climate Change. Us my colleague. Npr News San Pre market trading. Us futures are higher following mixed trading on Wall Street Monday. The Dow Jones industrials lost three hundred. Twenty eight points Monday. The Nasdaq Composite Index gained thirty eight this is NPR news. The XFL seeking chapter eleven bankruptcy protection. The filing comes just days after three booted pro football league suspended operations and laid off nearly all of its employees as NPR's Tom Goldman reports. The XFL canceled its inaugural season last month because of the corona virus pandemic when the xfl canceled. Its schedule halfway. Through the season officials assured fans the league would be back but now after the chapter eleven filing the xfl has no current plans to return in two thousand twenty one after starting its first season with strong attendance numbers and TV Ratings. Both declined the XFL. I go around in two thousand one created by pro wrestling IMPRESARIO. Vince McMahon was heavy on gimmicks and light on good football. This year's version again backed by McMahon was supposed to be a football I enterprise but now fans won't have the chance to see if it had staying power as a second pro league football landscape dominated by the NFL. Tom Galvin NPR news. A liberal challenger has ousted a conservative Wisconsin Supreme Court justice endorsed by President Trump. She'll Kurowski is victory. Reduces the state's courts conservative majority to forty three that seen by some observers as an indicator of how some voters cast ballots in November Kurowski will be on the court when Republican controlled legislature in. Wisconsin takes up redistricting next year. The battle is expected to end up before the Wisconsin Supreme Court on Asian market shares arising. I'm Shay Stevens. Npr News in Washington.

President Trump West Coast Governors NPR president Npr XFL Joe Biden Washington Shay Stevens Npr Senator Bernie Sanders Wisconsin Supreme Court Npr Joyal Snyder football Governor Tom Wolfe Governor Ned Lamont Vince McMahon Connecticut
NPR News: 04-14-2020 7AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 1 year ago

NPR News: 04-14-2020 7AM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Korva Coleman. President trump continues to insist that only he has the power to decide when to reopen the nation's economy amid the pandemic trump says the White House will give the nations governors some guidance. We will soon finalize new and very important guidelines to give governors the information. They need to start safely states. Some legal scholars disagree on the president's power in several governors aren't waiting for trump's advice to groups of states have banded together to form alliances the eastern and western state packs will share scientific and economic information on when it's safe to reopen states for business the East Coast Group includes Massachusetts Connecticut Rhode Island New York New Jersey Pennsylvania and Delaware. The West Coast Group includes California Oregon and Washington for crew members from the aircraft carrier. Uss Theodore Roosevelt are said to be hospitalized in Guam. Npr's Joel Snyder reports. This came after the navy disclosed. A Roosevelt sailor died of covert nineteen the four or among more than five hundred eighty. Roosevelt crew members who have tested positive for cove in nineteen their report to be in stable condition the navy's handling of the outbreak onboard. The Roosevelt is being closely watched after a series of events that started with the letter that leaked to the media. The Roosevelt's captain had urged Navy leadership to take strong action to curb the outbreak. His firing led to the resignation of acting. Navy secretary Thomas Mode. Meanwhile the navy is keeping another carrier at sea the USS Harry. Truman is returning from the Middle East. But instead of docking at its home port of Norfolk Virginia the Navy says the Truman will remain in the western Atlantic to protect the crew from the krona virus. Trial Snyder NPR news. Researchers at Johns Hopkins University say there are more than five hundred eighty two thousand corona virus cases in the US more than twenty. Three thousand people have died. Joe Biden has one Wisconsin's Democratic presidential primary from member station W. WM in Milwaukee Chuck quarterback reports that Biden's rival Bernie. Sanders endorsed the former vice president. On Monday four years ago Sanders defeated Hillary Clinton in the Democratic primary in Wisconsin Clinton then lost the state to Donald Trump that November Sarah Benesch chairs the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee Political Science Department. She says with the presumptive. Democratic nominee Biden carrying the state. This year that may inspire Democratic voters in seven months may feel like they've already supported. The person is up for election before and so they can go and do that again. Says another plus for Wisconsin. Democrats was a win by Jill Kurowski in a state. Supreme Court race announced Monday. President trump had endorsed incumbent justice Daniel Kelly for NPR news. I'm chuck Hornbach in Milwaukee this is. Npr news severe weather on Sunday and Monday has left at least thirty people dead and several eastern in southern states the Associated Press reports more than a million customers lost power from damaging winds tornadoes flooding and mudslides. Eleven people were killed in Mississippi. Nine people perished in South Carolina and another eight people died in Georgia. North Korea test fired several missiles from its east coast today just today ahead of legislative elections in South Korea. Npr's Anthony Kuhn reports from Seoul that it's the north fifth test launch so far this year South Korea's Joint Chiefs of Staff says it believes the projectiles were short range anti ship. Cruise missiles which were launched eastward from coastal gone one province the launch also comes a day ahead of the day of the Sun and National Holiday marking the birth one hundred and eight years ago of Kiel Song. North Korea's founding leader Kim Jong UN's grandfather South Korea meanwhile is preoccupied with the elections the corona virus epidemic and a defense cost sharing dispute with the US. Which has led to the furloughing of roughly half of the nine thousand Korean employees staffing US military bases in South Korea Anthony Kuhn NPR news soul large forest fires continue to burn in Ukraine near the devastated Chernobyl. Nuclear Power Plant. It is the side of the Soviet era nuclear disaster. The fires broke out more than a week ago but have crept to the edge of a village Ukraine in authorities. Say they're fighting the fire and that the situation is under control. They insist radiation levels have not changed. This is NPR.

President trump Uss Theodore Roosevelt navy Npr NPR South Korea Wisconsin Joe Biden US president North Korea Milwaukee Sanders Anthony Kuhn NPR Korva Coleman Washington Hillary Clinton Truman Johns Hopkins University
4-13-20 What's News

The Nicole Sandler Show

06:00 min | 1 year ago

4-13-20 What's News

"It's time for New Coal Sandler's what's news from. Nicole Sandler Dot Com and the progressive voices network. Donald Trump's farce of a daily White House Corona virus briefing reached a new low on Monday trump. Took to the podium as if it were festivus in time for the airing of grievances after complaining about how. He's not being appreciated for the great job he's done protecting the nation from Kovic nineteen and the recent damning examination of his disastrous response by the New York. Times trump called Dr Vouch e to the podium for what looked like a hostage video. The good doctor stated that he wasn't criticizing Dear Leader and interviews over the weekend when he suggested that more lives would have been saved. Had the mitigation steps been put into effect earlier but then trump went over the edge as he played what can only be described as a propaganda film. Highlighting highly edited praise for hair trump from journalists and governors alike both CNN and MSNBC. Cut Away from the so-called briefing on CNN. John King clearly called it. What it was that was propaganda that was doctors to campaign video. That was propaganda aired at taxpayer expense in the White House briefing room and it was selective cherry picking information but wait. There's more seriously. The wrecked train kept rolling. Is Trump began ranting about the need to open the economy again and that the decisions about when and how to reopen. Everything was his exclusively. As the President has quote Total Authority specific Francis. It governor issued a stay at home and you say my authority the President's therapy treatment because it's not me this when somebody is the president of the United States. The Authority is total. And that's the way it's gotta be your total. It's total governors governor. So you have a Coupla band of a excuse me. Excuse me a cup. You have a couple of bands of Democrat governors but they will agree to it. They will agree to the authority of the president of the United States. Having to do with the subject we're talking about is total you get that Kudos to C. N. N.'s Kaitlan Collins. Who attempted to question that assertion? Even calling him out saying that statement is simply not true. Something you just said you said when someone is president of the United States their authority is total. Dot is not true who we're going to write up papers on this. It's not going to be necessary because the governors need us one way or the other because ultimately it comes with the federal government that being said. We're getting along very well with the governors and I feel very certain that there won't be a problem. Yeah please go. Governor agreed that you have the authority to decide when their state Roy. Because I don't have to go ahead. The President has the author. There really are no words thankfully. Most of the governors are adults who've actually read the Constitution and on Monday two groups of governors one from the east coast the other from the West Coast announced that they were joining forces to develop coordinated plans to eventually reopen their economies. The group's plan to Rollback Corona virus restrictions slowly to avoid new spikes of infections New York New Jersey Connecticut. Pennsylvania Delaware and Rhode Island or forming the eastern regional council while California and Oregon are forming the Western one Senator Bernie Sanders on Monday endorsed his former rival for the Democratic presidential nomination. Joe Biden saying we need you in the White House and I will do all that. I can to see that that happens. Biden responded by telling Sanders. I'm going to need you not just to win. The campaign but to govern speaking of Elections Democrats won a significant victory in Wisconsin's election for a state Supreme Court seat on Monday. The Liberal Challenger was declared the upset winner of last week's election over a conservative incumbent backed by Donald Trump the liberal candidate Jill Kirovski just as Daniel Kelly by more than ninety thousand votes as Monday night a margin of victory that surprised members of both parties in a potentially crucial presidential battleground state Kurowski. Victory also marked the first time in more than a dozen years that a Supreme Court beat an incumbent and just the second time in more than a half a century her win over Justice Daniel. Kelly will shift conservative. Control the court from five to two a four three majority. We still got work to do now the. Us Supreme Court is gearing up to hear arguments for ten cases over the phone for the first time in history the next session from May fourth to thirteenth will include a case on faithless electors in the electoral college. And a case combining House Democrats and New York State Prosecutor's subpoenas for Donald Trump's financial records. The Supreme Court has already delivered decisions remotely since the Kovic. Nineteen pandemic began though. That wasn't a new practice for the court. The decision to let Wisconsin's primary continued during the pandemic was delivered remotely but the court had postpone future arguments until deciding to proceed via telephone on. Monday. I've got and that's just a bit of what's news for now. I'm Nicole Sandler. If you're appreciate these reports Nicole Sandler show. I hope you'll consider making a contribution. My work is one hundred percent listener supported. And I can't do it without your help. Find out more by visiting Nicole Sandler Dot Com and clicking on that donate button.

Donald Trump President Nicole Sandler Supreme Court United States New Coal Sandler White House New York Joe Biden Kovic White House Corona Daniel Kelly Wisconsin Bernie Sanders CNN John King Democrats Dot Kaitlan Collins West Coast
CORTE DE CABELO COM MOCOT SURPRESA (por Fred Fagundes) - #CORTES

Eu tava la

16:23 min | 10 months ago

CORTE DE CABELO COM MOCOT SURPRESA (por Fred Fagundes) - #CORTES

"Avella is he's a symbol budgets. told the. Without my story, you enjoy viewed I started you. wounds. Going to June quarterback ability fit ancient. Buki starbucks to my squad tinge me into space. Due. To happen to premiere. Daily secure a, to maintain we spinoff yelling this project. Castro stocks tomato. Universities incision Jesus spotify new grudge. To finish on the side of our a lean discipline. Zhao avails this. Nasty liston being spinoff public odd. New sparkles. Sparkle ILYRGPLNC achieved the Hodgepodge owned own. The quarter fear with daily help hotel help spinoff Komo field of own judging chicken be store zinc complex does not start as Kosovan stone revealed. Through the suspicious I contrary Nice phillies stars you'll participate participatory Malak Tom, I started. Is. A mighty me on what other participatory the quad fear Israel as contrasts Nice Feel Winters Veasley Gould Prakash Dad's he's about sparked does. With man this week on without the, you don't have the capacity the sparkle Barco. Your spot pleasure toys models boom also wound beautiful for reports to me is designed jet plunge pool hall authoritative absurd, quite got Botha's. League. You provide us with ruthless was aimed cynical. About the telehealth brow. So by show spark overseeing was. The March for seven contra can watch might spark who are the into the larger Tuesday twenty three Ohio S as Abba shop you've got you've got a new simpler. Prisoner. Nkhoma. Dash Dot. Dash. Muscled quantity with daily help. Some guys. Don't figure Joel Stern dodged the sparkle to our people. This. Season spoke together Q. is. Like. A mood workers in terms Chris Sierra succumbing dodgers. Today. With L. E. helped me break all to the spinoffs. Sued Him mooning breath to spark? For Dichotomy importers that is cases monthly and what? has to be. B Be was. Almost going to schools are Rudrud Avella adamantly among those bullets in Geo quiz inconceivable system will be by. Myself Dodge. You see the photo of just not Avella would be echoing temperature Jessica and wetsuit those major program Antonio. Was Fused with hell, we for out goes, Fuzzy, program ends see. Physical Navidad hourly can go through the mice OPEC. I Mints View is never complained you parcel sculptors, incompetent parcel and the bullets availed. Catastrophic does vis-a-vis generic STA narcotic victim if you. Know musical atmosphere. Demise would be. To give out to the moon fussy fuzzy mass was. Lincoln, a moment take program allergies much. Phone to La by Ashini, letting audience through central system in the guest meet Unique Zine be Ricardo's. Boondoggle. See might say. Various. died of the fridge fog moods escorts bill would. Need to. Basalt. Employed that allows welcome. All DACA BILL I can do with it to our. Communities. Schisano Google. Maps cookie but we are here to set since maps. Belon-. Out. I. Would've all wrong cub. Lewis, it's. Billy's squatters on the article she little guy. Again. Again. We'll guide. Back. With more than goes KOTOKA building. Was who he? Is could be. On a mobile, the sort of it they did. It you. Did you. I do not prejudice those also over is. There to A. It'd be turnage is at. GotTa. Soak chicken single the saboteur by. The Way, I think cloud the pickup. allocated. By. The, idea. From. Look at a Chin Quadra Negro Beginnings. Disease I see. Quarter term was got bill. It the Moscow did you. Talk. Don't Marx's appropriate. quarterback. Jeddah go. Code? Laura. Thanks right. Three Children Okola. v I've only quite. Passes of French allowed to Chioma ideology, but it'd be mange was fought Geagea up at age speed. For for the was this quarter Kabale lassissi shovel got. Of them on it comes do how did he scoop Neymar does cost got. To them Kotoka. I seen date. Even. Talk, Bill. Shagong. This year. It will saint. Paul. Cut Big. Salah. Did it will go away CEO Korch? Bill killed this my shaving up. By shot. Threes. As whose lives? At. Two lied to follow which folk I mean. There's A. Big War inaugural speech, the Maccabi similar with. Financial. Triple Walk. For coach. She, get that. You who? Wins Subcontracts. Kids. Who is a physical I fought to? Get up, mazagines. Casualty. Is used to follow over the what. Starts. At the START UP that. By. My. Own Rental me. Seagate on. Bit Is A. Copy. Alicia. Eighty follow to I. DON'T GO JUDOKA DR. Only. You like Muslim shakeout advocate for another. Turkey. Kid regime quota, they'll play now. Look Jabbour. To. His. Visa. FOLLOWS SEEING EPO juncture Roy. Would warm is. Cash Eastern not SLOB. Is. This. Bill Keys Spokewoman W. Other. fought. It'd be motor Motorsport Mobile. You. Missy. fabricators tag. In follow. Mississippi car is buy food ACAS I would recently start. As. Soon as Possible. For each dodger chapel style swats. Quite good Jeffrey new GMC ECHINACEA. Goldenseal. It posters seem interest. Deploys CACAK Akaka. All? Dip Boys Kakaako. Say How would you gotta be Notre by Tara Shoe Mass? Quite books there was no. Report poor. V-CHIP he'll coca bill. To remote. and. I'm like Wow Austin? Don't that shoe fate official because of. New Second Lucar. Stamps who started car at a quarter to cover the must. Be a solid because I almost watched wire it. Is. Going to. The. If TAKADA SCHEME ON. He He. Sawyer. To. Coach really out of. Guess you're. Not. Really I. Plus I don't also strategic thinker energy. Bill Excuse me as I should go new prowse quite at the Jerusalem. Shoe qual. Measly bit who nap. Little Corrective POSTON CACAO GORGE? Child look coach. Accu to visiting prosecuted Newcastle contreras soccer of Maswadeh. Malaysian. Muslim culture aborted you meant that I at the GOP. That you must. Consist. Putu cameras. Pogo to tell the court. that. Is. Full Wall to. Jesus Siato Dubai. We beat the. Way Or what about them way up for the wealthy he tom plucking up liking on the combs. Rooms. Quarter Makoto Nuccio car pro quo doubts. Talk Assault in. With the Chew on solid there. Are you better be able to race? Finished procure overbill stuff. Yeah. So, chase chilled about a and tinge. Bitter Joe, Altay. Apply Kiawah he. Was Shaking local Arab Daca Hewlett Cobra our community. By. My scorch Kabila vitamins Quebecor bill for white mice. Kabila key woods, Thais or Keith out. Give. ME. Stuff. It will be broadcast stagger this model more. Clark. His edge out our simple styles says. We don't kick it. Okay. Could School for you. Gaza you pray it's already called Makoto era arrogant quarterback. T shirts. For for. Like A. Dome Baugh. For Contra Brunello. My Art, all that Kabul established Mughal. Kimberly must face each stay using blocked with Carpal Keanu. So Gore do Makoto now. Area. Tov. Not Prevaricate. Come Go. Fast it customer Cosimo Kotite. Bill. For. ME. because. This. Moscow Alvin Fragile. Fred Luda. Them Be careful zero events. Helpless Committee is. Key inhumane space, walk your quiz, key the web, the Lagow literally following the muscles get them being serious. Oh now. To a Louis Commissioning Kurowski office hypocrisy is. Alluded to Bay Barbara Massamba, ill Tequila I invite you down could. Sink as you. Plan now it does plums. Dot. com is you mucus technology ecosystem winced weeds against Nisa. Meals me Hughley a little Bay Blah more somber note avalanche for the point. Scott vetoed skeletal says it don't log through woods category Komo by myself for change. For. ZANU THE SCIENC-. In Australia still markets. Dow. You might as virus quizzes. Zhao s? July. Seen you've supported as it does this school so sounded Fuzzy Award Roussy made Christmas Hoping Full visit. To Stein clues. No. So plums, you will call for guidance plunged. Cuisine, is Komo assess all lingua? Appreciative let's bills. Must Total Sales Dean was mice Jimmy Carter Somatic gravity like you. So Mu Vincent, the Audit Concludes Nova alluded. To but she superhero vehicle operator to Nova. Silverstone now going to finish is neither on to our quitnow in this undefeated. Got This this. This is good. Let's go whip. US. Adele simple. Vocal. Tallish. Sukhoruchenkov boy. Knock your castle hoover. Guy You yeah. You gotTa Wash. College dropout. Lucrative. Will. Do this FDA. Makoto temperature. Is the culture McClintock sugar yeah born without. Trial we'll give it won't don't five keep going way back when. He got into. Office. Channel. Apology. June for. The DEMARCO lettuce please major fating cars boys an. Import. into. Mugabe is Scott is a soul. Make, make. a pasta doodles years we hit by what's. Their Moods. Must be odd. Scars, Kiki. It can do to watch Fuji you here's you better come album comedy. Scott? Choose someone Daniel. Fears or was it going to be? Eligible. CNN or Doc. Styled limited cassava data original age bill regime preside simply sees growth of Allah. Over my school versus batch POPs coverage for goons Super Cobra. was downsize you do our Mood Faster Mitch Rabbit Link Edging. Vega debut. Of Broken A. Says Scientist. Guess you also participate. So you fredge for good skills you know vaulted. Dungeon engines of. Command dishing subway. Of. Original. Moment way you typically the auditors that is mutually guys Bartica. But Jean Eliza toys at the president. Joe. Put of the sound that barred lab bud lab bulte on. Bond today.

Bill Keys Spokewoman Rudrud Avella Scott Tom Moscow starbucks Joe Joel Stern Sparkle ILYRGPLNC Komo phillies Zhao Nasty liston Castro Botha Veasley Gould Prakash Dad OPEC League Dodge Ohio
HSBC and UBS restructure, Lloyds slips up

FT Banking Weekly

14:29 min | 1 year ago

HSBC and UBS restructure, Lloyds slips up

"Five times the savings towards your dream honeymoon or five times the savings towards your family's ultimate vacation even five times the savings towards just capital one has a fresh take on banking now you can open a new savings account in about five minutes and earned five times the national average banking with capital one okay change your clients can i into i can visit capital group dot com today american funds distributors inc. FDIC welcome to banking weekly from the payer and the yield is among the highest on the footsie-100 has been for quite a long time where does that put you in terms of your faith in this latest announcement unveils a restructuring UBS where a similar investment banking restructuring is underway and lloyd's takes reputational hit as it mishandles client tell banking correspondent our guest this week is eric more from myton income fund this week we'll be taking a look at HSBC as it jobs as it tries to get to grips with certain of his underperforming divisions without explicitly confirming the cuts number yet it has basically confirmed the this big restructuring is underway tell us exactly what has been announced so i think in a sense they were bounced if you like into making this announcement slightly to try and move assets from low returning markets in continental europe and the us to high-growth asia and the second and perhaps more interesting wills i b c david you wrote a couple of weeks ago now that the bank was planning to cut up to ten thousand crecy that first point around the distribution of costs and capital and so on is striking HSBC isn't it because they make something nanteuil times with me patrick jenkins joining me in the studio today are david crowe banking editor stephen morris our european banking correspondent and nick magor are strong so you know there's nothing existential about what's going on here but we can't expect any growth in dividends for the next few years although like yield also wanna see growing dividends to it's very important well you're absolutely right about the income shares yield six point seven percent now which is a lot compared to kind of anything pretty much on the planet you know there was a difficult statement yesterday but they did confirm there and looking through the language used by no quinn the interim chief executive who's working on this restructuring is very similar to language that gulliver his for this for years but it's got a problem the execution you know they stand up and say we're going to do this but then it doesn't happen no absolutely well let's bring in more here predescessor but one used in two thousand fifteen reshape the bank redeploy capsule from low returning markets to high-growth markets ages BC has known that it's needed to do nick you run the might and income fund and i can see from an income investors point of view probably like h as a very decent dividend in the sense that it hasn't been tried before is to try to do something about HSBC's brought a cost problem it structure its complexity and higher all can was to ninety percent of their prophets of asia particularly hong kong and yet what more than half the balance tied up outside that region in lower depositions around continental europe and the US these have been so discussion points for a long time i know we really get a conclusive answer to that when era they put it in this sort of broad outlines of the restructuring which has two parts the first is a tried and failed method HSBC along in terms of what is this bank actually sparring to be and ongoing shavings of the footprint ongoing so question about to they want to be an investment banking do they note he obviously pushed out the previous chief executive after very short time is he the one pulling the strings here does that make it academic who is the co will dan rather oddly the person leading these changes now is an interim chief executive yeah that is unusual it's not very HSBC i mean over the years engine tilles hold the dividend and the positives are the you know this is still a bank that made five billion dollars of pre-tax profits in three months it's not quite the end of the world and the capital position of the bank is very turning europe and the US yes about fifty percent thereabouts of risk weighted assets are in europe and the US and of course they just try to do this before when i was turn how you gonna make money out shares in the long run growth in the difference you get as well as as a decent starting yield yes i suppose it was some comfort that there was a confirmation of the dividend being earlier than they would have liked by by us and and then some subsequent stories adding a little bit of color to where the job cuts might take place so this week they gave us a state because the had been suspicion that they wouldn't be able to afford a drastic restructuring without eating into that yeah and to follow what you said already the slightly tricky partner for the shares lil quinn get confirmed from interim into permanent what are your thoughts on these questions while i think no quin seems very confident he will be unveiling this plan solution and are quite carefully choreographed to ensure sort of minimal disruption this time we know we've just had a recently sort of objected chief executive we seem to have a very active tells on that the bank has flagged the chabrier themselves for further restructuring charges and writedowns are they going to be severe enough to put any pressure on the capital position the bank or the dividend colosseum it seems unlikely but you know it is a continuing disappointment for shareholders as you said we've been here before you know i'll probably go further back and say no ten years since the credit crunch and we really haven't got much mm-hmm we now have a temporary interim chief executives putting out i suppose an acceleration of the strategy which makes it slightly awkward for anyone then coming in to be chief executive on a full-time basis came true even writing for several months that the investment bank is in a bit more trouble than the bankas recognized and now they've finally come out with a hundred million very much for your thoughts let's move on to our second story of restructuring and look at UBS where stephen your prediction here to this plan or they'll have to junk it and start a gain and of course if they do that they have to work on another plan that take several months to draw up and so on before industry issue structurally fees are in decline trading has been hit badly by a lack of volatility it's also partly european problem you're side DBS's traditionally had very strong emanate advisory business and that was hit quite badly in the third quarter and had terrible first quarter so they're looking at restriction then in february at the bank's full-year results and so that does suggest that if he doesn't get the job full time the next person will either have to come in and opean swiss banks UK banks losing market share to the americans that are increasingly rapid pace as a renewable to keep their technology investments they're unable to hire if there's a now astrology emplacement in what they make of that do they have to sign up to that head of joining so i think these questions about what's going on around the boardroom to show that the bank is in perhaps because we're in a bit of a holding pattern until we get full details on what they actually intend to do which isn't going to come probably until the full year in february so in a shares haven't really go anywhere to go until we got the move difficult position than it has historically been a final toll from you david mentioned there the broiler the chairman mark tucker who's got a reputation for being pretty forceful in europe and asia the two regions when compared with the US that performing fall was in terms of generating revenue but also on the advisory the pursuing broadly the same strategy what is very clear is that their investment bank cost too much and they need to deepa both in terms of headcount the hundred million a i think they had can read blocks against their name on every field equities fixed income advisory revenue and profit which no other banks hiring these businesses linking them closer to the wealth management unit which has caused the major driver of prophet at UBS so increasingly we're seeing the investment bank hugh units and said that they're going to explore more revenue synergies so there's little change on the surface but underneath the still the same back the same people are still running and restructuring charge they can a book in the fourth quarter is just the first of many we hear from analysts investors and people inside the bank so they can't wait any longer for the environment date despite the problems of golden sachs and so on in certain spheres will this restructuring delivered well at the moment what they've done is they shuffled everyone around changed the name was being very well behaved in their corp govern how that they management transition so the new chief executive has a long handover from the eggs egg they usually HSBC lifers and you know and it's oh you've come to almost a year where he just has been going sideways so it's really interesting thing about this big bank that prides itself on being like the military the civil service structures on and they cannot get succession right and they seem to mock it up every single time well we'll keep a close eye particularly from lentil february pain the best staff because of disparities pay but you BSS felt this particularly hard because it's a big equities house do equities trading and they're very focused interesting of them having mishandled their client wills what exactly went wrong yes so lloyd's eastern not as a subsidiary but definitely playing second fiddle to the demands of the wealth management unit and the changes that are making now really just solidifying this trend and you'll remember the new heads pierra novelli and rob kurowski really are under a bit of pressure from investors in the CEO to show that they can perform and they can advocate the performance of the andrea sell years well it will oversee be some time before we know we're gonna have happened but they are taking action as votes thank you for that a so-called safe custody scheme for customers where you could pay to have them store either valuable items jewelry or documents let's move on to our third and final story of the day and i look at lloyds bank nick you really interesting tale on my show lloyd's planet of a mistake meant that the deceased customers estate distributed to the wrong people so this is a pretty embarrassing gaffe for loyd's looking at reader comments on our story you can see that there's not much sympathy with the banks mishandling of this and it's been another reputational hit i suppose after the very embarrassing was frank restructuring plan what is going wrong with our investment bank and what are they hoping to achieve with the restructuring well what's going wrong with the best investment is partly in the customers affected but it's not expected to be material on a financial basis what it is as you say is really embarrassing on the risks improve their structure is no longer suitable for the current environment and the two new heads who took over from andrea or sell who left last october in a doomed attempt to take over center PPI mis selling scandal obviously completely different proportions but it's not gonna help committee and it kind of highlights why most banks have stopped offering the long after this family members bus away and because even you a will had superseded at all of those another copy store outs in several hundred cases ace of those customers who had died and the majority of cases this didn't do too much damage besides maybe causing distress getting a phone call from the bank potentially i suppose the question is will they work because they do have as you say more headwinds than the competition there was a striking charts that published with your story feeling good about saving it's time to make your savings goals come true this is banking reimagined what's in your wallet capital one and a member help your clients achieve their financial goals with capital group home of american funds and investment firm that has the seventies as you say they've been phased out by mainstream banks in large part over the last few years but are there any players offering this service now so the one properties all the subject of this wills the problem was they kept them a little bit too safe and that they failed to return around nine thousand wills to the family he's h SBC have all pulled out of it because as well as to fly this way you don't contact christmas or maybe lose contact with them you could lose the items which has happened in cases before services because i mean you compare it to p i in financial terms this is going to be nothing nearby so of scale i mean they have given a figure for how much it's gonna cost to compensate as well thank you for that little tail well that's all for this week thank you to nick and stephen and david also guest erik more from might an income fund oil a fair that your customers could use the services to store things that they shouldn't be storing like weapons or drugs stolen items which they've been farris examples of and thank you for listening remember you can keep up to date with all of the latest blanking stories at after dot com slash banking banking weekly was pretty fiona simon until next week goodbye to pay for that box lloyd's has reintroduced the service in a few select branches in the last couple of years over they no longer allow you to start wells triple pizzas guan who have been growing in this area lasca phase is metro bank who offer they only high she bank offer in all of their brunches actually metro vancouver famous for having these of the sort of embarrassment has led most banks to stop offering safe custody and safe deposit loiseau she stopped offering the service new customers in twenty eleven obvious barclay twelve yeah it's it's really interesting safety deposit boxes a part of the old style banking the people would have been used to in the nineteen fifties six

FDIC lloyd eric five billion dollars ninety percent fifty percent seven percent five minutes three months ten years
The Battle for Wisconsin's Dairy Farmers

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

16:53 min | 1 year ago

The Battle for Wisconsin's Dairy Farmers

"This episode is sponsored by Charles Schwab. No matter what tomorrow brings things won't change like Schwab's commitment to see the world through clients is that commitment is why Schwab is always here for clients with clear guidance and committed service to help maintain focus on achieving long-term goals. So whatever happens today Schwab remains invested in you visit Schwab Dot Com to learn how Schwab is ready to help. No balloon drops no funny hats. No spontaneous Conga line snaking through a packed convention floor. Instead this week, a cory zoom handoff will be how Democrats officially nominate Joe Biden to be their presidential candidate. Let it suffice to say this is a long way from Milwaukee Wisconsin. A place. Democrats thought they'd be celebrating the Twenty Twenty Democratic National Convention. Just a few months ago. A location journalist Dan Calvin says was picked for a very specific reason obviously holding the convention there was. A symbol that the Democratic Party was trying to atone for. Sin Of Ignoring Wisconsin in Twenty Sixteen Dan Kaufman is a native wisconsinite and has written at length about Wisconsin. Politics for the New Yorker and in his book the fall of Wisconsin Hillary Clinton was the first candidate of either party to not campaign Wisconsin during the general election since Richard Nixon in nineteen seventy two when you say didn't campaign Dan The Democratic nominee for president didn't set foot in the state of Wisconsin not during the general election now now not once. Dan Travel to Wisconsin over the last year. To Talk to the people who helped Donald Trump win the state that calls itself America's Dairyland by a whisker in two thousand sixteen, Trump one Wisconsin by about twenty three, thousand votes that year. So I think there was a recognition that they needed to pay attention to not just Wisconsin but the the rust belt states in general. Wisconsin had not voted for a Republican for President. Since, one thousand, nine, hundred, four, Ronald Reagan's forty-nine St Triumph. During his travels Dan spent a lot of time in what's called the drift Louis area, the rural southwestern part of Wisconsin home to family farms and tragedy Wisconsin lead the country and family farm bankruptcies for the past three years. That has led to really significant and serious social costs including most importantly the dramatic rise in suicides that Wisconsin had a statewide record of suicides in two, thousand seventeen and a lot of this was tied to the family farm crisis. This drift. Louis. Region voted overwhelmingly for Barack Obama in two thousand eight but came out strongly for Donald. Trump. Just eight years later. Today on the show how the Democrats lost Wisconsin's dairy farmers and why four years later their discontent could end up costing trump the presidency. I'm Ray Suarez subbing for Mary Harris and you're listening to what? Next stick with us. To understand the political earthquake that shook the drift. Louis area back in two thousand sixteen. You I need to look at how agriculture in America has changed in recent decades. I think there's a lot of frustration with both parties who have presided over a real. There's been a real erosion of rural. America. particularly. Since the early nineteen seventies when a man named Earl Butz retired Nixon's secretary of agriculture really started changing agricultural policy in a profound way. He basically encouraged consolidation of farms and he said in fact that Basically to get go get big or get out he encouraged firefighters to adapt or guy this was these were heads words and he wanted he didn't see much room for the small. Agrarian Farmers Small family farmer, and that is happened and both parties have encouraged it to various degrees and I think this anger sometimes doesn't know how to be channelled. There's still a lot of support for trump in these rural areas but it's also eroded to a significant degree and I think the drift Louis area will be key as far as which way Wisconsin we'll go for Dan Coffman the drift Louis area was a good barometer for how rural Wisconsin felt about the trump presidency and the Democrats, the dairy farmers who live and work there have been challenged by the consolidation of family owned farms. And says, the frustration was one of the driving forces behind their support for trump there's three kind of main protagonists in my article. One is a guy named Jerry Volenik who had voted for Obama twice he voted for trump but not. With any kind of passion or Even paying close attention to politics but he was. Discontent with the status quo like Jerry. Says at the beginning you know I'm working harder now than I did when I started fulltime farm and twenty five years ago and making much less money. Jerry's grandfather was able to survive nokia a herd of sixteen cows. Now, Jerry. As he calls it is the biggest of the small guys and he has three hundred thirty cows. It's a much different operation to survive in today's world and the market forces are really encouraging consolidation and there's no government policy to mitigate that. So they are really struggling and it just keeps getting worse well, unlike in two thousand sixteen. President trump is running. With a record what has he done in the last three years that's changed farmers lives do they perceive as having made their lives better or worse? You know I think that there is like everything. It's a mixed bag I. think overall, there's a lot of frustration. Because he's basically continued the agricultural policy that has existed for the past fifty years forty or fifty years his trade wars have worsened the condition of a lot of farmers. and. He has launched trade with China, Mexico the European Union Canada. And that has. Caused. Export markets to dry up and increasing pain. He's somewhat cognizant that needs these role voters he has offered. Substantial amounts of federal aid for farmers but most of this aid is going to the largest arms, big factory corporate farms. So it's not really helping these small family farmer at all, and there's a sense of frustration and a sense of profound hopelessness in a lot of a rural Wisconsin. That there's little that can or will be done to to help them on a lot of midwestern family farms farmer's. We'll tell you their their own kids don't want farm life or some of them will say, they don't want it for their kids. And, a lot of the work day to day is being done by Mexicans and Central Americans. He is immigration much of an issue in farm country in Wisconsin I think it is and and the dairy industries is massively dependent on a dairy as one of the most labor intensive form of farming, and almost every farm I visited had many immigrant farmworkers doing much of the work I think it's a huge issue and it's it's a source of friction between Sort of some of the elements and the trump. Republican Party wing and some of the. More traditional elements there absolutely the agricultural needs of united, states, depends on you know of foreign labour Mexican immigrants particularly. And that is that is an issue and you're right to say that most of the younger people don't want it I think they see that it's it's almost essentially. Hopeless to keep the small. Farms going I mean there is a you either have to get big or get out. There's so much pressure on that. So and they see how hard their parents worked, and in fact Jerry. In. The peace says, you know that he will essentially be the last farmer for his family. He doesn't want his daughters to farm because it is. It is so it is so hard and he he's he's barely as he says, I'm basically paying myself living expenses now. So he's not getting ahead in fact, he's falling behind but here you are describing this decline this steady decline in the rural areas, and if you go to a state like Wisconsin, it's not like the urban areas of going great guns either I mean if you go to casino show racine or Cheboygan or Green Bay, not to mention Milwaukee, those places of seen their factories close and their plants be bought and sold and then closed and. I. It sounds like the Democrats will be beginning their virtual convention in a place that's That feels like the twenty first century has a lot to answer for. I think you're right right and actually I'm really glad you said that there's a lot of similarities between the de industrialized towns and cities have the rust belt and some of these rural areas I was shocked. I've done a lot of reporting. In Michigan and Ohio. Wisconsin as well that South Eastern corridor and you're seeing some of the same dynamic these people left behind again victims also lack of public investment and concern the American trade policies have really sent a lot of those jobs. You know. Overseas. But you're right most of southeastern. Wisconsin and also the Fox Valley Green Bay the paper companies are struggling. You're seeing a lot of these problems and there are similar and trump actually linked in two thousand sixteen, the fate of family farmers to steel workers and coal miners and so on and I think you know he seized upon a decades long. Erosion by both parties in these kinds of jobs in the the idea that you could make a decent living and it definitely helped him. Win Very narrowly, but win these states particularly Michigan Wisconsin and Pennsylvania after Republicans took control of Wisconsin statehouse governor's mansion the Democrats fought back and sought to win support by exploiting the difference between the president's rhetoric and his policies. And at a local level, it seemed to have worked when you look at the elections since trump has one conservatives have one just one of nine statewide elections I think there's a growing frustration with Donald Trump, and Democrats have. I think become more tactically skillful. Since you know since. Twenty sixteen when? Hillary Clinton didn't campaign there that became a kind of national. Sort of emblem of how out of touch the Democrats were with some of what happened their core constituency. But now there's a recognition on the democratic side. That the battle for Wisconsin represents much more. Than just the state itself but a kind of national proximate and I think they have been more organized a turning out their voters and most significantly. The defeated Scott Walker in two thousand eighteen narrowly but a lot of that was also shifting of the rural vote and Tony Verse. The man who defeated him did do significantly better in the drift Louis area and campaigned heavily in rural areas and was able to win back some of these voters. One more recent example of democratic statewide success came in the form of a state supreme. Court race this past April the election itself was hotly debated as the Republican legislature overturned the Democratic governor stay at home orders and forced Wisconsin to move ahead with in person voting in the early weeks of the pandemic Weil at the same time closing almost all polling places in Milwaukee. Conservatives might have felt moving forward with the election and in person voting could help secure the seat for their preferred candidate. But the voters didn't see it that way. Ironically, it backfired and I think drew a lot of angry. Progressives to the polls and Jill Kurowski the Supreme Court that one, one, fifty, five percent of the vote and including an all over the state. So I think there's been some fatigue with this kind of hyper extreme. Politics that the Republicans have been pushing and I think you're seeing that why you know play out and you saw it play out in her victory and particularly in the size. And breadth of her victory which occurred in areas all over the state including some areas where Democrats, traditionally struggle within the convention. That's not quite a convention will soon gavel into order. You won't be heading to pack hospitality suites. You won't be glad handing with state politicians You won't be getting the free meals that reporters can often count on at convention time. You're going to miss it. Well, that's the free meals are a bit of a mixed blessing I have to say. But. I'll Miss Milwaukee Milwaukee I think it's an incredible city and I was Anxious to visit some old friends and yes to see this. Incredible. You know pageantry and display of American politics in a city that I know really well and I'm sad that I'm sad for the city, all of its residents because it would have been a great economic boon. For the area but but obviously, we're living in unprecedented times and that was clearly not the right decision to hold any kind of a gathering like that now but it'll be interesting to see in the months leading forward. How Wisconsin is paid attention to by both of the major candidates and parties, it could go either way. Clearly. But at the moment it seems like. There's. A sense that the Democrats. The ones that I talked to you seem to feel they have a bit of momentum although they are not binding means taking it for granted. Dan. Great to talk to you. Great to talk to You I. Really appreciate this conversation. It's wonderful. Dan Kaufmann is a contributing writer at the New Yorker and author of the fall of. Wisconsin. That's the show. What next is produced by Jason De, Leon Mary Wilson, and Danielle Hewitt with help from Daniel navis where led by a leash Montgomery and Allison Benedict find me on twitter I'm at Ray Suarez News. Thanks for listening. I'm Ray Suarez.

Wisconsin Democrats Donald Trump Milwaukee Twenty Twenty Democratic Natio president Schwab Ray Suarez Democratic Party Jerry Volenik Hillary Clinton Barack Obama Dan Louis Charles Schwab Dan Calvin Joe Biden America Schwab Dot Com
Tuesday, April 14, 2020

Up First

13:08 min | 1 year ago

Tuesday, April 14, 2020

"Hey before we get started we just WanNa take a moment and say thank you. Thank you so much for listening. There's so much uncertainty in our world right now and we do everything that we can hear it up first to get you the news that you need we know information is really crucial to keeping you and your loved one safe and healthy and your support is crucial to this service because the money you give to local. Npr stations funds this reporting if you can head over to donate that NPR dot org slash up first and donate whatever you can. We're so grateful for whatever you can give thanks The president generated fresh conflict with states. Asserting can tell them. When to reopen. The president of the United States calls the shots. He faces criticism of shots did call house. He defended his pandemic response. I'm Steve inskeep with Rachel Martin and this is the first from. Npr News A sailor from an American aircraft carrier died he served on the Theodore Roosevelt's whose captain pleaded for help with the corona virus and was removed. How's the Navy responding? Also results are in from the Wisconsin. Primary voting in person went ahead. Despite the governor's insistence. It wasn't safe. Voters gave their views of the presidential election and decided a seat on the State Supreme Court. So what do the results suggest about? November's voting stay with us. We'll guide you through this day's news Support for this podcast and the following message come from Integrative Therapeutics for over thirty five years focused on manufacturing supplements with premium ingredients. Committed to helping people navigate their health journey. Integrative Therapeutics because confidence is healthy support also comes from log Mehan powering remote work with videoconferencing virtual event. An online collaboration software like all new GOTO meeting which helps people stay connected whenever and wherever more at gotomeeting DOT COM SLASH UP I. The president is defending his response to the pandemic and his White House briefing. Last night the president pushed back against ever more detailed accounts of his leadership. In this crisis the pandemic has now killed around twenty three thousand Americans but the president used his time last night in the corona virus briefing to attack the media generated fresh conflict for the TV cameras. Asserting that he can tell states went to restart their economies. The Federal Government has absolute power has the power as to whether or not use that power. We'll see in reality. The constitution reserves many powers for Congress. The courts the states and the People. Npr Scott detro-. Watch the briefing for US either. Scott Good morning how did this couple of hours differ from some other briefings by the president is even by the standards that president trump has set over the course of his term and over the course of these briefings this one was particularly angry and defensive and some context here several major news outlets had published lengthy stories in recent days looking back at the early days of the pandemic January February early March the Times on the president and many senior advisors were downplaying the scale of the threat of the corona virus? And we're not taking the drastic step that they in most states ended up taking in later on in March this clearly got to president trump and he spent more than forty five minutes at the onset of this briefing just attacking the media and defending himself. All I'm saying is this. How do you close down the greatest economy and the history of the world? When on January seventeenth you have no cases and no death and then president trump also repeated earlier criticisms of governors like New York Governor Andrew. Cuomo saying they exaggerated their needs for ventilators pointing out that hospitals have not been overwhelmed on a large scale as was initially feared. And that was due to social distancing actually having an impact and also The federal assistance and and the state run efforts to get the supplies. They need it now after. That defensive is record and attack of the media. The president did get around to the question of when the United States can reopen which is another subject where he has been pushing and generating controversy. He says he will unveil a task force today which is charged. Put together a plan to reopen the country. But what is his power here? Yeah there is a lot of demand for some sort of national plan and some guidelines for how to get the country reopened at some point in time but this is something that legally will come down to governors and mayors who are the ones of course who ordered the restrictions and closed schools to begin with and even president trump spent a lot of time last week saying he wants governors to take the lead. Yesterday he pushed back on the fact that it is not his legal call. He also said something. Pretty notable that the president has ultimate authority of course constitutionally that is not the case especially in a situation where it was state laws to begin with and on that note on Monday you saw two different. Compacts of states representing more than one hundred million people combined A group of West Coast states and a group of East Coast states where the governors are saying that they will coordinate with each other on when to start easing restrictions and they will make these decisions based on the data. And that's because even within these same groups. There are big differences from state to state yesterday. Delaware's governor John. Carney said that in his state. It's getting worse. Not Better though. New York Cuomo said the worst is now past Zooming New Yorkers are still careful going forward. I suppose governors would listen to the president if they've found his leadership to be credible. The President of course is on television for awhile. Yesterday spent some time playing a video. What was it a lot of critics has had these briefings often substitute for trump campaign rally? So it was notable that he spent this basic played a campaign ad for during the briefing for Awhile and said that it was put together by White House. Staffers who are of course government employees Scott. Thanks so much thank you. Npr's Scott detro- a sailor from the aircraft carrier Theodore Roosevelt has died from complications of corona virus. The US Navy ship became the scene of an outbreak and then a source of controversy. Captain Brett Crozier wrote down his concerns about the safety of his crew. After that letter appeared in a newspaper the Navy then removed him the Acting Navy secretary then visited the carrier and denounce the captain so harshly that he lost his job. During all of this the crew has been trying to look after each other and NPR Pentagon correspondent. Tom Bowman is following their story. Tom Good Morning. Good Morning Steve. Who was a sailor who died? Well the Navy has released his name yet. Steve Pending family notification. I'm told he's a chief. Petty Officer in his forties and he and four other sailors were isolated after testing positive for the virus. Two weeks ago in this is the first death among the crew. He did not show any symptoms. Though I'm told and was checked twice a day and at one point in April Ninth. He was checked and he was unresponsive given CPR he went to the ICU. At Naval Hospital in Guam and died yesterday the chief of Naval Operations Admiral. Mike Gil de offered his condolences and said quote. We pledge our full support to the ship in crew as they continue their fight against their corona virus. Okay the first active duty military member known to have died of complications of corona virus. But not the only person on that ship with the virus. How are others doing well? Nearly six hundred now of the five thousand soldiers have tested positive for the virus Steve. Four of them are hospitalized. But I'm told not in the ICU. All their stable as of yesterday more than ninety percent of the crew's been tested and more than four thousand sailors are assure in Guam. And of course all this began with the lighter from the carries captain crozier urging his superiors to move faster because he said the virus was spreading. Quickly He wanted a four thousand sailors taken off immediately and he sent letter to more than twenty people. Some outside the chain of command and then of course. He was relieved after that letter leaked to the press. Tom I'm just thinking this has got to be a microcosm of the whole problem facing the navy there ten other aircraft carriers whereas something like this could happen their scores and scores of other ships. Were something like this could happen. Not to mention Navy Bases No. That's right I if officials have said there's no reason to think the Roosevelt is one of a kind problem. Ships are highly vulnerable because of the tight quarters crews on top of one another. So the navy's watching this particularly closely There are two other carriers or keeping tabs on the Reagan based in Japan and undergoing maintenance has had fifteen virus cases all those sailors office ship. And then you have the Nimitz which is important and it's sailors and restrictive for two weeks. The Renault positive cases but again. They're keeping a very close eye on this. They're very concerned about it. Tom Thanks for the update. Really appreciate it. You'RE WELCOME STEVE. That's NPR Pentagon correspondent. Tom Bowman this morning well. Wisconsin is an important presidential battleground state and in last week's primary elections Democrats we now know scored a significant victory. Yeah remember Democratic Governor. Tony Iverson had tried to postpone the election. Because of the corona virus the election included the Democratic presidential primary which Vice President Joe Biden one but also on the ballot. Was this important seat on the State's conservative Supreme Court that same court to ultimately ruled that the election would go on a scheduled voters showed up at the polls in person and at personal risk and voted to replace the Conservative incumbent on that bench with a liberal justice and my on silver of our member station W. W. Emma's here to talk about results. Good Morning Good Morning and Bhai here of course I mean sheltering somewhere right. I mean are you and your basement. W. W. Yes I'm at home in Milwaukee. Okay okay. As long as we're clear on that okay so there was this Joe. Biden's victory was expected at this point but this upset and the State Supreme Court race and incumbent endorsed by the President. I believe was thrown out. What happened yeah? Liberal backed candidate Jill Kurowski. The trump endorsed incumbent Daniel Kelly. So she had a socially distant victory party it was just Karachi and her two kids and she thanked her team supporters. But she also had a caveat look. We shouldn't have had an election on Tuesday and for many many people. They had to decide between whether or not they were gonNA risk their own house or the house of people they loved or their lives or the lives of people that they loved in order to vote. It wasn't on tenable decision yet. The GOP controlled legislature and the conservative majority in the state. Supreme Court fought hard to hold the election date in place despite calls to postpone or change to all male in so this was a big defeat for them. I guess. In theory these judicial elections are nonpartisan. But it's clear where the political parties stood between these two candidates and there were Democrats who said that they felt that going ahead with the election under these circumstances amounted to voter suppression preventing people from voting. Because it would just be too dangerous to them. Is there evidence of that now that we know the results well so in Democratic National Committee Chair? Tom Perez had called this election voter suppression on Steroids. So in larger cities voters reported weights on average of one to two hours even up to four hours. But some voters just couldn't wait that long or didn't want to brave the polls and risk their health. Nearly ten thousand voters requested mail in ballots on time and didn't get them in there. Were POST OFFICE PROBLEMS OR POSTMARK PROBLEMS. So there were voters who were disenfranchised. We'll never know. Just what turnout would have been if it hadn't been for corona virus but all in all one point one million mail in ballots were requested and returned that makes total vote. Count Right in line or even higher than previous State Supreme Court races and also on par with other presidential primaries and I suppose we should mention also. The ultimate result was in favor of the people who said the election was unfair. Yes it was in fact my on silver of WWF. Milwaukee thanks very much thanks so much and that is up. I for this Tuesday April fourteenth. I'm Steve INSKEEP and I'm Rachel Martin. Start Your Day with us right back here tomorrow and remember that you can subscribe to US wherever you listen to podcasts. And if you've got a moment rate us and review us on Apple podcasts. There's a simple way to explore. The vast world of vast world of public radio shows and PODCASTS. Npr One your news from the station in your community as well as stories from around the country. And you get podcast suggestions based on what you liked download. Npr One at the APP store

president Steve inskeep NPR Navy State Supreme Court Theodore Roosevelt United States trump Wisconsin Supreme Court Tom Bowman Milwaukee Npr Rachel Martin Scott detro Joe Biden White House Cuomo
8.6.20 Big city crime, telemedicine, and WORLD Watch

The World and Everything In It

31:25 min | 1 year ago

8.6.20 Big city crime, telemedicine, and WORLD Watch

"The world everything in it is made possible by listeners like me. I'm phoebe Toy Wesley from. Houston Texas, I'd like to congratulate my brother Michael Wong for graduating from. Arrowhead Park Medical Academy. A hope you enjoy these program. Good morning violent crime has spiked this summer in big cities across the country. We'll find out what's behind that trend. Also, today doctors increasingly rely on technology to meet with patients virtually will examine how telemedicine is changing healthcare plus behind the scenes look at world's latest venture speed the truth to twelve year you'll be amazed at how many adults. It's Thursday August sixth. This is the world and everything in it from listener supported world radio I'm. Megan. Basham dime. Nick Eicher. Good Morning. Up Next Kent Covington has the news. Rescuers in Beirut were still digging piles of twisted steel and concrete Wednesday looking for more survivors of Tuesday's massive explosions. Meantime, investigators began searching through the wreckage of the port looking for clues to the cause of the blasts that killed well over a hundred people and injured some five thousand others. Buildings are damaged or destroyed for miles and hospitals have been overwhelmed. Semi Nater leads a think tank called the length institute. For Strategic Affairs he is based in Lebanon and said, he's never seen anything like it. I went through the civil war. In Lebanon, I was with miss to Hariri, bombing to other from being so targeted politicians. But nothing of this scale I have seen in my life nature said quote, the whole city of Beirut was built economically and urbanistic. This port and he said when you had this cataclysm to covid nineteen and the financial crisis, it will likely take more than a decade to recover. US. Intelligence officials say there are no indications that the explosions were the result of a terrorist attack. Investigators are now focusing on nearly three thousand tons of ammonium nitrate stored at a warehouse in Beirut for years that has a highly explosive chemical used in fertilizers. Officials want to know how that much of the volatile substance came to be stored there and why nothing was done about it. U. S. businesses slashed hiring last month suggesting the recent covid nineteen resurgence has slowed the economic recovery World Jones reports. Payroll processor. Reported Wednesday that US firms added just one hundred, Sixty, seven, thousand jobs in July. That's a stark contrast to June's gain four, point three, million and maize increase of three point three million ADP says July's limited hiring means the economy's still has thirteen million fewer jobs than it did in February. Hiring collapse companies of all sizes and in nearly all industries, a category that mostly include restaurants, bars and hotels added just thirty eight thousand jobs last month after gaining more than three million in May and June combined. In spite of that report stocks surged on Wednesday the Dow Jones industrial rose one point four percent and the Nasdaq hit another record high closing almost eleven thousand. Reporting. For World I'm Lee Jones. With negotiations over new corona virus relief bill moving very slowly president trump said Wednesday that he may act alone the White House says pushed for a payroll tax break in the next stimulus bill something many Democrats have rejected and trump told Fox News well I may do it. Myself win shooting right now I have the right to suspend it and I may do. It myself I have the absolute right to suspend the the payroll. One of trump's economic advisers to Stephen Moore wrote an op Ed this week in the Wall Street Journal. He said the president could order the Treasury Department temporarily stopped collecting the tax using the same provisions of the tax code used to delay the dude for twenty, nine, thousand, nine taxes earlier this year. The move would be tax deferral but more said, the intention would be for the next president. Trump or Joe Biden to forgive the tax payment. But trump said, he is still hopeful that the White House and GOP lawmakers can strike a deal with Democratic leaders on a new relief bill. And with the election, less than three months away, the trump campaign is suing the state of Nevada, a lawsuit seeks to stop a new measure Democratic governor. Steve Says lack signed into law that sends mail-in ballots to all registered voters. President Trump said Wednesday absentee voting. Great. But. This mail in voting with a male mid indiscriminately millions and millions of ballots to people. You're never going to know who won the election you can't have that. Republicans argue that the law will allow for so-called a ballot harvesting sends it expands who gets to collect enhanced in ballots. They say volunteers working for political groups can easily hold back or turn in large quantities of votes to sway the election. But Democrats charge that Republicans are only trying to silence the voices of voters who don't have safe access to polling stations during the pandemic. Americans in at least twenty two states recently received mysterious packages of seeds in the mail sent from overseas and the US government is now investigating world's Kristen Flavin has that story. The Department of Agriculture says the unsolicited packages many Americans received include a variety of seeds, cabbage, lavender, mint mustard, rose sage, and others. The USDA is working with other agencies to investigate the packages but it has no evidence that there an act of ECO terrorism or a health threat. The agency said the seeds were likely part of a brushing scam to generate fake reviews and boost online sales. Still authorities are warning people against the packages or planting the seeds. The USDA recommended recipients, mail them to their state plant regulatory authorities, or State Plant Health, director reporting for world. I'm Kristen Flavin. Kent Covington straight ahead. What's behind the violent crime plugging America's big. Cities Plus Cal Thomas on a leading candidate to be Joe Biden's running mate. This is the world and everything in it. It's Thursday, the sixth of August twenty twenty. Glad to have you along for today's edition of the world and everything in it. Good Morning I Megan Basham. First up today a spike in violence in America's cities. On July twenty first fifteen people were shot outside a funeral home in Chicago. The funeral was for a victim of another shooting the week before the month of July with Chicago's dealiest in almost thirty years. But the windy city is not the only metropolis plagued by violence. This summer crime statistics from the nation's largest cities. Show homicides are up this year by almost twenty five percent. The summer months do tend to be more violent than the rest of the year, but this season has been unusually deadly worlds and Johann reports on what's behind the trend. Two people shot here early evening. I don't know the ambulances aren't. leaving. So. That might not be a good sign Donovan Price Calls Himself a first responder that he's not the traditional kind. He's a street pastor father you know this situation you know the Your will. Heavenly Father Please Let. These people be okay to see another day into when a person is shot in Chicago price is one of the first people on the scene is goal is to minister to the victim's family friends and community. Sometimes, he posts real time videos on his website as he prays out loud. Tonight. God. Please bless the city in the city be at peace tonight. This summer. There have been few nights of peace in Chicago or in any of the major cities across the United States in Chicago in the month of July, killings were up almost one hundred and forty percent compared to last year in New York it was almost one hundred and eighty percent other cities like Philadelphia Detroit, Omaha and Phoenix. At double-digit, rates. Lance Williams teaches urban community studies at northeastern Illinois University. He says violence in Chicago is nothing new, but this summer has been different. He flags a couple of main contributing factors. There's been a difference and policing. It's been this heavy criticism directed at law enforcement right for the races and being Brousseau right in a community, his having impact on how particularly the regular reconfirm how police officers feel they feel Williams says police officers are too. Afraid or too angry to intervene. So sometimes, they aren't stopping crime even minor things data from the Chicago Police Department show that traffic stops in June dropped by eighty six percent Williams says he saw at first hand on his block the same morning we spoke a couple of cars running red lights going seventy in a twenty five police officer posted on the corner did nothing about it S. so now we see guys who are just. You know they don't fear being stopped by police. They feel like they can do whatever they want to do Dan. SCHOBER is a professor of public health at Depaul University. He also works with Chicago Gun Violence Research Program and he says, this trend isn't new resort sewer trend in two thousand sixteen where there was a lot of discussion about police it seems like when there's Big events that puts on scrutiny on the police law enforcement there tends to be a change in violence the happen so more violence and less trust in the police that makes it really hard for officers to do their jobs. Schober says that's reflected in Chicago's clearance rate. The number of cases the police are able to solve to arrest rates after shooting is less than fifty percents. That goes back to how well can they police address and work with community who has a better sense of what goes on day to day. So it's not just the protests shaking things up corona virus lockdowns have also destabilized a lot of social structures, churches, schools, and community organizations have all been sidelined for months institutions that infuse communities with a sense of hope are just gone. Lance Williams points to another factor that might be contributing to the spike in violence in March and April Chicago officials worried about covid nineteen spreading in overcrowded areas. So they released over one thousand inmates from the city's largest general New York City used a similar tactic. William says, releasing those prisoners wasn't a bad thing in and of itself they weren't in jail for violent crimes but he says officials should have handled the process differently. You cannot just empty out the jails and don't the people back into the community with no resources no support nothing Chris Butler as a pastor at Chicago Embassy Church. He says, it's important to look beyond the big picture to the individual the broken missed the soul deep broken. That has to be Anna person to be the perpetrator of this kind of violence. We also have to think as a human society bow. How do folks? So many folks get this way. And what can we do about those things years ago Butler started a type of street outreach. He calls positive loitering. We would go out bare late on Fridays and just hang out Shan Lights. Flashlights, and Carlights. Candlelit counts read saying him just Kinda hang on to fill up spaces where negative things would usually happen with positive activity. It was just one small thing and Butler knows there will never be a magic cure for this kind of societal sickness but he hopes Christians will realize they have part of the cure. Named the name of Christ. Church in any level, we are called to this. Butler recommends asking questions. What do I have the capacity to do and what is God calling me to do? Then do those things. Reporting for world. I'm Ana Johnsson. Additional support comes from Mir Anathema Baptist University flexible biblical engaging online options from high school to Graduate School M B. U Dot Edu. From Samaritan Ministries Samaritan members care for one another by praying encouraging and sharing healthcare costs all without the use of insurance more at Samaritan ministries dot org slash world. And from the Bible speaks today the best-selling commentary series. Now, within a single study, Bible learn to apply the Bible for everyday life more at the Bible speaks today DOT com. Coming up next on the world and everything in its seeing a doctor without an actual office visit despite covid nineteen patients still have chronic and routine ailments to deal with to avoid potentially catching the virus doctors. Offices many are trying out telemedicine. That's where health professionals provide medical consultations by internet or phone. The nonprofit group fair health says the use of telemedicine increased eight, thousand percent between April. Twenty. Nineteen and April twenty twenty but patients and doctors alike say the tool presents both benefits and Challenges World Senior Correspondent Candy Gawltney reports. Injury boy ED is still paying for a fleeting mistake. He made while studying abroad in France fifteen years ago, driven by all the Hubris a twenty year old could muster he and classmates decided to climb a moss covered exterior wall at what remains of Richard the Lionheart. Castle. My goal was to climb higher than everybody else. Which I did. But after climbing forty feet boy, it remember that what goes up must come down. Just jumps because it seemed like it wasn't that far but it it was he still feels the pain of the resulting herniated disk and it flared up again earlier this year his doctor's appointment arrived in. April, just as the corona virus hit the United States in medical practices canceled most in office visits boy it's doctor consulted with him through an online platform boy. It didn't even have to leave work and he says that convenience will make him a repeat telehealth customer telemedicine has been around for several years. The pandemic has caused many patients to experience it for the first time and like boy it many of them will likely continue utilizing it when they can. Andy Khan is an ER physician turn telemedicine provider. He left hospital practice in December twenty seventeen and transitioned virtual visits. full-time some doctors have brick and mortar offices and offer the option for telehealth. Like con contract with online only telehealth providers. Concepts his work has an annual rhythm you seek out a seasonal things. So in the summer, there's not as many patients, but you see more like swimmer's ear and poison ivy from hiking and people wanting medicine before they go traveling somewhere with altitude motion sickness things once school starts calls begin rolling in from teachers and students who picked up a bug in class October through March con an increase in flu and respiratory related calls then in a typical march things slow down a bit but. If Twenty Twenty twentieth proven anything it's that things just aren't typical these days mid March this year on noticed a spike in the number of patients using telehealth services because their primary care doctors weren't taking non emergency cases, there were so many people calling in the you know there weren't enough doctors on telemedicine. So people were waiting a long time and and sometimes the system would crash and so on. Line platforms quickly got the bugs worked out after that initial influx of patients as weeks. Went on in doctors offices began reopening patients still wanted to avoid waiting room exposure. So telehealth patient volume has remained steadily. High Con has also noticed more providers joining telemedicine networks. Tear cavazos is a doctor of nursing practice who runs a Dallas clinic before the pandemic hit Cavazos his practice was set up for telemedicine visits through its electric health record system, and we probably were doing I mean I would do one or two telehealth visits a week at most if even that by mid March. Though vases and her partners took nearly all appointments. Virtually, her office was authorized to do cove nineteen testing. So it was important to limit in office exposure for healthy patients with a huge shift from office visits to nearly all virtual visits, Cavazos, and our partners face hurdles mainly figuring out the financial side of the technology plus dealing with less tech savvy patients that may be the biggest obstacle to tell a health on the one hand. CON says most patients can get online everyone has an. Internet connection with their phone or their laptop like you can. But that's just the first step. Patients also need to create an account log in for the online platform and make sure they're using a computer with a camera or a smartphone or tablet. Cavazos says providing that tech support puts an additional strain on her offices front desk staff she was relieved when the federal government announced in late. March it would waive privacy law restrictions against providers using less secure technologies for patient consultations our office when that came out, we made the. Decision to use something more familiar with patients like older patients don't have facetime their grandkids so they would know how to pick up the call. So we used our office IPADS, facetime or Google hangout virtual consultations are convenient and more affordable than an urgent care visit. But KONIN CAVAZOS say they don't hesitate to tell in e health patient when they should be seen in person by provider. There are the few that we just need to get into the office ticket bloodwork needless to the heart and lungs are complaining if. Your pain and you know we need to look in the ear some providers worry the growth in telehealth will widen the chasm between underserved patients and Quality Care Dallas doctor of nursing practice. Katie Vogel said her low income patients many of them refugees have language barriers that make telephone encounters difficult. That is if a patient even has a fountain to do telemedicine, you have to have a way to communicate with someone I. So you have to have a reliable telephone. Some places require you to a video chat will that requires you To have a smartphone, Cavazos says, many doctors agree that telemedicine isn't for every patient even providers get a little weary from it. We didn't go into health care to view behind a computer. You know we went into cared to you know part of a holistic approaches seeing touching talking to a patient and when you are behind the screen as you lose some of that. But like so many trends sped up by the pandemic telemedicine is here to stay and it's poised to make lasting changes to help care for patients and providers alike. Reporting for world I'm Katie Golden. Jill Carafe ski is a brand new justice on the Wisconsin Supreme Core. She had her swearing in during a marathon ceremony last weekend and when I say marathon I don't mean that the ceremony was particularly long. I mean that literally she was sworn in in the middle of a marathon award one, hundred Mile Ultra marathon to be precise Kurowski took the oath of office during an outdoor ceremony in south central cabin somewhere around the thirty five Mile Marker and will faithfully and impartially discharge the duties of set office the best of my ability to the best of my ability. So help me God. I'm impressed. That's terrific. Breath control but I don't know I guess it comes from a lot of running the fifty four year old justice finished the race and took her thirty four hours to complete the whole thing. I would have just thrown myself on the mercy of the court I don't know. It's the world and everything in. Two. Today is Thursday August the sixth thank you for turning to world radio to start your day. Good. Morning I'm Nick Eicher and I'm Megan Basham coming next on the world and everything in it a brand new way to get the news of the world on May First Watch News in three made its debut on. Youtube. It's a video news program for students from. Grade School to high school. Now on Monday, we launch the full World Watch program and world senior correspondent. Myrna Brown takes you behind the scenes of our latest venture nearly forty years in the making. This. Is What's known as a splashdown. It's early afternoon at the world headquarters in Asheville North Carolina team of young reporters and staff are working feverishly putting the final touches on the next day's World Watch video news. program. This will become. Off. It's Tuesday August fourth. We'll watch news in three world. Watch is the latest development in a forty year dream in one thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, one, Joe Bells began the Children's publication. God's World News in honor of his father. Speak the truth to a twelve year old and then he said you'll be amazed at how many adults are listening in. And they were. Parents were asking for a news publication from a Christian moral view of their own and world magazine was born. CEO Kevin Martin sees the World Watch News League return to bail founding vision. The reason we still serve kids is because Joel started serving kids I. It is full circle because he started with kids papers and expanded that into world magazine, and that became the podcasts and the digital, and now we're going back to kids again with the video. So the current pandemic provided a great opportunity to step in and help families and educators. The timing was right all these kids who couldn't go to school we're at home and so in. In April. We started saying, well, why don't we start producing a short version of this program and to see what we can do with it so really trying to bring up bring a little light to it. Yeah. Seventy shows later, the World Watch team is finally settling into a production rhythm. This this week that you get us is operatives starts around a black table in a small conference room overlooking a huge green screen. Before World Watch associate producer rich bishop kicks off the morning editorial meetings pitching stories. He discovers from various sources evaluating whether the footage. gives us some good visuals work with and whether it's truly a headline story and whether the kids. Really number one should know about a number to know about it. So the team settles on content and flow reporters get their story assignments. What was Sarah Do? Let's have Sarah do NASA milestone story. That voice sounds familiar. It should Nick Eicher Co host of the world and everything in. It has also helped to launch world magazine and world digital for the past three months he's been working on World Watch with program director and host. Brian. The Big Bash Basham, what else would you call him? He is he's big and he is. Happy and he lights up every room that he walks into and it's just like it's the big bash is fun to work with. He's got a lot of energy. He's got a lot of broadcast Knowledge Basham uses that experience to lead and mentor the team of six reporters. World Journalism Institute graduates Hannah Harris and Michelle Slaven along with a few voices heard before kristen? Flavin Sarraj Weinsberg Janna Joe. They're helping out of just helping out as as they can. Say. Similar. Liberty University Graduate Taylor Farrar and rounding out the crew, a television news veteran who spends his days making every frame cows you tomorrow. Every time we get to the end of the show. He adds this little element to take us off. He didn't want to have. Also has a signature closing and remember whatever the news the purpose of the Lord will stay a lot of bad stuff in there are a lot of stuff you don't really want to dwell on. We just wanted to let the kids know you're going to hear a lot of bad stuff you're to be you're GONNA be living in a lot of stuff that's not great. But but at the end of the day that doesn't really matter does it because the Lord's got your back and he his purpose prevailed when World Watch news expands on August Tenth Joe Bells, we'll be watching and celebrating. Earlier this week, he stopped by the studio to encourage the team. Who chose this auspicious day? August, tenth is Pretty Big Day. It's my birthday. I can't imagine anybody having a grander. Gift. To See all this unfolding. And with such a still a group of people. It's wonderful. So thank you. Thank you the hordes name. After many years of Drina and months of planning, Nick eicher reflects on Bell's legacy. He does sell by quoting from Deuteronomy six. We're harvesting from vineyards that we didn't plant we're living in homes that we didn't build. we've got giants on who shoulders we stand. Or pointing for world. And Asheville Carolina. Today is Thursday August sixth good morning. This is the world and everything in it from listener supported world radio I Megan Basham and I'm Nick Anchor Commentator Cal Thomas now on Joe Biden and the veepstakes. Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden appears to have painted himself into a corner with his promise to select a woman as his running mate and based on his reported finalists. It seemed sure to be an African American woman. This means people with good ideas need not apply if they don't fit the predetermined demographic criteria press reports have indicated congresswoman. Karen Bass Democrat from California is a leading contender. She chairs the congressional black. Caucus and unlike Biden presents well on TV with her appealing smile and soothing voice all. Candidates, have baggage ambassador has plenty of it especially when it comes to Cuba Bass had visited Cuba multiple times of the nineteen seventies when she and Hollywood celebrities were praising the literacy and health care programs. So the communist dictatorship in a Fox News Sunday interview Chris Wallace Reminded Bass of her statement on the two thousand sixteen death of dictator Fidel, Castro. She said quote the passing of the common. Dante. An heavy is a great loss to the people of Cuba unquote. Best. said that her perspective on Cuba. Developed over time and that she now understands the Castro government was a brutal regime Bass said she spoke with colleagues from Florida, which has a large Cuban than anti-castro population in Miami and they raised concerns about her comments. She said she would not do that again for sure and profess not to be a socialist or communist but that begs the question why did it take her so long to become educated about Cuba? Was it only in the last four years that she learned about the repressive nature of the Castro regime? Did he think communism was of a different brand when practiced in Havana that in Moscow or Beijing where people are jailed or executed? For speaking ill of or resisting the government on other issues, bass seems consistently in line with the party's Bernie Sanders Wing. She was the lead author of the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act of twenty twenty, a partisan bill passed the house and went nowhere in the Senate among other things. The bill would have prohibited police officers from quote, intentionally pointing a firearm at an individual what about the intentional pointing of a firearm by a criminal at a police officer the bill has nothing to say about that criminals would love it. Any real journalist should ask bass about these subjects and more before she anywhere near one heartbeat away from the presidency I'm Cal Thomas. Tomorrow the second part of our culture Friday conversation on Racial Division and the Church and a little known film that avoids the Common Pitfalls of the Christian movie genre that and more tomorrow. I'm nick and I'm Megan Basham the world and everything in it comes to you from world radio world's mission is biblically objective journalism that informs educates and Inspires proverbs tells us the lot is cast into the laugh, but it's every decision is from the Lord I. Hope you'll have a great rest of the day we'll talk to you tomorrow.

Megan Basham US Chicago Joe Biden Nick Eicher Kristen Flavin world magazine President Trump Chris Butler Beirut officer Cal Thomas Kent Covington Twenty Twenty Cavazos Fox News Cuba KONIN CAVAZOS Lebanon Lance Williams
The Blibbering Humdingers

Everything is Filk

32:17 min | 2 years ago

The Blibbering Humdingers

"Welcome to everything is filled with andrew mckee be show for information soon interviews and news at dragon con the world's largest fantasy science fiction bench <music> welcome to the everything is filled podcast. I'm here with the why did that. The blithering hunting sometimes at the upper registers users there or those people who's hearing aids. You just blew out. I don't know i got yet. Another reminder of why onstage should never do all seto when i sing this so we know definitely a no no so. How are you all doing great. We've been great great yeah. It's been a good couple years because i is there a drug gone last year. We must be we played excellent wedding instead and for for some dear friends sound well okay. That's a good excuse. I guess in your friends okay okay. We paid us the friends who paid you. Oh my god it was on the beach. You know so yeah so we had a beach vacation in her. Sorry dragging on. We missed you but okay. We're going from forgiving understanding to resenting the hell out of you right now. We're back caceres so okay. Okay the not that's great. That's great because like i said we mischief so good to have you back and i guess two years ears. You've got you've got news. New stuff has happened right yeah a bit we do. We have a a new full length. Album that came out was was that show january of ninety eight the last dragon con we were at we had like an ep of the few songs that were finished but we weren't done with the whole cds so we have finished it and put it out and we're happy with it. It's called fantastic mystic geeks in find them. Gosh i wonder what inspired the title how clever imagine it probably about half the songs are inspired by the harry potter universe and in specifically jesse b.'s media <hes> <hes> and the other half are generic phantom things <hes> we also we the last few years. We've been taking ballroom dance. It's lessons so we wrote some songs that we could dance to different dance styles. There's trot in a tango and the triple swing and we do a rumba now and you can do know loki little locally run the cia to leukemia. It's a rumba and the judge interesting idea. I like that too. That's a good motivation i see. Can we hear one of the songs from the cd absolutely we can. We can hear that little go loki so kirsten kirsten in in in actually chuck actually started writing this like me to tell the story i could have set it up more. They got it wrong so they started writing this at dragon con in ninety seven yes you did you guys were sitting at emerged as we were working on a working on it in you had some lyrics and in started messing with a tune that sounded like that seven nation nation or russo it changed into that later who had anyway so they'll reason the the song exists this because i have a lego figure of loki who is one of my favorite <hes> movie characters and <hes> he was sitting on my window sill and i was trying to write a song about movie loki and his angst yes i have. I have pages of notes for that song or more low-key. He just causes trouble. Qazi can't help it. Well something like that but anyway the lego figuring yelled at me from my kitchen windowsill and about it's not about and i went the old gay so it's it's yeah it's about him and he rides around with us in our bag and comes out when we sing the song and you know it's and lives in a shot glass. Does i it. I don't know i appreciate that somehow. I always always low. This is a very strange song. It's it's very different than our normal winters stuff so when it was sitting on the windowsill in the kitchen he sat in that little shot glass. There's something special about the shot glass. Oh there's a musical called puffs all about what it's like to be a hustle puff and how they try so hard to come in third place in place. Nothing blaney way guy just puffs the musical check it out. It's pretty cool pretty cool but yeah so the song is little lego. Loki okay well. Let's give us <hes> mm-hmm and may have no quarrel with the seeker or a boot but my little lego lucky. He won't win dispute his ambition adorable bull and bruce. He's glorious san dashing in his green gold jumpsuit giant tiny and the donnas helmet looks so kids adorable. I live it up with little legos lewke. He sits blackout. Install <music> lego low keys my little leg monkey loki. You're made of them plastic polymer alama. That's classic not this will subjugate these humans with great power gross and he principal take you on hold him in my hand as i tried to keep him close listening four hours of his house he does boast. Devious mischievous always click with bola. We want take up my leg loki. He sits here in you again. My little little lego loki. He's the monster in the night dead so that you should be concerned as an impish this genius trickster in a role he didn't earn go your friendship and affection. He will outwardly to spend for love and acceptance. Loki sacred lead does. He said he was gone to school. One thing in return we will watch take it up with my lego loki. He's here in the car. <hes> lucky lucky lucky the lego go lucky little lego. Hokey talk with the best. He's my little lego game. Lucky a <music> <hes> well. That's great. <hes> okay so that data's on i guess we can still call it your new cd for now. Yes as far as con <unk> eating yep yep excellent. How many tracks are on the cd. You had to go and ask twelve hundred matthew on twitter. It's what i would call a full length cd. It's about somewhere between between forty and fifty minutes long surprised by over thirteen tracks something like that so yes sorry. I didn't memorize prices. Don't have a copy sorry i i sometimes i like to quiz you and just bonus questions. I i do that fail. The boring dinger's trivia. I do have a little bit of trivia about that c._d. Though so the movie fantastic beasts the first one <hes> that it's based partially on <hes> was set in nineteen twenty six and one of the songs that we wrote as a about a speakeasy z. <hes> in the in the twenties and so i got really into art deco design and so the the cover of the sea is art deco and we made some <hes> merch flasks so for a giggle water with them and stuff in the blind pig inya holly juice. It's all this sort of you know nineteen twenties looking art deco yeah which i just love love that designed the flasks are excellent merge. Lemme tell you pick up your blueberry hunting flask ethicon does he will be at your table again. Yes oh yeah okay excellent well. I did hear something thing about you and adults wim. Yes i would like to thank you for turning down that game and mikey and i actually he responded faster than even adult swim was does looking for filmmakers to do a song <hes> celebrating in to help promote a new show that they had coming out at this past january or february. It's called tig tone t. I g. t. o. N. e. and it's sort of a goofy. Midday.we ebel medieval fantasy hero who there's a lot of destruction in his wake of saving people he saved the toolbox but down the whole forest and everyone's homes but guy same to the toolbox you know a lotta people die while helping includes helping you're a narrow focus on what his goal is got yes yes and then we always about a quest. There's always a quest we watched a whole bunch of episodes besides and then we <hes> wrote <hes> they just wanted a sixty second song <hes> so we wrote it using a lot of things that happened in the episodes and also through a few things in that hopefully really will happen in future episodes nauseating ready so that's out there and if people video we we've filmed of oh cool of that stuff so yeah if you if you go to youtube and you just search tig tone filc you'll find it excellent bill of tig tone that all those keywords search so clever yeah. We just gave them a whole bunch of video. Oh footage we had a higher videography for to shoot all he did awesome lighting to we turned our living room into a medieval tavern oh cool so and they used about twelve seconds and most of it is ear shots of our kids kind of stereo opposite. There's just a few brief seconds of us sing. We smiled too much. It was not there the looks they were going fulmer. Dolly minstrels drills julie lee yeah anyway. That's how it goes do the filming all day long and you cut like most of it in yeah. That's against veria very tough on actors to get past after a while will well if you'd like you watch some of the footage the behind the scenes stuff on like lord of the rings and like all the make you know someone spends hours in makeup up just in case for hours to get their feet on and then they're not even in the scene yeah yeah but that's a digression so maybe we'll the as so how about that phil track but no the so you had a lot of fun doing the adult swim thing we did was an kids not famous at school because you know they went is gone and other kids on youtube the adult swim. You and your kids like cool credit nice. I can rain and it was nerd credit. If nothing else money money the money was not much money yeah it was it was good. It was worse than what we got and we really over delivered. We feel like way over deliver. Live blood was like it was fun and maybe they'll think about this for future gigs. They are doing a season two. I heard that was announced so so so season to the revenge else who has helped uh-huh excellent and it was you know it was really cool getting a a private message from one of the creators of <hes> you know he lays spoke message that we really got the the story we we understood it and got their sense of humor and he just loved it. Yeah yes so that was that was a good good feeling is like yes. We understand your weirdness are weirdness matches with your weirdness almost a moment we're just let with what is known as a god in you that we a match made in silk so romantic well. You caught me. What can i say <hes>. Oh mercy okay well. Do you have a i mean. Do do you have on your schedule all figured out dracaena where we know oh of course it's always subject to change. You know how this works so true happen at the last minute but our main shows right now at least with the filc doc tracks so friday from ten to eleven pm in. I think i think that show actually overlaps with the misbehave and maidens i add. It's kinda sad test because there are a lot of fun to we've actually done a bunch of cons with them. This year recently had a really dig into the filc seen in the convention scene. They also hopefully some people will come to our show to there's some overlap so go see then some and then comes the uscca. It'll if your schedule's limited about thirty thirty minutes of friday ten pm and then saturday eight thirty to nine thirty pm okay as our other big show that i don't think there's a lot of competition with that one yeah and then on <hes> on monday actually like at one o'clock. Were actually going to reprise <hes> a program on medieval music that we do as you know. We do stuff around the s._e._a. In just came back from pennzoil war and a leader still dirty the laundry laundry for like a week are broken laundry machines <hes> but yeah so a bunch of medieval and renaissance bounce music in a little bit of s._c._a. Stuff that's written about historical events <hes> so that'll be fun too. It's it's different from our normal thing <hes> and we haven't heard back from the concourse people yet but will almost certainly be playing a show or two on one of the concourse stages so we'll try to update our a facebook page so if anybody is is wanting to find those kind of dates <hes> besides checking the dragging hans schedule you can also look at your blithering humdinger. Xxx is on facebook resort. We should update our actual website. Oil yeah wouldn't be a good idea hunting dot com. That's one of the things you get pinsker a lack of updates on your website a okay well <hes> can we listen to another the song from the new c._d. Sure we'd love to mrs one of our very favorite lie. It's mike current favorite song of ours <hes> awesome. It's it's called kissing the rain and we sort of sketched out the tune. I don't know a couple years ago. He was playing around something on the guitar. I recorded it and then i sort of sang a tune over top of it and i was like what is this going to be and then like much time later. I was listening to it again and <hes> it occurred to me that this song is about to kurowski who is the <hes> the baker muggle guy from fantastic beasts and it's about his story he it gets all hooked up with the the magic people but then they make him lose his memories at the end in. It's all kind of sad but <hes> but does he he really does he remembers a little bit. Yeah see other like you did. Gather neat thing about the recording is our youngest son. Liam is featured playing piano on it. He basically made up the piano part based around the courting and actually our kids. I have started playing a number of gigs with us liam on keyboards an eight and on drums and then chuck still playing bass with us at most it shows we did <hes> asian. We get a big band. My pieces pretty neural. It's been fun playing shows with the whole family you you know as a as a parent i get all for clamped in super. Proud music with liam is such an incredible musician. He's islamic so much better than both of us. Put together an and many other people together. He's just an incredible and so it's super fun to just let him go and he learns a new song thirty seconds of he's never played with played it with us before. You know it's like what is it in here. You go you know fifteen eighteen. He's like putting a kid like that on stage time and time again. I mean that's just going to be good for him. Honestly he yeah he. He also does theater stuff and he's super good at that too and all that he's like. Don't tell me i'm good. My head will get bigger. You can't have an ego. That's horrible musician. They wanted to go into. We're like music talent. Most parents would be like yes. You do career music monthly performance. Don't make any money it's like. I performance don't don't make any money but you should totally do that rain pile. It's a tough market out there. He needs a fallback plan. I think music is a good stable fullback glen for him kosei. I mean you know he can do music but you know you can try the marie give give him a few years. Let him you know just be open to that fallback plan. That's it's important excellent. Well okay. Let's let's let's hear the other song yeah <hes> kissing the rain. I don't know what's wrong. Feeling uncertain certain. I'm standing here confounded in the rain. I know i forgot. I should remember be ling strange but everything's the say these visions spill my sleeping. There's some thing hiding just outside of reach making beasts from sugar taste stunned flower dreaming. <hes> and angels dressed ben tastic beasts do a memory circle <music> own roof. They imagine door <music> dreaming l'oeil still dreaming of of a kiss in the rain kiss in the ray. Everyday life inspired by magic keeps me h._m._o. Settled in this place dream all the day possible story three rosy cheeks bright almonds and djelic face in strange creatures only imagine i make them out of cookie dough and fred benson bull fan testing for fashion from visions floating round inside my fantastic beasts where you live on the memories circle around imagine dog and man dreaming <music> still coming in the rain kissing the ray <music> happier <unk> happier. Now business is booming. My tasty treat spring happy smiles to all deep down in my soul something still missing winter into spring the summertime and fall raise my gaze up to the doorway always and magic blooms between her eyes add by now. I can see what once was hazy. Images are clearer in mine mine fantastic beasts. I won't forget and magic me once again and i know they're unawed dreaming <music> ring that in the rain remembering that <music> remember that kids in the ray <music> doc uh huh uh uh that's a good one. Thank you <hes> now. That's good. I think those are good choices races because that shows your range and music and you gotta you gotta show you arrange a little bit with different songs as this particular city has a whole a lot of different kinds of songs on it and it really stretched us as musicians like jazz and chocolates like you're making me learn tango we now we had to learn how to tango two for that so yeah and we wrote real base parts for a few in a slight like plac- for manager for a measure it was <hes> he has to walk around a bit on the base and <hes> we had a lot of fun in writing in her letter from performing this winston her people checking out and enjoy it while i'm sure they will cause yeah a <hes>. I'm sure a lot of people are suffering from withdrawal from not seeing you on dinner withdrawal like less. The theme of the group sing was harry potter without decide. I made the comment on that. I'm like really really they haven maidens have some potter songs and i'm sure mark has some hotter songs for cats. He doesn't yet he. We don't know if you well this year. It's the superhero theme so. We're working on a song for that into secret yom mark. We really don't have a superhero song so we're trying to figure out what we're gonna do yeah. We were going to write it at pinza but that didn't happen. Something spent the whole morning writing notes on it so let's not make it into a song tom. Is everybody just doing one song at that or it's only lasts than our except for an hour. I think it's just going to be one sauce can always do rocket and grew in pretender superheroes in if we can't get the other one will i think are set is on right. After the group sing uh-huh runs long will just eat into our own time and do that for you so ends it like eight in our set begins begins at eight thirty ake a half hour so we can. We'll just do another song at the end of the gruesome. Stick out for the rest. Take care then we'll do rocket and group which is another new one. It's so fun. I like it. We're we're not aflaid on the podcast on and when you know it really should be experienced in real life at least as good on that one. We'll go well. This is <hes> this is going to be great. Finally it's it feels like a complete dragon con year now. The y'all are back and everything so this is good. Oh that's sweet but yeah so i look forward to hearing the full cd the and getting that and <hes> everyone listening you do it too and again. Thanks for being on the podcast and hanging out with me yeah. Thanks for having us yeah. Thanks for doing this year. After year really awesome of you and yeah i mean honestly it's one of the few times i really get to talk to y'all because because dirks running around beginning a few comments here and there but yeah i mean what what we'll try to talk oricon this year jamil little bit that would be all right well. Thanks again and i guess i'll see you in a few weeks. <music> all right. Here's everything spill is reported in austin texas by andrew mckee. Oh let's resort questions or comments about show females at entra mccain dot com for more information on bilk music at talking on this doctrine dot eh.

andrew mckee Liam harry potter chuck facebook youtube cia caceres kirsten kirsten pennzoil principal Qazi austin texas russo blaney fred benson matthew mikey fulmer jesse b.