6 Burst results for "Kunst Museum"

"kunst museum" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

08:27 min | Last month

"kunst museum" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"I talked to Melanie gurlitt about the 6th edition of the art market report, what the headline figures tell us and what we can read between the lines. As the exhibition hideouts the architecture of survival opens at the chetta National Gallery of art in Warsaw, focusing on the spaces in Poland and Ukraine used by Holocaust survivors to escape Nazi persecution, I talked to the artist behind the exhibition, Natalia Rommel, and in this week's work of the week, coinciding with the 150th anniversary of Pete Mondrian's birth, I discussed his final unfinished painting, victory boogie woogie of 1942 to 1944 with Caravaggio, the co curator of Mondrian moose, an exhibition opening this week at the kunst museum den hag in The Hague the Netherlands. Before all that, the latest series of our sister Paul cast a brush with continues with in depth conversations with artists about their influences and cultural experiences, the latest episode is a brush with Mark leckie, the British artist, so subscribe wherever you get your podcasts to hear that and to explore the back catalog of more than 35 conversations, do also subscribe to this podcast and give us a rating or review on Apple podcasts. Now, the 6th edition of the art Basel and UBS global art market report has just been published. Its author is the cultural economist Clare mcandrew, who joined me on this podcast last year to talk about the report for 2020 a year, inevitably hugely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. So how fully did the art market recover in 2021? I spoke to Melanie Gurley and art market columnist for the art newspaper and the Financial Times, who earlier this week hosted a conversation with Claire McCann drew and the director of art Basel Mark spiegler to find out and please note that all the figures are in U.S. dollars. Melanie, in a way, is it best to compare these figures with those from 2019 because 2020 was just such an anomaly. Yes, I think that is logical because as you say in 2020, we saw sales fall by so much, and we are talking about a pre-pandemic and post ish pandemic. Having said that, we're not in exactly the same situation because of the pandemic. So yes, to say, woohoo, what a fantastic year, not really. It's just we've pretty much gone back to where we were, which in itself was a bit down on the year before, but it's great that we have at least recovered. So we deal with what's not the same then. So what has happened in the pandemic that has massively affected the art market? Well, I think on the plus side you've seen, obviously, online has become part of all of our lives and we can talk about that being an acceleration. But I think it really is a very, very rapid change from where we were in 2019 when I mean, there were some galleries who almost deliberately didn't have a website because there wasn't cool. And now that's just there's just not possible. And the auctions have been helped. And the auctions really were the biggest driver of the recovery this year. They've really been helped by having their online facilities capabilities and extra eyeballs. So let's talk about the headline figures of the report then. What's it telling us? It's telling us that having gone down from 64.4 billion as a whole, the market then fell in 2020 to 50.1 billion. I mean, these numbers, they are relative to each other, they're not perfect if that makes sense. And Clement Andrew has been doing this report for 6 years so at least it relates to itself. And then we've bounced back on the market has bounced back to a bit higher to 65.1 billion as a whole. What's behind those numbers is that the recovery has been complete and better in the auction area, as mentioned, including private sales which slightly encroaches on the dealers, whereas the dealers didn't quite make up, I think they lost 20% of sales in 2020 and they gained about 18% in 2021. They haven't quite made up the slack. And tell us about the sort of geographical mix then, which areas of the world are doing well or as expected and which are falling away a little. Well, you've still got the three main art market centers of New York, London and Hong Kong, absolutely dominant, I think, between them there nearly 80% of the whole market. But you are seeing a little bit of variation within that. I mean, New York is by far the biggest market and growing, and that is a continuation of a trend that we saw running up to 2019, whereas China has now taken the second spot away from the UK and for about ten years or so those two countries have been trading places. But the UK obviously had a trickier time of it with Brexit and Claire was actually very clear about one thing about online sales is that you can actually choose where you are affecting the sales. So if you want to avoid a certain tax a certain vat a certain bit of red tape that perhaps Brexit has added, you can just say actually I'm going to I'd rather do the self from Hong Kong or New York. Interesting. So we've seen the UK fall a bit. And then they were very keen to point out because our balls will have a fair coming to Paris, although I'm not saying it's not true. It's completely true that the Paris market and we've seen it has had a very healthy year. I think their sales were up as a total 50%, but they've taken a slightly bigger percentage share. So they've gone from, I mean, it's low. They've gone from about 6% to 7%, whereas the UK has fallen from about 20% market share to 17. Right. So I mean, I guess the sample size is still too small to make a real judgment, but we have been talking about this, and we've been saying that the UK is slipping away a little and France is on the rise, but I guess we'd need a couple more years of statistics really to be able to say that trend is being backed up by the stats. Exactly. And look, I'm not here just because I live in London. I'm not here to give the UK market a boost. But the start of the year has been okay. There was some good sales last month, and we've got this may season ahead with the London gallery weekend. And there's quite a lot of buzz about London. So let's see, but you're right. Claire's numbers may not be a 100% accurate, but they absolutely back up what we've seen to the helpful. Right. In China, there's still a growth going on in terms of more galleries, more auction houses, et cetera, right? Absolutely. Yes, I quite a lot of auction houses and galleries launched last June 2021, which is also incredible because I think China had even more lockdowns than we did in the UK. But their internal market seems to be much stronger than it has been for a long time. Is the fact that the U.S. is so dominant? Does it relate to the fact that that's where the most of the billionaires are? A 100%. I mean, I think it's difficult to know what came first. Well, actually, I can probably guess what came first. The U.S. has had the wealth for a very, very, very long time. Which also means it's just got a much more entrenched, efficient art market and modern and contemporary art in particular, which is everyone's favorite at the moment. That's the best place to trade it. And obviously, while we're talking about billionaires, there's been a lot of talk over the past month or two about Russian billionaires. What's in the data about that group and can you in the data detect what might happen next year in terms of that? Yeah, I mean, there isn't a huge amount. And I searched for the word Russia through the report. And I think it came up twice. We should say shouldn't we that the report is obviously up until the end of 2021. So it can not factor in what's happened in the news. A 100%. And I mean, I think possibly the very last interviews were done maybe in January this year, so even that is before we knew that Russia would invade Ukraine. But I would say that you can see that the Russians don't feature in the millionaire list at all in terms of the percentage of millionaires in the world. They do feature as a percentage of billionaires. I think it's about 5%. Which is the same as Germany and India. So these are significant, but nowhere near as significant as in the U.S. and China. I think also in a way what the numbers say isn't really what's going to happen going forward. We don't know exactly how many Russians.

Melanie gurlitt chetta National Gallery of art Natalia Rommel Pete Mondrian Mondrian moose kunst museum The Hague the Netherlands Mark leckie Brexit Clare mcandrew Melanie Gurley Claire McCann drew Mark spiegler UK Clement Andrew Caravaggio
"kunst museum" Discussed on DeaconLive

DeaconLive

13:58 min | 8 months ago

"kunst museum" Discussed on DeaconLive

"Country. I believe we're wrapping around about fifty seven countries right now. Does that career. No there was another one. I forget what it is. I looked at or i was looking at the charts. I'll pull up here now. That's not a some people. It's a country now. Then you ever hab the like a light bulb. Go off in the house. And you're like i'll fix that later right. I'll get around to that later. Check engine light. I mean like the light in your house. No usually affects them right away so we have in our master bathroom or were they call it now. You're not allowed to see master anymore. It's the owners bathroom. I don't know what the differences anatomy owner massar. You're still owning something. We have a toilet. That's a little closet. it's by itself. It's got its own little door. it's got its own little light. It's got a little fan well. The light went out and then of course our ceilings in the bathroom or a little bit higher. I think they're nine foot in the bathroom. So i physically have to stay on the toilet to get to the light up in the ceiling. Of course that's where they are. But i've ever heard of a ladder. It's a small area. I mean as wide as a tack room. That's it's only that widen there when you shut the door. It's pitch black. I literally the old saying you. Just pee into you. Start hearing water. And you're like i got it so. I almost two weeks without changing the light bulb in the bathroom and i just did it yesterday and when i took the thing down i had like dead wasp because it's a like an exhaust fan and light all in one and i pulled the cover plate and had like dead waspa- led lighting. No i had. I put the cfl ones that are that we got from duke energy when they when they sell real cheap like once a year. They do everything jelly de my house. I would put an led in there. But i mean when you buy the twelve pack from duke energy the cfl's and they're only a dollar something a piece and led lights are like maybe four or five bucks. I'm i'm going with the cfl's for now. We've been in house for eight years of this long. I can go another eight years and be okay with that light being in there dan and it's a longer it stays on the brighter kind of kind of warms up brighter. It gets now speaking of lights and being blocked out kia car companies. They can't get the computer chips right. We found out dan. Now for those. You don't know. Dan bought my chevy silverado from me. 'cause we were planning on buying the new one the new chevy silverado with all the cameras and all the packages and the towing options and all that stuff found out that a news article. We were watching tv. My wife and the theater room. And i know baller. And she said god damn it. And i said what she's like they're not releasing any of the new trucks until december of twenty twenty one. We have to wait till december to order our truck. Now you have to order them. You can get it. I can order it then and then wait another six weeks us about six to eight weeks to get it so she was all pissed off about that. And i'm like okay. We're good now. Kia is having the opposite. Problem said this month that a recalling eight thousand five hundred seventy six sedona. 's hey i own a kia do you. Own a sedona. No all right spectra. So from two thousand fifteen the two thousand seventeen because of software problems that could activate the opposite turn signal instead of the intended one now. This is a weird one so read the actual release that came out with the smart junction box. Subject vehicles interprets the signal from the multi-function switch to determine the intent of turn signal direction. They s j b software logic properly interpret the signals received from the multifunction switch and certain circumstances as a result the turn signal may inadvertently activate in the opposite direction of what was intended by the driver. Creating risk of it doesn't happen down here because nobody uses plinking and north carolina. So you see a two thousand fifteen to two thousand seventeen out on the road. They don't use your blinker. Just say thank you and thank you for. Not using your blinker. Because if you wouldn't put it on a left and you're turning right that would make me more mad than you. Just not putting on the blinker altogether. When i first got my license back in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine you had to know the hand signals if you stick your hand straight out the window you taken a left turn if you hold it up you take a right turn and if you twist your elbow and hold your hand down that you're stopping and they used people would use them. When i first started driving yeah and if you watch die hard or religious people who ride motorcycles they will do the same thing. If they're slowing down especially i'm from orlando florida and we have bike week over in daytona. You would see them as slowing down. They would do the down or they would have the girl or were they. Call the bitch on the back. They would have the girl on the back do the hand signals because got the big fat hairy leather guy. Upfront can't be doing this honey. I'm turning left. She put her hand out. And do the luck turns kind of good idea to have a hand on the stair on the on the bars so cute right now is telling that the owners will be notified in november and dealers will install the software free of charge until then if you have a two thousand fifteen two thousand sixteen to two thousand seventeen think of something else to you signals. And that's what they're saying. I guess go go in the analog with using your left arm as as damn saying now. Yeah that's we did. We'd take four years from when the car was built to for the problem show up. That's that's strange ever seen. I don't know if i brought this up to you before. Have you ever seen the movie. Fight club yes okay. Do you know what his main job at. Norton's job in fight club. Was i mean the actual fight club. What his actual job does what what why. He came to be what he was in the movie night. Only his job was an insurance claim. Adjuster for a manufacturer so he would go out and he would see a car. Car exploded on fire and it burned a family lie and he would go there and examine what would happen to and his report would have to say. Is it enough. That we're losing too many vehicles to issue a recall and if it doesn't they'll just let it keep happening it's cheaper to pay the million dollars to the loss families a million dollars for action into stuff like that didn't actually recall this and put these things in the fixed cars and sign to have to watch that again. That's they say it real quick in the very beginning where he goes out. And there's a burning car or burnt car in his lab or whatever and he looks at it and he has a fly all over the world for whatever auto manufacturer that he represents but yeah that's what he does he he. He adjusts evaluates whether the car is we should do a recall. Or just keep paying the people until the some you know. What's the least amount of money. We have the dish out now. Dishing out money for this artists. A danish museum gives this gentleman. Who's who's a famous danish artist the equivalent of eighty four thousand dollars. A danish artists was given eighty four thousand dollars in the museum to use it in a work of art to use it. You hear me in a work of art. When he delivered this pieces he was supposed to make that. It was not as a promise. They said that these are what we ordered instead. Artists jen jen's handing okay here. He gave the kunst museum of modern art in denmark to blank canvases and said they would title take the money and run haning was asked to create two of his previous works two thousand and ten an average danish annual income. That was that was his art. Art piece was does ten in average income and a second art piece that he did was called the average australian income in two thousand seven. So what happened was they said you know what we're going to give you eighty four thousand dollars and i want you to. Can you look up the actually. I'll do it right here. the picture who see right here so his images that that he had his artwork was basically he glues the average income. I can't find a stupid thing about glue all the money together. And that will be a display. And he'll shows that could have a third grader do that well. It's supposed to represent that the how much money physically you can look at it and see how much money that a person makes an australia. A person makes per year and then in. i'm sorry. Australia was twenty nine thousand and then a danish piece people made about thirty thousand glue in this and they wanted to recreate this thing so they handed him eighty four thousand dollars and he said you know what i'm gonna turn in as you see right here and for every podcast we do. We have a matching videos. Well you can see this by going over. Proper radio dot com. He turned into canvas right here. And what's on this one it's plank and this one right here just as planks so he said we're gonna call this. Take the money and run now. The museum says well this guys kind of jokester at times and his contract says that it will run from september. Twenty fourth all the way till january sixteenth of twenty twenty two. In which the money that. He's that the museum gave him to put in the pictures which are now not in. The pictures has to be returned so for example if he did put the money in the pictures the eighty four thousand dollars would come out of the picture after the art length of the showing ran and then they give it back to the museum but right now we won't know until the end of the running. I mean at being honest. You should have taken the money. Well they're they still haven't settled out anything and right now they have no. They have not reached an agreement whether he's actually going to give the money back at at the end of january six. A lot of things can happen from now from january. Sixteen twenty twenty two die. Pass away or diane pass away or it could be island somewhere. We'll never find now. Dan are you. Have you ever done a class action lawsuit or been part of a class action lawsuit. Yes what lawsuit were you part of i- lawsuit would budweiser because of some ugly girls. I slept through it no to be truthful. A was one at home depot. There was evolved in one for something out and both little things. What am i got a check for like four hundred dollars did you really. I remember there was doing something with a whole bunch of ever used like a lithium ion battery in your products. How many lithium ions because they said that causes. This doesn't cause us. And i got like a check for like fifteen dollars by the time. The end of the class action lawsuit. Now here's another one. Dan me and you were going to sign up for it. Because i want you know maybe we can retire off of this because this is going to be a big one. Wins wins the last time you bought like a bag of chicken or chicken in general at the store supermarket. Aware of oh. I probably punch a week twice a week. I big chicken. Have you bought chicken in two thousand nine had have you boughten chicken in two thousand ten and two thousand eleven and twelve and all the way up to the present time you bought chicken and some form whether we frozen whether it be from an actual a grocer or something like that you have. How many times a week do you buy. Chicken probably won't go shopping every week. I'll buy chicken some. How much do you think you spend on chicken a month now. Twenty five dollars a month. Maybe okay so right. I shop at all these really expensive. So if you purchase chicken in the last decade you could be entitled to some money back. A one hundred eighty one million dollar settlement pending in the broiler chicken antitrust litigation. This is a class action lawsuit that actually they found that. The processors chicken were actually fixing the price for the poultry industry to charge. Hey we're all gonna get together and we're going to only do our prices. You know this amount and they got caught in two thousand sixteen. They got caught in the letter. Saying that you know there is a new non newsletter but an interim letter in the office and someone leaked it so what they're saying to be eligible to receive money me and you dan you need to have purchased fresh or frozen encloses circles bother me for a raw frozen or raw chicken between two thousand nine to december thirty first two thousand twenty. Now i can tell you you know. We buy chicken lots of chicken every month and to claim this form to claim this. Here's a claim. Form go to overcharge for chicken dot com. And you'll see here. It has file your claim. And we'll we'll do a little. Let me get back into the what states you can do it. You can do an eighteen states now. According to the news release the settling defendants have not minute to any anything concerning or delaying the legal claims of this actual lawsuit. Nee agreed to settle to avoid any further expenses or inconvenience or disruption in the food. Line chain we did not do anything wrong. But wha- only give one hundred and eighty one million dollars that's how firmly. We feel that we didn't do anything wrong. So there's an there's another company out there that let's say stash ios pistachios are just so frigging expensive and the guys who makes possessions go regular nuts over there. How much you charge for pound charge three dollars a pound. Hey guys let's charge you fifteen dollars per pound. I mean who's to say. They're the only ones making the damn pistachios right. It's a market on that the claim for you to print out the form and actually male this in now there's twenty four states that are involved in this class action lawsuit so here goes washington. Dc california florida. Why illinois's iowa. Kansas maine massachusetts michigan minnesota missouri nebraska nevada new hampshire new mexico new york north carolina. We qualified dan or oregon rhode island south carolina. South dakota tennessee. Utah and wisconsin For more information on that you can watch us at the deacon. Live portion of the podcast. So there you go so if you purchase a purchase chicken during these dates the dates a little. Bit different in rhode island wisconsin. Fill out the form estimate. How many packages of chicken you purchase on a monthly basis and the estimated cost dan. You know what. I spend at least three hundred dollars a week on chicken. No this feeding you know. I spent three hundred. Dan look at me wake. I spent about three hundred dollars a week on chicken. The deadline to submit this claim December thirty first two thousand twenty two. So you got a whole almost a whole year sixteen months or something like that to exclude yourself from the suit. You need to submit or include yourself needs to be done by. I'm sorry november. Tenth twenty twenty one during the the website. So here it is. File your claim here instructions. Name care of street address. Phone number And it looks like a big old form so it's gonna take too long to do it on the air so if you get if you for only one hundred. Eighty one. People apply for that right. You're probably gonna get about two thousand dollars. Lawyer will still the rest. Got a million apiece. So don't tell your friends. Don't listen to this section on the podcast because there's going to be mean. Dan probably one hundred and eighty other people. Maybe when my finger heels. And i can use a computer all right when we come back. There's a lot of things at work killing. We have no control over. Wait a minute. i didn't kill anything. Yes we me and you. Dan have killed some things. And there's no way we. We knew that we did it. Control over. you'll you can live right here from ready are back..

cfl kia massar sedona dan Dan jen jen kunst museum of modern art haning silverado chevy Fight club north carolina daytona Australia Norton
"kunst museum" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"kunst museum" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"You are here to discuss the peabody essex. Museum latest exhibition the women who revolutionized fashion two hundred and fifty years of design as the title suggests. This is not by any means a small topic. Can you tell us about the exhibit and a little bit about the inspiration behind its creation. Sure absolutely <hes>. So this exhibition actually is a partnership that we did our we're doing i should say <hes>. With the consortium and then hand in the netherlands and it is an extension of a show. They put on called them. Vitol's strong women and fashion and their show then travelled to belgium and we are essentially kind of the third venue. But it's. It's an interesting collaboration because it's not an identical repaying of their show so they're installation on which was was beautiful and spanned multiple rooms in multiple galleries and our show is going to be designed a little bit differently <hes>. And part of reason that we were very excited to partner with consortium is that they're so accommodating on really great partners they allowed us to borrow sixty objects from their election which was huge for us because of course the european collection <unk>. Phenomenal works that represent into the big european designers for which <unk> doesn't have that much representation and but of course being in the united states. We really wanted to draw out of some additional stories that pertain to designers the twentieth century. But also american designers <hes>. For whom there wasn't as much representation in their show the we've been able to augment <hes>. With twenty five works from our own collection some of which are recent acquisitions and <hes>. We borrowed a few pieces from the mfa in boston. We brought to pieces from the chicago history museum and then we're working with <hes>. To private collectors. So there are a hundred eight mannequins in the show. It's a really big show and it does run the gamut. We say two hundred and fifty years. It's not of course the comprehensive look but it does span that timeframe and so why an exhibition dedicated to i mean. This probably goes without saying what inspired you to do. An exhibition dedicated just to women designers. Well that's a great question <hes>. It actually takes me back to a time in chicago. Because i was working at the post. Your museum as the custom curators there and of course as a social history museum we were definitely thinking about a twenty twenty s. A hallmark year for the anniversary of the ratification of the nineteenth amendment. And so even then this back in two thousand seventeen <hes>. By partner just kapoor. And i were already beginning to catacomb the collection and look to see what we might do in honor of women. Because of museum itself was looking to do a year of women based programming and exhibitions. My life changed. Because i. I moved tuesday when massachusetts became the vashon. Tech's curator the peabody essex museum. Is i kind of put that idea dressed. Rest until i was scrolling through instagram. One evening saw me ho. Hey who's curator at the museum post image of stack of books and i noticed all the names on the books. And they were all women designers. She said something pithy like coming soon. And you know a strong women fashion. And so i sent her a direct message and i said hey. Tell me more what is going on. What are you doing when he planning <hes>. And she told me about the show. And i said oh. That's really interesting and said you'll have you ever worked with the us institution before she said. No we haven't <hes>. What would you be interested. And she said yes so. I went and saw the expedition. And i came back and i spoke with our colleagues here in just so happened that we had a are scheduled for twenty twenty and <hes>. We really been thinking at that point about doing anything dedicated to him in and so it all fell into place <hes>. We were slated to open in may but of course because of covid that did not happen. <hes>. but again because we have great partners they were very flexible. And now we're opening number twenty first.

peabody essex museum chicago history museum kunst museum cassidy zachary elizabeth keck salem massachussetts Quant essex pem Lucille gordon bonnie cashin Vitol boston belgium partner Phenomenal united states madeleine
"kunst museum" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"kunst museum" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"Seven billion people in the world. We all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed. Welcome to trust the history of fashion. Podcasts are we explore the who what of why we wear. We are fashion historian and your host april kellyanne and cassidy zachary will hello dressed listeners. Today we are very excited to feature an exhibition. That does something that you know. We love to do on dressed. And that is celebrating the work of bad ass ladies from their history and today. And that's right because today we are welcoming the peabody essex museum fashion and textile curator pitcher sling card to the show to discuss. The exhibition. Made it the women who've revolutionized fashion and as the museum's website says through more than one hundred works made it celebrates the stories of women who revolutionized many aspects of the fashion industry and traces how these efforts parallel history of women's global struggle for equity and opportunity exhibition is actually collaboration between pem and the kunst museum didn't hog in the netherlands and it features clothing from both of these museums collections. As well as from private and public collections and so from every designer from elizabeth keck lead to lady. Lucille gordon to madeleine to bonnie cashin and low mary. Quant and then all the way to more contemporary designers like rei kawakubo <hes>. Irishman herpin gina. Kuma you do not want to miss this exhibition. It actually just opened in its on view until march twenty twenty one yes and alas we will not be able to make it to salem massachussetts in person this year especially right now so what better way to celebrate this exhibition them by being joined by his co. curator patriot. Welcome to the show. He had show welcome to dress. It's such a pleasure to have you here today thank you. I'm excited to be with you. So you are here to discuss the peabody essex. Museum latest exhibition the women who revolutionized fashion two hundred and fifty years of design as the title suggests. This is not by any means a small topic. Can you tell us about the exhibit and a little bit about the inspiration behind its creation. Sure absolutely <hes>. So this exhibition actually is a partnership that we did our we're doing i should say <hes>. With the consortium and then hand in the netherlands and it is an extension of a show. They put on called them. Vitol's strong women and fashion and their show then travelled to belgium and we are essentially kind of the third venue. But it's. It's an interesting collaboration because it's not an identical repaying of their show so they're installation on which was was beautiful and spanned multiple rooms in multiple galleries and our show is going to be designed a little bit differently <hes>. And part of reason that we were very excited to partner with consortium is that they're so accommodating on really great partners they allowed us to borrow sixty objects from their election which was huge for us because of course the european collection <unk>. Phenomenal works that represent into the big european designers for which <unk> doesn't have that much representation and but of course being in the united states. We really wanted to draw out of some additional stories that pertain to designers the twentieth century. But also american designers <hes>. For whom there wasn't as much representation in their show the we've been able to augment <hes>. With twenty five works from our own collection some of which are recent acquisitions and <hes>. We borrowed a few pieces from the mfa in boston. We brought to pieces from the chicago history museum and then we're working with <hes>. To private collectors. So there are a hundred eight mannequins in the show. It's a really big show and it does run the gamut. We say two hundred and fifty years. It's not of course the comprehensive look but it does span that timeframe and so why an exhibition dedicated to i mean. This probably goes without saying what inspired you to do. An exhibition dedicated just to women designers. Well that's a great question <hes>. It actually takes me back to a time in chicago. Because i was working at the post. Your museum as the custom curators there and of course as a social history museum we were definitely thinking about a twenty twenty s. A hallmark year for the anniversary of the ratification of the nineteenth amendment. And so even then this back in two thousand seventeen <hes>. By partner just kapoor. And i were already beginning to catacomb the collection and look to see what we might do in honor of women. Because of museum itself was looking to do a year of women based programming and exhibitions. My life changed. Because i. I moved tuesday when massachusetts became the vashon. Tech's curator the peabody essex museum. Is i kind of put that idea dressed. Rest until i was scrolling through instagram. One evening saw me ho. Hey who's curator at the museum post image of stack of books and i noticed all the names on the books. And they were all women designers. She said something pithy like coming soon. And you know a strong women fashion.

peabody essex museum united states Tech england chicago massachusetts partner vashon twenty twenty
The Women Who Revolutionized Fashion with Petra Slinkard

Dressed: The History of Fashion

05:30 min | 1 year ago

The Women Who Revolutionized Fashion with Petra Slinkard

"Seven billion people in the world. We all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed. Welcome to trust the history of fashion. Podcasts are we explore the who what of why we wear. We are fashion historian and your host april kellyanne and cassidy zachary will hello dressed listeners. Today we are very excited to feature an exhibition. That does something that you know. We love to do on dressed. And that is celebrating the work of bad ass ladies from their history and today. And that's right because today we are welcoming the peabody essex museum fashion and textile curator pitcher sling card to the show to discuss. The exhibition. Made it the women who've revolutionized fashion and as the museum's website says through more than one hundred works made it celebrates the stories of women who revolutionized many aspects of the fashion industry and traces how these efforts parallel history of women's global struggle for equity and opportunity exhibition is actually collaboration between pem and the kunst museum didn't hog in the netherlands and it features clothing from both of these museums collections. As well as from private and public collections and so from every designer from elizabeth keck lead to lady. Lucille gordon to madeleine to bonnie cashin and low mary. Quant and then all the way to more contemporary designers like rei kawakubo Irishman herpin gina. Kuma you do not want to miss this exhibition. It actually just opened in its on view until march twenty twenty one yes and alas we will not be able to make it to salem massachussetts in person this year especially right now so what better way to celebrate this exhibition them by being joined by his co. curator patriot. Welcome to the show. He had show welcome to dress. It's such a pleasure to have you here today thank you. I'm excited to be with you. So you are here to discuss the peabody essex. Museum latest exhibition the women who revolutionized fashion two hundred and fifty years of design as the title suggests. This is not by any means a small topic. Can you tell us about the exhibit and a little bit about the inspiration behind its creation. Sure absolutely So this exhibition actually is a partnership that we did our we're doing i should say With the consortium and then hand in the netherlands and it is an extension of a show. They put on called them. Vitol's strong women and fashion and their show then travelled to belgium and we are essentially kind of the third venue. But it's. It's an interesting collaboration because it's not an identical repaying of their show so they're installation on which was was beautiful and spanned multiple rooms in multiple galleries and our show is going to be designed a little bit differently And part of reason that we were very excited to partner with consortium is that they're so accommodating on really great partners they allowed us to borrow sixty objects from their election which was huge for us because of course the european collection Phenomenal works that represent into the big european designers for which doesn't have that much representation and but of course being in the united states. We really wanted to draw out of some additional stories that pertain to designers the twentieth century. But also american designers For whom there wasn't as much representation in their show the we've been able to augment With twenty five works from our own collection some of which are recent acquisitions and We borrowed a few pieces from the mfa in boston. We brought to pieces from the chicago history museum and then we're working with To private collectors. So there are a hundred eight mannequins in the show. It's a really big show and it does run the gamut. We say two hundred and fifty years. It's not of course the comprehensive look but it does span that timeframe and so why an exhibition dedicated to i mean. This probably goes without saying what inspired you to do. An exhibition dedicated just to women designers. Well that's a great question It actually takes me back to a time in chicago. Because i was working at the post. Your museum as the custom curators there and of course as a social history museum we were definitely thinking about a twenty twenty s. A hallmark year for the anniversary of the ratification of the nineteenth amendment. And so even then this back in two thousand seventeen By partner just kapoor. And i were already beginning to catacomb the collection and look to see what we might do in honor of women. Because of museum itself was looking to do a year of women based programming and exhibitions. My life changed. Because i. I moved tuesday when massachusetts became the vashon. Tech's curator the peabody essex museum. Is i kind of put that idea dressed. Rest until i was scrolling through instagram. One evening saw me ho. Hey who's curator at the museum post image of stack of books and i noticed all the names on the books. And they were all women designers. She said something pithy like coming soon. And you know a strong women fashion.

April Kellyanne Cassidy Zachary Essex Museum Kunst Museum Elizabeth Keck Lucille Gordon Bonnie Cashin Low Mary The Netherlands Vitol Madeleine Gina Salem Chicago History Museum Belgium MFA United States Boston Kapoor
"kunst museum" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

03:32 min | 3 years ago

"kunst museum" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Probation and two hundred hours of community service Okuma arrived at the New York City court where she was greeted by supporters. She taped her mouth and other parts of her face before entering the courthouse for her ruling Okuma has vowed to continue her activism and protests against Trump immigration policies, and the renowned Nigerian art curator, Oakley and ways or has died at the age of fifty five after a battle with cancer and ways or was the director of the house there Kunst museum in Munich Germany until last year, he was also an art critic educator, editor and writer he worked to put African art and artists center stage as well as women artists in nineteen ninety four he founded in K, a magazine for contemporary African art his exhibit the short century, celebrating African art and independence movements was hailed as a landmark exhibition and ways or was the first African born chief curator of Venice Biennale and was widely credited for bringing political art back to the prestigious. Festival democracy now spoke to oakwood and ways or in Venice in two thousand fifteen. Many many different ways. And I think he's both in the lodge on small ways. One can begin to see the Tilleke of ought not something to be appropriated us propaganda awfully puppies. But two. Learn to teach in to but also say way full the public to learn how to expand the view of the world that was oak way and ways are he died Friday at the age of fifty five in Munich, Germany to see our whole interview with him at the Venice Biennale, you can go to democracy now dot org, and those are some of the headlines, this is democracy. Now democracy now dot or the Warren peace report, I'm Amy Goodman, and Juan Gonzales, welcome to all of our listeners viewers across the country and around the world. We begin today show looking at President Trump's meeting Tuesday with Brazil's far-right, president j air both Sinatra the at the White House. I also know that we're gonna have a fantastic working relationship. We have many views that are similar, and we certainly feel very very true to each other on trade. I think Brazil's relationship with the United States because of our friendship is probably better than it's ever been by far who's days meeting marble sonatas first trip to Washington since he was sworn in as Brazil's president in January. So I'm have describable Sinato as the Trump to tropics. The former military officer has praised Brazil's former military dictatorship which ended thirty three years ago. He's spoken in favor of torture and threatened to destroy imprison or banish, his political opponents human rights groups have expressed alarm over his past comments about women and the LGBT. Community. He wants told a female lawmakers she was too ugly to rape. He also said he would rather hear his son died in a car crash than learned that his son is gay plus an election last year was aided in part by the jailing of his chief opponent, former Brazilian president Lewis and Nacion Lula to Silva who remains in prison. The judge involved in Lula's case is now both Sinatra's Justice minister at the White House ball sonata defended what he called traditional family values and attack the news media. Those news through conclusion may say Brazil and the United States stand side by side in the.

Brazil president Trump Sinatra Venice Biennale Okuma Munich Germany White House Venice chief curator United States Nacion Lula New York City Munich Kunst museum Justice minister Oakley cancer Amy Goodman director