35 Burst results for "Kuhn"

"kuhn" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

07:47 min | 4 months ago

"kuhn" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Simon Thanks for being with us Spread in Biden continues his Asian trip This hour is completed a meeting with the new South Korean president who's just 11 days into the job and promises a tougher line on North Korea The U.S. and South Korea have expressed concern the north might test a nuclear weapon or missiles while President Biden is visiting the south and Paris Anthony Kuhn joins a Anthony thanks for being with us Nice to join you Scott What kind of harder line a North Korea did the president's outline Well in recent years joint military exercises between the allies intended to deter North Korea were scaled back in order to make way for diplomacy but no diplomacy has been happening since 2019 So those exercises are likely to expand They're also going to consider moving more U.S. Military hardware such as planes and ships possibly nuclear capable two or near the Korean Peninsula and they're going to cooperate on cyber threats from North Korea They also say they're going to focus on the goal of denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula and it looks like this could be a recipe for a period of increased tensions and diplomatic stalemates because both sides expect the other side to make the first move and make concessions which neither side has been willing to do And additionally North Korea is in the grip of what it claims is at first COVID-19 outbreak Did that come up Yes after denying that it had any COVID cases for the past two years North Korea now admits to having more than 2 million although they don't have enough testing and so it's hard to know the extent of it But South Korea and China have offered vaccines in assistance President Biden said the U.S. is also offered assistance but received no response A reporter asked Biden if he'd be willing to meet with Kim Jong-un and here's what he said There would be depend on whether he was sincere and whether it was serious As you may remember Biden was critical of his predecessor president Trump's cemetery with Kim Jong-un is essentially high stakes poker which ended in 2019 without a deal At the English policy in Asia of course has been focused on competition with China as that form a subtext to the visit so far Yes there were coded reference to preserving the international order the rule of law and to flashpoints such as the South China Sea in Taiwan But there's been no movement past these sort of ways of speaking no language aimed at antagonizing China It's interesting that South Korean president yunsong y'all talked about how the U.S. and South Korea share values of freedom democracy and human rights but he added that he didn't want to exclude countries that don't share those values suggesting that he's not ready to offend China which is South Korea's biggest trade partner Isn't U.S. competition with China largely economic or American South Korea trying to tighten economic Tyson Yes they are and the buzzword of this is economic security which means securing supply chains protecting intellectual property developing high-tech products And to governments are going to set up a dialog on how to cooperate more And President Biden's first stop in South Korea on Friday was a Samsung semiconductor factory he touted the fact that Samsung is investing in a big new semiconductor plant in Texas It's important to remember though that South Korea and Samsung are doing this because they feel they're getting the right labor costs and infrastructure and incentives but the technology belongs to South Korea and if they don't get those conditions I think they'll probably continue to make them on their own turf And pierce Anthony Kuhn joining us from Seoul Anthony thanks so much Thank you Scott Some healthcare providers are gearing up to provide access to abortion pills online These new efforts cropped up during the pandemic thanks to a boom and telehealth and now with abortion restrictions looming there's likely to be even more demand and piers ping Wong reports Earlier this month on the day the Supreme Court's draft ruling that could end nationwide protection of abortion rights was leaked a woman named Nora was on the couch in her apartment getting through a medical abortion And I was bleeding through a pad about every 40 minutes And I would take penny liners I made like these caterpillar pads just to cover all the bases They lasted maybe 40 minutes We're just using Nora's first name for personal safety She lives in upstate New York And I've always wanted kids but I'm 22 and I am poor And I just can't even wrap my head around like just going to the doctor getting an ultrasound all of these things are very expensive and if you don't do that you are charged with criminal neglect Over a baby that you could be forced to have For Nora deciding to end the pregnancy was hard but getting the FDA approved abortion pills was not She got them online through medical provider called aid access It's one of a handful of telehealth abortion services that have sprung up in recent years They're named things like hey Jane and abortion on demand And they've benefited from pandemic changes that allow abortion pills to be sent through the mail and taken at home The FDA made these changes permanent last year Now the possibility of abortion restrictions looms over parts of the country Robin Tucker a nurse practitioner and midwife who works in D.C. Virginia Maryland and Maine says these telehealth services are seeing a big surge in demand The future of abortion access is going to be getting pills out there and getting pills in the hands of people that's like one of the interventions that can provide the most autonomy in this kind of environment where people are going to lose reproductive rights Abortion pills in the U.S. are a combination of two drugs mifepristone and misoprostol Together the pills block a hormone needed to continue in early pregnancy and get the uterus to expel it They've been approved since the year 2000 and now account for more than half of all U.S. abortions The pills are considered safe and effective for ending pregnancies up to ten or so weeks Nora was 6 weeks along when she realized that she was pregnant and she found aid access through social media I was on TikTok maybe the day I decided about aborting and one of the comments was like hey guys you should check out 8 access and it's an organization run by female doctors The rest of the process was also virtual She filled out an intake form which asked questions like how far along is your pregnancy and do you have an IUD in place A clinician was on the other end reviewing Nora's answers to make sure that she was a good candidate for a telehealth abortion And they checked her ID to make sure that they were complying with the laws in her state Right now abortion is still legal in every state but telehealth abortions are not Doctor Jamie Pfeiffer is founder of abortion on demand a telehealth provider that operates in 21 states Any restrictions on abortion care within a state whether it's just age limits state managed ultrasound extended waiting periods no matter how egregiousness restrictions are they also apply to telemedicine abortions within that state States like Texas Tennessee and Missouri have explicitly banned telehealth abortions Other states have some in person requirements Elena sulgen director of women's health policy at the Kaiser family foundation says there are many gray areas Can a patient see a doctor and a different state can friends and pills across state lines and how will any of this be enforced We really are moving into a new zone I think it's going to be challenging for providers I think it's going to be challenging for patients And I think we're going to see a lot of litigation as these cases move forward In states where telehealth abortions are not legal.

South Korea North Korea President Biden Biden U.S. China Korean Peninsula Simon Thanks Anthony Kuhn Kim Jong COVID Nora yunsong y Samsung un pierce Anthony Kuhn Seoul Anthony ping Wong Scott South China
North Korea Fires 2 Ballistic Missiles as Arms Rivalry Mounts

NPR News Now

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

North Korea Fires 2 Ballistic Missiles as Arms Rivalry Mounts

"South korea test launched ballistic missiles within hours of each other today. npr's anthony kyun reports from seoul. The launches underscore a growing arms race between the rival states. South korea's joint chiefs of staff says the north's missiles flew eastward nearly five hundred miles before landing in the sea not long after south. Korea launched. Its first ballistic. Missile from a submarine sold denied. It's test time to retaliate. For the north's the us military's indo pacific command said the north's launch posed no immediate threat to the us or its allies. Npr's anthony kuhn reporting on wall street.

Anthony Kyun South Korea NPR Seoul Joint Chiefs Of Staff Indo Pacific Command Korea United States Anthony Kuhn
​North Korea Holds Scaled-Down Parade to Boost National Morale

NPR News Now

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

​North Korea Holds Scaled-Down Parade to Boost National Morale

"North korea has marked the seventy third anniversary of its founding with a night time parade observers. Were watching displays of new weaponry. But as npr's anthony kuhn reports from seoul there were none to be seen. The north's official royal dome shinmun newspaper published pictures of canine squads police on horseback and a pandemic control unit wearing red has met suits the korean central news agency reports that the parade was led not by soldiers but a civilian militia unit called the worker peasant red guards. The parade appeared to focus on countering domestic threats. Not foreign ones leader. Kim jong un showed up in a suit and tie instead of a military uniform but he made no speech and its last. Two military parades in january and october. The north revealed new intercontinental and submarine-launched ballistic missiles but it has not test launched them.

Anthony Kuhn Royal Dome Shinmun North Korea NPR Kim Jong UN
"kuhn" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"kuhn" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Super and you sweatpants. From what i. Yeah yeah we. We got engaged actually. The weekend of locked down in new york city. Central park is friday the thirteenth march thirteenth elected. Yeah yeah real time. Poor danny you know already. Having the exile of having to propose or not having to things and meanwhile the world is going crazy We were supposed to have an engagement party and last minute canceled. But we the two families got to be together and we sang by the piano and very Kyun matt's fashion The most important thing was for danny was that his grandma would be able to be there. So we brought the wedding to grandma We did the the marriage license nuptials at the honda civic center But we were lucky to just do just our two families in boca at grandma's house at booz house yeah invoke into in december And we By younger brother. Jake is a tech wizard. And he works in like events and so we didn't do zoom wedding. We actually did a youtube link and it was cool because friends and family were watching from all over with their kids with their parents. And you know it was in florida and then came back to la and we didn't think we would ever be moving but as we're thinking about starting a family we you know danny's from michigan. I'm from new york. And both of our families. Spend time a lot in florida and we decided as we start that next chapter we wanna be closer to family and that was really the main reason for for moving so moving to miami staying in a warm weather climate We'll have to adjust to the humidity. But we'll get there. I saw on instagram. That you designed your own wedding invitations. How was that for you. Cobbler and choose kind of thing. Yeah i i think you know. There's kind of an expectation with certain things that i do like. Oh you're gonna do. Do the drawing for this. But i did for this case. I did want to do it. It just it felt special and especially because it wasn't with everyone getting to send out like a little i still sent out a paperless post With the drawing on it and you know it kind of had that new yorker style which felt like us so it was it was sweet and no one was telling me like oh. Can you make these edits. I working for oneself right. Yeah yeah do you anticipate this. Move to florida influencing the direction of your practice at all is this. Is this where you're going to open up in person studio. How do you see the work being any different. If at all. I think that the reason i kind of decided to launch want to launch the studio was because moving. I don't really know where we're gonna live or pobably being an apartment or condo for a little bit whereas in la. I thought you know we were maybe going to be in a house and starting family i i wanted to kind of have something that not felt like a little bit more traditional but be able to kind of focus on something and that one of the things that i realized that i love about what i do of all the different kinds of things is being able to kind of draw anywhere i think with design wall coverings and textiles and and moving to this new city. I'm able to kind of do that in whatever type of space that i'm in so if it's not a big you know bigger space. That's okay and kind of open to like seeing how i'm influenced by miami. You know it's will feel very different. I'm excited about that. Because i definitely feel like my artan home design meld together so i'm excited to be able to explore a new city and kind of welcome the new inspiration. That will probably come about well. I can't wait to see what you do next. Currently kim. thank you so much.

Kyun matt booz house danny florida Central park boca new york city honda Jake la instagram youtube miami michigan new york kim
"kuhn" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:54 min | 1 year ago

"kuhn" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"That you know build something on a social media platform like if i shift the direction of what i'm sharing. Are they gonna stick around but you also want to not just do things for other people you want to do it for yourself. But it is this kind of line to have to balance. Had he managed that. I think it really just has to do with growth in time. I think it it really like where i am. Today is very different from that. I think it's also. Because i feel confident in who i am as a person to and and and where i am in my life so weirdly. I think it's you know getting older having more experiences working on yourself and getting to a good place where you feel confident in yourself. So you know you'll you'll lean into what you wanna create versus what you think. Other people want to create and usually. That's what people respond to and people will come along that journey with you. You know they. I think when i started doing these faces it was kind of a response to me feeling stuck in this one world and fashion. This feeling like okay. There's another fashion week coming up. People are expecting me to draw this. But i don't feel creatively inspired to draw. Draw that and that's where like kind of like the one line technique came into play. It was almost meditated for me and a way to kind of break out of this anxiety of feeling like i had to do something. I had to draw off of an image now. I could just put pen to paper. Not feel like it has to look a certain way. Try something different and it was. It was like kind of a self soothing exercises that morphed into than different kind of style and you know people a came along the ride with it and some people didn't. that's fine. do you get a lot of feedback from your from your followers and fans. you know. i'm lucky. I feel like i don't have too many haters. But you know once in a blue moon. I remember i. I think like at the height of when things were kind of going on. I remember someone said you know. I like art but this is an art. You know. I mean the things like that and i think now obviously am able to kind of laugh at it and be like me you know. They probably maybe they're having a bad day But you know. I think it is really exciting to when people say. Oh my god. I had certain drawings where i've incorporated texan to. That's just maybe as simple as can. I have a hug. And i've had friends you know reject means say like this really turned my day around which is like the most incredible thing or or stranger. Deanne not to me or comment Show on the. I feel like there's more positive feedback that has come through the social media pot form. That is really special. That something as simple as you know a little drying with just like i love you or i'm thinking of you or whatever it is or even just the image itself you know how it can. Impact someone's life is is pretty cool. In addition to prada and absolute you since been commissioned by elle magazine bombay sapphire the jewelry brand alexis petar capitol records and more. How do you get most of your clients now. It really has been through instagram. I don't know a percentage. But i would say the majority of all of those you named and what has continued to happen has has been through instagram. Just a simple either. Dm or they email me Which is crazy. You're also working making fine art. And you do sell prince now. Do you have different methodologies in how you approach working for a client or working for yourself for commissions on the kind of more traditional art side of things. They have ten to be more the faces that are a little bit more abstract. So when it's when it's that it's a little bit more of the trust within me as the artist that you know the person that's commissioning me knows this styles a little bit more free form you know. I've definitely limited the kind of commission work that i've taken on now and that's just from kind of experience and and learning and saying yes to a lot in the beginning to be able to say no now to commission work that i don't necessarily think is what i think is my best work or what i enjoy doing I don't know if that answers. The question yeah you've also moved into home furnishings and installations. How different is it for you. Moving from two dimensions to three. When i switched from kind of you know the digital page to then the page two installations to then textiles. That was an exciting transition. Because i think there's a lot more room to play when you work in design and textiles. And i remember when i started creating wallpaper. You know what maybe was. My original drawing was maybe a simple figure on page on a white blank. Page when you put that into a pattern or a repeat pattern or you add color like i. Typically you know my work a lot of black and white and i feel like i kind of unleashed this or or discovered a different side of my style when i was designing more for textile or wall coverings because it is a different medium it's it's being viewed in a different way. You know you can kind of take risks a little bit more because maybe a piece of art on a wall is is a very specific thing and i really have found this love for design and home and textile and so i'm working on launching a design studio hopefully by the end of the year which is really going to be wall coverings textiles and kind of focused on that. And still you know. Pick and choose things that i do and i'll still always share because it it still the core of what i'm doing are these drawings and i just really have kind of a love for being able to play a little bit more and have things be within the home. So that's something that's exciting so wendy. You officially launch. She doing this on your own. are you. Partnering with furnish home furnishings manufacturer. Tell us everything about getting a scoop So i am working with a company that will be actually producing the wall coverings in textiles and they're based out of brooklyn so they'll be actually creating it but it will be something i'm doing on my own. You know. I want to kind of test it out and explore and see where it goes and i think you know i can have the control over it and i feel like because i have an audience of people that have already expressed interest in it and i had wallpaper for hot second and you know it was very well received so i think it will be good to be able to kind of put it out there on my own. And and i'm hoping by Fall winter chick. Kind of put it out there. That's really exciting. Carly will it be under the name. The cartoon realist or your name it will. I think we'll be cart oriels studio congratulations on this super exciting news. It's really wondrous to watch the path of your career. Currently the last thing. I want to talk to you about is your recent wedding and moved back to the east coast so i the nuptials i understand you got your marriage license at the honda. Civic center anaheim..

alexis petar Deanne wendy brooklyn Carly east coast honda anaheim
"kuhn" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:20 min | 1 year ago

"kuhn" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"And i remember i turned it in and the guy was like. You know. these actually aren't what we thought you were going to be able to produce for us. You'll get paid but like we're not gonna use it. And i was like i i mean. Let me try again. Like i wanted. I want to make this work. I didn't want to give up. And you had to draw like fifty different images slightly different from each image because zanu mation and a lot of the other. Illustrators worked on computer. I did everything by hand so like i had to redo everything by hand but again i just knew the opportunity was such a big opportunity and they stuck with me and ended up happening so it was a you know an early lesson you know in hindsight of just kind of saying yes to stuff and then kind of figuring it out along the way or just you know learning along the way. Even though i was terrified by the the ask at the time as commissions continued to come in you ultimately felt comfortable enough to leave your day job with chelsea handler and pursue a career as an artist and illustrator. Which is quite astonishing given the notion that you were not ever planning to do this. My was it a hard decision to make you nervous. You worried about surviving continuing to get jobs continuing to be the the it girl thing. That was interesting was a lot of that happened while i was still at chelsea at the time. My boss you know. He said we're going to be going on a heinous which television shows kind of going to titus and then come back and you know it was. It was february and said we're going to go on a hiatus but we want you to come work for us back again in may as a producer on this show so that was the point that i told them i was like so. I have this instagram. Kinda been doing this thing. And and that's when they pulled it up like in the room who are you. What is this double life. you've been living But it was a great way. That i didn't have to make the decision to quit. I was actually getting paid through that and was able to kind of. Have it be like a test. Like should i do this. And if not after a few months. I could always go back to this job. But i think because i was kind of open to saying yes to a lot of different things and just kind of not being so one path oriented. If that makes sense you know like saying like. I only want to try and mean galleries. I think the or. I only want to try to you know. Be a new yorker cartoonist. I think because it was kind of open that allowed me in a way like to be more open to a lot of different kinds of jobs. You've written about how when this new career path all started to come together. People felt free to offer you all sorts of advice about how to run your business and people felt you should only make originals and not sell prince others thought you should partner with a gallery right away. Others thought you should make greeting cards. How do you make sense of all the advice ultimately for japan south of your own. I think it's still a constant struggle. Like i think because i didn't go to art school and this wasn't you know an intended path. I had definitely an insecurity. Of where do i fit in. I didn't know if i fully felt like. I wanted to go that commercial route and and just start doing greeting cards. But i also didn't really feel like i was someone who could be in a gallery an art gallery and i think it just became a lot of trial and error and what presented itself. I think i got connected to someone at the time who was doing absolute art which is another online art platform. So that was i. Think the i art prints that i ended up doing. And eventually i would create my own art prints. But it's hard to say how to navigate it. Because i still feel like i'm still navigating it And and i do think that. I sometimes still get worried or i've been paralyzed by. If i do this in my not going to be able to do this. Or if i do this. Am i gonna get stuck in this world. And i think i felt that way Within the fashion illustration world that i got kind of categorized into in the beginning. I didn't view myself as a fashion illustrator but it also tied to instagram illustrator. That was that other kind of insecurity that crept up. Because why can't you just be called an artist. You know that even now today. I'm kind of like the. Why is that a bad thing to be called this or that you know again. I think it was. Because i didn't necessarily ever view myself as an artist or that you know to claim that word and it wasn't my intended path. That's i think what has made made that kind of like struggle. Of where do i want to go. Or what world am i allowed to go into. You know you said that at the tiny were also bothered. I the term fashion illustrator Why did that while the with being an artist and a creative is also tied to your identity. And where you are in your life. And i feel like i was in my late twenties going through some life changes relationships and everything and i just think like my identity. I didn't really know who i was. And i also in the beginning only drew fashion illustration drawings or fashion inspired drawings and nothing else on the page. I didn't share photos of myself. I didn't share inspiration photos. And i didn't really feel like i was coming through like i remember when i met a friend person after she had followed me and she said i just assumed you're like this fashion girl that like did her hair and always had a full thing of makeup on and would wear these amazing dresses. And you know that's not who i am. I wanted to explore more of who i was and even though i am not my art it does feel like they're connected and then on the other hand i think because i discovered this artistic side of later i was just at the beginning of it and so i didn't want to be put in a box if i wanted to. Do you know something completely different. And i think that's what happens with instagram. And my my crew did happen in front of like people lie. You know real time. They're seeing me. Try new things. And so i felt kind of constricted by what oh will people started following me or liking my work because drew the readdress so i have to continue to draw the red dress And i think that's a struggle struggle that a lot of creatives probably have even today that you know build something on a social media platform like if i shift the direction of what i'm sharing..

zanu mation chelsea handler titus chelsea japan instagram
"kuhn" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

10:16 min | 1 year ago

"kuhn" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Instagram was just like a photo editing app. I didn't know it was the like public form of expression. Interestingly i decided to go back to your first first first post so like scrolled all the way all the way all the way you posted your first image on january twenty ninth twenty fourteen. When i did that i started to look at mine too and i was so bad at instagram. At the beginning that my first image is in the wrong direction. I didn't know how to rotate yeah direction. But your first post was a black and white illustration of a pixie girl inspired by january fourteenth. Two thousand fourteen post on the website. Sirtori a-list so talk a little bit. If you remember about that. I post yeah. I don't know if i can place myself and easy from from andy warhol's days eighty sedgwick. I like i don't fully remember. You know. I think what i remember. Is that someone One of my friends was like. I can't believe you're you're putting your art out there for people to judge you and i at the time was in like an improv group. That would perform this like random hole in the wall on melrose called neon venus. And maybe we would have like four or five people. They're usually their significant others. Maybe a little bit more. But that was so vulnerable and scary of your face in front of other people's face being like you're at a grocery store you're bumping into someone you haven't seen in ten years go. You know like that was so scary so in a way i do kinda feel like it was exciting to be able to do something creative and put it out there and and maybe and i didn't have my name on my account for. I don't know how long i don't know if it was because i was Eventually while i was still at chelsea lately i was. I still didn't have my name on The cart tori lous. Because again like it's such a weird thing and when you're driving and you're working in comedy you don't wanna be like. Hey guys like i draw on the side check it out you know and yeah So i think in that way was just kind of i do have a memory of it just being fun and exciting that i was kind of stumbled upon this new or old new creativity again that it didn't and i do think that's why i say i think the improv growlings allowed me. Even though you don't think improv groundlings to artist is is a normal path. But i think it gave me the confidence to kind of put myself out there. Did you come up with the name. Cartwright realist so. I think it was that the world was fashion and sartorial and sartorial assed in and then i had this kind of cartoon quality to my work and then my name being carley you know that. Like a c. sound. I think i kind of just like blended the words together of just kind of sartorial cartoon and carly and they had a baby and You know in hindsight it's great but also it's. It's kind of hard for people to say and spell. But i i do you know. I think that there's something that people kind of get a sense of the two worlds combine. Currently while you're in college you took only one fashion illustration class looking at your early work. It's really well developed and you have voice and a style that's completely unique. Had at that happen without any training or consistent practice through your life at that point all thank you You know. I think that it really was the product of repetition in in a weird way i would see an image and draw something and in do that kind of almost every day as just you know having something as a creative outlet and just trying to stick to something every day and i even remember when i started out. I would sometimes use pencil. Because i didn't want to mess up like once. I start doing a little bit more on instagram. Maybe people were starting to recognize it. Then you get scared. And i would draw an image and and use pencil and then go over it and pen and i. I kind of felt like. I had these mistakes within my art. Like early on and wasn't sure of people like that and they were kind of these flaws within my art that i realized that that's what actually people gravitated towards these perfectly imperfect lines and i next using a pencil. I like drawing with pen. Because you know if there's a line out of place on a hand or you know a legs a little wonky or an is not in the right place. I kind of eventually leaned in to that. And i think it was only because i just started. I was doing it every single day. A little bit every day and you know when people like oh how did you find style or how did you get good and i say it's not about getting good. It's about becoming confident in what you're doing. You know. maybe this person over there. This fascist trader was drawing the perfect model on a runway. And i and i liked drawing people backstage. You know seeing the weird angles and and doing it and and find myself gravitating to the things that were a little weird a little bit off if such a unique. I feel like there's an ease to your lines. That is so unique. There doesn't feel it doesn't feel like there's tension in the drying or struggle. It just feels very natural and almost sort of instantly burst thank you. Yeah i think There's that improv side of things too. It's like you know they say yes. And is what the the motto improv. Where you're just supposed to someone throws you a line no pun intended. You know they say something to you and you're supposed to yes and we then went to the park instead of saying. No it happened this way and i and i feel like weirdly. That's kind of how. I approach my art very improvisational. I don't usually plan out. What i'm doing i i do. Maybe have a stack of notebooks of of failed drawings. 'cause i as i said i like to draw pen and because i don't feel like i get the same quality of lying when i'm drawing with pencil unless i'm doing something different and it's that's the style but i still even with pencil don't usually a race and i think that there's kind of like magic that can come when you're just you know going and you're not planning it out even with my with like murals that i later did You know that can be a little scary on a wall planning it out but yeah on. October eighth twenty fourteen. You june illustration featuring sarah jessica parker sitting on the stoop of the brownstone that she lives in the tv show. Sex in the city She sitting on a stoop. You can't really see her face but she's trying on shoes. What happened after you posted this image. So i saw the image and at the time. Instagram was that it was instant and it. Was you know. Chronological and i remember. I drew the drying. And i think i posted it under an hour from one. She posted the photo. And i was sitting at lunch later that afternoon and i looked down at my phone and i got a text from my older brother joey and it says. Omg s. j. p. and i was like whoa what. Oh my god and she had reposted my drying and was just like. Wow that was quick love it. Excess j. p. and the new yorker girl inside of me just was like oh my god any early i mean anywhere. Yeah like you know. It was just kind of like shocking moment. I didn't really know what was going to come of it But it really did kind of kick off like a a next round of things that started to kind of happen all organically through instagram and just showed me like the power of that platform. After the sarah jessica parker reposed you started to get your first requests and commissions one opportunity that came in was from prada. Talk about what you did for them. Yes so that was all through instagram. I remember. I just got like a blind email. You know you set up these emails and wait for somebody to come in you like email yourself a couple of times. I just want to make sure your testing. And i remember i got this email and it was for a digital sunglasses campaign called pro raw and they were tapping six fashion illustrators art illustrators to kind of interpret the line of sunglasses and they were going to pair us with a animation house and they were gonna turn it into an animation and they h- had it all up on this website and it was going to be this big thing and a significant other kind of came in to help negotiate for me because i was just like. I don't know what i'm supposed to do and let me tell you it was. It wasn't all roses. Like you know i did this. Product rock campaign and it was great. It was dealing with people like in italy so there was a delay. I didn't really know what i was doing. And i did these drawings. And i remember i turned it in and the guy was like. You know. these actually aren't what we thought you were going to be able to produce for us. You'll get paid but like we're not gonna use it..

Instagram Sirtori sedgwick andy warhol carley Cartwright carly chelsea sarah jessica parker joey prada italy
"kuhn" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:17 min | 1 year ago

"kuhn" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"On paper. But you remind me of a young version of me so i wanna give you a shot and i was able to just of start on her desk right away and what you're doing is essentially rolling calls is kind of like the industry term so you kind of get on the phone. Make the calls. Like i have so and so for steven spielberg batch. Patchy through and you're you're kind of like expected to take notes and you're adding names to call sheets and then you're also managing inbox emails. Up the wazoo where you're setting up meetings for agents. It's all about setting up megyn meetings and lunches and dinners and drinks and it's really fast paced. It's also really great to do. I think especially in los angeles because l. as a very spread out city can feel very lonely and the agency world is kind of almost like a grad school for the entertainment industry. Everyone is around the same age right out of college or just kind of you know the first one of their first jobs and just looking to make friends and there's an event or something for anything imagine imagine a birthday or this or that and everyone's kind of going out together and that's kind of how i made my group of friends. I didn't really know anyone. When i moved to los angeles. And yeah going back to your point. About entre loyd was the assistant to ari And so i kind of joke i was. I was that character You know just went from that boss and then worked on her desk for six months and then had to go to a more senior desk. That was a little more chaotic. And i definitely developed a lot of thick skin from working there but i think it. We're leaving though it doesn't directly on paper seem like it would lend itself to being an artist today are but i think a lot of those skills have just kind of having to like. Think on your feet working in a fast paced environment. Maybe helped me later on. You know navigate later things at the same time you were doing this. You were also performing a groundlings which you mentioned. Groundlings is the legendary improvisation and sketch comedy theater at that point. We you still hoping to get a gig on saturday night. Live or second city or something. That was more standup related. I don't think it was like an actual go. I'm sure deep down there was like. Would you wanna be the craziest thing. I would turn away. Someone's like you should be on us. No but i just got you. I wanted to just put me on. I probably wouldn't have turned down. But no i think it was again kind of why i went to see a i. I was searching. I think i was always searching for what i wanted to do. And i remember. I auditioned in college for an improv group like freshman year. I didn't make it. And that was that and i definitely enjoyed it and when this came about i think i was dating an actor at the time and he was. You know had friends that were doing it and that was another great way to also meet people you know. It's really fun When i when. I got to start groundlings and i was taking classes aid to be in a class environment again when you've been out of college even for just two years or a year and a half and you're feeling lost and you just want a little bit little bit of praise once you're being like yelled that outworked it's good to be good job carly but it's so silly and you're you're meeting people that were so different and eclectic and and yeah and you just get real. I feel like. I had like a really weird period groundlings because everyone's just like do invoices and like you know you're just picking up everything around you and just soaking it in soaking in all the weird characters around you at that point though from what i understand. You had stopped drawing but you began again. Correct me if. I'm wrong here after an unusual experience getting high. You know. it's so funny. Because i'm not someone who smokes. I'm so anxious on my own. Just like it was like one of those. La nights in malibu a friend had it and she hadn't thought about this in a very long time like blushing. Because i'm such a like. Oh my god. I've smoked pot but my friend. Who is a little bit more of the earth than hippie dippy and had always had kind of like a notebook on her. And i you know we were kind of in. Malibu had that experience than and it wasn't anything that crazy was probably like not even anything but Yeah it kinda reopened up that creativity inside me. I had like you said. I hadn't really drawn in a while and i just started kind of like doing these little doodles in her notebook and then kind of started up again. While i was still at sea a you know. I just would draw friends on their birthdays than solely like their bosses would see it and they like. Oh that looks like a weird. Tim burton character. Can you do me. You know But yeah i mean. I just think i was excited. It was something that i rediscovered but didn't really know what it was going to become. It was just as i said that like continuous path of searching to wanting to be more creative at this point you began working for chelsea handler on her television. Show chelsea lately You started as an associate producer and then as management of development and production at chelsea's production company. But you're continuing to draw and began sketching daily. When did you begin to start thinking that this could be something more than just a daily artistic practice but the possibilities of a career. yes so when. Instagram came along I remember sitting at a dinner table with a friend. And i think i had maybe done a drawing of her or something and she was. You know you should start an instagram account. I was like okay. I'll you know. I'll like go for it again. I didn't really know what was going to happen. But i was doing these drawings. Initially i started kind of drawing my like little weird timber ness characters and then i guess just kind of like what was on instagram. At the time in the beginning it was a lot of fashion. Photography fashion bloggers street style. And it just kind of organically. I shifted from just drawing the little characters in my mind to i would see an image and kind of just feel inclined to interpret it in my style but i would credit who i would draw something and say you don't inspired by so and so and yet at the time i think even thought..

los angeles steven spielberg loyd ari carly malibu chelsea Malibu Tim burton
"kuhn" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

09:06 min | 1 year ago

"kuhn" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Design matters. Thank you for having me carly. is it true. you can do. A spot on impression of janice from friends Yeah i don't know how spot on it is. And i don't know at what point i declared this but it's pretty loud and piercing so i don't i don't know if you wanna hear it or not. Yes can you believe chan lubang. I don't see race. Stay on after that piercing noise. So actually i have to tell you i. I can do an impression of lois from family guy. And i know the ease outdraw family guy esque type characters so the pita i love it. I feel like there's like a world where they kind of was blend in the lowest and janice would be good for yes in an alternate universe. You're a native new yorker but until very recently you lived in los angeles. And i understand that your dad played for a long time and a classic rock cover band. Your brother is a filmmaker and cinematographer. So would it be fair to say you grew up in artistic family. Yes and i also have a younger brother who is also their artistic and my mom is very creative and my dad is actually still rocking out in that cover band. Yeah i feel like you know the combination of my parents and growing up in new york city. Where you know. It's the hub of culture and you know fortunate to grow up around feeder and fashion. And i mean just people watching lent itself to being exposed to creativity so early on. I read that you grew up singing and acting even did theater at a sleep away camp i want to this camp point opines upstate new york and it wasn't a theater camp but i think you had to participate in plays and i was a little shyer when i was younger and I think i even when i went to day camp. I told this memory. Have this memory of getting up on stage in crying. Like a you know an end to this summer performance and it's funny because then i would later go on to slowly grow within camp getting bigger and bigger roles. I think my last three years. I was a do opt girl in little shop of horrors and then i was Adelaide and guys and dolls. And then i was jesus and jesus christ jesus christ superstar which was performed on parent's weekend A uplifting performance. Not so much. But we grew up going to broadway musicals and definitely a very musical family. Both my brothers and my dad are all incredible piano players. I quit when i was in fourth grade. Which i'm very sad about anybody that has kids. That's listening to this. Wanna quit piano. Don't let them. I know but we did. Even you know. Recently we were all together and there's a lot of seeing by the piano Which is kind of one of my favorite things all at the same time while you were doing this. You were also doodling dresses and thought you might grow up and become a fashion designer. But i actually read that. That was just one of the many careers. You were imagining happening. What were some of the others. I think comedy was always a through line. You know watching. Snl growing up he wanted to be on snl. Yeah and i would later. Go on to take improv. Classes at the groundlings. Yeah but yeah. I don't know if it was how some people have that set goal like my older brother kind of always knew he wanted to be a writer. Director a filmmaker. And i think for me and my younger brother we we kind of had different interests. But you know maybe we kind of we've two different things and hobbies and krier paths along the way so and then landed and and none of those fields creativity yet but an unexpected really interesting. An unusual path You went to syracuse university and got your degree in science television radio and film and while you were still in school you got an internship working on the television show the view so tell us all about that. I need all all of it. I i believe it was the summer before i graduated college and our main job as an intern on the view was wrangling. The audience members as they were waiting online. Which i believe they overbook usually with these shows for the audience because people don't show up but i guess you know it was a very Popular summer and we would be outside waiting online and have to turn people away and people were not happy about that and got called some few names. Even though i'm like. I'm just a lowly intern. Like i have no power but you know it was kind of that first faure into the world of entertainment and kind of getting a little bit of a thick skin and also being exposed to being on a live set Which was exciting and getting to you. Know what being an intern. You kind of got to shadow in and pop in and all the different departments and who were the time you were working there. I know what whoopi elizabeth barbara. What was that see. That's my. That's where i was wanting to take this. I wasn't sure if she was still on the show. I e yeah well. I wanted to say i personally worked there So you know because we didn't really interact much. But i think it was. Just you know that magic of hollywood or the entertainment industry and kind of seeing these people up. Close you know. I think it was really cool just to see all these women. It was very fast paced. And it was a little bit of an intro into that world which i ended up you know working in. Did you witness any of the onstage or offstage debates slash fights. I feel like i did. My memory is a little murky. I feel like sometimes. I'm like i wish i remembered things more vividly so i can't fully remember but i i have a vague memory of being in the control room and witnessing whether it was fights or even just kind of the chaos of a live show. And you know what's going on in the control room and being like go to come one golkar have not could look what are we doing. You know like that chaotic like newsroom. So yeah. I think that that was it was something that was cool to see and experience after you graduated. You figured you'd continue in television. But you were persuaded to consider joining and agency. And the example was like ari from entourage and you got your first official job in assistant at creative artists agency so ever three questions about a particular part of your life. How does one get a job at a place like creative artists agency. What kind of work were you doing. And just generally what was it like when i graduated. I never thought. I was gonna leave new york city at first and go to los angeles but i think i knew i wanted to be in television and thought maybe scripted and just kind of knew that there was more opportunity and i think i had a friend that had moved to la and was working at an agency and said you know if you don't know exactly what you wanna do in the industry working at an agency as a really great steppingstone. Because you get kind of an overview of the whole industry you know when you work at like a ca and they represent writers directors and actors and all the different areas. So you're kind of learning all the different facets of the industry. And so the way i got there. I think it was a family friend of a friend. I do think sometimes it becomes like who do you know. I think you know. If you go to a certain school and alumni may i think there was a syracuse connection. Got me into the door. And when i interviewed sometimes people have to start out in the mail room which is kind of like that famous like grunt work and i interviewed with this younger agent and she said to me..

chan lubang janice carly lois whoopi elizabeth barbara new york city los angeles Adelaide Snl snl syracuse university new york hollywood ari la syracuse
"kuhn" Discussed on The HeFluence Podcast

The HeFluence Podcast

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"kuhn" Discussed on The HeFluence Podcast

"That just kind of. It's just incredible. It's it's an amazing. It's amazing life part time my life. That's so cool. And so as as you were speaking. I i had this vision and and when we get to the end i'll tell you about it it was really the i had my friend nico loesch on on our call. She's been on record champions. Now glenn founder and brought her on. I'm grateful because We just have another god ordained connection right and My friend Dr phil carson. I'm reading his book and him. And i are working with Together now and We talked about this. The last thing i want to talk about. We talked about community. Stephen and and how important that is. You know it's it's it's super important like Shared this my wife. And i've been digging into some of these prophetic dreams and stuff and and you know i think about it. How god's specifically chose twelve people right and how he chose three and an. There's a really awesome series Called the chosen. I don't know if you've watched it or if you if you had the opportunity to it's amazing i would just tell you if you're listening to me at the sound of my voice and you're watching my interview with stephen. Is there in season. Two right now and season one ended at the woman at the well and now they're indices into My wife and i are going to watch them on sunday. If you if you have an apple iphone you can go to the chosen. It's that there's an app on the apple. Iii store in the first series the first season was eight hearts. Eight one hour parts. I watched them twice I won't go into that. Because i could literally talk about it for probably about two or three hours the revelation that i had i wrote down Abouts and if you know your iphone. I wrote down about seven notes. Pages of notes on my iphone k. From the revelation. That i got from this. It's it's great it's itself funded They've already raised money for for for heart. Yes that's it. That's it for for part. Three part three is being raised. And they're and they're just raising money. They did a christmas special. That was just epic. And and what i what i learned from that is is about community and about how when you create an atmosphere and a community that people feel safe and encouraged people's lives change rider. Like like i. I made a mistake. Stephen by As a believer having some codependent relationships in wanting stuff for more people than they wanted for themselves right an indirect me brought the wrong. Pete into my life. And i i just reread the boundaries by Townsend and cloud was. I think every human should ever read that boundaries..

nico loesch Dr phil carson Stephen Iii store glenn apple Pete Townsend
"kuhn" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

Very Bad Wizards

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"kuhn" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

"That's what you think is out. It's i think this is a completely over thought like so you know. Galileo wants to know whether two objects fall at the same time like regardless of their weight. There's an answer to that is an answer to that great. But that doesn't i don't think anything kooning as inconsistent with that. Well it kind of is if the if the claim is that. There's no need to believe that there is an objective reality for science to be science he again. There does need to be an objective reality for science science. Because otherwise what the fucker we do. That's exactly what i'm saying. But but it's still the gap between that and science needs to be understood as working towards this one true picture of objective reality. That's the thing. That kuhn rejects. I mean look. There might not be one true picture of objective. Reality that we can ever achieve. But that doesn't mean that we're not sort of working toward describing more and more accurately that's why paradigm are achieving progress. Because they are approximating like the truth of the world that is external to us. This is let me see if this is wrong. Abadi either exist doesn't just the me frame it this way right haircut. There is one true picture of reality. out there right and maybe we'll get there maybe we won't prop maybe we definitely won't but we'll get closer and closer to and all i'm saying. Is that what you understand that that that the meaning of one true objective. Reality the things that you wanna find out about. Gravity or about You know oxygen or about quirks or about whatever that is going to be shaped like inevitably necessarily by your paradigm and so this is why. It's not that helpful to think. Oh as we go from Successive paradigm from one paradigm to this accessorized. I'm we are now just that much closer to the truth because even just how we understand the truth or reality has now changed in a way. That is That is a part of that paradox. so just even understanding what the target is. I think this is just all he's saying. Is that the target changes depending on the parrot. And so you're not even aiming you're not aiming for the same thing.

Abadi kuhn
"kuhn" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

Very Bad Wizards

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"kuhn" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

"Thanks to give well for sponsoring this episode of very bad wizards. Okay i wanna be so so. Let's let's table that think. That would be a good way to end is to talk about I wanna talk about like this idea of pre paradigm into paradigm. And the i thought of maybe entering. This conversation is to ask you because kuhn is really not talking about the social sciences. At all in this book is he mentioned by the none of his examples. They all come from chemistry and physics and occasionally biology but None of the social sciences social sciences often may be used as an example of something So so take social psychology for for example would you call social psychology in a pre paradigm or a paradigm stage normal science as. I can see an argument for both in. Well you so part of the problem. That many people pointed out is that he offers like a whole bunch of different ways. A defining paradigm in the strongest way. Where it's like that whole world view rather than sort of like a guiding exemplar which is sometimes would use this. I don't i think we're we're prepared matic. I think we're just going about everybody's sort of turning away it's specific different questions and like you have a best. You have like some some agreement about methods in fact a lot of times people use paradigm refer to particular method in psychology. Which kind of bothers me. But we have things like a widespread agreement about the task of of experimentation and but it still feels so if still feels too early. There are other areas of psychology. That i would have called paradigmatic. So when i think when i think of paradigm in psychology think of like behavior ism so like the dominant paradigm of behavior. Ism did seem to me to go through the the normal science phase and the anomaly crisis and then abandonment large abandonment but in social psychology. Should people doing on their own ship. They're like yeah so like philosophies also clearly at pre paradigm but in.

kuhn matic
"kuhn" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

Very Bad Wizards

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"kuhn" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

"Was at harvard he started teaching a class on the history of science and moved to princeton where he fully embraced his role as historian and philosopher of science. So in this book kuhn is attempting to describe the progress of science overtime from the perspective of historian science and what motivated him was that he saw that there was a kind of a widely accepted. Standard view of how science seems to proceed. That it's gradual and linear in its accumulation of knowledge and sort of builds over time. The coon thought that this view was actually mistaken and in this book he develops what is like a stage like description of his approach. To how scientific progress works so four coon. We begin who start doing working in science. What might be called pre science or prepared matic science. They're just many approaches to scientific questions. There worked on independently. There's very few shared assumptions and methods. So this is where you get like a bunch of people writing entire treaties on how the world works. They're not in communication with each other but after a while especially probably through the emergence of communication with each other there is an emergence of shared paradigm. So here's where. I'm gonna try my best to to give a quick definition of what a paradigm is although this is controversial a collection of beliefs assumptions methods definitions and probably some other stuff that guide scientific practice. It sort of describes the set of questions that should be asked in the phenomenon that should be observed guides what kuhn calls normal science so once a paradigm get set into place. normal science begins and normal scientists. Sort people plugging away at the questions. In phenomenon that have been defined by their paradigm but after a while the current paradigm the dominant paradigm starts to accumulate some failures It starts being unable to account for some of the observations out in the world. These are what kuhn refers to.

kuhn princeton harvard
How the Olympics Is Working to Be More Environmentally-Friendly

Environment: NPR

02:01 min | 1 year ago

How the Olympics Is Working to Be More Environmentally-Friendly

"Organizers. Have pledged the games will be safe from the pandemic. they also say they'll be environmentally friendly. Npr's anthony kuhn takes a closer look at that claim last month. Grandiose music's welded a ceremony to unveil symbols of olympic sustainability when simple comes courtesy of olympic sponsor procter and gamble stanislav vesa. Ceo of png's. Japan subsidiary introduced the podiums on which athletes will get their medals. The tokyo atlanta twenty podiums are made for use plastic packages directly collected by consumers and then recycled even the gold silver and bronze part of the symbolism. They'll be extracted from recycled cell phones and other gadgets to make the athletes medals but some analysts say the symbolism of sustainability exaggerates the reality unfortunately the data show that stability in all dimensions is decreasing over time from nineteen ninety. Two to twenty twenty. That's fan daniel wolf. At the university of lausanne switzerland he co authored. A study of the sustainability of recent olympic games wolf define sustainable as having limited ecological impact promoting social justice and being economically efficient. These goals he says tend to take a back seat to the ambition to put on dazzling mega events but wolf and some environmental groups. Do give olympic organizers credit for at least trying. Monaco konishi is the climate and energy project leader at wwf japan. She praises the games energy plan. So the extra electricity that is required for the tokyo olympic will be one hundred percent renewable energy and that could be a very good role model for the future olympics. The games will of course still produce carbon emissions. But she says the organizers have already secured more than enough carbon credits to try to offset the greenhouse gases. The games

Anthony Kuhn Grandiose Music Olympic Daniel Wolf Vesa NPR PNG Tokyo Japan University Of Lausanne Atlanta Monaco Konishi Switzerland Olympics
"kuhn" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"kuhn" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"Unquote Prior to that yes so growing up in brazil. I was exposed to photography more on the magazine style. So he would i. I knew about national geographic knew about fashion magazines But i didn't. I wasn't yet exposed to the as as art it was. It was not until. I came to a high state than i was hanging out. I always liked studying together with other people or seeing that. Their study always made me study a little longer. Bios moses so. I would always go to different libraries until i finally got to the library end on the art library. I realized i wondered a little bit and look at all of those books and there was this whole huge segment of photography books and for the first time i bent saw the work of edward western or ruseler earnhardt or at the time the the star star twins were really big in the early nineties and i realized while photography is actually are. It's it didn't occur to me before so that realization came maybe on the second year in college here and it was thanks. should art. Librarian was always interested in the arts. And i had started our history but i didn't realize that you know coming from brazil. We were a lot more exposed to nature or fashion photography. Okay we're gonna take a short break when we come back more. Qna.

brazil second year first time early nineties twins edward ruseler earnhardt
Three Months Before Olympics, Japan Declares Emergency in Tokyo

The World

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

Three Months Before Olympics, Japan Declares Emergency in Tokyo

"Of the Tokyo Olympics say they're prepared to hold the games without any Spectators if necessary. NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports with less than three months to go before the Games. Much of Japan's population remains under a state of emergency chief organizer Seiko Hashimoto told a press conference Wednesday that the games could proceed without fans if having them causes problems for the country's medical system. Critics say such problems are inevitable. Organizers have requested 500 nurses from the Japanese Nursing Association to help out at the Games. Medical workers launched a protest on Twitter in response, saying they can't spare the personnel in that the country should be focused on coronavirus countermeasures, not the Olympics. Overseas Spectators have already been banned from the Games. Organizers say they'll decide about domestic fans. By June. Anthony Kuhn NPR NEWS Seoul

Anthony Kuhn Seiko Hashimoto Olympics Npr News Japanese Nursing Association Tokyo Japan Twitter
South Korean Court Rejects Suit Against Japan Over Sexual Slavery

Morning Edition

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

South Korean Court Rejects Suit Against Japan Over Sexual Slavery

"Court in South Korea has dismissed a case against the Japanese government brought by victims of sexual slavery during World War two. NPR's Anthony Kuhn is in Seoul. The judge ruled that Japan enjoys sovereign immunity and cannot be the object of a civil lawsuit. The same court ruled in January that sovereign immunity does not apply to crimes against humanity. And ordered Japan to pay the victim's reparations. Historical feuds, including this one helped keep ties between the U. S. Is main allies in Northeast Asia Tense

Japanese Government Anthony Kuhn South Korea NPR Seoul Japan U. Northeast Asia
South Korea's Opposition Party Wins 2 Key Local Elections

NPR News Now

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

South Korea's Opposition Party Wins 2 Key Local Elections

"President has been soundly defeated in a special election for mayoral posts across the country. Npr's anthony kuhn reports from seoul. The results signal support for the country's conservative opposition. Opposition candidates won by large margins in mayoral races for both soul and bussan the country's two biggest cities the votes were held to replace progressive mayors with the ruling democratic party. Both of whom were felled. By sexual harassment scandals souls ex-mayor committed suicide. The democratic party which favors engagement with north korea had won four elections in a row since two thousand sixteen but diplomacy with pyongyang has stalled and government efforts aimed at controlling soaring. Housing prices have failed. Wednesday's vote is seen as a strong sign of voter sentiment presidential elections in march of next year. Anthony kuhn in

Anthony Kuhn Democratic Party NPR Seoul North Korea Pyongyang
Delayed Tokyo Olympics Torch Relay Kicks off Amid COVID-19 Fears

Morning Edition

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Delayed Tokyo Olympics Torch Relay Kicks off Amid COVID-19 Fears

"Is underway in Japan. The summer games in Tokyo were postponed a year by the Corona virus pandemic. NPR's Anthony Kuhn says the competition begins July 23rd without foreign Spectators hold athletes and white tracksuits carried the torch is they jumped out of a training center in Fukushima Prefecture. A few Spectators were urged to clap but not cheer in the relay will be rerouted or stopped if it gets too crowded. A total of 10,000 runners will carry the towards through all of Japan's 47 prefectures in 121 days, although someone is have pulled out Theo event is supposed to demonstrate Japan's recovery from the 2011 Fukushima earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disaster. As well as mankind's triumph over the pandemic. A Kyodo News agency pole over the weekend showed that only 23% thought the game should proceed while 40% thought they should be canceled. Anthony Kuhn.

Anthony Kuhn Japan Fukushima Prefecture NPR Tokyo Fukushima Earthquake Theo Kyodo News
Mona Kuhn Talks About How Photos Help Us See Ourselves And Others

The Candid Frame

03:16 min | 1 year ago

Mona Kuhn Talks About How Photos Help Us See Ourselves And Others

"I'm fine. I'm so pleased to finally have a chance to to talk with you. How are you. i'm i'm really good. I'm good especially now that i'm going to have a chance to talk to you about your work because ever since i discovered i have just loved it only and you didn't even get the book yet. Did three two days ago saying from got it. Okay i think is important. Because it's such an overview and it's kinda like a with new news are sensitive subject so i don't put too much online get avoided. It's been really interesting because the book is sort of a comprehensive look at your career and your work and there were moments that i missed from different periods so really nice to see sodas to the progress but it was really interesting seeing the early work And seeing that there's an attention to lying and shape. That's really consistent throughout your entire career. And i i saw it especially with with the nature images that you're doing sort of doing right and it was just really lovely to see a photographer evolution. The see sort of a through line but also see the ways. They changed and experimented. Oh yeah yeah so when you took a look at the work and you were editing. The book did you see that. Did you experience any surprises. When you're looking at your work collectively. I never looked back. So i'm looking for things that i wanna do as i go forward i. I think that. I came here from brazil and i started studying. I went to higher states and looking back was always painful. I would miss my friends. I would miss my family. So i stopped looking back and i always looked forward and this was the first time in two thousand nineteen when the publisher from thames and hudson andrew sandigan reached out to me he said. Would you like to do a retrospective. And i was thinking a little bit a back because first of all i think is a little early. I'm not that old bud. But secondly because i never even thought about it i never thought about actually stop time in. Look back at everything you have done in kind of reflect maybe thought. He was too much of dora's box so it was interesting because we started the conversation in the end of two thousand eighteen and then twenty twenty southerly the pandemic arrived. And i think if it wasn't for the pandemic i wouldn't have been able to do the book just because i wouldn't have had this in a way precious moment to look back and opened the files again and remember the conversations ahead with all these people. I photographed and i don't only have files and images of people that photographed i also have correspondents. I have emails. i have ladders. I have notes so it was like going back in my life in their lives and it was good. Then what you're saying. If i knew that there was a thread throughout. I don't think you know when you're doing it. But at this moment in time when i look back i see that threat like you mentioned.

Andrew Sandigan Brazil Thames Hudson Dora
Judge dismisses lawsuit that sought to block hazard pay for Seattle grocery workers

KUOW Newsroom

01:07 min | 1 year ago

Judge dismisses lawsuit that sought to block hazard pay for Seattle grocery workers

"Today. Federal judge threw out a lawsuit seeking to block hazard pay for seattle grocery workers. Seattle city attorney. Pete holmes is calling it a win for the city and those employees k. u. o. w. amy radel reports seattle's ordinance requires four dollars an hour in hazard pay for grocery workers during the pandemic in their federal lawsuit. The northwest grocery association and washington. Food industry association said. The ordinance was unconstitutional for singling out. Just one group of employees. They also said it was preempted by federal labor laws but u s district judge. John kuhn our said cities do have the power to enact minimum labour standards. He cited seattle's findings that supermarkets have earned record breaking profits during the pandemic and that grocery workers have a higher risk of contracting covid than the public at large buren. King county have also passed hazard pay requirements the grocery store chain. Qafac says it will close to stores in seattle partly in response to the law. Amy radel k. u. o. w. news.

Seattle City Pete Holmes Amy Radel Seattle Northwest Grocery Association Food Industry Association John Kuhn Washington Qafac King County
US, China hold first high-level talks under Biden

Morning Edition

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

US, China hold first high-level talks under Biden

"Secretary of State Antony Blinken is due to hold high level talks with Chinese government officials today in Alaska. This follows his trip to Tokyo and Seoul with Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin as NPR's Anthony Kuhn. Reports from Seoul, blinking in Austin offered reassurances of the Biden administration's commitment to defend Japan and South Korea. The two countries signed a deal on sharing the cost of the US military presence in South Korea for the next five years. But their language suggested major differences on how to approach the North Korean nuclear issue and how to deal with China. A top North Korean diplomats said Thursday that Pyongyang would ignore Washington's efforts to contact them until it's scraps its hostile

Secretary Of State Antony Blin Chinese Government Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin Anthony Kuhn Seoul Biden Administration South Korea NPR Tokyo Alaska Austin Japan United States Pyongyang China Washington
On Asia Trip, Biden Administration Seeks To Restore Alliances

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

On Asia Trip, Biden Administration Seeks To Restore Alliances

"Gets underway today. In a sign of its foreign policy priorities. NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports. Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin are heading to East Asia. The two secretaries will meet counterparts and leaders in Tokyo and Seoul. Their aim is to reassure them of the U. S is commitment to its allies and enlist their help and issues including North Korea's nuclear weapons and China's challenge to American primacy in Asia. To do that. They'll also need to Coke soul in Tokyo to set aside historical feuds and cooperate with Washington and each other. The USS has tried to engage with Pyongyang for the past month, but has received no response. The Secretary's will not be visiting China this time, but blinking and national Security advisor Jake Sullivan will meet with top Chinese diplomats in Alaska on Route back to Washington. Anthony Kuhn. NPR NEWS Seoul

Anthony Kuhn Secretary Of State Antony Blin Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin Tokyo NPR East Asia Seoul U. North Korea China Coke Asia Pyongyang Jake Sullivan Washington Alaska Npr News
Remembering The Fukushima Nuclear Disaster On Its 10-Year Anniversary

1A

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Remembering The Fukushima Nuclear Disaster On Its 10-Year Anniversary

"Anniversary since an earthquake with a magnitude of nine and a tsunami struck its east coast. These triggered a nuclear reactor meltdown. NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports from Seoul. The triple disaster left more than 18,000 people dead. We're missing Emperor Naruhito In his wife, Empress Masako observed a moment of silence at exactly 2:46 P.m. local time. Prime Minister Yoshihide Ace Ooga expressed condolences for those who suffered and promised government support for people trying to rebuild their lives. The crippled Fukushima nuclear plant is expected to take at least decades to decommission NPR's Anthony Kuhn reporting stocks are much higher

Anthony Kuhn Emperor Naruhito Empress Masako Prime Minister Yoshihide Ace O Tsunami NPR Earthquake East Coast Seoul
Woman is named Tokyo Olympics chief in something of a breakthrough

Morning Edition

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Woman is named Tokyo Olympics chief in something of a breakthrough

"Woman in one time Olympic athlete will lead Tokyo's Olympic organizing committee after the previous chief resigned for making sexist remarks. NPR's Anthony Kuhn says Japan is hosting this year's summer games, which were postponed last year because of the Corona virus pandemic. Seiko. Hashimoto is a former Olympic athlete and one of the most prominent women in Japan's male dominated politics. She resigned his Olympics minister and minister of gender equality to take over as the Games organizing chief. The previous chief, Yoshiro Mori, trying to install his own successor, but was overruled by the organizing committee.

Olympic Organizing Committee Anthony Kuhn Olympic Japan Tokyo NPR Hashimoto Seiko Yoshiro Mori Olympics
Seiko Hashimoto takes over as Tokyo Olympic president

Morning Edition

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Seiko Hashimoto takes over as Tokyo Olympic president

"Organizers have chosen a new female leader after the former chief resigned for remarks widely criticized a sexist. NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports that with just over five months to go till the games, much of Japan is under a state of emergency and the games, fate remains uncertain. Seiko Hashimoto resigned her positions as Olympic minister and minister in charge of gender equality in order to take over the position of president of the Tokyo Olympic Organizing Committee. She competed in four Winter Olympics as a speed skater and three summer Olympics as a cyclist. Hashimoto is 56, a protege of Yoshito money, her predecessor who resigned after basically saying that women talk too much

Anthony Kuhn Seiko Hashimoto NPR Tokyo Olympic Organizing Commi Japan Winter Olympics Yoshito Hashimoto Olympics
Alabama and Ohio State match up in the CFP National Championship, but UConn may be the real winner

Pardon My Take

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Alabama and Ohio State match up in the CFP National Championship, but UConn may be the real winner

"All right. My hot seats is Alabama in ohio state. They're playing in the national championship on monday. But they aren't the national champions so The new york times noted football publication had an article that said the college football champion. Not in the title game and this guy. has deemed that the university of connecticut. Because they were the first football subdivision team to squarely face the coronavirus and decide against playing a single snap during a raging endemic should be are twenty twenty twenty one national chair. The real champs. How how. i'm actually in favor of that just to watch how badly that pisses off randy edsel initial. No dude. are you kidding me. Rental definitely has a ton of clauses. That gets them so many bonuses for this really probably he probably has a clause like if the new york times deems us nashville radio king

Football Alabama University Of Connecticut The New York Times Ohio Randy Edsel Nashville
South Korea Faces Third Wave Of Coronavirus

Morning Edition

03:25 min | 1 year ago

South Korea Faces Third Wave Of Coronavirus

"South Korea, one of the most successful countries and fighting the pandemic is doing worse now, case numbers are growing during a third wave of infections. NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports on the debate over how to respond. For the past week, South Korea has tried to discourage year and revelry by banning gatherings of more than four people and shutting down ski resorts and tourist spots. But new case numbers and deaths remain stubbornly and or near record highs. Those new infection highs of around 1000 today in a country of more than 50 million are, Of course, nowhere near is bad is the US, nor are they as good as save New Zealand or Taiwan. Dr Kim Woo ju and infectious disease expert at Korea University's Good. A hospital in Seoul recalls that when the first wave of infections hit in February, fear of a new and unfamiliar virus gripped South Koreans, Ah Kitana. Sarah's got so scared. They started wearing masks and stopped going outside even before the government mandated it. But as the pandemic were on, people loosened up and mobility went up. Meanwhile, the government listen to a crescendo of voices of exhausted citizens and struggling businesses. The government hesitated to raise the social distancing level when it should have and was too fast to downgrade it when it shouldn't have. Kim argues that the government has got it backwards. It's not the counter measures that are hurting the economy. It's the pandemic. Experts also point out that the third wave is going to be tougher to crush than the first two. This time. There are more undetected community transmissions, more smaller clusters of infections. China and me, a respiratory disease specialist at equal Women's University in Seoul, says South Korea relied on testing and contact tracing to beat the first two waves. But this time that won't be enough, she says, would you guys how does have a right to take that and that you can only cut the chain of transmission if we cut social activity? The government won praise early on by putting health authorities and experts firmly in charge of the pandemic response. But John says this has changed socially with their table got him over there we go in there. Aside From a few exceptions, most medical experts have been calling on the government to raise social distancing restrictions and warning that hospitals are under a lot of strain E few that our opinions are not reflected very well in the government's decisions. South Korea's government denies that there's any daylight between politicians and experts. Or that it's gone soft on the virus. Speaking on December, 22nd Health Ministry spokesperson Sonia Hong Lei acknowledged that some people are calling for raising restrictions to the maximum. Could you two get engaged with only days ago? Who does those calls are understandable, he said. But regarding occasional claims that the government has violated his own criteria for raising restrictions, he added, We've never done that. Just before Christmas. U. S troops stationed here got the country's first coronavirus vaccinations. Most South Koreans won't start getting theirs until February. The government insists there's no delay. But at Korea University Hospital Doctor Kim Woo ju says the government seems to have dropped the ball. E don't understand why the South Korean government didn't start actively negotiating advanced purchase agreements until November. The government announced Thursday that it's secured more than enough vaccines for his population. And, according to a recent poll, nearly 90% say they'll take the shot.

South Korea Anthony Kuhn Dr Kim Woo Ju Ah Kitana Seoul Government Korea University Equal Women's University NPR Infectious Disease Taiwan New Zealand 22Nd Health Ministry Sarah Sonia Hong Lei KIM China United States John Korea University Hospital
U.S. starts COVID vaccinations of its military personnel in S. Korea

Morning Edition

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

U.S. starts COVID vaccinations of its military personnel in S. Korea

"Personnel based in Asia began receiving covert 19 vaccinations Tuesday. NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports from Seoul that the inoculations are voluntary. Army and Air Force bases in South Korea and Japan were the first to get shipments of the modern a vaccine. Commanding officer's first responders in frontline medical personnel will be the first to get vaccinated. U S forces Korea Commander General Robert Abrams urged eligible personnel to take the shots, saying they would contribute to military readiness. South Korean civilians may not start getting vaccinations until February, MPR's Anthony Kuhn for the first time

Anthony Kuhn South Korea NPR Seoul Commander General Robert Abram Asia Air Force Army Japan MPR
North Korea Executed Coronavirus Rule-Breaker, Says South Korean Intelligence

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

00:25 sec | 2 years ago

North Korea Executed Coronavirus Rule-Breaker, Says South Korean Intelligence

"South korean intelligence officials briefed lawmakers friday that north korea taking increasingly harsh measures to keep cova out of the country including executing a key official in august. Who brought a shipment of goods through customs in violation of quarantine rules. A recent south korean study says that the covid related closure of its border with china has hit the north's economy harder than international sanctions. Anthony kuhn in pr news

Cova North Korea China Anthony Kuhn
"kuhn" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

Breakfast Leadership

10:43 min | 3 years ago

"kuhn" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

"Welcome to the breakfast leadership. podcast this this is Michael. And I've got Steven Kuhn on the line with me today. Hey Steven how are you. Are you Michael doing great. Thanks for having me awesome. Glad you're here Steve near the principle of Ketu precision engine management so. Tell the audience some of the things that you're doing what I'm doing right now. Well you know. I've I've offline consultant for almost twenty years all over the globe mostly Salihi in Europe. I worked with Everyone from top tier politician Politicians in Europe and as well as rockstars like I worked with Mick Jagger I worked with Olivia Newton John and Andrea Bocelli. But what I basically do as a turn businesses around so I find Sola preneurs entrepreneurs and business owners Who are in trouble and I help them fix their trouble in new Ford with with the principles With a program called immediate impact and with the principles based based on hit which is why some people call me. The hitman hit stands for honesty integrity and transparency. We can get into that in a minute not scrape. So I'm guessing you probably see see a lot of similarities in organizations in why they're struggling and you're in trouble and you know so. Tell some of those stories without breaking breaking the secrets of who you helped. But you know when you're working with the likes of Jagger and a living in John and Jillian everybody else it's like and world leaders. It's like so you obviously have impacted influence so great to hear you know some of the insights on what are some of the counter things you encounter. Well it's So many to start the thing is that I I always i. You gotta realize when I walk into a business into an office into someone's place in the into it doesn't matter who it it is. I mean I've sat with the you know the highest royals in Europe. You know dined with kings and Queens and the whole point is this as a hit man. That's what they call me as a hitman. The honesty part of it of the honesty integrity transparency. The honesty part is about me being honest with myself. Where am I who am I what am I saying? Why am I doing it? What's my what's my purpose and all these kind of things honesty that I have with myself must be pure and then the way I communicate that honesty to the outside world is my transparency? Now you're not transparent with everything of course it's only to the degree the situation dictates it but because of that you show up was zero expectation. Expectation was zero prefixes so to say like showing up saying Oh and all this is going to work and you show up wholly and fully for the person. That's in front of you and when you do that you're at their level. One one hundred percent. They feel immediately at ease and they allow you into their space. That's what real networking is by the way. And you know this is how I approach all of all these people so when I do that I see you know the depths of there's of their of their problems in their business every business problem is based on a person almost also always But you can't go in saying that obviously because it's not my problem you know it's the sales team so I always go in and do what I call immediate impact revenue. You find money really quick and that gets their mind off the money and We can and we can end up talking to them about the real problems in their business or the real challenges in business but some typical you know constants that I see is lack of organization lack of KPI's lack of measuring No they're not solving having a problem. We just have a product for me number one. If you're if you're businesses not solving a problem you're GONNA have a heck of a time staying above water I mean even the smallest weirdest does things that solve a problem. They explode so for me that someone and you know what a big one is. They have a nice logo. And all this kind of stuff in a brand but no and Not No one. But many do not take time to work on their branding messaging so their mission vision value proposition. They always think it's this fluff but that gives the direction of the company. And it tells you exactly why you sell unil- why will make the by you know as you say so Package all of these mistakes that I see over the last twenty years to put them into a program that we can talk about later as well. You know it's great. And he highlighted something right off the bat in a couple things you know the the no like entrusting people will buy live from people that they know like trust and when you go in like you did and establish. Hey you know we're on the same level here that automatically creates the comfort level because if you're coming in as a quote unquote consultant and you know everything. There is always that apprehension in an actually makes the client feel feel less of themselves like. I don't know what we're doing you do. And even if they're happy that you're there they're still that element of a separation the distance and that often limits quite. Frankly you know what type of revenue generated from that client. Because there's that gap there but it hit another thing that happens commonly as organizations bringing people to help them with the problem and when consultants and coaches. Che's in get in there. I would say the majority of the time you say okay. Yeah that's what you think your problems. But you're actual problem. Is this but I love your approach on. Okay let's address. The thing that they say is the problem. Let's fix that if we can sooner than later. L. Suddenly go I can breeze right and then you proceed with everything else. You WanNa do right. Because it's their perception right. I mean you know you have to address their perception I I. Would I try to change it. That's their perception. Their reality perception is reality. So you WanNa go on an address them completely and you WanNa address it in the way that they wanted addressed this. It's just like when I talk. Mike Clients who want to pitch for investors or the pitch deck or something they always ask for my structure of how that I would pitch and I said no you need to ask the person you're pitching for their structure do it in in their language do it in a in a in a in a form that they're used to so when they look at your pitch they know exactly where to look for the numbers for the number for for anything they WANNA look because it's the same one they always use. You always want to put yourself in their shoes. What do they WANNA see? What do they want to hear? And that's not that's not bowing down. Expectations doing is clear enough. Any blocks or or any reason for them to say no if I show up with a pitch say pitch deck that has three solutions in it for their business and it's in their format. What do you think is going to happen? You know they're gonNa take me period absolutely even even back in the day. When I was working for organizations for went out on my own I would do this on anybody? WHO's looking for job? A highly recommend US figure out what your during the interview. What their problem points are and then come in with a thirty sixteen ninety day? Plan of what you're GONNA do for your first thirty sixty ninety days of working there. Make sure you use the logo that they use. Make sure you use the same font. The using their materials They produced it in even if they don't hire you. I've heard this because I've talked to people in organizations that have done that they still take that slide deck and the whoever the higher they say okay implement these things out of burns the candidate a little bit. It's like wait a minute. I did other work. Sit Beano what that's paying it forward. Don't worry you'll find your thing but and also you can say hey. I helped out an organization. That didn't even pay me so I wouldn't put that you're marketing material. But it's just one of those things. Where you you with the branding and in everything of you make it feel like that? You are part of their team. You go in that door on it just knocks down so many barriers and you can really make some impact with some organizations. It's funny you're talking about that. That's exactly what quantum physics is right. So you're doing on the practical terms. The the you know the say the metaphysical terms terms when you want to get somewhere go somewhere and you want to set a goal to be at a certain time in your life at a certain place. Exactly what you do you you assume or you say you envision that it's already happening and you're grateful for it so you present life to yourself as if it's already there so if I want to be living in Spain in three years when I meditate when early in the morning. I'm in Spain. I'm enjoying my life. It's three years later. My let my wife and kids are there this right so I enjoy that so I tricked myself into my brain into thinking. I'm actually in Spain and basically you're doing the same thing but in a in a physical form where you say look. I'm already employees. I'm already working for you guys ear. My Solutions Silas role and that actually is a psychological like you said. It's a psychological gap that most people don't ever bridge So yeah it's an excellent tip there Sir thank you I forget where I learned it and whoever showed it to me twenty something years ago I thank them. Maybe they'll reach shout to me and say it was me or I'll get a little saves me it's like I don't know who argue so so tell us about you. Know the revenue until you're talking about a little bit before And and how it works and and you know what impact you've seem in with organisations that have implemented right so the scale companies you know up until the millions of six seven eight figures You know I've done everything from from mortgage banking to two movies to security Music rock bands and all kinds of stuff and also a lot of classic businesses over one hundred businesses over twenty in my own business and the one thing I saw was that most people at the small to medium level can't afford a consultant so nowadays online big problem is is everyone's paged by facebook. Ad Course go go make money And most people don't realize that facebook ads course by will not make you money. It'll cost you money and then you're gonNA blow your money early on ads because you don't know how to do half the business so I also saw that. A lot of charlatans are online who have absolutely no experience or twenty sixty six years old talking talking about consulting eight figure businesses and they've never actually owned a business or actually been in business or worked for a business like that And it's just rampant so fifteen. Eighteen months ago I decided to end my offline business and go one hundred percent online which I wasn't that time the only thing I use facebook for it was pictures of my family family and so I decided online but didn't know what to do I'd no idea about online and I knew I couldn't do it myself so I started doing facebook lives in my In my a demographic which is the veterans space and within three months because I was giving out free value teaching businesses how to start business marketing all kinds of stuff. People come to me and say hey. Can you go deeper with this and can you help.

Europe facebook Mick Jagger Steven Kuhn Spain Olivia Newton John Michael Sola preneurs Steve Andrea Bocelli Ford Queens US Che Mike Clients Jillian
"kuhn" Discussed on FitLabPGH

FitLabPGH

09:43 min | 3 years ago

"kuhn" Discussed on FitLabPGH

"Those better off running as me walk for sixty minutes briskly before they start running I mean it's just about getting anybody should ever go from not walking or just like hey I'm going to join this run club choose the bones have to support the load the tens in muscles have to be able to absorb alot through our body to to handle it so are you able to Brian it's dangerous to to be running marathons and not having any kind of so if I was how to run are coming to me or somebody coming to me to try to decide if they were able to run I have a and I would if somebody couldn't perform those tasks again it wouldn't necessarily tell them it should be able to prove and they can progress to the marathon but that's time so it goes back to what be dangerous if you just take somebody and be like hey put your changes foot strike because they're striking like that for in decide hey this is you need you need some more work before you running the long distances I liked the fact that you mentioned the strength training and the fact that some people may every time the commercial comes on the steelers game up here's my set of exercises that Kelly gave anywhere doesn't I think that's another big thing we see all these great types of exercise in your legs to tolerate the strength to be able to tolerate load and there's lots and lots running to be their fitness so that's what they enjoy what they wanna do sometimes they just you'll find a way to get it in your day somehow but I think the selling point for strength training for national to do my rehab right as I think if you to address exercises back in I want you add your strength training give it a try on your own I because you can do it call me I but I think that the goal is to teach patients to take control of their own injuries and say and one of the things you can see when you go around social media is there are all kinds runner who's not injured coming to you saying look I want a regular routine are running or whatever my activity is to counteract the effects of standing analysts when it comes to the spring training I think it's fun to have all these fun exercises out there for most people the old fashioned let squad a little bit let's lounge a little bit let's go up and down to begin with so that's where we screen that's where the valuation comes in you know not no two people move exactly certain areas so I would look at that person and see where their weakest spots are and you know we're doing lots of squats and things like that lunches are good too because you're the stands work on that one leg that is so Yeah that would be I think getting if we can get if we can convince people to start before the season started you starting a Tele Med program we're in the fall there's Lonner who's not a physical therapist who is not a strength coach a personal trainer who's familiar with this sort of thing before I like alters partially because I like the way they fit my feet I have yet to find a shoe it's wide enough sure about running shoes is nobody knows the research is so all over the place says but for some people you might so but there is some advice I give people with running shoes and I have forerunners three pairs of shoes three different pairs of shoes because you stressing the exact same things the same way more likely to strengthen so just changing the shoes a little I'll have to be drastically different but a little different I to get her to kind of change your shoes a little bit and she just wasn't comfortable in it until I went back because like maybe I can find it something that's a little better in.

"kuhn" Discussed on FitLabPGH

FitLabPGH

10:33 min | 3 years ago

"kuhn" Discussed on FitLabPGH

"Of the great way to do this how do you explain to somebody. The Difference Between Discomfort comfort pain which sometimes as normal and bad pain or bad. Her I give I give a set of rules for her. My all my patients percents and and I think the importance of the rules to it gives them some control because if you just tell somebody to exercise through pain they think you're crazy and walk out of your at your clinic So I tried try to explain that you know when we the number one thing I want people to know his Pena's unequal tissue damage. So just because you have pain does not mean you damage anything. Pain is just our nervous system trying to protect attacked us. It's a it's a response to threat or potential threat. So pain can be from stress. It can be from. It's it's usually a combination of a lot of things so just because we have pain. It's it's not damaged you know. It's not necessarily damaged and most likely it's not damage but for those few times that it is damaged. How do we know I usually say you know if you you wake up in the morning you have a little bit of a pain? Maybe it's a two out of ten and you move and it goes to an eight out of ten but when you stop when you stop it comes back to a two or even better well. That's just your nervous system Adjusting to that pain is trying to figure out. Hey is this okay for me to move it safe and you're OK to do that if that pain stays elevated more than ten fifteen twenty minutes Then then maybe something's going on you know and so at that point. We can't be sure that that there's You any damage but we just know that something else might be going on. It's more that the pain lasts longer instead of like you feel it calms down feel it and it calms down You know if the pain ever goes away it means it can go away. We're just not doing the right stuff to make it go away. So it's more constant pain Specifically for runners I tell them. Hey if you're having a little bit of pain gene but you can run not change your stride. You can keep running and the paint should kind of toned down by the next day. It's you know and so same for a big workout if you have a big workout and after after the general workout you're sore. Not Necessary. Muscle soreness but you know just paying any kind of like your pain that you're usually feeling if by the next day it's back to baseline you didn't do any any damage that's just your body adjusting to load and that's what it needs. It needs to learn that those loads are safe and that you can tolerate them so that it can tolerate the load of life but we tend to do is okay. I did this workout. It hurts so I'm going to rest. I'm not GONNA do anything. And what we're telling our nervous systems. Hey that was too much. We can't tolerate that keeps sending that pain for that activity And so I think if we can kind of teach people to move the next day instead of taking a day off or move through a little bit of discomfort with those rules. We'll find that most people are in that in that zone of the safe in the few that lasts will then. That's when we go on and we do more tests and figure Out What's going on and I know one of the things when you're educating people on that there's the intellectual of you standing there or sitting there telling me this and then there's the psychological on my aspect I know in my case I've had the good fortune or bad fortune to have a couple disk herniation. I've got some arthritis in my back and I know that if I do a lot of sitting if I travel if I spent a lot of time sitting at my computer which is why I use a standing desk I'm going to have some sort of the the hardest thing for me to learn and it took me five or six years is when I'm sore synonym for pain. It's not I don't WanNA stop moving. I want to force myself self to move and when I do that evidently I feel better educationally. I knew that I would tell what I worked. As an athletic trainer working as a personal trainer we tell my clients Assis- psychologically for me to take my own advice and I think people have a tendency to forget that especially clinicians that look you can say this is what it is but you have to find out the right way to say so I think the main thing is to actually do it and reinforce it so what we do is i. I do exercise. The patient says hurts. I stop immediately and I say okay. Does it walk off. Is it feel better. Does this stop when you stop. And then we talk about it again. The number one thing that he was a patient has control of the patient. I always said I one one other rule. I didn't give them. I think this is really important. Is that that jump and pain has to be acceptable to them. Because if it's not acceptable they won't do it hurts. They won't do it so I I just let them see it like okay. We did this exercise. It hurt a little bit wanted off. Do you feel better worse saying a lot of times I make it those three choices better. Where same because sometimes you just need to simplify it like it's either better? It's either worse insane can be an option. I think one of the things. That's important to emphasize there that you did is. You're not giving him a closed ended question. You're not saying. Does that hurt. Worse right yes. It's it's they have to to pick one and and and I'm okay with same same can be okay. You know Giving them the chance to walk it off it kind of reinforces it. The other thing that I do that I think is probably what's changed my Treatment Strategy more than anything is exercise throughout the day. So I the whole idea of I I think. We are sitting at desks sitting at computers for most of the day. And then we ask her body especially for athletes but anybody really. We didn't ask our bodies to go home and run and you know there's not a transition there And I don't think sitting is bad for us. I think sitting for a long time as bad. I don't think sitting slumped is bad for us. I think sitting slumped for a long time is bad for us. So I try to teach my patients strategies There's my favorite word strategy throughout the day to kind of add moving into the day. So I you say you know like let's set alarms and heavy stand up at your desk every ten or fifteen minutes but I give them exercises that they can do throughout the day and explain it to them like this. You know if you and I were both to take a medication. We have a dose in her dose. Might be different well. There dose of exercise is their personal dose. And that's their job to figure out how much they need an on certain days they need more or less but I have to start somewhere so usually maybe say let's start with ten an hour on this exercise it makes you feel better and the idea is getting them thinking about moving throughout the day and and adding moving in at work and it's just simple movements in their movements they can do anywhere takes thirty seconds but the idea is to just see him when I think when when you added in that way and you give them the chance to say to see how they feel better after movement starts to solidify it and it starts to give them control and when they come back to me and they say they you know. Hey I- flared up this time and say okay. What did you do we talked about? What did you do what you didn't do what you could have done? That's all reinforcing. Their plan to see like how the movement made them feel better. I think a lot of times when people feel better and they're moving they don't put it together. You know and so I think when you see kind of come back and say okay. Let's talk about what you did to make it. Feel better what you did. It wouldn't hurt what you didn't do and start connecting the dots that they actually start to see. I'm hurting more when I'm sitting still and they and it's a process it's a process but it it can be learned it just has to be reinforced and they have to get to it in their own way on their own time and I like the earlier you said on the importance of education. I think you kind kind of hit on something with runners. One of the things when people start running the common question that anybody asks his so have you run a marathon yes and and some people run marathons. Some people don't want marathons if you can kind of talk when you educate runners you know. How did they decide when they're ready to start training for Romera thon versus somebody who maybe is like you know? This might not be the right event for you to do or you might be somebody. I would be one of those better off running on soft surfaces on trails. If you I mean I think it's all about the progression so to be honest. I want people to be able to run. I mean excuse as me walk for sixty minutes briskly before they start running. I mean it's just about getting your body to tolerate the load of that you're asking to do and then from there. You should build up in progress to running and so i. I don't think anybody should ever go from not walking just like Hey I'm GonNa join this run club to running a marathon. I think there should be a couple five ks under your belt. What do you do them in a race or you do them on your own but it should be getting that cause your it's all about getting your tissues? Choose the bones have to support the load the tens in in Muscles have to be able to absorb energy and get used to that And then I think some other things are are we string training and I'm not saying that we have to go in do Olympic lifts but we should be putting low through our body to to handle. So are you able to run. Ron Give the time it takes to run and also give the time it takes to do the strength and mobility drills that. Go along to keep you safe In some people just can't dedicate the time to both and I think it's dangerous to to be running marathons and not having any kind of program to help Dangerous is a rough word. I mean you're just more likely to get injured And so I think that that needs to be an I also think that I I was how to run are coming to me or somebody coming to me to try to decide if they were able to run. I have a series of movements and exercises. I take them through to show me whether or not their body is able to tolerate the the impact whether they can tolerate the force generating loads And I would. If somebody couldn't perform those tasks again it wouldn't necessarily tell them that they couldn't run but that would be something that we put in their program And we tried to to get them better at that. And so as I see those things improved and run. Tolerance should be able to prove and they can progress to the marathon. But that's time so it goes back to what they WANNA put in and what they want to get out of it And then also we can do running analysis and look at I. I don't know he's changed. Somebody's running for him. Because I think that can be dangerous if you just take somebody and be like. Hey put your changes foot strike. Because they're striking like that for a reason and if you just change it without knowing why but I do think looking at videoing somebody Ron and slowing it. Down can give you some hints to their weak spots and see what they can tolerate so again I would look at them and decide. Hey this is you need. You need some more work before you running these long distances senses or else you're going to be predisposed injuries So it all looks at the whole complete package and what they're willing to put in what they want to work at what their goals are are also taking into account. I liked the fact that you mentioned the strength training and the fact that some people may say they don't have enough time. I think it's the sort of thing that almost every person should have a suspension suspension trainer that they can put in their door or they can put in the tree outside so really every time the commercial comes onto the steelers game up. Here's my set.

"kuhn" Discussed on FitLabPGH

FitLabPGH

11:32 min | 3 years ago

"kuhn" Discussed on FitLabPGH

"Exercise. You're choosing an understanding of what Pena's would injury is what movement is is and how to put movement in our day to day. Life is important and how hard it is to do that in the clinic when you are just bound by time restraints and I'm bound by so many other barriers so it started to become frustrating trying to keep that on track China keep you know teach and let them go T- instead of keeping them coming back And so I just felt like there was a better way a better way to get the information out there more people into get people moving and getting moving earlier because there's there are studies that show we can get two people quicker and get them moving. Get Him in P.. T. or get him exercising before they have that. MRI SCAN SCAN before they get to. The doctor can actually save a lot of money and time. So I felt with the telehealth platform I get people faster sir in a more convenient way And could have that one on one time. It's just me and that I can't have three computers going at the same time so it's me and them so now I can. I can focus on the education and teach them what to do and do all those things without all those barriers. And so that's what pushed me over the over the Hump at all kind of throw. Are you a softball here. Having gone to physical therapy and worked in a physical therapy clinic you hit on education which I don't think anybody will disagree is a bad thing but don't they get the Education Asian and a PT Clinic where you spend your twenty or twenty five minutes with them and then you give them the printed handout sheets that they go home with well so the education is definitely more than the exercise. The education the exercises are very very very important and teach exercise. But the why they're doing the exercise is what's missing in the clinic. Why are you doing? When do you do it? When is it okay to keep doing your exercise even though it hurts a little bit? When do you need to back off? What should you do if you have flare up? All of that that is what makes it effective if I just tell you to do here. Here's your four exercise. You go do them once a day. It's not gonNA work. You know you have to know when to I use them. Why do you use them how to use them and the understanding of like? Hey this might hurt a little one. I do it but but it's I'm not doing damage why when I should stop when I think that's really the crux of it and you can't get that in twenty minutes. And and he exercises and I just think it's it's and if the therapist is with three to four other patients at the same time. It's just not possible. It's not happening. And you mentioned your business is going to be telehealth health for people who are listening. They not understand what telehealth is exactly what it is. What exactly as Telehealth we'll tell? Health is basically online physical therapy. or I I mean there's online any kind of health. Doctors are doing it but it's basically through a Webcam so you would sign up. You could schedule online for an appointment and then we go on on the Webcam and we can do pretty much everything we do in the clinic. minus any manual therapy which I think is is an issue And we can look at you online and then come up with a plan online To just as you would do in the clinic with With therapist right there and I know one of the things things that we haven't touched on but I know what allows us to happen at least in Pennsylvania is with physical therapy. There are some physical therapist who have something that's called direct access if you can kinda talk about that and how that allows you to do healthy telehealth and Pennsylvania sure direct access is. We have it now in all fifty states in some way shape or form But it is the the right to go straight to a physical therapist. You don't have to go to a primary care or have a prescription which a lot of people still believe that. They need a referral for physical therapy in Pennsylvania. We have it for thirty days if if the practitioner is a direct access provider so we have a second license which I have that allows me to see patients without that referral after thirty days. All we need is for the doctor to sign off on our note which they almost always do and that gives us up to another three months and if that point if we need more we can sign up again end which. There's no reason why we need that much there but that would be the fear you know if we had to so for most people. There's never a need to see a doctor. You unless something is up. And that's we are trained with their direct access license to say okay. This is a red flag. We need to see the doctor you know so you can it's it's easier to get into a PT than it is a doctor so it's a great place to start because they can tell you they can get to go on on exercise right away and then can also tell you. Hey I think you do need to go get this. MRI or you do need to see the doctor. And that's the rarity but sometimes it is but most times you can just need pt. And I'm curious people are gonNA WANNA know with Direct access does insurance cover that or does insurance cover that so for direct access for physical therapy clinic yes it is covered in telehealth. It is not covered for physical therapy at. There's no codes to bill for it so it's not able to be built at least here in Pennsylvania yet I think it's coming There's a compact to start having PT Providers be able to treat across state lines Pennsylvania's not in that compact yet. So I can only treat patients in Pennsylvania mm-hmm But it is not covered by insurance that being said I think that with co-pays being as high as they are And the amount of times names that you need to go to physical therapy in the old model oftentimes twelve to fifteen visits versus. The hope is just a few visits Sometimes mm some people can go. Just get one do fine and then just kind of check in via email the cost oftentimes will be about the same or even less But but it's not officially covered by insurance also if you have an Hsa they they should reimburse for it. I'm because you can pay for help you know that way But the actual insurance now. I know I have flexible medical spending and I used it for chiropractor. WHO's direct access? Does that sort of thing and and I think one of the things are the things that you hit on. It's pretty important as first of all for many people. Maybe they're out running and South Park may twist an ankle and they're living around over the weekend and the first thing they do or maybe they don't limp around over the weekend they go to like a medic press. Nothing Against Express. I think they do a great job done well by me but they go to med express met expresses. Well you need to get an x Ray. So they get an x ray and the X ray if they go to whatever the hospital is. I happen to like Saint Clair Hospital. There's a plug for them. If they want to be free services. You know Saint Clair Hospital. The radiologist reads. It says. Well you should follow up with an orthopedic and the orthopedic looks at it goes well. There's no break you need physical therapy and as you mentioned given the timeframe of how all of this happens it could be a week ten ten days worst case scenario two weeks before they actually show up at the physical therapist and by that time. If it's an ankle sprain. The ankle is probably has lots lots of swelling or a fusion. They're already changed the way they walk because they've been giving around because it hurts whereas with telehealth especially. We wouldn't tell you to message Kelly at ten o'clock on a Saturday night but it would be something on a Sunday you could message and potentially have a response or appointment on a Monday Sunday or Tuesday if you were a previous previous patient right even sooner yes. I had a situation where I had the good fortune to improve the range of motion of my spine by doing some kayaking which corresponded with some pretty severe muscle. Spasms and I had a previous relationship with a chiropractor who uses exercise and I was able to text him and say hey do you have any openings news able to get in and a day so curious with this. How do you get the word out with this? Because I think for anybody who takes movement as a priority in their life as we say Pittsburgh movement is a lifestyle not just an activity. Whether whether you're a runner whether you're somebody who getting out in the garden and doing gardening how do you get the word out about telehealth to say. Hey if you've got an injury if you're in this area we can do something to help you. Well it's it's a long process that I'm just starting on And I'm trying to explore all avenues. I mean doing this podcast. I hope we'll get the word out a little bit I am trying to get out work with Getting out to the races and being there just as as a hey. I'm here asked me questions and so the people can see you know what. Pt is what telehealth is and how I can help them and so same with in the gyms. I've been known own to sit in a gym before inches. Do Injury screens where I'm just sitting there. It's kind of like you know ask. The doctor will ask the P.. T. Come on up tell me about your tell me about your problem. And I'll I'll help he kind of gets them solutions and figure it out and that starts to build people to realize like. Hey there's a way to handle this at isn't medicine and isn't X. Rays raising isn't isn't taking weeks off of an injury And I'm also going about it. hold new venture for me is online in stuff. I'm I'm not the most tech savvy person so this is a process for me. But I'm starting to put blogs ow and share more on social media I I I have been following awesome therapists and strength and conditioning specialist doctors and journals for years. And that's where I learned and then I I've taken courses is and there is so much content out there so I'm trying to share their stuff and put my own out. Now that I learned to that people can find me that way but I think mostly it's going to be me getting in front of Pittsburgh and it's you know at the races And and I hope that to the you're just sitting in a gym and injuries screens. One of the things things you touched on with the ankle is if we can. I want people to kind of throw out that whole rest ice compression elevation thing you. It just don't always think it's the best way. Obviously if something's really really hurt we need to protect it but after that we actually want to get moving quick as we can and as fast as we can so for in your ankle go example somebody limping around for a month. You know while they're getting this that sets way back you know but if I can get them walking you know two days after their ankle ankle injury and they're walking. I have much less ground to cover to get them back to the race. They want to get too. So that's another thing that I hoping that I can instill when people when I'm in a gym. Somebody like literally just hurts themselves. They can get to me right there. So that's that's kind of hope that answered your question. I know when I was working as an athletic trainer. Rainer would you work. With more experienced athletes. It was very easy for them to identify pain versus discomfort. And I know one one of the great things about running as you can start at any age and I know one of the things with movement is a lot of people you know. They may hit twenty five thirty thirty five. Maybe they have the child. Maybe they recognize that gained some weight from high school. Modify my diet. I also need to take movement on I know we had the good fortune to interview the lady who was I was just named Head of venture outdoors and she went from a cigarette smoker in junk food addict and now she's a hardcore runner and she said you know. I just can't imagine not doing this anymore. So for somebody who comes or somebody that you work with educating on the gyms.

"kuhn" Discussed on FitLabPGH

FitLabPGH

10:31 min | 3 years ago

"kuhn" Discussed on FitLabPGH

"Practice the less you see I think it's hard to compare to our from Maryland Pittsburgh I think it's the same I mean Baltimore and Pittsburgh or similar cities just wasn't the population I was working with I'm always curious when I talk choice it's just kind of an interview people who are interesting we've interviewed a variety of medical professionals outpatient physical therapist and I know that you're making plans to leave and go out and over the last few years and with the change in theory over the last few years when using an understanding of what pain is what injury is what movement is I'm bound by so many other barriers so it started to become frustrating a better way to get the information out there more people to get people moving and getting scan before they get to the doctor can actually save a lot of money and time time it's just me and that I can't have three computers going at the same time as me and them so are you a softball here having gone to physical therapy and worked in a physical therapy clinic you hit on education a handout sheets as well so the education is definitely what's missing in the clinic why are you doing when do you do it when is it okay to keep is your four exercise you go do them once a day it's not gonNa work you know you have to know when to should stop when I think that's really the crux of it and you can't get that in twenty minutes and it's just not possible it's not happening and you mentioned your business is going to be telehealth I mean there's online any kind of health doctors are doing it but it's basically through a Webcam therapy which I think is is an issue and we can look at things that we haven't touched on but I know what allows us to happen at least in Pennsylvania is with physical this is we have it now in all fifty states in some way shape or form but it is the for thirty days if if the practitioner is a direct access provider so we have a second almost always do and that gives us up to another three months and if that point if we need more we can sign up again unless something is up and that's we are trained with direct access license to it can get going on exercise right away and then can also tell you hey I think you do need to go get this direct access does insurance cover that or does insurance cover that so for direct able to be built at least here in Pennsylvania yet I think it's coming mm-hmm but it is not covered by insurance that being said visits versus the hope is just a few visits sometimes but it's not officially covered by insurance also if you have an Hsa they they used it for chiropractor who's direct access and does that sort of thing and the weekend and the first thing they do or maybe they don't limp around over the weekend they go to like array and then the X. Ray they go to whatever the hospital is I happen to and the orthopedic looks at it goes well there's no break you need physical therapy and as you mentioned I and by that time if it's an ankle sprain the ankle is probably has lots wouldn't tell you to message Kelly at ten o'clock on a Saturday night but yes I had a situation where I had the good with a chiropractor who uses exercise and I was able to text him and say hey do you have any is a priority in their life is we say Pittsburgh movement is a lifestyle not just an activity whether to help you well it's it's a long process that I'm just starting on and I'm is and being there just as as a hey I'm here asked me questions own to sit in a gym before inches do injury screens where I'm just sitting there it's kind of like you know ask the doctor allies like hey there's a way to handle.