33 Burst results for "Kubrick"

Mysterious monolith discovered in Utah desert

The Art Newspaper Weekly

00:36 sec | 5 months ago

Mysterious monolith discovered in Utah desert

"A mysterious object resembling the free standing plank sculptures of the late minimalist artist. Joan mccracken or the alien monoliths in stanley kubrick's sci-fi classic. Two thousand one space odyssey has been discovered in a remote area of the utah desert prompting theories ranging from extraterrestrial visitation to avocado installation biologists from the utah. Division of wildlife spotted. The monolith from a helicopter welcomed up during a routine count of bighorn sheep in the area. The location of melissa has not been disclosed but the footage shiny object in store within a red rock canyon suggested that live somewhere in southern utah which has distinct ecological landscape

Joan Mccracken Utah Desert Stanley Kubrick Division Of Wildlife Utah Melissa
Interview with Chris Ford

Hallway Chats

06:28 min | 7 months ago

Interview with Chris Ford

"Welcome to hallway Jets. I'm Liam Dempsey. I'm Cara Clay's today. We're joined by Chris Ford Chris spent the first twenty years of her career working as an agency and freelance designer five years ago. She took a hard left and to project management team is a hybrid project manager and designer at reactive a WordPress VIP partner. Hi Chris. I'm so glad to hear welcome. Thanks for having me. I'm really glad to be here. Mm. I have missed interactions with the WordPress Community. I think tank fair to say that we all have Chris Chris. What a pleasure to meet you. Can you tell us a little bit more about yourself off? My name's Chris Borg. I started working on the web in Nineteen Ninety Six when I graduated from design school. I was supposed to be a T-shirt designer at a skateboard company and then their web guy quit and suddenly I was the new one person on staff fortunately. There were like five tags so there wasn't a whole lot to learn at the moment. We were very excited when animated gifs and background images came out for a little bit of context. I did that with the agencies in every industry from like skateboarding described booking at agencies and as a freelance writer and then five years ago, like I said, I took a really hard left into project management because I was interested in more kind of the business end of things. Like, how do you run a profitable project? How he managed timelines, how do you manage budgets which is something I always struggled with as a freelancer. And now I have just recently within the last couple of months started dipping my toe back into the design Pond relearning everything because it's been five years, which means nothing is the same Everything Has Changed. I started in WordPress. I don't even know how long it go but it was before Studio press was Studio project. I had been working as a professional scrapbooker which he says an actual job and the industry. It's the craft industry is like the tech industry. There are bubbles in different crafts and then those bubbles burst. And so when the scrapbooking Bubble Burst, I knew a bunch of people with photography. Skills he needed websites. So I got me a copy of the Kubrick theme and added flash headers with navigation to him and stole my WordPress Journey. Wow. I am so many things I want to ask you about I do too. I totally do. Can we start on scrapbooking, please, please please. Yes, I did a little scrap booking not professionally and now, you know with digital photos, whoever I mean what may have do people still do it? I mean I assume people still do but it seems like a a something that Is not a thing anymore because nobody prints out there photos. I actually I got into it because I started as a print designer and I'd love to paper and I am working it is miserable job where every day I wouldn't go in and recreate Rain Bird sprinkler timers and Flash like my whole job was to show you how like the dial spins phone numbers flashed and then you push this button and it was miserable and horrible and there was a scrap booking store down the street. So I would go and buy papers and things change and usually I just hoard crafting supplies cuz they're pretty but I actually used fees and digital scrapbooking was just taking off and that's kind of how I got notified because I do a lot of like retouching and like Photoshop was my thing. And so I got to know enough people who knew that about me that Wednesday, Digital scrapbooking started getting more popular. I got more people calling me saying hey leading someone to write an article. I was the art director for digital scrapbooking magazine and wait a second cuz I think scrapbooking and I think paper. So what is digital scrapbooking? It was basically you would go in and it off when skeuomorphic design was really big so I could like make things look realistic. So you would go in and you know make something that looked like a rib shack and put it on a page or design your own pattern backgrounds that look like paper I would do a lot where I would design my own stuff and then print it out on a printer and make kind of hybrid page. Just whip it so the Andrews to still pay and yeah. Oh, that's a really yeah. Well, no wonder you did it professionally that sounds amazing for a print em out and log. Yeah, it was super fun. Like I had a Michaels in my closet people would just send me stuff because you would get published in magazines. Like it was a really really good fun mystery years until the money ran out where I basically just kind of got paid to paint things and I don't know if anyone knows who clotting home but she's this really amazing collage artist who does like acrylic image transfers and packing tape transfers and it was you basically got page to make crafts which was kind of the coolest thing in the world, but I had a you know, I had bills to pay so I couldn't like walk it was a really competitive thing. Right and a lot of the people who were involved in it. It was their second job their husband was working. They weren't really in it for the money and I'm like dude. This is my full-time job. Like I need to get paid and I need to get paid on

Chris Chris Digital Scrapbooking Digital Scrapbooking Magazine Chris Ford Chris Borg Wordpress Liam Dempsey Project Manager Cara Clay Design Pond Rain Bird Partner Studio Press Writer Photoshop Andrews Director
Polish composer Penderecki dies at 86 after long illness

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:19 sec | 1 year ago

Polish composer Penderecki dies at 86 after long illness

"Celebrated Polish composer Krzysztof Penderecki has died he was eighty six he was a four time Grammy winner and his music was used in films including Stanley Kubrick's the shining Poland's ministry of culture said in a tweet today the Penderecki died after a long and serious illnesses daughter says he had tested negative for the

Krzysztof Penderecki Stanley Kubrick Poland Grammy Ministry Of Culture
Top Five Mark Wahlberg Movies: Say Hi to Your Mother for Us | The Big Picture

The Big Picture

15:27 min | 1 year ago

Top Five Mark Wahlberg Movies: Say Hi to Your Mother for Us | The Big Picture

"Unfortunately this Shithole has more fucking leaks in the Iraqi navy. Fuck Yourself. I'm tired from fucking your wife. How's your mother good? She's tired from fucking my father. You have a job Tom. I'm a firefighter. Oh God bless you a hero. I'm not hero. We'd all be here. We could use the petroleum. No excuse me Christmas. Utah a lot of fucking money. What did you do? I mean if you take away nothing else for my class from this experience let it be this. If you're not a genius don't bother right. The world needs plenty of electricity and a lot of them are happy and they can help. It really can't be that we can always do. Better let me keep trying. If you guys keep trying I'm shawn fantasy and this is the big picture. A conversation show about Mark Wahlberg. This episode may break the all time record for big picture dissonance later in the show. I have an interview with Kelly. Reichardt the writer and director behind independent film classics. Like old joy. Meek's cutoff in the new film. First cow which might be the best movie of Two Thousand Twenty so far. I hope you'll stick around for that but I were joined by the frog. Sheriff Chris Ryan. I heard that Mark. Wahlberg actually dropped out of first cow. He was gonNA play the cow Alao. But you're already doing animal. Humor here on driver too is calling. Chris. You're here because you're a fan of Mark Wahlberg work. He's The star of a new movie. That is hitting Netflix. This Friday called Spencer confidential. I think gets his fifth film with Peterberg. The actor turned director of such films as lone survivor and deepwater horizon. This is a very strange movie but I think it's going to be a a very watched movie because the corona virus is scaring America into staying inside their house. And so I think that there's a potential for a lot of viewership of this movie. So we're talking about Mark Wahlberg one of the most resilient and persistent movie stars. I guess of the past twenty five years so let's just start with WHO is Mark Wahlberg. How did this happen? That Mark Wahlberg became one of the signature figures of movies in the twenty first century. I would not say I'm a fan of Mark Wahlberg as like I'm a I'm agnostic as a citizen. Yeah I would say that. I am very interested in the way that he has conducted his career. Which is kind of a weird throwback to a studio systems our he makes three to four movies every eighteen months somehow and just releases them at like a hugely prolific rate at. I'm fascinated by all the little pockets of his career that he has created where he repeats. You know he goes back to these little micro genres that he and he works a lot of people over and over again by the way he kind of has conducted his career to me is almost unique among Hollywood movie stars anymore. I mean most of the time when people achieve a certain level success. They just like see in three years for my next blockbuster or award fodder and he's just like nope. I'm grinding out. Family movie violent action film and then every once in a while Raunchy comedy and it's just like pretty pretty like unique among all Hollywood stars so I'm fascinated. What do you make them Amanda? I was fascinated when going back to you. Remember how many great directors he's worked with and how many actually excellent movies he's been in. Chris was asking me how much we watching I had to do for this podcast and the answer is a lot. Because I wouldn't say that Mark Wahlberg stays with me besides certain shots that will certainly be discussed on this podcast but he especially I guess in the first decade of this century just goes on a tremendous run. I really from Boogie nights on and works with a does a lot of really great movies and then kind of decides to just become like the Peterberg comedy guy in the second decade of the century. And I it's a really interesting shift. He just Kinda decides no. I'm going to do this now. And it's very fascinating to me I can't really make sense of. I also is Christmas talking about his efficiency. Just pulled up his daily schedule. Do you guys remember the days? Will he wakes up. Like four o'clock in the morning posted this on his own instagram typical daily scheduled to thirty. Am Wake Up. What don't you forty five prayer time. Three fifteen am breakfast. There's a lot of work work. He's golfing from seven thirty to eight. Which is the golf people? And there's a chamber recovery at nine thirty that takes more time than golf workout number two lunches and our so our meeting slash work calls also an hour and he goes to bed at seven thirty PM and which in Los Angeles for. I'd say six at least six months of the year. That is still broad daylight. Yeah Yeah Su. There is real efficiency baked into this. He's clearly very deliberate guy. He's making choices. And I think that pertains to his daily life and also his his career. There is clearly thought going into this. It's not a type of thought. I can access. I still don't know why you would wake up at two thirty and I don't know why you would do like five deep water horizons. There's a rumor that he has a routine. I think you. I'm speculating here. But I think he's a member of Wilshire Country Club here in Los Angeles. My husband told me this last night and he likes to play alone. He likes to play. And that's why he's playing so early in the morning and he's trying to get in like a quick nine or quick eighteen. I don't know five days a week which I'm who among? Us would love to do that if I could wake up before five. Am I would do it. I'll tell you I would love to do that. I'll tell you something else I am. I find golf to be social and I get crippled like when I play by myself. I'm like all the neurosis is creeping like. Should I take another shot now like it really playing golf? If you're not playing with anyone can just tell you. He's got three snacks on the schedule. Including one that takes an hour and a half from eight to nine thirty. Am is snack after seven. Thirty to eight am golf. Probably a euphemism. Oh Okay so you think. His sessions are ninety minutes. So you're saying to jump off something. Amanda said You know who? He reminds me of a bizarre way Cruz. Where it's like that run. Where cruises like I'll just work with Barry Levinson Stanley Kubrick and Steven Spielberg and every great director at it seems like I'm just the most important factor in the whole world and then one day he wakes up and says I'M GONNA make action movies for the rest of my life? It's very unlikely though. I mean his origins restraints obviously member of this very well known family. He's from Massachusetts. He starts out as a a rap artist and ultimately becomes a Calvin Klein M. C. An. Mc Yes we watched the vibrations video. Recently I took my top five twenty two. Would you make of good vibrations? And and how did you feel about the funky bunch all these years later? It's just really bizarre that this was a thing that we lived through. Who is the funky bunch? I I still don't know who's in it. Were you in a Chris? Thought it was the backup dancers. I mean yes. That's who they were but like do you know anything about them and where they are now. I was pretty. Yeah I was pretty. I was pretty authentic back then so I was. I was already listening to deep deep newer. Grab I love talking about the early nineties with you. Can we talk about the Calvin Klein ads for a second really really important? You're almost put these on my list. And it's and my honorable mention boxer briefs. Yeah I was still a boxer sky back then that was not interested in the product. Would you just tear the ads out of the magazine? Crumpled them up and throw them in the garbage. I think that the those are the signature moment in his career without the advertising campaign he would not have become weirdly Tom Like sub Tom Cruise but he you know. He soared to a of fame on that ad campaign. They're just extremely important. Ninety s imagery obviously came as also in them. And that's where the whole K. Moss thing starts Them Hating each other. Great early celebrity feud they're very important that's all and also it looks great. I mean he and his image was of basically like a tough guy with a bad attitude whether that was true or not he obviously got into some altercations and his his personal history is pretty complicated. We're not gonNA spend too much time talking about on this show. But I think that he basically leveraged his complicated persona in the public into a movie career and if you look at the first few movies that he makes replays these kind of like weird intimidating Undeveloped YOUNG MEN. You know in the basketball diaries in. Ryen Russillo favorite movie fear And even in boogie nights. There's something like violently adolescent about his his persona which is very different from the kind of actor and movie star that he is right now so a lot of times. I think that we could. You could write like a series of essays about how much actors of his generation have attempted to mimic the kind of like rough and tumble blue collar upbringing. That Walberg apparently had like how how often like DiCaprio Damon or these guys have tried to be like no I'm Jim Carroll and he's just a function Carol I'm the real thing but it's weird like even in his authenticity. If you WANNA call it that he still lacks like any kind of emotional intelligence or psychological depth to portraying those things and you could write all these essays. But you could just watch the departed. Because that's what this does that. Do you need that from an actor? Do you need to feel like this person is like in control and has that depth that Chris was talking about? I think I do ultimately. I think that there is a reason that I gravitate to Matt Damon instead of Wahlberg. And I think that you not just because of the departed and the Boston. Bill will talk about that a lot as a comparison but I like I said I really remember a lot of Walberg performances. Even though he's been given a lot of great ones and I think that's because they have a I don't WanNa say surface level. That's unfair. They're actually a lot of depth but they aren't the emotional depths and I think I personally don't hang onto those. I think I'm always wondering how in command of the Ark of his career. He is because you pointed out he makes he's. I mean he's just been a lot of great movies a lot of movies that are going to stand the test of time and it always seems like he's being cast the way that a lot of young actresses or cast as the. Nayef as the like the naive and innocent who gets corrupted when put into a system and like did someone in a room. Say That to him. This is your lane man will early like you think so. Well I just don't think that he I think he's largely in charge of the movies that he makes. Now he's like. I think that the movies that we see our movies that Mark Wahlberg once made for the most part and my suspicion is the reason he made that transition. Amanda was referencing about just mostly doing action. Comedy movies now is because those movies are more fun and easier to make for him there either like a physical challenge there like a day on the set whereas making boogie nights as hard Russell Smart. Yeah I think that he is both like sinking very strategically as the schedule would suggest and also like not over thinking it i. That's the VIBE. I guess sometime at the end of the day he's going like it very much is what it is. He is a very Surface level or just immediate actor. That's that's what you're getting and so I think he wants. He gets to produce the movies himself and make the decisions. You just kind of like. Yeah action comedies. Got There before we get into our top fives and I think we should figure out what we mean. When we say top five if it's five performances or his top five movies because there's some complexity. There is a very strange celebrity. The the nine eleven thing is you're staring right at. It's just hanging over my head as I think about him as a public person. So in twenty twelve Walberg was quoted in a magazine interview regarding. What would have happened if he had flown aboard American Airlines Flight? Eleven on September eleventh. Two thousand one. He'd been booked on a flight on flight. Eleven but his plans changed the day before the scheduled flight and he cancelled his reservation. Walberg received public criticism for stating quote. If I was on that plane with my kids it wouldn't have went down like it did and there would have been a lot of blood in that first class cabin and then me saying okay. We're going to land somewhere safely. Don't worry Warburg apologized for those statements. But they're actually the sort of thing that kind of inform his public persona and when we watch him in an action movie. We think that he's the kind of guy who's like I would have kicked some ass on nine eleven which I don't know if you like complicates the quality of the films that he makes but I can't get stuff like that. Outta my head once I've read or heard about it and I feel like we've referred back to it even in a joking fashion over the years right. Yeah it is definitely one of the top three things that I think about. When someone says Mark Wahlberg schedule yeah nine eleven yeah and the last night of prosthetic but like you know. I'm human beings. It's the point of the movie full movie as leading to that so yes I agree. It's funny he is both. I think very funny as a comedic actor like entirely humorless and it's that some things he's in on the joke on some things he's just kind of being like no I would have save. I would have stopped nine eleven. Which is just a ridiculous thing to say. And that's the joke of Andy Sandberg's say Heidi Mother for me. Yeah you know portrayal of him is this is like he's kind of total rube but also not. There's something very elusive about. Whatever's going on with an entourage thing it's like. Do you watch entourage because you think it's completely ridiculous or do you watch entourage because you think it's like six awesome representative drama and I dare to say that Mark Wahlberg is like Yup? That's how it went. I you probably think you're right. Insulin entourage Ari comes on and it's really like Whoa but most but he's like that's accurate me. Like Vince is very much living my experience. He's like we should make a show about it. I think. I think that you guys are right. Do you think that this should be five performances or top five movies I choose? I don't know I don't know where I landed. I think I did I tried to be interesting here but I I wouldn't say that any of these performances leap out at me except for my number one and number two as like excellent performances. They're more like movies. I really like was he ever given a truly great performance. Yes I I think. There's one and a half great performances on this movie and it's just a half is the end of boogie nights. No no I. Well that might be the case now. There's another movie I still did performances but I think they are. They are a little bit also an award for the movie knowing how best to use him right. Okay well then let's get into it. Let's go into our top five Mark Wilbur performances slash movies number five Amanda. Why don't you start us off? This goes out to Bill Simmons and apparently to right who I still have never met. Hello Ryan. I'm going with fear. Why not whow revisit? Yes I did okay okay seen Djing

Mark Wahlberg Chris Ryan Amanda Director Tom Cruise Walberg Bill Simmons Iraqi Navy Mark Shawn Fantasy Meek Utah Netflix Kelly Los Angeles Golf Calvin Klein Ryen Russillo Mark Wilbur
Go Networking with Sneha Inguva

Software Engineering Daily

09:41 min | 1 year ago

Go Networking with Sneha Inguva

"Guba. Welcome to software engineering daily. Thank you thank you for having me here have been a huge fan for a while so. I'm super excited and humbled to be on the show right. Well happy to have you on you work at Digital Ocean which is a cloud provider. Give me a few examples of engineering problems that you've worked on so digital ocean. We are cloud hosting provider. We have a variety of products in different areas for example with storage with networking as well as compute. Which is probably. I guess what most people are familiar with who used digital ocean we have droplets serve virtual machines that they can use but the interesting thing as cloud hosting providers that it's a little different from other companies in which in that we have both physical hardware issues we also have software issues and then we also have a web application so we've had interesting problems kind of all over the place when I joined the company. I wasn't actually network engineer. I was working on. One of the internal delivery. Teens is what we call the and on that team the biggest problem we were addressing was the difficulty in deploying and updating applications so namely working with Kubrick so that was definitely an interesting problem because I think we addressed. Both you know the challenge in building an abstraction layer on top of Kuban as that increased the just ease of deploying because before that people use chef chef was a little complicated in general and then on top of that also getting buy in from different teams to kind of use this new internal tool that we had so that would. That's kind of one of the problems we've had that we've addressed as you've mentioned digital ocean is built around these abstractions called droplets. Can you say much about what droplet is? Is it a VM? Is it a container? What am I actually interfacing with? When I spin up a digital ocean instance of course so it is a virtual machine. I think droplet just our marketing speak for everything oceanic themed in our company but it is essentially a virtual machine that is I guess. Technically Co located on servers with other virtual machines and you can spin up really in any location around the world. I think we have about thirteen data centers. So that super fine I I also heard you mentioned container so right now. We don't have containers as a service but we have coober. Netties is a service so technically speaking you could manage your containers as well although droplet itself is just a ritual machine. Got It now when you join a company. It's always tricky to find the bounds of what you should learn. And what you should know. R- it's hard to know just how deep to go and I know that when one of these virtual machines spun up. There's a ton of stuff that is going on under the hood. What was your process for figuring out what to learn the the life cycle of a user spinning up a VM. That's a really good point. In fact I think I think we still do this. When someone we have a for networking at least we have a really good on boarding process. Or when I joined the company not a networking we also had still had a pretty good on boarding process but it was more generic and there is in fact I guess. An on boarding session called how. The cloud works where an engineer who's been at the company for a while actually goes through the entire process and kind of goes through all the micro services that I guess receive a request and send a response. You know down to the schedulers that actually are scheduling the droplet placement on a particular hyper visor. Down to everything. So the thing is I think most people probably have a general idea of the different services that are being touched but then when it comes down to the nitty gritty of how exactly he's Networking Setup Hauser. Sdn configured all of that. I don't think unless you're on that specific team. You are aware so. It's it's kind of a t shaped process in a way so you have a general like breath of knowledge of how I guess the cloud works quote unquote but when it comes to the nitty gritty details. You probably have a very good idea of just your specific area. And I think it's impossible to have a very deep knowledge of absolutely every single service when you're at a company this large with this many micro services and with this many domains of expertise totally now. The reason I want to have you on the show is because I saw some talks. The you gave one specific talk about networking and the term networking can mean a lot of different things. But I know that now working at a cloud provider and you being a systems engineer working at a cloud provider. You probably have some insights on the engineering that goes into the actual nitty gritty of something spending up within digital ocean. What does networking mean at a cloud provider? What does that term networking so networking at a cloud provider? I think has two layers. There's of course the physical infrastructure that is set up so of course I think every cloud provider has physical switches physical address physical gateway so that is definitely one layer but then another thing that you have to consider especially at a cloud provider where you are dynamically. Creating and deleting virtual machines is that you are constantly adding different paths for networking packets traverse and removing them as well. So that's where software defined networking comes in and that's a completely different layer that you have to consider especially at a cloud provider and in fact at digital ocean. We actually have a team that deals with a lot of the physical details when it comes to physical switches in our data centers but we also have a SDN team which has a lot of sub teams that deal with a lot of the micro services that are interfacing and communicating with obvious open switch which is our virtual switch of choice that are actually making a lot of our networking products. Possible such as you know such as VP see or firewalls or even DHCP. A lot of these different things about some of the lower level networking concepts that you needed to know to build some of the projects that you've built within digital ocean. Of course so I'll just take you through. I guess when I first joined the networking team we were coming out with a product called. Bring Your own image so previously when people typically spin up a virtual machine or droplet they can select predefined image whether it's a boon to or I don't think we have Microsoft but a different version of a boon to or one of many different options however with Byu Hawaii we started giving them the option of bringing their own image. So the only issue with that is when we control the image ourselves. We can kind of control the cloud configuration meaning allocating IP addresses and setting up a lot of configuration. But when they're bringing their own image we need a way to dynamically allocate Ip addresses for those droplets using that image and that's where the DHCP protocol came in. And that was something that I had heard of. But I wasn't super familiar with but in general I guess whenever you're building a new networking product. That's using a new protocol my first step typically is to read the RMC so I pulled up the DHCP are of C and then the DHCP C. Which is a little different and started to learn about the protocol and I guess most people at home are probably familiar with it when they log into their computer and they fire up the Internet their ISP Rod are actually allocates Ip address for their home computer and so that's essentially using the DHCP protocol so we were implementing our own. I guess a hyper visor level demon to do that for different droplets in our data center and so that was something that I started to learn about. And then the other thing. When you're a cloud hosting provider is you start to learn about perhaps the ways in which you might have abusive actors and kind of look into security and so that was very interesting and then you you start to do a lot of load testing and try to figure out how to mitigate any possible issues so that was also something else. I started to look into when it came to the server that phrase you mentioned. Rfc reading the RFC. I've read some core answers and wikipedia recommendations about you WANNA learn networking concepts you should read the RFC which chance for the request for comments. Why is that the best path to learning about networking protocols? I mean that is fundamentally where the networking protocols were designed and some of these protocols redesigned like decades ago so I think that of course you could read wikipedia articles encyclopedia articles youtube videos. All of those are helpful. But I think that going to kind of the original source of where this communication protocol was defined. And of course to be honest the first time you read through any networking RFC. It won't one hundred percent make sense so obviously going through it marking up everything you don't understand which then and then of course every RC is somehow linked Tillich twenty other RC's so then go jumping to another RFC to kind of understand. Maybe another protocol that is used within a particular protocol kind of helps you build sorta like in a mental map or like a mental knowledge tree of what that protocol actually does what it

Digital Ocean Engineer Kuban CO Kubrick Netties Systems Engineer Tillich VP Microsoft
Kirk Douglas, Towering Icon of Hollywood’s Golden Age, Dies at 103

Q

07:24 min | 1 year ago

Kirk Douglas, Towering Icon of Hollywood’s Golden Age, Dies at 103

"So that's from the nineteen sixty film Spartacus it's Kirk Douglas in one of the best known scenes of his long Hollywood career Kirk Douglas died yesterday at the remarkable age of a hundred and three throughout the fifties and sixties he embodied a certain romantic idea of Old World masculinity in his films he often made movies about cowboys and soldiers prize fighters and rebels his most famous movie was Spartacus but the movie that made him a Hollywood star with the nineteen forty nine boxing movie champion the person he was in real life often mirrored the tough man that he portrayed on screen Kirk Douglas had a difficult childhood he grew up in New York in extreme poverty he actually was a wrestler and spent time in the navy before his success on Broadway he later went on to make movies that now define the era of Hollywood classics in nineteen eighty one Kirk Douglas received the presidential medal of freedom and fifteen years later he earned an honorary Oscar for lifetime achievement Jason Gorder he's a movie critic and a big fan of Kirk Douglas is work and he's here to reflect on the actors impact on the film world to chase and thanks for being here my pleasure and honor to speak about this giant of talent what do you think when you think Kirk Douglas I think somebody that helped change what we think of of modern cinema frankly he's he bridge is very much the gap between sort of the traditional Hollywood leading man that's sort of you know the beautiful dimple in the middle of his chin the incredible physique a sort of sense that we had of the strong man the strong big actor but is also somebody that brought a great deal sensitivity to his character system the steps two wasn't simply a matinee idol who somebody that sort of brought through his performance a dramatic richness that would we'd be exhibited in many of his contemporaries people like Burt Lancaster but also into people like Marlon Brando who get celebrations and more but he also brought a very political a sophisticated political angle to his films he somebody that absolutely shifted the conversation but what it was like to be a performer not simply studio tool but somebody that could take charge of his own career and shift at and that's when the look of the great things that he did everything that we saw after the fact of of these performers that are able to shape their careers much more explicit way he was a pioneer on that front would you consider that is greatest contribution or what for you just it gleams above all the rest I mean for me my personal connection or to serve master pieces which are the films that he did with Kubrick puzzle glory was a film that nobody wanted to make nobody wanted to make this sort of anti war sophisticated look at World War one it was sort of it was a war that nobody was particularly interested in such a grisly film that about moral ambivalence that wasn't really to be taken up and he and his production company Brina named after his mother foster got the money together now a great deal the budget went towards him but nonetheless he gave a shot to this this quirky New York filmmaker called Stanley Kubrick an fifty seven nineteen sixty while he was doing Spartacus the other our grand collaboration there's another director and after a week Douglas realize this is not going to work and he brought in correct now that the dynamic between the two of them was a little tenuous but none the less he brought this to start the superstar director to one of the sort of last big epic Hollywood cast of thousands films and still injected with the with this real subtlety and real intelligence of performance and finally with Spartacus again the connection Douglas Trumbull is it was Kirk Douglas who unapologetically said this blacklisted armed writer is going to get credit actually John F. Kennedy cross the picket line in order to see Spartacus this is what broke the blacklist the famous arms those that were accused of being communists so in so many ways I Kirk Douglas of star power was used for good he was used to bring stories to screen that would have been brought otherwise he brought directors that otherwise Hollywood didn't think that were I'm sufficiently commercial and you brought to light the hypocrisy of actually bring these writers to to dream if for the if you only watch two forms of Kirk Douglas these are ones actually fully sober in you know a lot of people will be doing that tonight I want to play you a clip from almost thirty years ago no looking back I realize I was much more successful when I forgot about being a hit for years I proclaim loudly that a movie must be good entertainment no messages for me but I've changed it must in some small way touch improve humanity that was Kirk Douglas accepting a lifetime achievement award from the American film institute and you can hear that Douglas was ingesting this chiseled jaw line or a typical Hollywood celebrity of the era is like you say he was a man of principle and you're quite cranky I hear that a lot of people didn't get along with him but is that how he will be remembered do you think is a man of principle was incredibly philanthropic and and again his story is fascinating he has for his father was a smart the dealer a rag command in upstate New York came from nothing I'm dealt with severe anti semitism the sun changes name sort of inculcates himself into Hollywood as a sort of brash fully American leading man from that he saw the the division between high and low and he really took that film trophic spirit that's that moral spirit the moral conviction through his career what a hundred three is a long time to live but he lived a very very full life and I believe when he was getting at AFI award he had just been in a tragic helicopter accident then here he is again I'm coming to the fore because he was called his performance he was there to actually have the signs that he also had a stroke he's kind of had nine lives and his son Michael Douglas was watching all of this and he's an acting icon in his own right do you think that that what is it from Kirk Douglas that you see that Michael Douglas has it has in him I mean I've said the drive the conviction but of the the big deal is that once a problem OR one flew over the cuckoo's nest was a Kirk Douglas production he actually did the stage production he got the rights again he saw this very quirky very politically charged project his son would eventually produce the film in the Afghan Oscar glory because of that so so the the tradition certainly carries along with Michael Douglas but the I mean it's it's for for viewers who are not familiar with this film we just don't really have a Kirk Douglas anymore the system doesn't really work with that but we have certain people the Brad Pitt's of this world who are stars but also bringing in these films after their production so it's quite remarkable thank you so much Jason Jason is a film critic he joins us live in the studio to talk about the death of Hollywood actor Kirk Douglas who died yesterday at the age of a hundred

Kirk Douglas Hollywood
A Look Back at '2001: A Space Odyssey'

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

08:58 min | 1 year ago

A Look Back at '2001: A Space Odyssey'

"Wasn't step to blow your mind. My name is Robert Lamb and Joe McCormick and Robert. Do you remember about seventeen years ago. How disappointing it was that? The year two thousand one was not like the year two thousand one in the movie. The two thousand one a space odyssey. Well certainly it did not resemble the nineteen sixty eight film. Two thousand one space Odyssey did not resemble that that vision of the future. Not Not exactly. We were not not traveling. We didn't have a moon base. I I want my milk. Carton of corn destructor Straw. Well that can be arranged if if that's if that's the definite futuristic experience you're looking for but yeah this is the this is a classic science fiction film perhaps the League Classic Science Fiction Film. I mean you can. You can certainly make the case for other pivotal works of sci-fi cinema but Stanley Kubrick and and Arthur C Clark's two thousand and one has a film that has stood the test of time inspired countless other sci-fi visions. And and and yeah definitely gave us this sort of benchmark to look for in the future so the reason we're talking about two thousand one space odyssey. He is because this year. That movie is actually fifty years old. Yeah it's hard to believe it half a century old. It was released in April. The one thousand nine hundred sixty eight and so because of the fiftieth anniversary because the movie so endlessly fascinating to talk about. We thought we would vote today to a discussion of two thousand one the film itself. It's ideas and its legacy Robert. How old were you when you first saw two thousand one? ooh I saw it when I was pretty young so I don't have a very very concrete memory of it. I think my dad he either he had headed the H. S. copyrighted playing or it was on TV. I'm not sure but I'd I'd say cu maybe eight or something. I'm not sure about Barack being a very interesting film to watch because it was it. has this dream like in quality to it. That is is there no matter. What level of a awareness You're approaching with viewer. You know whether you understand the more complicated science fictional or philosophical aspects of its message. They're still this hypnotic quality to the film that draws as you in I have a weird question about it I wonder if a kid For whom the plot pretty much goes over their head actually understands the the movie better than an adult who can grasp more of the content of the plot because the movie is in many ways. It's almost almost like a more like a painting or like a work of art that is radically open to interpretation where the stuff that the characters do. Well I'm not so sure that it matters as much as more the kind of visual themes established in the questions raised by you know the the spectacle gold before your eyes. Yeah the spectacle is Is a huge part of it. I actually was tempted. I I'd I thought well should. I let my six year old seat at least part of two two thousand and one I am just see what his take is on it and I did not quite get around to to to performing a test of that sort But I have a feeling he would be drawn in by the visuals for sure. Just thinking about the visuals alone. It's hard to believe this movie's half a century old. Like we were saying a minute ago. It still feels so weird and so fresh and so intellectually adventurous. Apparently you know when it premiered. One of the things about the movie is that it's it's mostly silent. They're only actually very limited parts of it were characters are speaking to each other. And according to the stories about the premier the first audience is just Hayden. Hayden not everybody. There were some people who saw okay. This is revolutionary something very different and new and original is happening here but a lot of the Hollywood hotshots shots who were in attendance just hated it There were tons of people. Walking out of the theater. Allegedly Rock Hudson walked out saying out loud. Will someone tell me what the hell this is about. Talk it's interesting because it is a film in which a lot of stuff does not happen. A lot happens. It's a film that that that kind of sums comes up the scent of humanity and where humanity might go beyond the beyond our planet but at the same time every any time. Something seems to be happening. We kind of get a cut. The scenes where characters are having pivotal discussions about what's happening is becomes just sort of a staple of so many other film like most films are missing. The murder that occurs to in the film is not actually seen so it. When you're watching two thousand one space odyssey there is almost this sense that someone is messing with you by removing these key? Bits of information. That should tell you what you're supposed to think about well. I can understand people hating it at first because it is in a way an intentionally challenging film it's it it goes against narrative conventions in a very Deliberate Way and another thing about it is just. I'm not usually a person to call out special effects. I as a thing I love about the movie but the visual effects in this movie movie are just unparalleled in so many ways. They look astonishingly realistic for for a time in the nineteen sixties when we hadn't even been to the Moon in yet when this movie was made we had not been to the moon. Space photography was very limited. So it's amazing. They could get something looking as accurate to the experience of outerspace as as they did. But then at the same time it so D- realized so monreale and It has almost kind of a Dario are Gento kind of quality though. Of course predates are Gento. But I mean like the you know the strange lights and The way the colors color our moods. I it's so oh good I'm glad Argenta did not directed by the way is very different than the monk. The the the the the dawn of man sequence might have been similar but The yeah the special effects in this film are just so breathtaking. I feel like if anyone out there is wondering what is it like to watch two thousand and one a space odyssey with Robert Atlanta. It's like every five minutes may saying aloud. Why can't we make? Why don't we make movies? That looks like this now. Why can't why can't why don't spaceships look like this anymore? Films and basically they don't look this good in anything else for instance nineteen seventy-two silent running another one of my favorite sci fi films was directed by Douglas. Trumbull who worked on two thousand one worked on the effects and silent running looks fabulous but it. It's not as pristine as two thousand and one in garbage can point to a lot of different reasons for that. But then there's you know you can. You can say well. These other films were not directed by Kubrick they. Maybe they did not have the budget. They didn't have the right key key. Artistic people in place this kind of perfect storm of creativity and intent. But but but you end up with this film that yeah just look so unlike unlike anything else and every single frame of this film I feel like you could you could print out and you could put on the wall and and no one would question the choice. It's also somehow a movie that many people I think have tried to copy and been unable to. It's a movie the style of which is uncopyrightable In my I've talked about this a bit with my friend Dave. He's he often points out that you have the the sequel to the two thousand and ten which which correct Kubrick did not direct came out in the eighties. Oh who was the guy who directed two thousand ten who is the same gentleman and directed outlandish alcohol Peter and not just outland. He made time cop. Oh The guy who made two thousand ten made time cop was interesting just if you just look at the trailers the between the two and you see just to start different because on one on one hand you have again the pristine white you know. Almost hermetically sealed all edible seeming. Like you feel like you could just crowd bite into the white chocolate goodness of the spaceships in two thousand one space Odyssey and then by two thousand ten everything is industrial grimy and not just the says the order of the day was the not only the sets but also also the character interactions because suddenly it's not this this very subdued performance limited interaction limited discussions between characters. No you have Roy. Scheider Heider Running Center Mayor Not Mayor of Amity from Jaws Chief of police. Chief Brody. Yeah chief Brody's just right up front getting into you know loud our discussions with with all of the characters We're GONNA need a bigger space craft

Stanley Kubrick Chief Brody Hayden Robert Lamb Barack Heider Running Center Robert Rock Hudson Joe Mccormick Murder Robert Atlanta Arthur C Clark Dave Gento ROY Peter Hollywood Argenta Dario Trumbull
Weekend Racing Preview | Caulfield Guineas Day Preview

Three Wide No Cover

12:13 min | 1 year ago

Weekend Racing Preview | Caulfield Guineas Day Preview

"Ayuthaya true good for perfect conditions I think a little bit of Brian sort of Wednesday Thursday just takes the main probably not much irrigation we'd love that I think it's going to Rice really well as coalfield does bought it's always an advantage to be on speed in those first one to sorta seven at caulfield it's always an advantage not much we randy the side I think it's GonNa play really straight and really fairly but I always think you've got to be advantageous just on spe does also to get there's a lot of variables in rising but once you back you control sometimes you need some walks on spayed where you want to bake oilfield Saturday very good or on the table at the first of our group we're GONNA rise pagoda so we've got six the thousand guineas used to be on the Wednesday boys now moved of course to the Saturday the last few years and it's just or for the die at fiber here's the first of a number of good often run his foot at two dollars thirty law at five fifty had some good memories of these track all has I missile mantra nine dollars acting hasn't these horse with good acting trae on the trump one of their ten dollars Tenley twelve dollars emerald thirty dollars southbank seventeen dollars Baba's Fox at twenty one on eloquent at twenty six dollars over the Piji Fatal Remember Twenty Six and Sin Edwards Crown at forty on dollars Josie very important here look not a lot of spayed Elliott acting oh go forward we'll go forward as well foot from that White Guy I think he has to be positive obviously there was a lot of talk about the run lost in the guineas prelude where he drew wide with her and he just sort of went back Salak along the LoC somewhat out of the equation expected to be somewhat in the one one way do you go with these rice well a lot of coming out of that is probably which was one boy acting own spate I'm just slightly worried about that rice and I will come out of it there's a lot of narrative sleeping on lucky but he fleet had won the rice boy half link let's do it right now if we'd be getting to thirty of mock to-to-to Seventieth Mock Duck Creek five is getting that but I just think she's going to drift on the I I think he'll get better than the two-thirty on officer if you like her maybe play a little bit lighter in closer to the rice I'm worried about that rice they went in slowly they couldn't break twelve seconds the lost two hundred that worries me about that Rice what do I do I know a lot of holistic coming into that rice will I go for a different form loin the oil eloquent full moines so I found the phone line from Sydney and I'm going with the Homeless Code Emeralds Got Eight and buy some pretty good ones last dot with Fun Star thirty one dollars but was fifty one hundred thirty one got Bayton that track was a little bit Ryan affected that died I went slowly but based lost four hundred two hundred of the dye that Rice to pay Arado who knows a superstar and before that Gobain by Yale she ran really well in the golden rose of a fast a game was really good light four hundred two hundred two different form on Jones agent really know he's done it before with the highest level lava who won the white when it comes around and this why so there's no worries with China Arkan emeralds at the price is ripping bit and I think it will drift on the well Josie interesting side that with would actually opened a twenty into to ten now aptitude thirty so if that continues there will be a drift estee e you in a similar can't wait you think the it can get beat or now that she's the one I wanna Roger Fleet because it's a tug at rice who to run these small I think she's going to be taking on the day the reason unquote last dot cushy drew fifteen I didn't want to give her a gut bossed out and went right back zoomed up sawed them she didn't have room approaching the if she gets out of the long she is them away because she's got an amazing turn foot so she's coming in flying onto the right our little bit she's a short pause because everyone's thinking potential with taint potential she should absolutely one that ornery so she finally draws a guy which is terrific all concur with Josie acting fit will roll for this more pressure on she's drawn a little at and she'll have to use because I'm eloquently locks the row Ford will mica US getting up the hill the first time at the four day southbank joining saw those two will be honest as well tron bucks doc bobby's Fox was closed last doctor on the pint it'll hold so that'll be the first four the interesting roundup will be cited which cran drawn aunt doesn't WanNa get caught going to rocky he wants to come across the bay in the first half dozen would imagine 'cause they're going to look that tape look back that by off this'll be the nature of the beast I'll go quicker early hill then they'll look to back the tempo off law and fleet get the best runs to pays back one eight one back to horses I've got a great turn of foot they classy Ranasinghe the rice they guy to get that sit back off that wall torp Iran and get at at the raw thome that's why I wanna Rod Fleet because she's had that topic coalfield now and she should have won last dot and she's got a lot of upside I'm not worried about the process so I'll be following southbank oil elegant into the rice now the key is here Emerald who gets back but it's a first look at coalfield and she's going to have the wall up with the logs have missile mantra who have her back on he's Roy showed running missile mantra Nice to have got the best turn of foot light by Kenai be close enough from the six fifty two the the three fifteen to build up and sprint with the locks of fleet and yes I law that again and get those beautiful rounds just off that high pressure really so I'm going with fleet on thinks she's got more upside and I recommend she uses that tuna food she'll be happy catch so of course I'm glad this is rice seeks saving I would not want this in the Corey these pretty auburn as open as you'd say rice to thirty five rituals Oregon just more attack when whenever it's worth which is not much let's have a look at rice seven now the coalfield stikes aviles easier five deservedly so those thirty five homes four dollars density area and those fifty gathered chop eleven bucks a dream castle thirty dollars black hotbed showing not backing up it or not paying to win second arrive there at seventy dollars getting those and Chitral Good Humour Twenty Seven Harlem and Asuka debuted at thirty five and sixty seven Josie yes saw matt pretty important he gal H Open Heisman have drawn gates one and two so I think they'll control the gala shop? I think heisman considered so expect getting to roll forward as well as your spayed and I think that's where they'll say it'll and that's where it will play at villiers can probably find fought on the back of my be three pairs back something like that he was back to his best oversee on that Swat we self destruct going back to a bit of a hard track boy rice seven these tracks gonNA firm right up even get back into the good three by that stage maybe there's a knock on that and not saying there is but we will say on Saturday Abed vilius where he really is at on God gala chocolate I thought he was really really good in he's run loss dodd he was thirty wanting to twenty six dollars he'd get beaten by Blackhawk bought bought or this he's ready to rock and roll he's got some big figures when he ran those big fee is probably about a year and a half two years ago our anymore just a bit newly back to that American from week eight one if these holiest goes forward gets a pretty genuine Tampa on I'm dick the white coal for Dole expected to apply arc and he's going to be really hard to bait just quickly would either well Cape of Good Hope time for one hundred twelve I think he will struggle is day. It's an intriguing Gallup we'll be controlled on speed runners for sure Guy Light Truck Fif- now Josie these the holes that you're going with I think heisman gets the best run Ben Mellon was caught in two minds audience think he'd be called and Lonzo Coalfield last outdrawing in authority shooter role folding it costing the rice you had to guy back kief grand and he gave blackout too easy around one eight one back and I think that happen on the ban will be positive on Heisman I think you'll sit outside the late and I think he'll be the catching this but the one that's got the turn of foot in the one that I can trust in the host it's buying the coffee full and sharing that Greg Turner fully Sevilla's coming off a red hot win-loss dot he excels at the mall and a quarter and woody's feet you can trust him and we've been wanting to see at this time in and he's acceleration las dot was good he's a group to win this track and trip and the dream force and also happy clap perform against this is the best form to follow trusting the fiber to sit midfield I'm not going to get caught up in these international hoses Iran Coalfield I have a two thousand made his way there cdn in terms of the speech up but what I can trust from guide seven civilians getting the best round midfield to pay us back and using that turn of foot when there's genuine rolling into that Bain from the six fifty white lit up he he'll get rolling Mike these real test over the two thousand meters but I think villas can climbing light afi or wanted a slightly bigger rises pyeho offered sands lock The boys giving you a copy you can definitely probably we're going to take a break when we come back we're going to have a little bit more group ones at Caulfield and then we're going to go up to see me for they want as well well that's too damn free to go in terms at five dollars coming off that probably win Kubrick non dollars ruckus Carina and Super Seth at thirteen dollars grams well at forty dollars Suba at seven dollars so patch nine hundred express poss- twenty-one Josie a few more on the next project will go to you now for the map and how it's all bay somewhat and rose forty can probably get it now that's a positive fit him if he gets the one but it's also another positive because I think if he gets the one one cannot say dollar saying he and getting in from guiding at all and I think would be posted three ward which again won a huge manage Bot it's not a sensational I one that the camp would want for dollar saying it's going to be a really competitive rice and I think there's a lot between alligator blood and ninety dollars saying I'm going with our saying ESPN profile look was very short in the market lost when it get Bayton well-documented day by me ED or works here in Dallas on has drawn at with Ella Guida blood they story we'll be positive and work up the hill for the first time but I want to try and get across to follow groundswell join me outside your deal be ridden Ford

Rice Josie Brian Randy Villiers Blackhawk Swat Dole Tampa Twenty Six Dollars Thirty Dollars Two Thousand Meters Thirty One Dollars Seventeen Dollars Thirteen Dollars Seventy Dollars Ninety Dollars Twelve Dollars Twelve Seconds Forty Dollars
A Review of Stephen King's 'It'

Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

03:37 min | 1 year ago

A Review of Stephen King's 'It'

"Today. We're discussing it star orrick harry anderson dennis christopher where should missour- annette o'toole. Tim reid john ritter and richard thomas special appearance by tim curry. The as pennywise was lonnie anderson busy like we're. We're all the sitcoms. What isn't a horror movie could get alan thicke directed directed by tommy lee wallace who does more comedy than horror no halloween three now. I guess depending on how you slice comedy. This is the the now playing co host. That's down to clown arnie and stewart and this the host who still insists he sees the ghost jacob. We're here a movie that has been so requested tested even before we started doing stephen king and then once we did. I can't count the number of times i've heard have you guys reviewed it and this is going to be the show with the most fun inflection an ever as we constantly emphasize the proper noun it yeah it is it for me. It certainly was the steven king book that i read that maybe wanna go back and read everything that he had written part of the appeal was i had just turned thirteen sixth grade and i had never taken on a book as is big as that book. My dad was a member of book of the month club but then showed up like a phone book on our doorstep over a thousand pages fourteen hundred pages weighing over four pounds at retail and you know aliens had just come out the month before and a movie and this really kicked off my horror movie phase like these were the things things that made me get so deep into horror in my teenage years i had talked to you about stephen king before this. I remember bus rides talking about it and then i remember one day you showed me your copy of it and there was a character who killed himself and you're like and he wrote this on the wall and there was a drawing join in the book. I'd never seen a book that had a drawing in it where the text goes. It looks like a letter age and i'm like i don't get it was an age. You're like no. It's it's the word it in blood and i'm like oh. That's pretty cool fast forward six months. I moved to florida. I didn't know a damn soul. Twelve hundred page book was exactly up my alley. I read it summer of eighty seven and that's the last time i read it until this year when i reread it for these reviews and i am once again the king newbie or the never have been i have not read it but i do feel like this is the one yes sure there's the shining but when i think of the shining i don't i think of king i think of kubrick the same with carrie i think of those movies but it because until two thousand seventeen eighty didn't get good adaptation. We'll talk about the nineteen ninety-one anyone but i do feel like this is the steven king book. I mean it's the scary clown which sure there's john wayne casey but this is such a trope. I feel like in horror now. I'm i'm sure this is a weird originated but i think he did popularize that whole concept. It's funny. You say that i was going to ask you. What's the first thing that comes to your mind. When when you think of it i wanna just put out there. One of my favorite things about stephen king and his first decade of output was to look at the cover because there were so many of them and i never knew what they were about hadn't seen many of the movies so it was fun to try and decipher from that picture on the cover. What is this one going to be about it. First edition hardback did not have no clown on it. It had the alien hand right clawed hand. It looked like a gremlins movie. It looked like he was was reaching his clawed hand out of sewer grates and that's how i read it.

Stephen King Steven King John Wayne Casey Tim Reid John Ritter Lonnie Anderson Dennis Christopher Pennywise Annette O'toole Alan Thicke Arnie Tim Curry Tommy Lee Wallace Richard Thomas Florida Kubrick Stewart Four Pounds Six Months One Day
The 'Doctor Sleep' Trailer is a Terrifying Return to 'The Shining'

Financial Issues with Dan Celia

00:16 sec | 2 years ago

The 'Doctor Sleep' Trailer is a Terrifying Return to 'The Shining'

"The teaser trailer is out for Dr sleep the sequel to the shining, which picks up four decades after the Stephen King novel and Stanley Kubrick movie adaptation left off this centers on Dan Torrance. He was the child in the original this time he's played by you and

Dan Torrance Stanley Kubrick Stephen King DR Four Decades
"kubrick" Discussed on Movie Crush

Movie Crush

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"kubrick" Discussed on Movie Crush

"So you you get the notion that Kubrick might understand a row j who was just very true. None now on hide he's the guy who Hines under the dead body. Right, right. He's what's his name platoon junior. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Exactly. Exactly. Yeah. And he there's there's that exchange between the journal and the shell shocked soldier. Yeah. And just just looking hits them just the way. He's like he's like, you know, the the other soldiers standing XM says sorry sorry is a little bit shell shocked. And he's like there's no such there's no such thing as shell shock in. You know, knocks him outside the head get pulled pull it together. You know at Vance PTSD. Absolutely. It is and. But it's like they could not admit that that was a thing possible. Because one b because I I don't know it takes away from the idea that war is supposed to be this ino- blinking. You know, thing that toughens you up and makes you a real man makes you brave and, you know, in for for for country, and so on versus just it's this horrible traumatic experience that even if you're lucky enough to survive, it can still have serious consequences for the rest of your life, the trauma, and and the kind of mental health fall out of it. And nobody was saying this. Yeah. Absolutely. Not I think even through a war to it was kinda like you're I mean, even God even way more recently, the the Iraq war, even you know, a lot of returning soldiers had heavy PTSD. And that was sort of like, you know, not not talked about so much for a long time. So I mean, they're they're making films about that now, but they're also still making these jingoistic he Mark taking the, hey, exactly. I mean, that's that's may be an interesting time to talk about just there's there's a debate kind of throughout film history and about like is it possible to make such a thing as an anti-war film because it's very easy for something that is ostensibly critical of war to still be taken as something like, for instance, full metal jacket. I would say as an anti-war film. But it's still like, you know, it's the kind of thing where like you watch like earlier me's characterization. Listen as the drill sergeant. And it is he is kind of a villain. But he's also very funny..

Kubrick Hines Mark PTSD Iraq
In the golden age of streaming, does film history have a place?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:40 min | 2 years ago

In the golden age of streaming, does film history have a place?

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by. Indeed, are you hiring with? Indeed, you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed dot com slash marketplace. That's indeed dot com slash marketplace. And Bryce Sunpro from Pitney Bowes, Sunpro online software makes it easy to save time and money print shipping, labels and stamps, right? From your desk and access discounted rates. Try it free for thirty days and get a free ten pound scale when you visit p dot com slash tech. That's PB dot com slash tech. With all these streaming services films knobs have to be in seventh heaven, right right from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm jed Kim in for. Molly would. It's Oscar season a time when we celebrate the history of film, but what if you want to actually sit down and watch some classics that was the selling point of one streaming service film struck that AT and T recently shuttered fills drug showcased directors like Fellini, Kurosawa Kubrick. It was the darling of Sinophile for the two years it existed given that streaming giants like Netflix and Amazon seemed to be focused on making their own original content. Could the golden age of streaming actually mean that film history falls through the cracks and Hornets is senior film critic for the Washington Post. She has high level thoughts on the death of film strike and the future of classic film. She says film strike never released its subscriber numbers her best educated. Guess is about one hundred thousand compared to about one hundred and forty million Netflix subscribers that's tiny. But Hornets says the fan base for classic or indie films has. Value beyond sheer size. It's a highly engaged audience. It's a very loyal audience. I mean, they have value. So whether the movies themselves, quote, unquote, don't have monetary value. I would maintain that they do have value. You know, in terms of the people who watch them, and what they are willing to pay to watch them, and it's not just everyday viewers, but also filmmakers who care about access to a rich array of film history the day after films struck announced it was closing. I happen to spend time with Barry Jenkins who won the Oscar a few years ago, his movie moonlight won the Oscar for best picture. He's just out this year with an exquisite movie called spiel street could talk he is an ecstatic student of film, he's constantly reaching back into the cannon into the history of the medium to enlarge and elaborate on his own emerging vocabulary and language and so for someone like him he was Crespi. On that it was going away. Because you know, when you talk about people like Barry Jenkins or Paul Thomas Anderson or Guillaume or del Toro, all of whom came out very very vociferously to support the site a resource like film struck helps these emerging artists to find their voice. And then it's also educating all of us viewers in terms of what they're doing. I think it was sighted of Warner Brothers and their corporate overlord AT and T not to kind of see the value in that. As the new streaming giants court the best in the business to make their original content or today says showing support for the canon of great film could be a hook. I think that's what Netflix has proven this year so aggressively going after people like I'll find so Koran and spending so much on the Oscar campaign for his movie for people like Martin scores says he will these are film lovers. And I mean, I think as they're trying to impress these tours and convince them. To come with them because they love art, and they love or tourism, a show of good faith would be to express your support of this archival legacy work. I mean, I think that could really sway somebody. She says despite the demise of film strike. There are other ways to stream vintage movies art house and cult films and other non mainstream cinema. There's a subscription service fan door. Also, canopy with a K available with your public library card and the library of congress L O, C dot gov. I got admit I'm not a major film buff. So I asked Hornets for suggestions on what to watch something. That's not a superhero movie, she suggested not a film, but a TV show on stars. And I kind of freaked out. Can I tell you what I'm obsessed with it's it's it's not even the one. I'm obsessed with speaking of stars is counterpart. I'm totally caught up on her part. We did this last week. I just don't know what I'm gonna do. I'm beside myself. I it's so good. Yeah. There's out. I've pretty good taste. I'm jed Kim. And that's marketplace tech. This is a PM. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by Sunpro from Pitney Bowes, San pro online software makes it easy to save time and money, no matter what you ship or mail print shipping, labels and stamps, right? From your desk and access discounted rates. Try it free for thirty days and get a free ten pounds scale when you visit PBA dot com slash tech. That's PBA dot com slash tech.

Hornets Oscar Pitney Bowes Bryce Sunpro Netflix Jed Kim Barry Jenkins AT Washington Post Warner Brothers PBA Molly Crespi Sinophile Fellini Kurosawa Kubrick Paul Thomas Anderson Martin Amazon Guillaume
Congress, President Trump And Ann Cates discussed on Power Trading Radio

Power Trading Radio

00:14 sec | 2 years ago

Congress, President Trump And Ann Cates discussed on Power Trading Radio

"Country. Nine of the fifteen cabinet level departments have not been funded because of the dispute between President Trump and congress over five point seven billion dollars in funding for a border wall. The defense department and the department of veterans affairs are open, however it because congress approved their funding through September thirtieth. They are the two largest federal agencies. The shutdown is furloughed three. Eight hundred thousand federal workers and has forced four hundred twenty thousand others to work without pay. They missed their first paycheck on Friday the same day. Congress left town, Christopher crews, Washington. A major winter storm that dumped up to a foot and a half of snow on the midwest is now bearing down on the mid Atlantic. Meteorologist Steve Kubrick says it's packing a wallop long. The Mason Dixon, line the amounts. Probably you're going to be a little bit lighter. As storm system is moving kind of south of the DC area. So up in those areas from say Hagerstown over to Baltimore City looking at four to six inches. And then as you move southward totals increase six to eight just north of the district of Columbia. I'm Ann Cates. Leftovers. Maybe

Congress President Trump Ann Cates Steve Kubrick Mason Dixon Christopher Crews Hagerstown Baltimore City Columbia Washington Seven Billion Dollars Six Inches
"kubrick" Discussed on Movie Crush

Movie Crush

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"kubrick" Discussed on Movie Crush

"Yeah. It's a Kubrick move for sure, but it uses it so much in this movie. It becomes it's not overused. But it becomes a thing of its in and of itself. Yes. The way he reveals and I started started getting way into my brain about it like is it even a metaphor of this character who started movie on this teenager in Ireland, which is you might say a tight shot, and then you pull back throughout the entire film right to reveal this three hour wide shot kind of the structure of society a little demotic. And that's probably a little you know, reading it into what Kubrick was probably doing. No, I think I think whether whether he thought about. Consciously or not I mean, it does it does make sense. And it does kind of emirs very well like you said the film is actually doing like fanatic kinda narrative level that. It's also it makes me think of like painting where sometime if you look at reproductions of paintings and books where you'll have the entire painting on like one panel one one part of the one part of the page. But then you also have a detail. That's like a blow up. Yeah. Yeah. Enhancement of just a particular subject in the paint. And to me, it's like moving from detail back through the entire canvas interesting like when you go to a museum early. I do you stand back and look at the picture, and then he moved in Wroclaw moving real. Yes. The thing on the table. And it's like there's things you can discover both ends of the scale. Yeah. So it's it's a way for him to kinda mimic painting away. But also to do something very cinematic, which is to do all of that within the same shot in it's moving it's like, a moving Tableau or something. And he's also pushing the audience away literally. Yeah, he's pulling you he's like starting close to the German, then you're moving back, and it's just like, but also consider them in the context of their surroundings right of history. And but Tony like if this has been criticized for keeping audience at arm's length. Yeah. And he's constantly literal way. It's kind of it might even there might even be a slight tongue-in-cheek knowing Kubrick when it comes to stuff like that. Because it is almost always a pullback. I don't know if he has any pushes he has like, I don't know if he has Zuma and got a couple of slow dot. Yeah. Yeah. And he's got a lot of static camera. And then the only time he goes hand held is when there's violence when there's a fight. Yeah. So, yeah, I, you know, the first one is the the fist brawl. Yep. In the army that's hen hell, which makes hand held super effective this when it's not overdone when he beat the crap out of Lord bullington that is brewed is incredible seen just the the tonal shifts the energy. The movie changes where it's like, he's making this break with polite society, you know, he's he's doing his kind of and everyone is just aghast at what he's doing. And so brutally yet soberly violent and messy. And again at shows it shows like those kind of like Barbara tendencies that are just bubbling beneath the surface of polite society. Yeah. In the hand held is big part of that. And then it also happens again when lady Leyland attempt suicide, you know, that's that's a remarkable scene because we get very little of her like internal life. How she feels about anything. She's you know, nothing. Yeah. You almost nothing to it. What's going on? You're just when she's being mistreated like when you blow the smoke interface or wins out walking with Lord Bullingdon, and she sees him with the housemaids. You know, it's all you see is her suffer basically in silence kind of. And you have very little indicator of how she. He feels about any of it other than she's on and. Yeah. And that one scene where knocking over the chair screaming hand-held again. And just kind of feel like, wow, okay. These are real living breathing apple. It's just that society. Requires them to not show any of that that happens feel in three hours. Yes..

Kubrick Zuma Ireland Wroclaw Tony Lord bullington lady Leyland Barbara Lord Bullingdon three hours three hour
Musks big spend; Blue Apron becomes penny stock; ex-Uber exec drives startup

San Francisco Chronicle Business & Technology News - Spoken Edition

02:02 min | 2 years ago

Musks big spend; Blue Apron becomes penny stock; ex-Uber exec drives startup

"You're listening to the spoken edition of the San Francisco Chronicle. Musk's big spend blue apron becomes penny. Stock X Kubrick drives startup by chronicle staff and new services from business number of the day forty million dollars. That's how much of his own money. Tesla CEO Elon Musk says he has spent on the boring company, which he started after becoming frustrated with traffic Tuesday night musk unveiled his first effort at a network of tunnels that will whisk Thomas electric cars, not just Tesla's underneath Los Angeles. With guide wheels attached to the front tires the trip and a model X through the nearly mile long tunnel near space x headquarters was reported to be a bumpy ride. Other number of the day, seventy eight cents. That's where blue apron stock closed Wednesday. After the fish Lee became a penny stock a day earlier the meal kit company, which went public in June twenty seventeen at ten dollars per share has seen a long slide since then at the time of. It's last infusion of private capital. Blue apron was valued at about two billion dollars. It's worth less than a tenth of that. Now hands off the wheel. Anthony Levin, douse gave the former Google engineer and key character in the lawsuit against Uber. From the tech giant's self-driving spinoff has a new trucking startup called pronto dot AI. The company plans to release its five thousand dollars seven cameras system that helps keep commercial trucks in their lane. In the first half of twenty nineteen pronto dot AI says it system works only when drivers are engaged in watching the road. Them douse key left. Google in two thousand sixteen to co found self-driving trucking company auto which Uber acquired later that year. Google spin up Waymo sued Hoover, alleging theft of critical technology the ride hailing company settled by agreeing to give way mo- about two hundred forty five million dollars in stock.

Elon Musk Google San Francisco Chronicle Tesla AI Kubrick Los Angeles Anthony Levin LEE CEO Thomas Electric Theft Hoover Waymo Engineer Two Hundred Forty Five Million Five Thousand Dollars Forty Million Dollars Two Billion Dollars Ten Dollars
"kubrick" Discussed on Movie Crush

Movie Crush

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"kubrick" Discussed on Movie Crush

"I got a couple more things on Kubrick here. So I looked up some of the things that people had to say about him that that worked with them. This is from Jack Jack Nicholson he said the guy was meticulous. I mean, he just had an impeccable eye for detail. I remember one time we were walking back to the set after lunch and he saw a slug laying on the ground. Suddenly Stanley picks the sing up and shakes his head and said this should be in Boston. He says, and he gets some intern to take this slug to Boston and put it on a patch of grass on the common thought it looked better there. And he was right. The slug looked better in Boston. Wow. I is that true. That sounds like the jazz. Yeah. That I don't know. I I'm I'm really fifty fifty on that one Vincent enough Rio during full metal jacket. He said when they were doing I think he says that scene. So the only thing I can think of is maybe the confrontation army shooting earlier Maria, but he said that he came back to him between each take and was telling him that the president was shot and that he came back to the second take in the news like he he actually was shot two or three times any the story. Just got worse and worse, and he said, my acting got better and better, and he was just totally fucking with them trying to I was trying to remember winded Hinckley shoot Reagan. Like, what was that? When he was. Yeah. The president would have been. Yeah. Full jacket would've been the eighties. And Reagan Reagan did have incessant attempt. But I don't remember what year that happened. If that was pretty amazing as two things coincided because they also arlier even has that line about marines in famous assassination attempt, right? Yeah. When he's lauding the shooting. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Well, yeah. The Kennedy Oswal. Yeah. Yeah. And then finally Batalli again, his old Powell talking about the sound. He said Stanley only use stereo sound onto films two thousand one and eyes wide shut the others were all in mono. And when asked why noted innovator resisted mixing in stereo, he explained we used to send people to all the key cities to check the projection. Yes. And what they found was nearly all the sound systems hadn't been looked at for years or even decades often one or more channels weren't working so Stanley decided it was better to record it in mono and mix it meticulously there. So the sound even in theaters where the speakers weren't working right with sound, correct. Yeah. Fuck it. Amen. Kubrick was yeah. And and on the same kind of level he would send out he had like an army of people that would go out to different theaters that were playing his films. Yeah. And they would go to see other movies in the in the same theater just measure like the brightness of the bulb in the projector in the screen and make sure like an escape was as it was always enough about the the ball. Quality. It's like often wrong. Yeah. Yeah. And like Scorsese, and like last waltz he has that card up at the front says this film was made to be played loud. Yes. But yeah, Kubrick, would he he was very very there were often instructions sent along with the films to projectionist, you know, please. Do it exactly this way? And if we find you, you know, projecting the film poorly with it from your cinema and all that. Well, I mean I've made short films back in the day..

Reagan Reagan Stanley Vincent Jack Jack Nicholson Boston Kubrick president Kennedy Oswal Scorsese Powell intern Maria Hinckley Rio
"kubrick" Discussed on Movie Crush

Movie Crush

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"kubrick" Discussed on Movie Crush

"Do not offer any no comfort there. No. Like those characters that exists only in Stanley Kubrick film. Yes. Very Kubrick in Krino old qua- constructs. Yeah. Yeah. Kubrick in construct. Yeah. It's good band name. Did you see the? Did you see room to three seven? Yeah. What was your take on that making fun of those people? Kind of the point in the movie, it seemed like that. Yeah. It did seem like kind of. Like, the director was mocking for the most part. Yes, he's people. It's been awhile since I've seen it. I saw whenever when it was first released. So it's not super fresh in my mind, yet didn't see it again. But I do remember. I mean, obviously, some of that stuff is kind of silly. I think the moon landing right Hooper guilty shirt for having faked it, that's why Danny's wearing the Apollo eleven shirt. And yeah, you know, the overlook is like a metaphor for Kubrick's agreement with the US government to come on that that's bogus to me the whole like miniature theory. Yeah. Where like the one of the main supports is that the ski poster kind of looks like a miniature come I. Yeah. I don't really buy into that. But I will say, and I was familiar with this with this reading of the film before that documentary came out, but the the native American genocide angle. Yes. So let's give everyone a quick summation of what this is all about. Yeah. So there's this article from. I wanna say the eighties. Obviously from the eighties because that's the film came out in nineteen eighty but call the family of man where he talks about the overlook hotel as standing in in a way for the United States. And if you start to look for red, white and blue those three callers in the film, it's all over the beginning of the movie once you know to look for it. You'll notice it's how windy is dressed is how Danny is dressed when he's in the meeting at the office. There's a little American flag and like a coffee Cup on the table. There's. You know, there's there's just as kind of like Americana color, like quite quite prominent in the beanie of the film. There's also numerous references that omen makes about having to repel Indian attacks in built on an Indian burial ground. Right. Like, he flat out says it. Yeah. Yeah. He talks about it. When when they're giving the tour, and so there's also this this famous kind of interpretation of the shot where it's Halloran is giving the tour of the pantry and behind Halloran. You know, very prominent in shot is this met like baking powder can with like a native American kind of profile with a traditional headdress and stuff yet. And it's improved file in it's kind of an exact profile with Hollarin' himself. And so if you buy into this theory that the overlook hotel is United States in some way, and that you know, when Halloran says things like a lot of good things happen here. But a lot of bad things happen to write when when almond says, it's still hard to believe it happened here. But it did, you know, I think there's there's a real sense that like, you know, the the film at a deeper level is talking about things happen in history, and they are in the past. But they are also somehow still present with us today, and that events have kind of like burnt toast. It has like it lingers for a long time. When these terrible things happen. When atrocities are committed not just in the more literal sense in the lives of the people directly affected survivors and so on. But it just it's history has echoes and it continues into the present. And it continues to so shining in a way the shining is a way of it's like a metaphor for history. It's like a metaphor for looking into the past and understanding that what you know where you're standing. Now, how how it got to be that way? There's there's a lot of blood there. And that if you were able to experience it more directly or see it more directly like the twins or something it would be this incredibly upsetting thing. So I was talking about the the met can in Halloran. You know, the the suggestion has been that is in profile Cala met Ken with Indiana's in profile that is sort of drawing parallels again between the African American experience in the United States. So interesting. Yeah. And you know, of course, the..

Stanley Kubrick Halloran United States Danny director Hooper Indiana almond Ken Hollarin
"kubrick" Discussed on Movie Crush

Movie Crush

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"kubrick" Discussed on Movie Crush

"Yeah. But it's very deliberate it and how it's pace. Yeah. And I kind of perfectly. Yes. And how it plays out the madness and builds up to that bat shit. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Absolutely. Yeah. I mean it works better. Because there is so much Bill to it for sure. So before we get off of it the the steady Cam as well. I mean, I feel like the shining has had such a lasting visual influence on so much cinema. That's come after it. If you think about films that have come out in recent years, something like the witch, for instance, has a lot of kind of Kubrick 'isms in it these slow creek. Opens. Yeah. Maybe not so much steady Cam on that film. But definitely where you kind of have these wide angle shots and pushing very very slowly. Yeah, or yeah. The kind of symmetrical framing if you think about a film. Did you see the killing of a secret? Dear. Oh, not yet. Yeah. That movie is like just, you know, full of again, these kind of Kubrick visual touches, it almost feels like no, much Kubrick or something the way, I think he is one of the more often Majd. Yeah. Absolutely. He is it's interesting too. Because I feel like partly Kubrick is a little bit easier to imitate for people because it's it is possible to set up these symmetrical shots. It is possible to kind of do these like slow slow creeping zooms and so on that's that's something that is in the wheelhouse of most filmmakers to achieve. And yet the way the Kubrick deploys it his control his you like his sense of. Wendy use that to not use it. And so on. Yeah. Till like Bill the atmosphere to build the tension. Well, it's interesting because he. The shot where it shows sca- or dick dick Halloran O'Halloran Irish dick Halloran is in his I guess house report in Florida. Oh, yeah. The the Tuesday amounts with the it could have been by all accounts should have been just a shot of him in his apartment watching the news. But it starts as you know, hard on the television and pulls back so slowly from the TV to reveal reveal his feet in the nude portrait TV. Yeah. Then the reverse of that same the other Newport bed. Yeah. Yeah. And there was no like when he said when did deploy it like, I wonder why they're? I think it's because it's it's starting to dawn on him. Like, he's just he's he's on vacation. He's on holiday. He's having a good time. He's in his own world. Yeah. And it's it's like the beginning of that feeling stirring in him that. Yeah, he's getting a sense that something is wrong something he's having that premonition. So that's why he just played it with a creepy sort of. So. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I think to give it this this sense of dread. And yeah, you don't even understand really why it's happening. But it is making you uneasy in that way. Well, I mean halloween's halloween's call to action sort of directly mirrors the ramping up of what's going on in the hotel like when he first skits that like oh shit. I gotta go get on a plane because he's getting Danny's messages. Yeah. Like that is when the that that's when the story really starts to kind of shift into third or fourth year. Yeah. I feel like well, it's like I was thinking about you know, those those zoom out shots. There's. A very similar when that happens with Danny when he's playing with his toys on that orange carpet. And it starts very close up on Danny in that ball rolls into shot and the camera variously zooms back out again. Yeah, it's like Kubrick. I mean, he used that shot on many many of his films where you would start in like an extreme close up and then zoom back out Souissi the entire world. Yeah. Around the character. I feel like that. That's just like his way of underlining something of kind of queuing us of you're like, hey, pay attention. Right. Something's about to happen. Yeah. You know, we're we're we're going we're shifting into another gear you need to really pay close attention. 'cause it's about to get you know, crazy. Yeah. Yeah. His use of lighting to we'll get into this is wide shut her. But he was very famous for. I mean, he obviously used movie camera lights, but he's USA practical..

dick Halloran Kubrick Bill dick dick Halloran Danny USA Newport Wendy Florida
"kubrick" Discussed on Movie Crush

Movie Crush

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"kubrick" Discussed on Movie Crush

"And apparently, he he didn't like he wanted final cut of this, of course of himself in it very much. Yes. Yes. So I'm sure there's more footage out there. Oh, they're just to see him talking about lenses in saying check, the gate all these normal things. 'cause he's someone that I sort of deify into see him at work thinking, he's just a director. Yes. There's a great moment on there's a commentary track for Steven Soderbergh's sexualizing videotape. Oh, yeah. It's from like one of my favorites from win the DVD. I came out which is probably like ninety seven ninety eight and it's sort of Berg and Neil abuse. You had no involvement insects lies. But was just, you know, for some reason he was there on the commentary to talk about it. And they're they're both talking on the commentary about having recently seen the making of the shining because the first Kubrick DVD's had just come out like the year before and. And you know, they had never heard Kubrick's voice. Right. So they're like they're like, it's like hearing the voice of God. It's unbelievable. Like, just just, you know, watching this legendary figure just like. Yeah. Hamble around and let you like you see him come up with that shot underneath Jack Nicholson. Yeah, it was holding the director's viewfinder. Yeah. And you know, he's like looking at. Yes. Just do it from down here. You know? Yeah. Just something that I contact that kind of like burns self into your mind. You know, you're you're just seeing somebody kind of casually come up with something like that. Yeah. And that's one thing that surprised me. Like, I did a bunch of article reading about Kubrick over the last couple of days and one of the guys we'll talk about a few times in this is he was an actor in one of his earlier movies, and they bonded big time. And he became Leon Vitale. Yes. And he became his personal assistant for like the remainder of twenty years working, and he has so much. Great insight. But he was like, yeah. He always gets. This rap is a control freak and you would. That he had everything like so meticulously planned everything story boarded, and that was the kind of control freaky was they said, but he would go in there. And then you see it not committee and be like, all right? Let's figure this out. Yeah. Let's reblock it. Let's let's get like two or three lenses to have on hand. And it all sort of builds out from that moment. Yeah. And then in the shining, of course, very famously the rewrites. Yes, we're Jack is even in that documentary that one part where they have Nicholson in the the woman comes up. I don't know if it's a script supervisor who bit hands him the sides in. She says he's kind of giving her a hard time. He's like, yeah. Had nothing to do between midnight and two a. And she said, well, this is the final script, you know, in the right? He said, it's just something to consider. And then he looks at the camera, and he said quit using my script. I just take the ones they type up each day. Yeah. And that was a very famous story that there were so many changes. And like, you just said of off Mike that Kubrick you see him in the background while they're doing this just bang bang away at the typewriter way. Beijing. Yeah. Yeah. So he would learn his lines minutes before shooting. Yeah. And I mean for control-freak that's a very loose way to work. Yeah. I think I think it's it's sort of like you have to. You have to prepare. At least Kubrick the way Kubrick sought by doing this like incredible amount of work front, and it gives you the solid framework that you can then be very loose within right and still be very very very very solid footing that like the film's not going to drift completely in terms of tone intern. Right. It's like you have to kind of establish like a very strong baseline framework. And then within that you can kind of just like you go crazy. And that's what they say actors say the best or a lot of actors say that the best thing they do is to prepare. And then forget it all in that way. You can just go on instinct. Yes. And all that shit is just part of your DNA. Exactly. It's like a reflex or something. Yeah. Yeah. It's really interesting. Yeah. Hey movie Crushers with access to tens of thousands of channels, apps and Alexa, skills. Amazon fire TV brings all the live TV and streaming content..

personal assistant Jack Nicholson Kubrick DVD Kubrick director Steven Soderbergh Alexa Beijing Amazon Berg supervisor Neil intern Mike twenty years
"kubrick" Discussed on Movie Crush

Movie Crush

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"kubrick" Discussed on Movie Crush

"Shit man, you are just like completely immersed. And and it's also a amazing sees for like international cinema. Not just French cinema or American cinema, but films from all over the world. Right. Come and play in Paris again with like the utmost kind of respect and the audiences are fantastic. I've never had a bad experience with somebody on their phone. Oh, that's shocking hockey people eating loudly. Right. It's like even even before you, even while the trailers are going on if anybody talks, it's like an absolute whisper. Right. And as soon as the film begins it's just like lights out like everybody just dead silent rate. So you have to go to like an Atlanta doesn't even have one. But in LA if you go to like the ark lie. Yes. Yeah. Those are you know, generally, very well respected film lover higher ticket price. Yep. Reserve seating is just like. Yeah. At the Arclight. Yeah review. Yeah. So it's yeah. And like zero tolerance policy for anything. Like that will kick you out. Yeah. That's great. Like, even the even the babies in France don't cry during the never never had a we're going to see the ring here at the the landmark. Uh-huh. And there's a baby in the audience. It's like what are you doing? What why are you here to see the ring with Vincent? And. Yeah, the baby started crying and the whole audience rioted and kick them out. Doing it's Friday night like here. I know what you're talking about though, like leaving the movie and in Paris, and like you're on that like the biggest back lot in the world. Like, I think you like myself get a lot of get a lot out of being in the place where something happened. There's not to be too hippie dippy, but the energy of whether it's like standing where Elvis stood in sun studios. Lutely these places that I've toured where some people like, oh, cool. There's sun records in like, that's that's small. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Whereas I and not just me or you. But a lot of people really get a lot out of going in there. And just being like man, this is where that shit happen. Absolutely. I'm standing in in the place where greatness achieved. Yeah. And that's just such a cool thing. I think I mean, the smallness is what's amazing about it? The the humble surroundings kind of like you realize like a normal human being did this. You know, a very talented. Yeah. Early in one, but still like immortal, you know person. I like that feeling. Yeah. Oh, absolutely. It's it's inspiring. It's a reminder that like you may put these people on some kind of pedestal now, right? But they were just human beings. And you know, they had their flaws and they were just doing the best. They could. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Well, that's what was so interesting to me about watching the Kubrick behind the scenes, and for those of you listening Kubrick's daughter, Vivian did a I mean, it's only unfortunately about twenty five. Minutes long, but some like just to see Stanley Kubrick onset working..

Stanley Kubrick Paris Elvis Kubrick France Atlanta LA Vincent Vivian
Douglas Rain, voice of HAL in "2001," dead at 90

Frank Beckmann

01:03 min | 2 years ago

Douglas Rain, voice of HAL in "2001," dead at 90

"Company died in Stratford. Douglas, rain was ninety hell was the creation of Arthur Clark, the author in nineteen sixty eight Clark, and the director of the movie Stanley Kubrick said how was supposed to be artificial intelligence and that conflicts like the one between Hal and commander. Dave could be expected as robots with rains would handle human activities, and there would be many conflicts between the humans and the robots and the robots would win most of the world thought they were crazy. I'm dick Haefner. WJR news more news at twelve or whenever news breaks. The Frank Beckmann show. News talk seven sixty WJR. Yes. And hooted how here the most

Arthur Clark Dick Haefner Stanley Kubrick Frank Beckmann Douglas Stratford HAL Commander Dave Director
"kubrick" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"kubrick" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"We're back. So there's a conspiracy of play here that we, we mentioned at the very top of the show, but we didn't really dig into Staley Kubrick in the aluminum body, aka eyes, wide shots. The last film he made or almost finished making right depending on your interpretation and one that really freaked a lot of people out. Yeah, I think largely because it's the only film to feature Nicole Kidman wiping her bum. Oh yeah. Well it, yeah, that was the original title. Only film is wiping her bum Il film featuring Nicole Kidman wiping her bum, well, it's a there'll. Yes. Nicole wiping her boom aside. There are a lot of things that have been brought up before that perhaps this movie had to do with the first one that I read had to do with Scientology and whether or not this whole film was kind of a jab at the. This is not me speaking. This is other people speaking. The Colt like similarities or the Colt leg things that Scientology has within it. Tom Cruise is in well, that's the well again, like also Vivian Kubrick we've talked about is now a scientologist. Yes. And the people online will report that this is Stanley Kubrick fighting against it as like you've taken my daughter, you know, very upset. I making this whole movie, exposing you. However, she did not join Scientology until after the, at least at the very, very tail end of production on this film. So the timelines little tough. Yeah. If he, if you're talking about a man writing a film and then coming up with the shot. For and all of this is it doesn't lineup, but having the coal in Tom as the lead character's interesting connection there, perhaps perhaps we're you telling us off air that there's this idea of Kubrick making eyes wide shut, just put them through the ringer. Well, I mean, that's been reported by several articles. I don't case Illinois if you've heard anything about this, but there is there's there's one scene in eyes wide shut. That feels a little bit weirdly out of place. It's where Tom Cruise is kind of walking the streets of, you know, the the back lot version of New York that they built in England at night by himself, and he passes these kinda like frat guys and they don't get out of his way and they kind of bumped into the kind of like start yelling, kind of homophobic stuff. Adam. And there has been some suggestion that that scene was in there almost as Kubrick's potential commentary on Tom, you know, there's been rumors for years about sure about Tom Cruise, so you. Just just not even so much Kubrick falling down on one side of the other of that whole thing. But just kind of, I don't know prodding Tom Cruise and like the control of his image and all that kind of stuff, but isn't also isn't Kubrick very well known for pudding all actors through the ringer. Yeah. Do all on the shining. Yes. Well, and also Scott, nine Cruthers you place in in the shining tells a story about having to do some wine, a dialogue like Hello or something like one hundred times and finally kind of crying out and exasperation Mr. Kubrick what do you want? And you know, couvert just saying, I'm just waiting to get it right, or you know, just just keep trying. Yes. Those London, but it goes, it goes much much deeper than that. There's there's a, there's an article in Vanity Fair that discusses specifically how Kubrick pushed the relationship of Nicole Kidman and Tom Cruise onset and offset there was this fairly very short sex scene between Nicole Kidman's character, and some other men and Kubrick barred, Tom Cruise in being on set, and they shot it for like six days in. It's this tiny little sex scene. It Tom Cruise was not allowed to be told anything about what was happening again, this is his wife, right? And that's a, that's one of those like things that almost I can see him as a director trying to unsettle both of them on purpose right test their marriage because in the movie they're married. Yeah. And then he's testing their actual marriage, and he would have them sit down and do a sensually therapy with Stanley with the three of them together in a room and talk about their actual marital problem. Uh-huh. And then work that into the movie, the joke about the the bum wiping thing earlier, not to keep harping on that, but that sort of fed into that too idea that he made them kinda behave.

Stanley Kubrick Tom Cruise Nicole Kidman Scientology Illinois director London Adam Vanity Fair New York Scott England six days
"kubrick" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

05:02 min | 2 years ago

"kubrick" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"We can't tell you how the story began to circulate. So it began to be taken seriously by people after Stanley Kubrick's death. This was not around when he was alive and the most prominent mentions. We can find someone seriously alleging this come from a writer and director named Jay Weeden or who began publicizing what he saw as clues supporting this concept and we can. We can dive into this. We do want to warn anyone who hasn't seen the shining for some reason. Go watch it. Now this is going to examine in detail aspects of the shining. It's not major spoiler territory, but there are a couple of spots that are troublesome, but surely both the movie and the book are well beyond the statute of limitations here spoilers at this point, but but the shiny is one of those movies that even if you haven't seen it by now, you should see it before. Penny one spoils, absolutely. You probably also know the stories already. You know, it's so it's almost a trope. It's almost an operation at tropes at this point, but still, I guess we should do the countdown for spoilers forty thirty nine at one about the dude that plays piano and kind of loses his marbles. That's the one I know what you're talking about. I can't think of it is called shine. Actually silly Joe, Jeffrey Russia's first big picture. Nice spoilers Jeffrey Russia's and shy. If that's if that was if that was the question wanted answered spoiler for shine his father, his father's father breaks. His violin makes them into a bitter. Old man turns into a penis. Oh. It does so factor. The shy Nin with an I g in Jesus meant Jack and Danny Torrance, the dad and the son represent different aspects of Kubrick himself. So Danny is the gifted youthful idealistic director who's in tune with a greater message. Danny in the story is psychic, and so some symbolically that's Kubrick being capable of seeing things. No one else can see. Danny also has a knack for telling people things that short narrowly be kept quiet. Jack. On the other hand, the fathers, the quote, practical, pragmatic guy wants to be a great artist and he's apparently willing to do anything to accomplish his goal of becoming a writer. So to support this Jay site, several perceived physical similarities, Jack's practice of smoking Marlboros the same kind that Kubrick smoked to the earlier point about his appearance. He says, Jack, looks unkempt. On his shaven as the film progresses, he begins looking more and more like the bow behind the scenes footage of coop cubic coober and yeah, it's. I mean, it is interesting. Kubrick CASA was known to carry it acts around set way that wildly people yet them to do what Shelly devolved. Get back over here. What I say actually go true story. He never used the door up. Only access is. Is like a metal phobia, Cuban, he, you know, maybe he just had a pro acts thing. Yes, yes. The, oh, he does look on Kempton. You see this in about behind the scenes footage he and Jack Nicholson playing Torrance become increasingly. I don't wanna say decrepit, but wild looking and the overlook hotel in this reading represents America. It's shiny. It's wealthy, but it is built upon blood and terrible, terrible secrets. We talked about the the baking powder cans down. Yeah, Kelvin. It comes in a little bit later, but that's something we can touch on now, do I only mentioned because Ben talks about how it's built on blood money, and they mentioned in the film, I believe an indie. Cans when they're doing the tour. He says, we had to repel several Indian attacks. We were building this place which is just such a throwaway light in there too it into more sinister. But visually there's a whole like crazy stockpile of Callum baking soda or powder that has the, you know, the traditional Indian chief, yeah, addressed very conspicuously, turned towards the cameras and Eric casing with its in profile, and and it's also Halloran who is giving the tour of the of the kitchen is in the same profile as the Indian. So there's been some suggestion that Kubrick's drawing a parallel visually between, you know what? What happened? Historically Indians and African Americans as well in the United States, but to j it's all about faking the moon landing to jail. Yeah, yes. In this context, it's like this is America, and here's the most important part right? The the hotel man. Major earliest. The first one we meet right?.

Stanley Kubrick Jack Nicholson Danny Torrance Shelly Jay Weeden writer America director Kubrick Jeffrey Russia United States Ben Torrance Joe Callum Cuban Halloran Eric CASA
"kubrick" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

04:39 min | 3 years ago

"kubrick" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"The late filmmaker stanley kubrick may have one more surprise for his fens a previously unseen script by mr kubrick has come to light more than sixty years after it was written kubrick the novelists calder willingham adopted burning secret from nineteen thirteen novel some say the project never made it to the screen because of its risk as subject matter the script was thought to have been lost forever and there was nathan abrams hens nathan abrams is a film studies professor at bangor university and that's where we reached professor how did you come to find the script after all these years well i just published my book stanley kubrick york jewish intellectual and trump reached out to me and also to show me a couple of scripts and this this person is the son of a full mcnabb rates a stunning kubrick and the script came into his possession because his father was going going to be off to work on the film and how did you feel the first time you had it in your hands oh this is testing it's i mean this has been commended that he was working on it back in nineteen fifty six but no one ever knew if it's completed it and what's the script was in and now we've got full fool droff and tells us up what do you have that it is the real deal and not something that someone who's an overzealous fan just made up you know question every document look i mean i'm in the all kind of every day and they're scribblings on the kubrick manuscripts house i know someone go in before being scruple trevi this stunning coup but we have thought don't could face but we try and get it with with the other information that we have to say it's you know the who's on the cover of the script you know all this extra information the other thing is this is a over one hundred page script this this take lots of publication to produce something this extensive i think what what tell us what the story is burning secret bunning secrets in vela by stephens vibe which was published in nineteen thirteen it's about the swamp byron holiday results who's spies an attractive jewish woman who's married and when she rejects his advances he decides the best routes host to befriend young some and stanley's taken the cuddle of the story and translates into a contemporary american idiom in mid fifties nineteen fifties america if they including you noted that this was a jewish woman including making them nonjewish yeah so so another way that this fits kubrick's working pots and is that the jewishness at the seoul texts that he adopted as is a race and we can see this certainly in his previous film the killing and we sit and all of his films off to that puffing thousand a month whether on the shining where they went to the jewish characters do you know what his motivation would be doing that easy for self hatred identically the mall complex is fuzzy doesn't economic motivation in mid fifties america he carly calculates the people didn't wanna watch jews on screen remember the parrot of the hollywood moguls putting jews on the screen but not as jews you know the dog la so tiny kind of and others where they've changed their names the deeper on stymied has an ambivalent relationship with jewish identity because you know what he didn't his films if you jewishness out explicit and then reinserted it under the surface those you can read the codes and we can see that and that's why i'll came my but multiple times i'm that was three things like costing decisions and of little factors many other things that relationships was shop how well firstly like shots thinks of him taking a stream jewish nova nevada of unissons since then secondly the seams of marriage fidelity at altri enough triangle as well which we'll see him the lisa we'll say that family try and go in the shining animal complex one environment and you know some of the.

stanley kubrick sixty years
“Lost” Stanley Kubrick Screenplay ‘Burning Secret’ Discovered By College Professor

As It Happens from CBC Radio

04:39 min | 3 years ago

“Lost” Stanley Kubrick Screenplay ‘Burning Secret’ Discovered By College Professor

"The late filmmaker stanley kubrick may have one more surprise for his fens a previously unseen script by mr kubrick has come to light more than sixty years after it was written kubrick the novelists calder willingham adopted burning secret from nineteen thirteen novel some say the project never made it to the screen because of its risk as subject matter the script was thought to have been lost forever and there was nathan abrams hens nathan abrams is a film studies professor at bangor university and that's where we reached professor how did you come to find the script after all these years well i just published my book stanley kubrick york jewish intellectual and trump reached out to me and also to show me a couple of scripts and this this person is the son of a full mcnabb rates a stunning kubrick and the script came into his possession because his father was going going to be off to work on the film and how did you feel the first time you had it in your hands oh this is testing it's i mean this has been commended that he was working on it back in nineteen fifty six but no one ever knew if it's completed it and what's the script was in and now we've got full fool droff and tells us up what do you have that it is the real deal and not something that someone who's an overzealous fan just made up you know question every document look i mean i'm in the all kind of every day and they're scribblings on the kubrick manuscripts house i know someone go in before being scruple trevi this stunning coup but we have thought don't could face but we try and get it with with the other information that we have to say it's you know the who's on the cover of the script you know all this extra information the other thing is this is a over one hundred page script this this take lots of publication to produce something this extensive i think what what tell us what the story is burning secret bunning secrets in vela by stephens vibe which was published in nineteen thirteen it's about the swamp byron holiday results who's spies an attractive jewish woman who's married and when she rejects his advances he decides the best routes host to befriend young some and stanley's taken the cuddle of the story and translates into a contemporary american idiom in mid fifties nineteen fifties america if they including you noted that this was a jewish woman including making them nonjewish yeah so so another way that this fits kubrick's working pots and is that the jewishness at the seoul texts that he adopted as is a race and we can see this certainly in his previous film the killing and we sit and all of his films off to that puffing thousand a month whether on the shining where they went to the jewish characters do you know what his motivation would be doing that easy for self hatred identically the mall complex is fuzzy doesn't economic motivation in mid fifties america he carly calculates the people didn't wanna watch jews on screen remember the parrot of the hollywood moguls putting jews on the screen but not as jews you know the dog la so tiny kind of and others where they've changed their names the deeper on stymied has an ambivalent relationship with jewish identity because you know what he didn't his films if you jewishness out explicit and then reinserted it under the surface those you can read the codes and we can see that and that's why i'll came my but multiple times i'm that was three things like costing decisions and of little factors many other things that relationships was shop how well firstly like shots thinks of him taking a stream jewish nova nevada of unissons since then secondly the seams of marriage fidelity at altri enough triangle as well which we'll see him the lisa we'll say that family try and go in the shining animal complex one environment and you know some of the.

Stanley Kubrick Sixty Years
"kubrick" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"kubrick" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"That's exactly right and that's a very solid point which everyone seems to miss also at the beginning of the film or not beginning but you know about a half hour into the film we discover that the space program people are creating cover stories that there's a virus loose at the base on the moon and and so you know he also is pointing out the fact that these people are not going to hide from trying to create cover stories to hide what's really going on and what's the cover story that creating what what is it hiding there hiding the fact that they found intelligent life proof of intelligent life in the past on the lunar surface so again we see that kubrick is telling us that they they found they may have found proof of intelligent life in the past on the moon and they're hiding it from us and i believe that's exactly what's going and i find one of the most fascinating parts of the movie has now come full circle in the past couple of weeks which is this the original screenplay the original draft of the book had the discovery mission going to saturn kubrick couldn't make the rings of saturn allegedly right good enough for the film so they switched it to jupiter and europa.

kubrick
"kubrick" Discussed on Here's The Thing

Here's The Thing

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"kubrick" Discussed on Here's The Thing

"When you saw him he'd aged quite a bit in between films kubrick is round and kind of full bodied and a thick main of brown hair than you cut the five and six and seven years later and two different kubrick and then a different kubrick and he looks withered looks tired older yeah he wasn't a health nut is what i'm saying no doubt about that but i think just is can i say this on going is almost a grind in a negative way but everything is like a cab yeah exactly yeah what's interesting in the film that i love about the film is that this film reveals that there's things he couldn't do or wouldn't do and that's what fell to you to do you know he if there's ten things you need a director and a director who's producing so hands on his own or her own films that individuals so hands on this ten things that are going to do he would do five or six of them on the deepest level then the other four of them he relied on someone else to do and that fell to you to take care of the little boy and to to do it emiri eight of job forget all the technical jobs figured about you as a as his curator of his love his film stock and so forth in the documentary film worker my guest leon the tally describes what a taskmaster director stanley kubrick was vinita even when he said it is your responsibility sure understand exactly what you want that could take two three full five six tries to get an right if i felt like i wasn't getting any response all people were kind of from one of a better phrase digging me around in a saying they're going to send something you never get sand and you got to chase them out and chase them up he'd say okay leon tonight you get on the phone and you say to them if they're talking that to you talking that to me it really felt like it was a kind of loyalty.

director leon stanley kubrick seven years
"kubrick" Discussed on Here's The Thing

Here's The Thing

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"kubrick" Discussed on Here's The Thing

"Not received that hispanic i actually know friends of mine who have used that with people in bed great voluptuous performance this movie the tally and he he's gone and then as these films come out you see his name in the crush like what the hell is he doing and of course this film offers an explanation to that of where where did leon the tally detour into from his acting career i would like to welcome please the director of some please stand up tony sierra thank you so much coming please have a warm welcome for leon the tally the dump that became film worker started out as something different zero set out to make the definitive account of kubrick's thirteenth and final movie is wide shut the project was called s k thirteen here in the middle tony want to ask the genesis of the film wasn't the idea of making on the protagonist we finished filming and leon was the last person that i went to film with and really the premise of thirteen which we haven't started editing yet was about really what was going on with standing towards the end because i is watch i is a controversial little bit and i wanted to like as a lot of people sexual how well they said that he lost it to resent some people said that it was tom nicole destroyed the film and some people say he really never finished editing and and people really surprised by casting and just there were a lot of.

director tony sierra leon kubrick tom nicole
"kubrick" Discussed on I Think You're Interesting

I Think You're Interesting

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"kubrick" Discussed on I Think You're Interesting

"Tell me a little bit about finding the the voice of how because i thought that was an interesting section they actually had cast somebody else in the part and then went with a different actor yes yes so they had they had a british actor on the set for a while but he was he sounded to british they had an american character actor who actually recorded how and kubrick was at first enthusiastic and his name escapes me at this very moment balsam yes indeed sorry martin balsam who had won an oscar and and there he was in the studio and kubrick didn't know what he wanted yet that was part of his process you know he would find out what he wanted by actually producing things in directing rather than necessarily conceiving of it in in advance he was enthusiastic about balsam balsams readings but then he you know as time passed he became aware that he had allowed balsam to sound to emotional to human so then you know he actually he end did up and i mentioned earlier in this in the podcast that they had worn out kubrick had worn out of print of that canadian production you know cbc production universe documentary about the universe on the narrator of that was was douglas rain you know shakespearean actor from toronto and so when kubrick realize he needed a replacement for house voice he he actually he cast rain to do the narrative voice over two thousand and one because there was the intention was to have a narrative voiceover on two thousand and one up until fairly late in the story so he had already hired rain douglas rain rain flew in and instead of doing the narrative voiceover he did hell well the final thing because we're we're heading into the end here the file thing i wanted to talk about is the last fifteen to twenty minutes this movie which are utterly mind boggling and wonderful and it's when the movie dislikes sort of takes off into some other atmosphere that i don't think any other movie has quite approached and that was the first thing kubrick shot made it into.

kubrick oscar toronto twenty minutes
"kubrick" Discussed on Show Me the Meaning!

Show Me the Meaning!

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"kubrick" Discussed on Show Me the Meaning!

"He's got all the other movies under his belt all the other ones i like you know i don't know like he he got the you got to experience the the the process and also like i don't think cruises a director is easy directing directed but he's like he's so in love i mean he must have been like i get to spend this much time with the master learning at all no i have no doubt he had a lot of fun making the movie yeah you just think that disappointed by it but anyway yeah it's such an interesting movie i feel like again is one of those films that that suffers because of particular expectations that were not met but twenty years later we have none of the hype built up it's more we're looking at the movie as a movie and i love the movie like with you guys but still like like i said it's not len let's go what's everyone's top threes kubrick's is this the end of the can we say that i think has to go so she should go first right what's your top three favorite kubrick's at this shining number one lalita whoa whoa and those are the only to have ever seen i thought you said you had seen a clockwork orange i've read a clockwork orange oca austin what about you my favorite kubrick film is actually the killing so good i fucking love my actually really liked her white kubrick almost more than color so but but i will i mean right now i'm just going to say i love is wide shut third just because i can't stop thinking about it and i didn't sleep last night because of it's all put it in third just because the killing is my favorite and then for number two just because i feel like it's obligatory two thousand one so you when you said black and white if you're going to pass the glory because i think that movie has the best ending scene of all time that might actually be my third favorite in real in real life but because i'm obsessed right now with eyes wide shut because again i couldn't sleep last night i dream world but.

director kubrick twenty years
"kubrick" Discussed on Show Me the Meaning!

Show Me the Meaning!

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"kubrick" Discussed on Show Me the Meaning!

"Kubrick is intentionally aware of of so many of the philosophical themes that were probably gonna talk about in this cast yeah i agree and that's what makes them a really special filmmaker is that it's not often that you really have this intimate genius autour who puts more thought into the movies than most anyone else how about your impressions okay so this is actually very special to me i remember seeing it in high school and i was totally captured and somewhere very titillated it really affected me like in a very psycho sexual manner like the first time i saw it in a very basic thing i just at the end of the movie i was like oh my god like it's really reaffirms to me like a very what i now later considered to be a very forty and disposition is that wow yeah everything's about status and sex like i totally see in connect with that like i can see that reality in the universe but another thing this this movie was a kind of a foundational moment for me because it was one of the movies that really it made me want to learn how to read cinema so i actually have a book here i'm going to be drawing a lot from this book and some of the discussion points where we bring up is the book i bought in high school people sometimes email us and ask like you know how did you guys learn how to read cinema recommendations if you're kubrick fan and you wanna learn more about you know reading cinema in like any kind of traditional way that's more than just kinda fan theories i definitely recommend this book it's called stanley kubrick narrative and stylistic analysis by mario falsetto this is the second addition i'm sure there's a better additions out now this was a really just watching movies and going through this book was a really.

Kubrick mario falsetto
"kubrick" Discussed on /Film Daily

/Film Daily

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"kubrick" Discussed on /Film Daily

"Yeah it really blew me away because the rest of the movie and is one of the problems i had with the movie is almost everything else in the movie looks really fake and it's intentionally faked because it's supposed to be in this virtual world but that really bugged me where but then at a nowhere they go the overlook kotel looks real and i was i was you know i don't get like as much on because i see so much so many movies but that's seen literally may be stop at wonder how did they do this how steven spielberg do this make this look so much like kubrick's film and a part of i was wondering if they actually went out and rebuilt a set but apparently not what they did was they found a this is this is quote from i o nine who got this info from the art of ready player one book says the team at island found a high quality high quality tele sign transfer of the shining scanned it into their computers as a reference and began to digitally recreate locations needed in the film so this really is it's all it's pretty much all digital they built a few sets here and there for close ups but beyond that this is literally just a digital scan of kubrick's film that they just dropped into this film it looks incredible and had the whole film had stuff like this in it i probably would have liked it a lot more but this one scene as much as i don't like late one i will freely admit this is a really good scene and i was really impressed with it.

kubrick steven spielberg
Is the Illuminati Behind the Death of Stanley Kubrick?

Truth Be Told

01:45 min | 4 years ago

Is the Illuminati Behind the Death of Stanley Kubrick?