35 Burst results for "Kruger"

"kruger" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

Chasing Poker Greatness

04:24 min | 5 months ago

"kruger" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

"But I do remember reading at some point on Dunning-Kruger that interestingly, the study is also culturally based that it's has a higher relevancy to Americans versus like Japanese, which is just like an interesting side note in the Dunning-Kruger effect and how I have no idea the why that would be the case other than like cultural, just the way that we think about ourselves the way we self analyze maybe how teachers build us up or how society builds us up. Sort of over time gives us this false sense, Americans, a false sense of confidence to their proficiency in any given topic or hobby or whatever subject it may be, but I do remember reading that and thinking that was quite interesting that the other, the other variable of culture can also affect these biases. Absolutely. And that's actually very true. And it can be a good and a bad thing. The bad thing is sometimes I'm joking. There's two types of confident people. Those who think they know what they're talking about. And those who know they don't know what they're talking about. And they're like, you know, what's the point of not sounding COVID? And am I as well, right? So you're absolutely correct, but the good thing is in what you just described, that sometimes cultures, and for the most part, cultures have wise elements into them. So these quick heuristics like this, a cultural elements can help guide certain new people into the youth, for example, of the culture, right? Which it's the wisdom that the predecessors are passing on to us. And of course, it's the youth's responsibility to question some of these ideas moving forward, but we do need, you know, as I'm no longer, you know, I don't qualify no longer as gifts, but we do need to have our youth to the older people give the youth the opportunity to learn some of the.

Kruger Dunning
"kruger" Discussed on Mount Washington Valley SPIRIT Podcast

Mount Washington Valley SPIRIT Podcast

01:31 min | 11 months ago

"kruger" Discussed on Mount Washington Valley SPIRIT Podcast

"Auto nieces auto kinetic effect baider-meinhof phenomenon. Butterfly effect clustering illusion crip dementia dark adaption dermal optical perception doorway affect dopamine in kruger affect gases gravity. Action sing effect. Heppner gajic hallucinations nepal hallucinations. Eddie of moulder phenomenon. Infinite monkey theorem for sound in ultrasound instrumental telecommunication ice or chronic tones in buying oral beats jorgensen frequency can lisa's lucid dreaming mandela perfect meteorology observer effect observer expectancy effect pell anoxia parapsychology related subjects such as channeling. Clear aliens clear ambience clear audience clear. Sundance clairvoyants dousing hypnosis pre cognition psychoanalysis psychiatry retro cognition until apathy other subjects. That should be included. Include parast omnia. Perry dollah peripheral vision photography pies electricity post addiction power suggestion psychiatry quantum entanglement scopus asia singapore theory sleep deprivation sleep paralysis solo weather stone.

Private Payrolls Increase by Just 374,000 in August

The Erick Erickson Show

01:12 min | 1 year ago

Private Payrolls Increase by Just 374,000 in August

"Our economy is realigning in various ways private poet payroll increased by just three hundred seventy four thousand in august the estimate from adp with six hundred thousand. This is from cnbc us. Companies created far fewer jobs than expected in august as the covert resurgence coincided with cutbacks in hiring according to a report wednesday for payroll services firm. Adp private payroll rose. Just three hundred. Seventy four thousand for the month well. Below the dow jones estimate of six hundred thousand though above july three hundred twenty six thousand which was revised downward slightly from the initial. Three hundred. thirty thousand reading. Most of the new jobs came from leisure hospitality which added two hundred one thousand positions in a somewhat hopeful sign that an industry beset by labor shortages continues to recover education and health services combined. Fifty nine thousand for the month is hospitals in some parts of the country were swamped with virus. Cases and schools began to reopen following a robust recovery from the shortest but steepest recession in. Us history economic data late has been disappointing. Possibly reflecting pullbacks from the summer surge of the delta

ADP Cnbc United States
"kruger" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

The Erick Erickson Show

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"kruger" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

"But they're just a couple thousand dollars left of the money they need to raise get people out of afghanistan. They're still working on word. Donate two three three seven seven seven text. Donate two three three seven seven seven if you would like to help them Help get people out of afghanistan. I wanna turn to the economy. There are a number of stories out there about the economy that i think Really shed light on the fact that we really are going through a level of realignment in this country in variety of ways. I have said for a while. We're in a political realignment stake. Jd vance for example in ohio jd. Vance hillbilly. Lg author is running for the us. Senate he's running. He had been a vocal critic of donald. Trump has become a supporter of donald trip over time. Very focused on The white working class. He's pro union pro free speech. He's pro social safety net. He is not by any. Stretch of the vegetation libertarian He is a big government conservative. If ever there was one and in fact a lot of people are saying his got the same views as people on the left did in the forties. And he's a truman republican. If you will earn fdr republican. And he's not alone. I've had a number of people. Tell me that they more and more view themselves as an old school democrat. They are pro unions. Which i actually think it's a terrible idea It just drives up costs among other things. i not as worker for legions funds the left ultimately But they're they're pro union They want good government. Education run systems. They want access to colleges. They want government healthcare. They want a social safety net benefits for people it very much. Sounds like a nine hundred thousand nine hundred sixty democrat with conservative social policy and in fact the data does show that if there's really a constituency for a new party in this country it is socially conservative and fiscally liberal a lot of people in this country of the academic and political elite believe we need to be socially liberal and fiscally conservative. We need to restrain the size and scope of government finances but we need to be all in an abortion gay rights transgender rights In the culture war from the left in fact Hispanic voters black voters and a lot of white working class perfectly. Happy with a government that provides a social safety net at large social dividend but is deeply conservative when it comes to life and transgender politics and the the alphabet gang war that we're all in with culture there's actually a greater constituency for that. Jd vance is one of several candidates. Other some of whom were funded by the billionaire. Peter the'll who are taking this tax. It's very interesting to watch his rise. I'm not sure..

Jd vance Vance hillbilly afghanistan donald Trump Lg Senate ohio us Peter
"kruger" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

08:07 min | 1 year ago

"kruger" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Kruger, Tom Tober with you? We're going to be doing today. Title NBA with Mitch Laurence. Then we're going to talk a little charity. Bachelor baseball. Would Jeremy Affeldt would do the same sands? The charity bash won't Giants with Susan Slusser and a little more baseball. With a good friend Eric. Burns. Fellas. I'm done with two things. Two things I'm done with. What's that? I'm done with Max Muncy. I'm paired with them and more and more so I'm just done with these NBA playoffs. I've had it. I'm done. Stop. That's enough. It's crap, and I'm done with it. So oh, what's going on, Yo. Well, what the good news if, uh, for me, and my wager is that Yannis is has no structural damage. That's the good news If you're looking for good news. As I am, but, uh, but also there's no timetable for his return his status for Game five Thursday night. Very much up in the air. I can't imagine he'd play. To me, though. That's the best news of all. I mean, for the box and for your honest and for the league because he's one of the great talents in the league, and you just don't want to see You get hurt. Now you're out for all of next year with that kind of an injury if he had blown the A, C l and very could've very well could have based on how it looked. I'm just I've had it with these playoffs. I'm just absolutely Had it. There's all the injuries. Well, you look at everything right? I mean, you got Murray, you got Kyrie. You have harden Trae. Young went down for a little bit. Chris Paul was out for a few games. LeBron was humbled. Anthony Davis was out. For a few games. Who else is there? There's more out there. That's all we do. They just seemed like every every series. I looked at CA Y y. Yeah, we we even forget about Ibaka. We've been out forever. That's a big loss for them. A buck is a huge laws for I mean it just every like every team. You look at. Has injury has impacted it. In some way. Probably the sun is the least. I mean, Chris Paul had to miss because of the covid, but no injuries. But you start looking around and every team and now the box. We talked about the bucks being healthy and the bucks now are impacted by it. Who knows? You May miss the game Name is three games. Is it random, Tommy? Or is it the shorter off? See? I think it's a little bit of I've got to be. It's got to be the short off season at least a little bit of it. Now. A lot of these guys have had more of an off season than others. But there's got to be something to that. I mean, we've never seen Ever. I mean, everybody always say Well, injuries are part of the bull crap. I've never seen this where this many star players. Have been injured and forced to Miss Games. In the playoffs. Never And if somebody wants to correct me, I go ahead. I'd love to see it. Maybe it's happened, but I do not ever remember. Star players. This many star players just missing games just flat out missing games in multiple games. Just it's been brutal, and I think that it's probably a little bit of randomness. But there's got to be something to the short offices that it has to be. It feels like a slog. There's no doubt about that. And it sure feels like with some of the injuries you can draw. Direct line from Short off season to compress 72 games schedule and then the intensity the obvious intensity of the playoffs. Getting Ratcheted up Here's where the randomness comes in. If Trey Young doesn't step back, and the referees not standing there, he's fine. Yeah, that played for Janice last night. That's just too big dudes going for the ball, and he lands any hyper extends his knee. You know, Mercury. Getting hurt against the Warriors. You know him blowing out his his ACL believe it was whatever ligament was. I think you can look at that and go. Okay? That's Denver played a lot last season, you know, got into the bubble went deep in the bubble. Richard gets ratcheted up again. He pulls a ligament. LeBron, I think you can say that. Cool. Why is a different animal Just cause quiet is well, a different animal, but you might be able to draw the line again from Short off season bubble compressed season this year, but the last two specifically in these these finals That's just buzzard's luck. That's all that is, but it definitely feels like all three of us. We love the NBA. We love the NBA playoffs, but I'm It just gets the appointment you just like I'm not ready for this to be over. But I'm kind of ready for this to be. It's like Uncle. I don't want to see anybody else get hurt. No one does. I mean, we all know it's a war of attrition to a degree, but really, if you think about it, almost all of my childhood I can think of watching the NBA when the big team you know, the big teams were basically there at the end, and they were fully intact most of the time. So it is a war of attrition. But this year more than ever And I wonder if it's you know, they cut the schedule from 82 to 72. That was the but they cut the off season dramatically. So I don't know. I don't You know, it's it's It's one of those things we're never really going to get. There's no empirical data that's going to be out there. That's going to answer this. But, um it does make you wonder and make sure and we'll see how it goes next year if we see more of the same or if we see a little bit more of a return to normality. I think we can all agree a lot of basketball in a short amount of time. It's not good for anyone. It's not good for the players. It's not. It doesn't eventually end up being good for us, because again with the Prospect for injuries and injuries to so many key people. So yeah. It sucks because you want to watch the best teams. At full strength battle You want to find out who is The best and this year. Look, whoever wins it has earned it and that's that's just I'm not saying that there's no Asterix. You know nothing. You earned it. It's just you do what you have to do to win a championship. But as a fan, you just want to see the best compete against each other at full strength, or at least as close to full strength. You could be at the end of the season like at least healthy enough to be on the court and and playing. But we just haven't seen it this year. We haven't since the I am. I'm getting the feeling like I don't even know who the best team in the league is. This year. Could it be the mean Could it be Denver If Murray were healthy? Could it be the Lakers that they're fully healthy health seriously nets If they were fully? I think it's Brooklyn. I think it's broke. It could be But what about those guys? You know about what? Hardening Kyrie? Yeah, That's yeah, That's those are questions you have, uh, this year, It's just again. I think it's a combination. Like most times, they get the randomness, But this time, I do think the I don't know what percentage But this is not just random. When you talk about all those stars that I just mentioned that have got hurt it just 88 can't be. It just can't be. You know what this is setting us up for, fellas. Look at the possibility of hearing these words. NBA Finals MVP Paul George. That's what he's setting us up for. I know right, You've got to laugh, but think about it. That's the thing that could actually happen. That's where we are. Pandemic Basketball. Wild playoff P Sleep tight America. That's a possibility we'll get into the Giants and, uh They're lost Couple of days down in l A. Oh, for 19 with runners in scoring position. Giants have the day off, and they got four in Arizona. So we're getting all things giants Jeremy. I felt he was a Slusser Burns, but we keep the NBA talk going. Mitch Laurence joining us next. Here on KNBR, the sports leader. T. J B.

Anthony Davis Chris Paul Jeremy Affeldt Kyrie Eric Trey Young Mitch Laurence LeBron Tom Tober Max Muncy Susan Slusser Yannis Richard Murray T. J B. 72 games Janice Paul George Jeremy three games
Episode 142: Freddys Back! Freddys Back! Freddys Back! - burst 22

The Swearwolves

04:19 min | 1 year ago

Episode 142: Freddys Back! Freddys Back! Freddys Back! - burst 22

"He's at school tired. You can't be comfortable. Pooping at school. He must just be really tired. he's just exhausted. And he's like maybe just maybe he's not pooping. Maybe he's just like i'm just a breather and just relax done that before a bit at work before it was like. Oh god i just wanna wanna go to the bathroom and just sit there and pretend to poop every couple of issues like sorry guys. Still pooping dude. We don't care we don't care which guys just give me update dude. Someone's there the whole time knowing what to do with their pooping in public place. It's the worst is the absolute worst and then like when you hear. Somebody entered the bathroom. Like oh and then you see them. Walk through a little crack between the door and like i contact. It's like saw each other most vulnerable. It's the worst. So yeah he falls asleep taking shit and he gets sucked into or he's in a dream and he's doing his he's had joe. Yeah phrase invisible. Which is kinda weird having an invisible fight. Yeah that is weird. Get to property. Lynch not wanna do the fights available. Maybe he had to poop well times the waste it in so he fights him. Yeah i read is kicking his and then starts fighting back and he's doing good and then all of a sudden freddy's glove appears and just flies rick and kill them and each time. One of her friends dies after kristen. It's like alice like gets a jolt of energy. We're finding out of their talents and abilities are their dream. Tell right are passing onto alice. I don't know what sheila's dream talent was brains. Mind over matter so she says she signed my poster. There you go there you go so then we to the funeral and this is kind of a weird scene because rick like comes out of his own coffin and has kind of a moment with his sister and he goes halo. Regan yeah very strange. Also notice at the funeral for some people like kincaid funeral. Some people. don't yeah but kincaid. Enjoy your like buried next to each other. And there are buried next to nancy and then kristen's buried next to them. It's like they all got funeral plots right next their plots right next to each other. They don't know how they died. They like the people who don't know anything about freddie. They still buried them all next year. Exactly exactly nobody in the no one else in the town died in the interim between you know so the greet at the funeral to me. Debbie's another thing another thing if you live in a town where like twenty years ago in. This wasn't even twenty years ago right so like it's a year after those people died at the mental hospital. It's like four years after what happened in elm street one. And it's like what twenty years after what happened to freddie krueger. Yeah like don't you think you would know the story like everybody's like who's freddie and it has to be explained every fucking movie who freddie s. Even if you're new to the town folklore at this point yeah was gonna come up to you and go. You're about freddy krueger yet. And you're like what the fuck talking about. Yeah of course have killed. He killed children like we know. Stories about like fucking jeffrey dahmer. And we don't even live. I did but don't even live in milwaukee wisconsin. Yeah this would be big news. Yes but not the dream stuff might not be big news but knowing who freddie krueger was when he was like in the real world like alive you would know that store exactly and why is nancy's house associated to freddie krueger of. Nobody lives there anymore. Like i understand in one to the house being there. But why's everybody always going back to that house. That's up freddy kruger house. That was nancy's house gets the freddie house. But it's not freddie's house. It's nancy's maybe was ready. But it wasn't. I mean did spread. Nancy's

Freddie Krueger Freddy Krueger Freddie Next Year Debbie Twenty Years Ago Jeffrey Dahmer Sheila Nancy Kincaid Kristen Regan Alice Elm Street One Each Time Milwaukee Wisconsin Rick Twenty Years Four Years Freddy Kruger House Freddy Lynch JOE Milwaukee Wisconsin Freddy Kruger Freddie House
111-Year-Old Australian Recommends Eating Chicken Brains

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

111-Year-Old Australian Recommends Eating Chicken Brains

"Australia's oldest ever man shares some secrets prolong life dexter Kruger is a retired cattle rancher and lives in the Pinnaroo aged care centre in Queensland he's probably one of the sharpest residents here his memory is amazing for a hundred and eleven year olds Melanie Calvert works at the center dexter Kruger told Australian broadcasting a weekly poultry delicacy has contributed to his longevity chicken Brian's yeah they are chickens have ahead and in there there's a variety as I have delicious little things as anyone ever bought Kruger is writing his autobiography have written three hundred stories and they're all packed in my mind gather gathered over a hundred years the oldest ever woman in Australia lived until she was one hundred fourteen I'm at Donahue

Dexter Kruger Pinnaroo Aged Care Centre Melanie Calvert Queensland Australia Brian Kruger
"kruger" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"kruger" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Kruger and Brooks begin now. What's shaking, right? Brooks Laich Kruger, Tom Tober with you? We are gonna be joined today shortly. By David Shaw, The head coach of the Stanford Cardinal. I'm gonna ask Coach Ivy's insane or not. I mean, I'd like he doesn't have enough to do. You've got to get ready to do a draft and do a really good job. Which means he really studied for no idea what we could sleep. Chris Mullin, Molly Gonna doing this at 2 50. Bags will join US tackle Giants baseball and then we will have the Iraqis. And the Giants for you. The fighting dingers from Colorado, fellas. What's up? Yo, Hey, hey! Great Monday, great Monday. I'll bite. Why is it so friend? Yeah. I mean, why is this Monday greater than the other Mondays? It's a Mac Lismore Monday. To Mac this Monday. That's why it's so great. Did you ever really believed they were gonna take? They were going to take Maggie Jones. You're on every time you said every time you commented Rod in the last couple weeks when you said I just can't. I just I refused to believe that they they're really considering this. I was buoyed by that. Everything I needed. Every one of those comments carry me for a couple days, but luckily I don't need an autopsy on how they got to the decision. I don't need a 30 for 30. Kyle jobs. I don't need any of that. I just want last.

David Shaw Chris Mullin Tom Tober Maggie Jones Kruger Monday Brooks Rod today Stanford Cardinal Colorado Molly Gon 30 Ivy Mondays Brooks Laich Kruger Giants Kyle 2 50 last couple weeks
Elephants Kill Suspected Poacher at South African National Park

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

Elephants Kill Suspected Poacher at South African National Park

"Something known his karma in life, and it seems to be what caught up with a suspected rhino poacher in South Africa's Kruger National Park. The guy and two bodies apparently spooked a herd of breeding elephants, causing the stampede. Culture was trampled by the two death by the elephants Check out more on the case, including what happened. The other two suspected poachers on the front page of wi rd dot com.

Kruger National Park South Africa
Chicago Loyola Basketball Coach Porter Moser Leaves For Oklahoma

SportsCenter All Night

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

Chicago Loyola Basketball Coach Porter Moser Leaves For Oklahoma

"Of legendary Oklahoma men's basketball coach Lon Kruger. The Sooners have their new bench boss, now former Loyola Chicago head coach Porter Moser. Moser went 1 88 and 1 41 in 10 seasons with the Ramblers, including three conference championships in a final four. The 52 Year old has a head coaching resume that also includes Arkansas, Little Rock and Illinois State. No word yet on if Sister Jeanne is also part of the steel, probably not to March madness on

Lon Kruger Porter Moser Sooners Loyola Moser Oklahoma Basketball Ramblers Chicago Sister Jeanne Little Rock Arkansas Illinois
NCAA Tournament West Preview

Courtside with Seth Greenberg

04:18 min | 1 year ago

NCAA Tournament West Preview

"It's ncaa tournament time we had championship. Week was absolutely spectacular. You had a championship game. That wasn't so spectacular in america conference by the big twelve was tremendous big. Ted was tremendous. Because you know what those two leagues are tremendous all season. Long games aren't games. they're events the acc was anti climactic but great for josh passenger and the greatest shield in the history of life. The big east to me was phenomenal. I mean patrick ewing. Not only does he no longer needed credential again but he got into madison square garden and walked away with four games in four days and his team played like an old vintage georgetown team. Pac twelve stolen a bid which was really cool. Wayne tinkle's got it was who was on the hot seat. It was so cool is good coach. A good person attack boil. Who's another great guy still going tournament. So i thought championship week was absolutely spectacular. Your take oh. I thought it was great. I look. I'm gonna tell you houston's legit at chance due to their games including the championship game in the ac. That is a legitimate. I was happy that drake dot in. I was happy that twenty five and four guy in. I thought that was terrific. I love the fact that the drew brothers are in the tournament. The demolishing of creighton shocked the living in. Hell on me. And says i'm telling you i like when you lose guys mclaughlin aquino record and next thing you know man. What are you doing better. The next year matt pain and getting himself in the top four seeds after losing two guys eastern and harms but overawe a look championship. Week was the sec. Tournament was off the charts with the championship. Game and college basketball delivers it delivers every damn nights. Let's go to the west ready. Let's do it all right now. Let's do this number one seat. I was thinking what games in the upper half of the west. Are you looking forward to see. I wanna see what. Oklahoma can do eight nine game now. Maybe it doesn't matter because you're gonna play gonzaga. But i think this i think if you're gonna play along krueger team whether you're konso martyn missouri. Who has struggled or whether you're gonzaga. You know you're going to play a very very good basketball team. And i had them earlier in the year they can shoot it. They defend it. They play hard. I don't think they're overly talented and the kid to get something done but lon kruger is so good at dictating pace. That if i'm sitting here with gonzaga i wanna lesser coach in my second round game assuming that they win. What do you got. Well you know i actually. I think missouri can win that game. A jeremiah tells me he's going to have to go out guard on out on a primitive 'cause they're playing brady at the five and they've run them all over the place on the other side though rate mattis gutter guard that dude on the block to is become a good player control martin's team when they're older and more mature and her physical they are talking tournament. Think about what he did tennessee. So you know this is going to be really good game because you've got a tough physical team in missouri. You've got a team that attacks match ups plays almost four guards in oklahoma. I'm actually leaning towards missouri in this match up. Well you're going to be wrong and that's okay you can be. It's okay. I can be wrong. It will be the first time won't be the last time and you know that's right. I don't have either. We'll on from barry. I but i touched on that but also got to say tony bennett said that most of his team is in quarantine south. Now i don't know about you but that preston kid that plays at ohio university. Ooh yeah he can go and all of a sudden. You're talking about a team that wait a second. I know i know. Virginia's good. I know virginia came on. I know they ended up with the one seat in the acc tournament. But seth you're playing against a hot as hell ohio university team. A team led by jeff bowls. Who frankly he's the perga- guide ohio you because he loves ohio you. He played there with the with the shock of the mac. But when you're playing a team in quarantine sat that tells me they're not practicing. That tells me this is gonna be a hats. This'll be a good game regardless.

Wayne Tinkle Mclaughlin Aquino Patrick Ewing Missouri Gonzaga ACC Madison Square Garden Lon Kruger Ncaa Georgetown Basketball TED Creighton Josh Drake Houston Krueger America
"kruger" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"kruger" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Kruger Brewing Company delivered 2000 cans of Kruger's finest beer and Kruger's Cream Ale to faithful Kruger drinkers and Richmond, Virginia 91% of the drinkers approved of the canned beer, which gave Kruger the green light to produce more. It was so successful Kruger's was eating into the market share of the Big Three national Brewers, Anheuser Busch Caps and Schlitz Big three soon followed suit and by the end of 1935 over 200 million cans have been produced and sold jumping way ahead this week in 2007 in Beijing, China, the capital city of the planet's most populous nation, gets its first drive thru McDonald's restaurant, fast food chains from foreign countries first came to China and 1987 with the opening of a Kentucky Fried Chicken. McDonald's arrived in China three years later, This'll week in 2009 after more than seven decades as the world's largest automaker. General Motors officially loses the title when it announces worldwide sales of 8.36 million cars and trucks in 2000 and eight compared with Toyota's 8.97 million vehicle sales that same year. This week in 2010 Comedian Conan O'Brien hosts his final episode of The Tonight Show. Following NBC's announcement earlier in the month that Jay Leno would return is the host. The decision to replace O'Brien was met with protests by his fans. It became a public relations nightmare for the network, and that's what happened. Thanks for listening to this week in history on my heart radio, this'd the I Heart Radio Sports Report. Brooklyn Nets star Kyrie Irving apologize for a seven game absence today. Otherwise offered no specific explanation.

Kruger Kruger Brewing Company China Conan O'Brien McDonald Anheuser Busch Caps Kyrie Irving Brooklyn Nets Jay Leno Beijing Virginia General Motors NBC Brewers Toyota Richmond
Bitcoin value surges past $30,000 (£22,000) for first time

WGN Programming

02:08 min | 1 year ago

Bitcoin value surges past $30,000 (£22,000) for first time

"Extended its record record smashing smashing run, run, the the digital digital currency currency saw saw its its value value explode explode by by more more than than 300% 300% in in 2020. 2020. Culminating Culminating in in being being traded traded at at more more than $33,000 today. Perhaps no one is more excited about that value surged in Carolina Panthers offense of linemen Russia Lo Koon. Who this week reach an agreement with the team to pay out part of his salary, Not money. None cash but in Bitcoin. His nation. Reporter Ryan Kruger breaks down how we will get paid. And if this could be a growing trend, among other pro athletes, he's a beast on the gridiron, a two time pro bowler Super Bowl champion and now a trendsetter in the NFL, Russell O'Connor took half of his $13 million salary from the Panthers. And got paid in Bitcoin $6.5 million in crypto currency. You used crypto currency. It's backed by nothing. You know, it's literally one sin zeroes out there on the Internet. So what exactly is Bitcoin for that We turn to cyber expert Dever and weren with liquid video technologies, Basically just Currency That doesn't really exist. You know, it's Ah, It's a Blockchain of money that doesn't have any value. Just like any money market. You can make money on your investment. They're probably speculating. That the market will change enough and when they bought in when they got the $6 million to go up, But it has wild dramatic swings. And look Kano comes Twitter feed shows he's been passionate about the crypto currency for years and sees it as a way of the future. In fact, many crypto currency advocates say it's a decentralized form of money. Gets customers away from big banks. But word warns if tomorrow the bank folded my in your bank folded, the federal government would step in and ensure that money. Make sure that Ryan endeavor and got their money back if big Point goes from 26,000 to a dollar Nobody stepping in to do anything.

Lo Koon Ryan Kruger Russell O'connor Carolina Panthers Russia Dever Panthers Super Bowl NFL Kano Twitter Federal Government Ryan
Europe reels as it sets new coronavirus infection records

All of It

01:27 min | 2 years ago

Europe reels as it sets new coronavirus infection records

"Health Organization says the soaring number of covert 19 cases in Europe is of grave concern, but that because of wider testing, the situation is still currently better than during April. Esmie Nicholson report. Several European countries have seen the largest increase in infections over the past 24 hours. The World Health Organization's regional director for Europe hands, Kruger says thie evolving epidemiological situation in Europe is worry as numbers grow exponentially. Leaders of the EU's largest economies. Chancellor Angela Merkel and President Emanuel McCall share his apprehension and have announced stricter measures in Germany. The number of daily infections has doubled over the past week, hitting a high of more than 6000. Today. Merkel and Germany 16 state leaders have agreed to the introduction ofthe tighter local measures in Holt's bolt regions, including mandatory mosques in crowded outdoor spaces that says me Nicholson in Berlin in Paris and other major cities across France tomorrow night. I'll be the last chance for the foreseeable future for millions of people to hang out at night in bars, restaurants or friends, homes beginning midnight, A nighttime curfew goes into effect. The French government's tryingto keep a growing outbreak from getting so bad. It has to impose another nationwide locked down. Meanwhile, local authorities are investigating dozens of complaints that senior officials mishandled health emergency resource is police have searched the homes of Francis, current Health minister Ah, former prime minister and other senior officials.

Chancellor Angela Merkel Europe Esmie Nicholson Health Organization Germany World Health Organization Prime Minister President Emanuel Mccall EU Holt Kruger Regional Director France Berlin Paris
"kruger" Discussed on Blind History

Blind History

05:40 min | 2 years ago

"kruger" Discussed on Blind History

"About a stone's throw from his house. But Gareth is a bit of controversy behind the song Quite A Lot in that. He deserted his fellow countrymen wage. At the time that Lord Roberts is a load Roberts is basically just at the edge of Victoria about to take it over. So he basically got out of there and he stayed for quite a long time in the Eastern transvaal. He had a train that he stayed in and I believe that he was carrying his many bags or whatever. They might call it and they crossed into the Portuguese Frontier down to Lorenzo Marques as they called it and then his wife got very ill and when he gets it to Europe, she didn't join him. So yeah, that must have been a devastating time in his last seating the last of Africa and he would probably believe very much that have never see it again and leaves his wife of fifty odd years and part of the story is also that on his flight to maputo which is been known as Lorenzo marks. He was actually basically held hostage on a ship as a political prisoner for a month until Queen Philomena of the Netherlands intervened and gave him safe passage where he he obviously went first to France and then to to Holland wage. And spent quite a lot of time in Holland. He was very close to the Dutch royal family. I mean, he spoke Dutch, you know Afrikaans was still in nascent language at that point. He also spoke a little bit of English, but interestingly he could talk to Anna and sesotho almost fluently, correct? Yeah. I think that one of the things that struck me about this guy Paul Kruger is that again, there's an intersection between his life and the life of your choice, which we've paid some attention to in the previous episode of blind history because he actually appointed once met at a very tender age as State Attorney and upon meeting smarts for the first time he remarks to another man who ended up writing a Dom that he thought that this man had great prospects and would turn into someone quite formidable and that's interesting because of course, they were very different personalities and what they ended up in buddying was such very different things and deliberates, which we didn't have in disgust too much of but he was very much key in that actual. Now we Krueger went into Exile birth. And he was you know kitchen at came with a surrender document for them to sign interesting reading this Gareth on the surrender document that that was requested a representative not a military government that the birds allowed to retain their firearms Dutch language to be maintained the Dutch Church to remain unchanged and obviously the public trusts and often thought to be looked after the attacks on farmers and amnesty to all of the end of the war and actually they the British accepted that but then Larry Bird came back and said look, but the birds didn't accept that. So so then walk out on for another two years. He's well-known obviously for a number of things the Krugerrand which is a famous bit of gold currency. It's probably the only golden age you can legally own Krueger statue in church square, which I mentioned Krueger house switches in Pretoria, which is still a museum and of course the worm full pipe the pipe that he used to smoke his tobacco. It's a famous style of pipe which I say was especially developed for him. Sure. I wonder what what was the shape of his face or his nose? Well, I'll tell you something that when Paul was he was not much to look at and in almost any picture from his youth right through to his very old age in Switzerland. He was not a looker. I think Sonny had a tough time. There's one famous South African part that said the image human from the clips blow-by-blow is described him. So overall not a pretty picture a bit of a cantankerous personality mostly formidable human beings by any guys estimation and someone who just wasn't to be messed with at a time where the strong survive and the weak ones just conduct and I'm kind of proud that. I know a little bit more about him. I agree a hundred percent of what I'm very proud of is the fact that he was a hunter but you also like many Hunters groups.

Lord Roberts Krueger Gareth Netherlands Paul Kruger Larry Bird Lorenzo Marques Anna maputo Eastern transvaal Europe Holland Queen Philomena Dutch Church Sonny Africa France Pretoria
"kruger" Discussed on Blind History

Blind History

13:49 min | 2 years ago

"kruger" Discussed on Blind History

"Heard the name before but it probably doesn't mean that much to most of us. He lived between 18-25 wage. A 1904 so a little outside of living memory. They called him when Paul and he was the president chiefly of the zika free concert Republic the early South African public mostly in the transvaal at that stage. That's kind of the most important Top Line stuff about Paul Kruger. I must tell you I found his early life a lot more interesting than his political life Laden when he became president and he was descended from a woman called Cricket or who was a a slave girl who was brought from Malaysia and there were a lot of Malay slaves brought to the cape Colony Shack. He grew up somewhere in the in the karoo. Actually. It was like the the Northern Western Cape that area, you know Carlsberg area. That's right. And and he he seems to have come from a family of some repute. He also has descended from Peter Pan Meredith who is quite a well-known Dutch settler. The family had been in the country for some generations already by then in his father Casper and his mother had him in, Georgia. Like somewhere I think you're right Colesburg or something, but that's not where he started making history. Not at all. But he had to grab very fast cuz his mother died when he was very very young ages. Also his dad beige brought up him and his brothers or his siblings. And then his Dad decided to join the great trick who who was Edmund moving up from the south and from the southwest and when they moved through their joined on and basically across all River there's quite a cool story about that. So Hendrick putki third, one of the famous Trek leaders came through the town where the Krugers lived and he convinced Paul Kruger's dad that there was a possibility for independence from the English. They weren't particularly anti-british, but the idea of building their own country of pioneering their own land was really what pulled the crew goes in and and you know portrait was a young man at that stage very young age, but he learned to hunt very quickly. He learned to ride horses immaculately. He learned about life on the felt and you know, you think about the fact that in 1835 dead. This is a very young man. He went and took part in a battle called The Battle of fat club, which was in Hell brought in the Free State now listen to these numbers and just to give you an idea of how difficult it was wrong to be both a member of the much ability tribe and the King Chillicothe but also to be a four tracker on the 9th of October of that year and silicates resent 5,000 Metabolife Warriors to attack the food trackers. Now the ratio of matabele Warriors to put trackers was one to a hundred and fifty and somehow remarkably miraculously block. These foot traffic is managed to win. And Paul Kruger was a young man. He was in his teens as early teens and he was loading guns and the women were loading guns and they were only probably a handful of fighting men who could actually backfire the weapons and they still one. I mean, this is just if you think about that ratio, it's quite remarkable hundred percent and if you look at Mozilla causey's Warriors, they were notorious they were famous for purging Fearsome, you know a fighting Army. He also famous for being quite shitted battle if you ask me I suppose but I don't you know, you obviously the guns vs Spears that's always played a role as. Yeah. I mean actually there were there were some guns in the matter be contingent as well. But what happened was that out of those five thousand Warriors many of them were just sheep and cattle Roberts who joined in and then once they got their plunder they left so to Farmers and 184 matabele died the rest of History left and ran away but in spite of their choice, apparently the spoiled was great. So there might have been managed to plunder fifty thousand sheep and goats and five thousand cattle so they may have lost the battle but it seems they won economically. It sounds like a great tool. Yeah, it's this is what he knew cuz what's really hunting at a very young age as you mentioned earlier and often when he went hunting his rifle used to back fire or something. Went wrong with it and please Summers was blown off on one occasion. Yeah, so it's apparently he shot a lion at age. He said 14 but one of his friends who was there said he was only eleven at the time. I mean, he shot a life and the incident you're talking about was actually in elephant gun, which is a substantial piece of artillery and it blew off is left them. But the best part of the story, I don't know if you know this already but he went home the camp afterwards with like half of his thumb blown away and he put it in turpentine. That's how you that's how you made it better and then it wasn't healing and he felt that his arm off a gangrenous and the doctor said they're going to have to amputate the arm and he said not a chance that he took out his pocket knife and he cut off his own thumb with his pocket knife. That's correct. And when the incident happened actually in the bush off the off his Hunting Party of anybody had a pocket knife with him instead. No no, no, no. No, we haven't but and recklessly City winter time and cut it off. So he was known at this stage of his laughing. Fearless very brave Fearless in his Hunting Expeditions and also, you know when yours with the Commandos, well, he may have been Fearless but he's also really uneducated. I think he only had three months worth of Education in his entire life and that just proves to you know, we often give Jacob Zuma the gears for having only completed up to standard six but here's Paul Kruger had three months of formal education and he still became a president of the site after concert in public. They settled in potchefstroom and then obviously in rustenburg later on an area which is filled with natural art crops and and natural features that are named after the cruises but their family farm he actually got at sixteen which was the customer at the time. He got to choose a farm of his own at the foot of the Mechanicsburg. And that house is still a National Monument today that well the property is certainly and in fact, it's one of the places and we'll get to this later. It's one of the places they say that they may have lost or hidden or stashed the krugerrands the Kruger Millions. Yep. Vegetable married Anna Maria Asia duplicity. I mean these names are just fantastic and he went off to the Eastern transvaal with her and then they returned later on to rustenburg, but she had caught some illness and she and the infant child died in those days wasn't unusual to marry early. I think he's dead and were married when they were fifteen and eleven while because that normally didn't live very long the women were very scarce. Gino's day so yet to you have to go get his first bride from a very far distance and he wants a story a bit Legend and not that he had to cross the Volta River in full flood yet to actually swim across it to be able to to grow up his broad and We complain about Tinder exactly. So no problem. He got married a second time also to a duplicity. But this one's name take this down Cocina sewage Frederica Willamina duplicity sunny, sunny sunny sunny, and they had seven daughters and 9 sons and she lived all the way to 1901 dying off. Three years before him and his son. He obviously was particularly voluptuous. Awesome on this young round woman. And today we would call that fat-shaming exactly and yeah, but they said she was not a pretty girl but when he loved so I spent the rest of their lives together and they said the soft round woman that would like to be affectionately known as dents any he became a field cornet which is like a magistrate or an officer when he was very young. He joined the foxtrot also at a very young age and played a role in a quarrel between two of my ancestors, which I I really find interesting, you know, the minute history becomes personal it seems to me that much more. So I'm a direct descendant of stuff honest woman who's called the storm full funny new idea who is a month red bearded quite aggressive nasty, man. He didn't have a lot of friends, but he was a force of Nature and mustiness vessel pretorius who's also an ancestor of Main and I didn't know that Kruger had played this role in trying to bring them together a number of times. In fact, he did that with the end goal being that he wanted to unify the afrikaners into a new Republic. He took part in the famous palm sander of a convention with Andreas pretorius who was actually a major influence in his life. He developed quite a relationship with the older pretorius underneath the guy who'd one blood River and asked him pretorius made em, and he admired he said his resolve sophistication and piety and piety, especially with something important to Paul. He was a very religious man. He became a common Dunton at all in the Army then which is kind of like the most important officer in that army and eventually vice president in 1877. Very very young managed. All these different positions. It's quite a remarkable life and you think that he was out there, you know, hunting lions and and and taking part in battles in his teens and then going into politics and and living a really full life wage. Makes me feel like such an underachiever. He became vice president in 1877. And that was when Britain annexed the Zar into British territory, and that was mostly because they saw that goal was becoming the big thing in South Africa and they were greedy to make sure that their hands were all over it. The British played on this and educated thought they saw him as backward superstitious. Yeah. I'm an old man and then grotesquely ugly and often called him a literate peasants. So they were hardcore. Whereas the European continent loved him when he got to Europe. He would got a hero welcome, which is incredible. I mean when you got to my say they were significant amount of people there to receive him and the same as in in Holland well in in some ways they treated him much like we think of Nelson Mandela today is a freedom fighter because here he was this man who was standing up to the mighty British Empire and trying to get independence and sovereignty for his own people. So in some ways I suppose that contract Has been born out in history many times one man's Freedom Fighter is another man's terrorist and he did make a mess of difference. I think he was one of the first to rise up against and start the resistance against the British. That's absolutely right and wage. He sent deputations to London to plead for Independence and sovereignty for the Z they are and they were ignored and the first world war broke out just after that and it was really a fight for independence phone number but he'd gone over to England and number of times and gone to Europe and on the second occasion that he went to Europe. He actually met. So from Bismarck, you know, the famed month and he took a balloon ride over Paris, which was a massive highlight for him. Wow. That's tremendous. I mean you see again these lives intersecting all these famous people who kind of met each other but they were alive at the same time and they were important enough to be in the same room, correct? Well, he became president eventually and that was when he succeeded in going to London and pleading with Britain wage. For Independence and they actually recognized the South African Republic then as a separate independent state, but it became an issue that Brits were pouring in to the Zar or the s a r s shows at that point and they were coming in mostly because of gold on The Big Box restaurant and you know Cecil John Rhodes and and Maitland and people like that were very much in favor of of sending British Prospectors wage. They would Prospectors you were coming to try and find their their fortune and on the Bedford restaurant, but the media T that fork who started calling them eight Landers, you know foreigners. That's right and wrong treated them actually to be the folks who are treated them very very badly in that that's been massive taxes and it didn't get the same rights and it was quite an interesting story about the Jewish people and he was actually off he called in God's chosen people but there was an instance when you were surveying the city in this is of Johannesburg now. Yeah, each church was allotted a certain number of stands and just so happy. Do a double the amount of Christian churches to synagogues and then they asked why and you just basically said they could only receive half the amount of land and seems that you saw the humor in there because they only read off the Bible. Well, yeah, it's interesting that he was a religious man, but they were very old testament type Christians, you know that he had foreign dekat which he was a founding member of we call the dopers in South Africa. That church is. Well known for really being A Very Old Testament based Church. They don't allow music in church that quite joyless and very calvinistic but he was with the guys at the very beginning of that movement. And that's where a lot of the reputation that he has for being this deeply serious quite grumpy humorless and Bland human being comes from and how long is all of those things but just not to the degree that he was caricatured by the British. I'm definitely not. I mean it was one instance where he built a church and then he went on to the roof that just being built and stood on his head in front of everybody. So he did some strange things as well. Well, the egg lenders were a big problem and he was re-elected three times on the 8th landed question. The Jamison read the famous Jameson raid happened in eighteen ninety-five ninety-six and that was embarrassing to the British girl led to the second world war of this thing. And after that second world war Kruger left for Europe in Nineteen Hundred and he refused to return home. He died in Switzerland of old places. Overlooking Lake Geneva in a reasonably nice house at the age of 78 in 1904 and he was buried there but then they dug him up and they brought him back to South Africa and he's buried in Pretoria at the hell darker, which is.

Paul Kruger vice president Europe rustenburg Army Andreas pretorius founding member officer Peter Pan Meredith Northern Western Cape matabele Warriors South Africa Britain Zar Laden cape Colony Shack Warriors
"kruger" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"kruger" Discussed on Pantheon

"Announced <Music> extra. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> Yeah. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Yeah. <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you so much for spending <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> so much time with me. It's been <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> it's a Porsche. <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you for helping me <Music> this really great. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> Sing <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> my <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> birthday <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> song. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Hey everybody. I'm <Speech_Music_Male> Mike <Speech_Male> and I'm Jessie. <Speech_Male> I'm Aaron <Speech_Male> and all together. <Speech_Male> We are the <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> punk tree <Speech_Music_Male> off <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> the show. We're <Speech_Male> going to share music that we <Speech_Male> love we're going to discuss <Speech_Male> how punk rock has <Speech_Male> evolved and <Speech_Male> different subgenres <Speech_Male> have developed. <Speech_Male> I'm going to talk to <Speech_Male> bands that have been influential <Speech_Male> in shaping <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Music_Male>

"kruger" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

05:21 min | 2 years ago

"kruger" Discussed on Pantheon

"And on medicine board, but once you add more people, are you still the principal songwriter or is no I mean was very much so very my songs. I mean the band as a as a stomach as a Sonic on Thursday. It was extremely collaborative. Okay, but they were my son's well, I mean whatever that means I guess the lyrics and the melody. Yeah. I was feeling like there's something you know, there's something that wants to be said and I find it quite difficult to you know to say it without it's nice to have some Sonic assistance and trying to really get something across, you know, yeah, I can cash it will not can I mean it absolutely does contribute to the overall feeling you're trying to get across to you. Yeah, you're on the boys are really a big part of that and you guys are familiar with each other. So you don't have to make a plane as much exactly your building some kind of language together. Right? So medicine boy just released their their final album. It's different than the other song medicine Boy albums. It's a lot more aggressive. Yeah, and the other homes was at it it was it a conscious decision for you guys to really go in that direction that as your final album. I mean, I guess we didn't know to be open when we first started making it. Okay, so not it was a conscious decision but not as not because it was the final of them. I think, you know dead. I guess should always that always been a sense of it. I mean like, you know, if had a very Wicked it's quite that always been a sense of it, but there was some kind of restraint I guess and some of that came from the fact that we started with a drum machine. Yeah. And so there was a kind of feeling that developed around that but then I think at some point there was maybe a bit of frustration in the freedom of expression that the way that you can kind of push or pull when you're hoped down by a drum machine. Okay. I think we felt like in order for us to keep saying something in a honest about that expression there needs to be an unrelated. You know, I remember cuz I've played this in so many different ways now and I guess you haven't seen in place now, if you know, I I I've only this is as close I've ever gotten so I mean, it's really I mean, obviously I'm extremely biased. Yeah, he's a really dead. Beautiful and expressive performer and there's a kind of wildness and that I think is sometimes quite restricted by the drum machine and that's also makes for something interesting. But like I say, there's like I think we had melted a bit for what we had I so we wanted to to like the clickers also can be such a metronome can be such a murderer choice and we didn't wanted to and I think and I do feel that it's I feel proud that we did that though. We didn't ever want to be like, okay. This is kind of working for us. So this is what we'll do now, if it wasn't feeling allies, then it wasn't right. And yeah, I think we just there was a feeling of wanting to Let go of it and let loose and rage but I don't know. I don't know how to say it. Exactly about what idea there was just a feeling of wanting to yeah, I can can definitely hear you. Like I was like wrecker, you know, it's just that's way more aggressive than and and it's it's I'm trying to think of some of the rest discography. I don't remember anything with Andre being that aggressive vocally. I mean, know definitely some aggressive guitar work and some really in a psychedelic guitar work throughout. Yeah medicine point, but vocally he's really giving it everything on this one. Yeah. I know it's it's a super Supernatural truthfully and and it was really beautiful to see that's awesome here. I loved it. mean, it's definitely my favorite part of little bit. This is I think it's local performances are super beautiful. I mean, it's it's like I guess there's so much that but it's really I mean, I remember when he was doing some of those workers and fuzzy. The guy that we worked was who mixed it and we work with all the time and the two of us were sitting outside of the vocal room obviously off and it was so intense to listen to and you know, it's such a crazy and it's too crazy process to hear this person performing this song and also, you know, we knew it was the last open there was such a kind of so much for such a cathartic thing. Yeah, very emotional. I'm sure at that point. Yeah. I mean, think I guess there had been so many emotions. So then to have the kind of expression of it and it's really cool place to live for a few other people who need that off and you do some really cool stuff vocally nuts on the last album last night as in boy album take me with you and you disappear and the name Two songs. It's a ragdoll and half of a woman you do.

"kruger" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

05:52 min | 2 years ago

"kruger" Discussed on Pantheon

"It became the medicine. Anyway, I guess that they'd take they very strange Journey sometimes well for the time being is my youngest daughter's favorite track. She absolutely loves that song everytime. I put on she's like oh very much so that so it's connecting with me with with my whole family package. It's it's some of the music with modes of the music you've written is incredible to me and it's like this is kind of a backhanded compliment. That's weird should say I'm not at all. So when did you guys decide to move to Berlin and what how did did you choose Berlin and I mean it was pretty simple. Actually we wanted to be touring and it's very difficult to do that Africa and Europe was more possible. So we had started doing that and in order to kind of try and grow on that we decided needed to move and because of our Visa stipulations off. Dylan was possible. It was kind of central it was relatively affordable. Okay. So yeah, I mean that's pretty much it. I've heard through a few people that have had Alicia that Long Island how open and wonderful it is for artists. So have you guys found that to be the case with the with medicine board with touring and in that area and down there? It's interesting. I mean, guess it really depends how you conduct your life and I guess could learn you can do it in. Anyways, I guess that's the idea of openness I am. I sometimes find it a bit difficult to use that openness somehow in the sense of I don't know. I guess I'm still just sitting in my room making a lot which is what I was doing in Cape Town, you know? Yeah, there's potential I think maybe I think you've got to be song old enough to tap into it and and touring you know, It's not that we're playing a lot in Berlin, okay. You know, I guess it's just it's it's idea is that you could be touring a lot more. I don't know what I'm saying. Of course. It isn't a very open space. I think that I think because There are so many different kinds of feelings and people and scenes here, but it's interesting. You don't have to be you know, you don't have to fight for you. I talked to but that comes with another kind of. I don't know if have to figure it out, but oh. But oh, yeah, that's going to take a long time to show. I just have to you back on. I'm sure I'll be just as confused I want you to do is just to kind of help me out with a little bit of this. This is the part of the timeline that gets a little confusing for me. Yes at the let's see a couple of years ago medicine Boys still active and then Lucy Cooper in The Lost Boys kind of tapes take shape. But Lucy Krueger in The Lost Boys is basically the very Wicked Memories the same people my right? Yeah. Yeah, it's okay. It wasn't sorry. No, no, no. No. No when this occurs, are you still in Berlin when you guys start with the Lost Boys actually, I mean the last boy is So the way that it happened was Lucas started playing with me and then Andreas wall and this is already the start of the Lost Boys And then I started working with, and we had another drummer for The Very Wicked but that didn't at some point. I guess we want things shifted a bit and Thursdays. We we decided to work with Steiner who was The Lost Boys drama and then you know it just then Calvin his who played bass was like I mean, I'm actually really started playing with him a bit before I think it makes so much sense in a way, you know, develop these deep friendships both musically and personally. Yeah and Thursday. It already had some kind of identity and you know, like I said the first of them I work with professional session musicians and that's a very different thing. Oh, yeah. It's it's not as easy to generate conversation music musically honest conversation, you know, like yeah. So anyway the last very Wicked at some at point in time then it was the same page as the same band and I I recorded a we recorded a I think this was an 2015. We we did a we went away to a family. I mean not a family friend of a friend's place by the Sea and he helped us record an EP, right? Okay, and then yeah, okay, and I'm just trying to pull some of this stuff up while we're while we're chatting. Yeah get the names of these of some the stuff correct. So that was just called at that point in that EP. We made was just called basic Ruben the doc's place. Okay, and I think it was the start of some kind of sound..

Berlin Alicia Lucy Krueger Long Island Lucy Cooper Africa Dylan Cape Town Ruben Europe Calvin Lucas Andreas wall Steiner
"kruger" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"kruger" Discussed on Pantheon

"You can't get away with that kind of.

"kruger" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

05:20 min | 2 years ago

"kruger" Discussed on Pantheon

"Some of it sounds pretty close to being just youth. It's no no, I'm there are actually some stuff. There is some there are some songs that are just all right, so that's true that it's gone backwards. So how did you go from from doing solo stuff wage being on T being out in the front doing your own music to the very Wicked? We're in the first couple of singles that I'm hearing and the first EP You're kind of you're more background vocals. And then the first the full length that you guys did which is incredible. By the way that I've just listened to that honestly for the first time yesterday and it oh my God that the sound that you guys got on that. It's it's the feedback blast on songs like wash away when you're so it's that's just kind of stuff that I bought a live by love that stuff. But you you were in the background for first two singles in the EP and then you kind of get your right out in the Forefront for the lp. How did you how meet up with everybody? And then what was the process to get you out in front? Yeah. Well, actually I think on that the first EP it's not me. I'm not very I'm a very good job is and one of the I think a drop of water so it's called I mean, it's been a long time. Yeah, but then so you know, so I suppose what happened was. I mean, it's kind of a funny story but God. I mean, it's not very funny in my mind. It's between those are good story. I should never start a story like that cuz I don't tell funny stories regarding setting my birthday. And also when I when I moved from grahamstown Captain, I really wanted to play this with other musicians and I had no idea how to go about finding a band and the one of the same family friend that I'm speaking about his and had a band called the pretty blue guns and they were actually playing their last the last show and I knew that Lucas the drama played a few instruments. And I really I just got a little bit drunk and or maybe I don't know maybe more than a little bit drunk just went up to him after the show. And I said you want to play in my band home and he was super cool and he was like, yeah sure why not and so then we started sort of experimenting and he was really he playing a better guitar but of drums for my solo project off, but at that point at that point him and under were busy working on the very record, okay, and they had another they wanted a woman to sing and play keys, but I thought I should break use and they had somebody else but I guess it wasn't quite right and about two weeks before they launched as a live band. They asked me if I would show it and I had never played Keys before and I had also know that then I mean I've never been in a band and song I went into that rehearsal room for the first time and I was in a tiny room and it was the loudest thing I've ever heard of the whole world. Yeah, I was genuinely shocked off and I mean also cuz the boys at that point, we really like a joint, you know, now for example, I mean, it's still extremely well, but if we rehearse in a room, it's not that bad, you know, all of us have yeah. I'm always being magically I couldn't yes, I couldn't play I couldn't play keys and I couldn't hear anything. So it was I remember that first show. I thought it was all very overwhelming like, you know, but then then I guess we just started spend time together personally and musically and under I started to play a little bit in my solar project. Okay, and then I started working with a really great drummer and then he ended up playing drums for the very record and then the basis for the very good started playing bass for me and it just became this kind of And so I think we all just really developed some kind of trust in some kind of and all of us are writing songs. And yeah, I guess just as as as as a developed and I suppose I suppose it just became a.

"kruger" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"kruger" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"Once and Kruger servant it deep. In the Mustang territory, trying to get the kills saved by Kruger trying to get the kill. Very good set up for the Eagles goes very deep. All the way to the Mustang logo on the far end of the backcourt there on the Mustang, now, up three once again. With Meghan Olson looking to serve it up with the jumps, sir for the Mustangs. With a nice set up past finding the open area able wild for the kill. Kruger set up wild beautifully. And while put it to the back corner where there was nobody A very high arc in short serve that just about enable the top of the net. There was dog up. By the Mustang to returned it. But the second time here they were not able to as they just had a myth Play and the Eagles now all right back in this. It's 20 to 19 Mustang leaders were approaching the very Late links of Set number two, but that short high are conserve once again, by able wild was not able to make it over that time. So Mustang will regain that two point lead and we're gonna have Jaden Fife, the heart and soul, this Mustang team getting the server right here. Was sober, getting the bump return, setting up sober for a kill that is blocked, but it will go out of bounds. Solberg will accredit flick deal right there. Ray Solberg at five in.

Kruger Ray Solberg Eagles Meghan Olson Jaden Fife
White GWU professor at Washington DC's GWU admits she falsely claimed Black identity

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:47 sec | 2 years ago

White GWU professor at Washington DC's GWU admits she falsely claimed Black identity

"It's an unusual confession tonight from a history professor at George Washington University in a blogger Post today, Jessica Krug says that she has lied about being black. Krug wrote that throughout her adult life, she claimed to have North African African American and Caribbean heritage but is in fact white and Jewish. She says her appropriation of black identity was unethical, immoral and anti black. Kruger is an expert in African American history, imperialism and colonialism and is a finalist for both the Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass Book prize is, she says she's battled unaddressed mental health problems since she was a child when she first began claiming a false identity. Krug, right. She believes in can't cancel culture and that she should absolutely be canceled. But she did not say whether she would rot a resign now from G W.

Jessica Krug Harriet Tubman George Washington University Frederick Douglass Professor Kruger
White college professor admits she lied about being Black

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | 2 years ago

White college professor admits she lied about being Black

"And unusual confession this evening from a history professor at George Washington University in a blogger Post today, Jessica Krug says that she lied about bleep being black crew growth and throughout her adult life she claimed to have North African, African American and Caribbean heritage. But is in fact white and Jewish. She says her appropriation of black identity was unethical, immoral and anti black. Kruger is an expert in African American history, imperialism and colonialism and is a finalist for both the Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass book prices. She says she's battled unaddressed mental health issues since she was a child. When she first began claiming a false identity, Krug writes that she believes in cancel culture and that she should absolutely be cancelled. But she did not say whether she would resign from the school.

Jessica Krug Harriet Tubman George Washington University Frederick Douglass Professor Kruger
"kruger" Discussed on hopnology: Hop Growing and Brewing for Craft Beer

hopnology: Hop Growing and Brewing for Craft Beer

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"kruger" Discussed on hopnology: Hop Growing and Brewing for Craft Beer

"Or. Don't have the innate ability like talent like some people can paint. Some people can play instruments. Some people are are great at you. Know driving cars really fast. But. They haven't been trained how to take that spark. OF INSIGHT! An assumption. And molded intemperate and make it a tool that they can use and that it's okay to say I have this in forbid a bit of mission, but I don't know. But I'm going to use all these other tools that I just learned about sort of clear away all the detritus to figure out what is real. And that takes. That takes a lot of training like my case, a lot of training, and in some people's cases, it's just an innate talent. So the dunning. Kruger thing isn't necessarily a bad thing. It has phenomenon that is observed. Lay that out there. That's that's very good. Point that it. Brings to mind the phrase. A little knowledge is a dangerous thing. Yep If you know virtually nothing about something in your sponge. So before we started recording tonight James I told you did something today I've never done before. I, I have a little drywall work to do in the house. Just a couple little patches I've never touched any of this. I was given some advice from a friend I watched. A couple of youtube videos got my supplies. And I'm approaching it as someone who knows nothing about what they're doing. And it's going pretty well as a result. because. I'm trying to soak in everything that I can. Now next week when I go, give someone advice on Drywall God. Help that person. I know. Because, you've done at once on his tiny little. Tiny little patch in. You know it all now. Exactly, so yeah, yeah, you know I did at one time in all drywall. Jobs must be exactly the same. So if I did it once, I can do it a thousand times over, and it's.

James I youtube Kruger
"kruger" Discussed on hopnology: Hop Growing and Brewing for Craft Beer

hopnology: Hop Growing and Brewing for Craft Beer

05:28 min | 2 years ago

"kruger" Discussed on hopnology: Hop Growing and Brewing for Craft Beer

"I said the absolute most powerful tool. At everyone's disposal that is absolutely underused or just plain old forgotten about. His the question why? If. You can feel comfortable asking the question why to kick off a response. From whomever is telling you the way things we're supposed to be. That's a great for start, but then you have to have the wherewithal to basically filter out the bullshit from the response. And understand what it is. They're trying to tell you because. If you're talking to somebody about why they should, you should trim your bowl shoots back and that person has been doing this for generations, but doesn't understand the physiology around what a bowl shoot might actually be or the fact that we don't even know, but they tell you with. Without a shadow of a doubt you have to do this. Why if it doesn't make sense probably isn't right and I think to the you know an another psychological trope of cognitive dissonance. which is. Doing the same thing. Doing something that's contradictory to what you really do. Know is the right thing to do, but you continue to do it. Right when I shouldn't have that last twinkie because I know, it's not good for me, but I'm going to have it anyway Oh sure sure, and you'll regret it later, but at the moment it's really. Just fucking! Sums up pretty much mine. Tire existence right there. That's just the way it is certainly applies to my day. Yeah right so I I love this idea of of Dunning Kruger. Dr Tyson and and others who have come up with this position, which has basically as humans. We are fragile beings. The our our I think our largest fragility is in our our idea of ourselves, and so when we are put in a position, any position whatsoever that provides us a bit of power or influence. The first thing we do is try to protect that. Sector we do try to cultivate. That's apparent in and people that get belligerent or absolutely were the first ones to say you're raw. nope can't do it that way, not sorry. What are you stupid? Re trying to put people down? No, that's. Those are the people that frankly are the ones that I? Think have the most hide based on the stunning Krueger effet. It's the people that are willing to admit I. Don't know, but I think that or a hypothesized that I. try to do that as much as I can, and and lay out the fact of you know what we just don't know, however if we look at whatever this other plant. And what we know from plant physiology is x, Y Z. Then great. we try and draw some corollaries, but. In order to really do yourself justice as a hop grower. You, have to ask these questions and you have to bring up the contradictions..

Dunning Kruger Dr Tyson
"kruger" Discussed on hopnology: Hop Growing and Brewing for Craft Beer

hopnology: Hop Growing and Brewing for Craft Beer

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"kruger" Discussed on hopnology: Hop Growing and Brewing for Craft Beer

"As that sort of sphere inflates, it just keeps pushing. It repels facts. And you can't really challenge them anymore. With what is factual and truthful. Because the. The sphere that they built up around there colonel. Won't accept it and I prefer to think of that as more stubbornness than than. You said there too dumb to realize that the wrong. I think it's more of a stubborn thing than dumping. I think it's both I. Think it's just. I shouldn't say stupid knew she'd call ignorant, but at the same time. It takes. For some people at skill, it's talent. To have insight. Others it requires training to have insight and be able to put oneself in a position to say. I know I don't know everything I. I know that I'm missing something here. Therefore, How can I put myself in a position to say? The Sky is purple when all the facts point to the opposite. Refuse or I other refuse to look at those facts or I can't either comprehend them or even fathom the idea of going out and gathering information that can be really really dangerous. I told you earlier before we started I wanted to mention a quote. as shouldn't come to any surprise are surprised at any of you. That a lot of my personal heroes are scientists those that are living Neil degrasse Tyson is a is a huge. Influence on me and the man is brilliant. He's not only a great scientist. Sublime thinker he is a great orator, and he is the ability to break things down in. Teach them in a way that I've ever encountered. And, he has a fairly famous quote from two thousand seventeen way says. The greatest challenge of life. Is Knowing enough to think you are right. But Not Knowing enough to know you're wrong. I'll say that again knowing enough to think that you're right. But not knowing enough to know you're wrong. And I think that sums up the dunning Kruger effect to two good example. Yeah it. It's interesting because. UNLESS, you're constantly trying to improve yourself and working toward learning more and questioning things you. You're going to get to a point in any topic where you think you know the answer. And how do you know that you really do know the answer versus that you're just telling yourself? You know the answer and convincing yourself of that. When in fact you could be wrong and the courses I teach both for Siebel and. A privately for for other folks and I think I talked in the past I do. Coaching and team building stuff too and..

scientist Neil degrasse Tyson Siebel dunning Kruger
8 Podcast Principles That Lead To Highly Successful Business Podcasts

Accelerate Your Business Growth

03:36 min | 2 years ago

8 Podcast Principles That Lead To Highly Successful Business Podcasts

"Guest today is Ben Kruger. Ben is a podcast educator, founder and CEO of cash flow podcasting, and he's dedicated to helping industry advocates start launch and grow world-class podcast for their businesses. He believes podcasting is one of the best tools to help. Leaders reach more people connect more deeply and make an impact because it allows them to educate motivate an advocate at scale like nothing else. Then has had the privilege of collaborating on hundreds of podcasts since two thousand twelve, applying his podcast principles and service systems to help clients easily. Host shows that make a deep impact while reaching millions. In today's conversation with Ben, we are going to dive into some exciting topics around todd casting fundamental principles of business and how to plan start grow podcast. The generates amazing business results using those eight podcast principles. Thanks for joining me today Ben. Diane. I am tickled to be here. Always love talking podcasting shopping and digging in so excited to be connecting here with you and your listeners right on, and I am excited to have you here because podcasting is obviously one of my favorite things but it feels like it is. It is something that a lot of people have questions about. and I have a question for you. Which is why? Why do you think now? Is such an incredible time to use PODCASTING TO BE A. In whatever industry someone is? Yeah and I love starting with this question because I'm I am. Of the opinion that cussing just a communication channel and medium there's video. There's podcasting there's blogging. There's email there's social. There's various forms and. PODCASTING is has its own natural strengths, and it has its own natural weaknesses when you compare it to the natural strengths and weaknesses of the other platforms in medium so. I see podcasting, being particularly important and relevant now because we're in this phase to where in person and live events are a little bit thrown into question from from covert and from you know a lot of companies are now having their workforce's working from home. and there's much more of a distributed more digital interaction format going on right now. And part of the challenge here is, it's just a time of uncertainty. People are looking for leadership. They're looking for connection there, looking for information and guidance now more than ever. They're working from home. They are not attending live events and conferences, and some of those things that they're used to in their business schedules, and so. podcasting allows for someone to be a leader to. To advocate to. Essentially create content and create a valuable resource for their audience for their industry, and they can do it from home, so it's got you know social distancing built right into it. But, I think I think that's a pretty important piece at the moment.

Ben Kruger Founder And Ceo BEN Diane Todd
A National Treasure Disney Plus series is in development

Rush Limbaugh

00:17 sec | 2 years ago

A National Treasure Disney Plus series is in development

"Disney plus bringing back national treasure a new series based on the film is in the works for the streaming platform producer Jerry Bruckheimer has confirmed that a TV series featuring a younger cast being developed a third movie is also being made but Nicolas Cage Diane Kruger and Justin Bartha haven't yet been confirmed for the third

Disney Jerry Bruckheimer Diane Kruger Justin Bartha Producer Nicolas Cage
Studio 360 Extra: Aural History: How Studio 360 Got Started

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

09:43 min | 2 years ago

Studio 360 Extra: Aural History: How Studio 360 Got Started

"Invited the rock the World Wrestling Federation champion to speak at the Republican National Convention. Pupil sock it to me. I became an official painter. I don't express political desires in my novels. I just tell story. Hello I'm Chris Anderson and this is studio three six. That's how studio three sixty began. Its first episode on November. Four two thousand just before we elected George W Bush and we all learned what a hanging Chad was my special guest today in Studio. Three sixty is the artist. Barbara Kruger. Who will talk with us about politics and power in movies and music and even in her own art? I make art about the collision of my days and nights with the culture that has constructed and contains me all that and more coming up in studio three sixty from WNYC and PRI public radio international originally produced out of WNYC. Here in New York. The show is all about the cool but complicated and sometimes strange ways that art touches our lives two decades later. That mission hasn't changed. Even if the people making the show have come and gone I'm Jocelyn Gonzalez executive producer of studio three sixty but I was still wet behind the ears associate producer when the show debuted two decades ago. I was away from the show for about ten years before returning to the staff in two thousand seventeen so as the show draws to a close sadly after twenty years I turned to some of my friends from the formative years of studio three sixty for their impressions. Could we create these beautiful stories that represent all sorts of interesting things that are going on in the country in terms of arts and then have Kurt sit with some of that? He was comfortable with and talk about them. That's Julie Bursting who was executive producer of studio three sixty when the show launched and who wrote the studio three sixty book called spark in two thousand eleven and this is Carrie Hillman who was our first senior producer and is now the executive producer at story car. At the time there had been a lot of magazines shows and it was a way for us to sort of do something different and fresh and it was like a a really creative solution to like a lot of really boring magazine. Formatted programming so I was like really game to try to figure it out. We also had two assistant producers. I'm Michelle Seagull. I started at studio three sixty as a assistant producer. In September of two thousand. I stayed through twenty thirteen as a pretty Sir and I'm now the managing producer of Sleet Studios I'm Tall Milad and I started at St Three Sixty as an intern in the year. Two Thousand and I was there until two thousand fifteen When I left I was senior producer of the show for about ten years before that and I now work at Pushkin Industries Heading up development also on staff during the early days of the show was producer and technical director. Steve Nelson Steve's now a programming executive at NPR Johnson. Do you remember what the working title was when we got there? Oh yeah hot ticket right which is first of all a terrible name and doesn't get to any of the big ideas that studio three sixty does as a name but secondly this is sort of in the relatively this was during the post dotcom boom and someone typed in hot ticket dot com into a website and it was an adult site for general audiences for sure. That was the end of hot ticket as a name every week. Studio three sixty we explore. One big idea in-depth. Today we look at the intersections of art and medicine. The idea of studio three sixty or an art show for public radio had been kind of kicking around for a long time. People were on the ground producing pieces. Trying to sort of see what would stick Eventually they brought Julie Burstein and she had this idea of like putting on pieces that sort of built on one another in having an artist or somebody else react to each piece. We started calling it a through line which was just an idea that we would carry through the show and I think the idea of having a theme came from we have to have some structure in order inside it to be able to play. The idea was that Kurt would open the show with a monologue is always delightful to look back and see that exotic bits of civilization. John Ashcroft was a senator his most celebrated crusade a failed crusade for some years. Now one of my hobby horses has been the blurring lines between news politics crime or and entertainment and then he would have a person in the studio with him and then we would present pre recorded pieces to play for this person. I try in my work to speak to the human in US and That human end to bear kind of witness and in enabled react to it. That's really fascinating That makes me think of this. Yes we looked a lot at the degeneration of people's memories and one of the pieces of research we discovered is precisely why I found listening to that piece so fascinating so it would give us an opportunity. Say something that took them off of their typical talking points that gave us an insight into the way they think their personality It also added some depth. I think to the the pieces themselves because you can't do everything in five minutes and so maybe you have to like leave something on the cutting room floor but you can resurrect it a little bit with with the like well-placed Kirk question so I thought it was really cool. I loved gathering stories from really disparate places and putting them next to each other and then talking about them. It was just so much fun. Do you remember a point when you realize it was working? I have to say. I think that first Shakespeare show because it was a whole show bringing Shakespeare up-to-date but we had Neil Gaiman Willie's just grumbling about the fact that he's a crappy writer and the San man the eponymous Lord of the rings who happens to be in this up goes over to will and offices deal are you will shakespeare. I have we met. We have but men forget in waking hours. And you and Steve or maybe it was Steve. That incredible intro He started it with Scharzenegger's hang on not to be not to be tied in the phase of man when in disgrace with fortune and men's on have we hear. Hello I'm curt Anderson and Mrs Studio Three six. It was so hilarious and it was just. It was like okay. We got it this works. I'm Peter Clowney and I was studio three six I Adler and these days I live in Saint Paul and I'm vp of content strategy for stitcher. It's a struggle sometimes to do a show. That has a theme I approach. That idea would caution now if someone wants to do a show that theme like to say like remember. It's got multiple pieces in it. You're going to have the fifth favourite piece about Gardens in this episode. But it's true that like building on the ideas across an hour is like really meaningful. My name is Eric Linski. I started as an intern. In two thousand four became assistant producer and then decided to become a contributing reporter of which I was to studio three sixty through the beginning of two thousand sixteen and I am now the host and creator of the podcast imaginary worlds. Yeah I remember this one episode where they had Madeleine Albright the through line theme was democracy and so she's sitting in the studio with Kurt and then one of the pieces was about American idol. Which was the hottest thing back? Then and they were talking about how people were taking American idol democracy far more seriously than actual presidential elections. Have you ever had a chance to see American idol? Well I actually have and I've been pretty depressed As I am by television generally these days which seems to be going to the lowest common denominator and I. I don't like the word Elitism as we kind of lost me on this last segment of him and it was really funny here. Man Albright come out of that piece. And what do you think of that? She was not too thrilled with the peace to quality that piece but what she was hearing in the piece. I'm Derek John. I was a producer and editor on the show from about two thousand four to two thousand twelve ish and since then I've done a whole bunch of work in the podcast world but I am now currently an executive producer of the how to with Charles Duhig podcasts. At slate when the theme through line shows worked man they were amazing. I mean it was like we had set this high bar and they were so hard to pull up when they clicked and everything fit together. It was truly fantastic radio and it was hard I would say we had some shows that weren't successful and that's actually what led to having to change one. Really terrible through line. Thematic show was fish the fish just literal fish in the sea. Animals really jumped the shark on that one

Producer Executive Producer Kurt Steve Nelson Steve Madeleine Albright Intern World Wrestling Federation George W Bush Chris Anderson Wnyc Barbara Kruger Official Republican National Convention Mrs Studio United States Chad John Ashcroft Julie Burstein Michelle Seagull Jocelyn Gonzalez
Orphaned albino elephant recovers from poacher's snare

AP 24 Hour News

00:51 sec | 2 years ago

Orphaned albino elephant recovers from poacher's snare

"A baby albino elephant found trapped by a sharp wires near was rescued by a south African elephant orphanage the elephant fell into a trap set by a poacher in the Kruger national park the hunting snare went through her mouth down her face underneath her ear and under her chin the four month old was found badly dehydrated but alive a few days later and brought to the orphanage a month after being rescued Conesus named after the song a word for like wait a healthy three hundred thirty pounds and was adding a pound every day she was still separated from the rest of the herd spending her nights in a heated room and days in a large enclosure with tall grass and a mud pool under twenty four hour supervision the blue eyed pink skin Tyler was frequently in a playful mood craving attention and only stopping now and then to scratcher itchy scars on the wood pillars over in

Kruger National Park Conesus Tyler
Imposter Syndrome with UX Designers Amy Silvers and Lori Cavallucci

UX Podcast

10:15 min | 2 years ago

Imposter Syndrome with UX Designers Amy Silvers and Lori Cavallucci

"Imposter syndrome. Let us know a bit more. About what made you want to do that. Talk at the summit. And what the title responses you got from that for me. It's something that I've grappled with for years. It's just been something. I never knew what it was until I started started reading about it. And I'm like wow that's me there's actually something for what I've been experiencing and amy and I've talked a a lot about it over the years. She happens to have been she. She cringes when I say this but she happens to have been my my mentor. Who helped push me? I needed someone to push me. I was holding myself back and So it's just it's it started off basically as a self study like anything in psychology allergy research. So it's The interest came from my own Difficulties suffering with it through the years. Yeah I think Laurie and I we're had both been going through some career bumps and I had maybe done a little bit more Applying for jobs than and she had because she'd been a freelancer for a long time and she was. She was sort of looking around for things to apply to but she kept kept saying things like well. I don't have I don't I haven't used Jack sure. And they want actor. I don't use this software tool and they wanted I don. I kept telling her you know nobody meets all of the qualifications for job. Just push yourself and go ahead and apply for things even if they're a little above your level and we talked about how much we both felt like frauds like complete frogs doing that kind of thing like we weren't really qualified to be applying for any you X.. Jobs in spite of both having at that point you know several years experience at least east in the field and it kind of grew from there. Exactly actually James. Was the one talking to me James About doing this. Show show about imposter syndrome for over a year now. I think he's probably close to two years. But even even before you mentioned it to me the first time and I actually didn't know there was a name for it because is when you described it and I realized Oh my God I feel that all the time. I didn't know there was a name for it. I mean I I remember I mean occasionally you get those for me anywhere. Ah Kitchen you get those moments where people come out and say. I remember one situation where I was working at a clients and we're having a conversation Near the coffee machine and and somebody just brought up the fact that they were feeling nervous about doing a particular task in this project and the conversation then snowball pretty quickly and everyone is four. I think four of his run this coffee machine all of US basically end up saying to each other. Well I think we all feel so you like that a lot of the time I feel like we. We were not good enough to do these jobs or not qualified to do them. Or we're not going to be a deliver what's expected of us and you get those moments where you realize that Well I think probably everyone has their moments of feeling like an impostor and a fraud. Yeah so what's what's what's really going on. Here I mean is this special for the field of U. X. because it seems like the US especially as a field where there are so many new things like you were saying saying that there are so many tools we need to know about. There's so many things. Do I know about search engine optimization analytics as well we need to care about that how much do I Actually need to know to be a good designer and that sort of of course contribute to that feeling of being an impostor not having that holistic view of just just everything that you need to know about but has imposter syndrome been around always and as soon as something. We've been afraid to talk about. Yeah I we can talk a little bit about the origin of the term. Laurie cover that. It was originally identified as a phenomenon among women women in academia. PhD's tenured professors. Who at some fundamental level just doubted? They were even intelligent much less qualified to do the work they were doing. But I think that was mostly putting a name to do something that that certainly every professional experiences and probably every human experiences or most humans experience. It's actually the ones who don't experience it. But you have to worry about And there's a name for that syndrome to it's called the denning in Kruger Affect people who actually overestimate their qualifications and their own intelligence but but imposter syndrome. I think is very common among people who are high achieving I can talk a little bit about whether it's whether it's particularly prevalent in you X.. And and hypothesize about why But I'll let Lori give a little background on on the original the whole the origin of the syndrome and the naming of it. It was first diagnosed in high achieving women by two women. They realized that it's something that high-achieving women in this university where feeling and they did the study now. What we know now is that it's not just women that suffer from limit it's women and men it's It tends to be people who who really are high achievers and and have high expectations of of themselves and have achieved a lot that tend to feel it the most and This was in the late seventies and that was the first diagnosis and it was called called impostor phenomenon and it it really was It wasn't well known it wasn't publicized and I think As amy I work exploring this. We found so many articles people were just starting to come out about it and talk about it because it's something that they had been feeling and I realize that it's not just them. It's other people's well. Yeah and we actually did. A survey nonscientific survey of people in the US community and the percentages of of people. Who agreed with all or part of the statements that we posed About feeling like an impostor in particular situations Not only feeling like like you're not qualified but also feeling like you're going to be discovered at any minute you're going to fall on your face and everyone who's going to figure out you know what the you've been getting away with Faking it all the time And we discovered that almost everybody is it's seventy and eighty percent on almost all the responses agreed with the statements and I it's a huge percentage jagger and and it it almost made me feel like you know if if everyone has imposter syndrome. How important is like is it something we should just sort of acknowledge and get on with our lives and just sort of tried to ignore it as best we can but I think they're also there are things that we can do to actively combat at that are probably a little healthier but it does it it makes you wonder a little you know everybody has it? Is that even really a syndrome or is it is part of being human part of being a relatively relatively successful human but I do think I think you X. poses kind of some unique challenges challenges for people who are prone to feeling like imposters. Because not only do we have all these different skills that were expected to have but nobody obt defines what that skill set is in the same way. No two people much less To companies or to hiring managers defined it did anything like the same way and we have all these sort of standards that were held to all the time. But the standards keep shifting and nebulous. And there's no way to say like in the talk. I give the example of architecture physical architecture I can look at a building that that frank gehry designed and say. That's a frank gehry building. But I can't look at Frank Juries website and say oh seven seven designed that website or for his digital presence or whatever I can't I can't point to anything there because there aren't really standards words or objective criteria there. We don't share our work that actively a lot of the time. So it's it's just kind of nebulous and again shifting all the time I remember I I think it's the guy who's behind future Web Design Conference series. WHO posted three or four years ago? He tweeted about you. Rex designed being a bullshit dot job title designer. and Oh okay then guess. I'll pack up my things and go home because you know my Dr is bullshit and we get stuff like that all the time you know you have to know how to do. You should never code All this stuff telling us how we should be. And if you're not doing this you're not really a UI designer and that makes it very hard into feel any sort of sense that you you have mastery over your your skills over your job.

United States Laurie James About Fraud Amy I Frank Gehry Frank Juries Jack REX PHD Lori Denning Kruger
Our 2020 Travel Wishlist

Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

07:57 min | 2 years ago

Our 2020 Travel Wishlist

"Talking about our twenty twenty travel wishlist. And what what I said to you how. I was attacking this list this year. There's a few things that I did. We did one. We did not look back at our twenty nine thousand nine wishlist. We didn't want to do that and I didn't want to look back and say why can't put this on against I wanted this to be. These are the place to go. I don't even know what my twenty nine thousand nine lists was. There might might be some. My memory's not great so you guys probably can't remember it. I don't remember exactly and there is some method to the madness here. TRAV- have I was kind of having a hard time thinking of places that I wanted to go next year and we do have a lot of it planned out so that also was kind of you know it makes it a little harder because we're more organized with our travel plans but had here's what I looked at. I just said if if you had if someone said Hey. You've got two free weeks three weeks a month. Whatever some of these trips are long would be longer or shorter depending on how hard they are to get to and how far away? But but where would I want to go so again. I didn't try to think of this from a realistic perspective of Kenai actually get here in twenty twenty or will I be going here in two thousand twenty. That didn't play into in my decision at all. It was simply. What would I do if I could do? Obviously we have two kids now. That changed our travel plans. As you mentioned we're more organized than we plan stuff out so we kind kind of know places. We're going to go in two thousand twenty already so a lot of these Saying these are my this my wishes. I know I won't get to that's fine. Yeah it's more of a dreaming thing here ear to inspire ourselves to inspire you in create that wanderlust. Because you know sometimes I feel as though even because we're entrepreneurs resume we can go whenever we want and leaving we want. We do get bogged down a little bit in the everyday work life and then the planning of a trip which I know a lot of you can can relate to out there because planning is hard so we didn't want to think about that in factor that into this dream wishlist. WANDERLUST wanderlust. You I WANNA go. We're here to incite your Wunderlist for twenty twenty and I'm pretty excited about my list. I have to say I'm excited to know you this. When we do these lists we never talk ahead of time so I have no idea what we would like to hear from you so hit us up on social at extra pack of peanuts on Instagram? That's easiest way. Let us know what your Dream Twenty Twenty wishlist is. So let's dive right into one real last note. I guess though before we dive into it I actually was looking us a map of the world all the time when I'm trying to there's so many places I wanna go. I really wanted to go ever trying to narrow it down so I just look at Google Map I do too. That's funny and I was looking at map. I scrolled over in Asia. I scrolled over over and got into Europe and American I kept scrolling. You how you could on Google maps you could just keeps growing. It just shows you you know it goes back to Asia and I literally sat out loud. That's it like. I went from Asia to Europe. And I'm like Oh yeah I just looked through the whole world so I just thought that was a funny anecdote. I there's obviously so many places you're going to be but it seems small when you're looking at it from such a bird's eye view that's right. Yeah I I was kind of feeling the same way especially when I was scrolling over Europe and I you'd love Europe and I was thinking we've been to almost every country in Europe. Where do we want to go? I do have some places in Europe. Don't worry all right well. Let's start with our honorable all mentioned as usual. You have to. I have to go ahead correct. So my first honorable mention is a place that we almost got to this year in Twenty nineteen and that is Charleston South Carolina because this city to me just seems like it exudes Southern American charm. It's beautiful historic. The architecture is just what you would imagine would be in a in a beautiful southern city and it just so happens to be on the coast which is always something that for me. If I'm if I'm glancing up at my list almost every single go place on my list. Somewhere in that country has a coastline off on purpose. When I'm just glancing up here at this you know I really I love love? Love the coast so to me Charleston. South Carolina is a place in the US. That I really WANNA visit. Because we've you've never been there and it's not even that far from Philadelphia but an incredible food always talk named and ranked as one of the top Foodie cities in America so Charleston in definitely. I'm glad you put on your list. It's going allow me to chance to bed. I mean it could have made the real list but I put it on the honorable mention. Because it's not is exotic as I like I like it's going to allow me to cheat all right my first honorable mention than what we'll get back to your second is we'll stay I'll stay in the US to domestically a New Mexico state that we'd never neither of us have ever been to place. We both really wanted to go. Just you know. We have not spent a lot of time in the American. Southwest definitely definitely a region of the country that that we have not seen near as much of as some other places in the US. And I've always wanted to get to New Mexico when we threw this out there you know L. A. couple months going podcast when we were talking about fall bus paces to fall Got Tons of feedback from you guys about Albuquerque. Santa Fe why we should go to New Mexico so so it is definitely on the list here so New Mexico and this seems like when we feasibly could get to. Obviously it's not near as far as some of the plates. We're GONNA talk about so New Mexico honorable honorable mention just for the fact that you said seems a little more realistic might actually go to in twenty twenty so not that. I don't want to all right. Let's get going and this the reason that you liked that I put Charleston on there. I almost put New Mexico on there. I feel like we talked about New Mexico last year on the on the twenty nineteen wishlist. I can't remember about own fall back with two weeks ago and then on our radar and we've both been wanting to go so awkwardly Charleston South Carolina. We're helping each other out so far on this list. Your last on my last article mention is on here only only because in the main list only because we have personally been there before and that is South Africa. Let me jump billionaire going there again. This is my running. Capetown is on my honor. Roll Okay for the same reason that we have it planned to go there. September twenty twenty to watch my mom. Interestingly enough in the field hockey World Cup she is on the US. Under sixty five or over sixty I forget which way they caught national team. She's the Golly. Maybe we'll win. MVP this year. I know you're listening. Mom You got to get in shape. Let's get better shape than I am. She's incredible and we are going to South Africa and we're going to keep town specifically we've been there before but I am so excited to go back as one of our favorite cities in the world. Also also the wine region Man When I was making this list a lot of my places are winds. And you're leading wine and coast go wrong. Oh Oh and Kruger National Park which is not near the coast. It's in northern South Africa. And I think that we're hoping to do a safari there in the National National Park. Would you be really exciting and I know that what is young. He'll be almost three by the time we go. It's a little young. I fry but I think he'll love it. Yeah Capetown and as you mentioned more broadly South Africa on my ro mentioned again. We are unless something happens. We are planning to be there. September into October twenty twenty twenty couldn't be more happy about that. That's our big couldn't like our beer couldn't be more happy. Couldn't be happier. That's our big trip. That's planned for twenty twenty. That's it's actually on the calendar so far so

New Mexico Europe United States Charleston Dream Twenty Twenty South Africa Twenty Twenty Asia South Carolina Capetown Charleston South Carolina Kenai Santa Fe MVP National National Park Kruger National Park Albuquerque
Are Less Experienced People More Confident?

BrainStuff

03:26 min | 3 years ago

Are Less Experienced People More Confident?

"He rain stuff lauren. Vogel Bam here with an episode from the archives for you back when our host one Christian Saker this is one. That's come up and I think all of our conversations and frustrations lately are less informed. Armed people more confident and if so why bring stuff. It's me Christian and Sager. If you're like most people you think you're very good at some things and are able to admit your less good at others. You probably think you're superbly-talented in one honor to areas and hey you may be right you try to be honest with yourself about your strong points and you're weak ones and you likely shake your head in pity at people you see as well. Oh stupid say things like. Why don't they understand that they're bad at doing stuff? Well there is an answer. But you're not gonna like it and this answer it doesn't just apply to people you think of as dumb it applies to everyone on earth including you and me. It's not a matter of intelligence necessarily a difficult fickle thing to measure but it is related to competence the ability to do something well in nineteen ninety nine psychologist named David Dunning and his Grad assistant didn't Justin Kruger tested. A group of students in several categories the ability to think logically to write grammatically and to spot. Funny Jokes folks. They also asked students to rate their skills in these categories. That is when they noticed something. Weird the people scoring below average on these tests were just incompetent in these categories. They also didn't know they were incompetent. And here's the kicker the less competent they were are the more competent. They ranked themselves. This is a phenomenon called illusory superiority this is a cognitive bias. Bias wherein people tend to rate their own abilities as above average multiple. Studies have proven this effect in everything from firearms to college. DEBATES AND MED students opinions of their interviewing skills. It doesn't seem to matter what specific skill were talking about. The less person knows about it the more likely they are to overestimate their knowledge. While dunning and Kruger popularized this effect in modern society. They weren't the first people to notice the relationship between confidence modesty. Honesty and skill philosophers throughout the ages have contemplated this idea like Bertrand Russell. Who famously wrote the trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure talk? Show in the intelligent are full of doubt. And here's another weird thing. People with actual competency are likely to actually underestimate their abilities. Researchers believe this modesty comes because competent people are more aware of how much they don't actually know as well as their field in general they also also consistently overestimate the performance ability of others. It all goes back to

David Dunning Justin Kruger Sager Vogel Bertrand Russell
A Review of 'It: Chapter 2'

Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

10:08 min | 3 years ago

A Review of 'It: Chapter 2'

"Today. We're discussing. Sometimes it comes back for you where it's more boring name it. Chapter Two starring Jessica chastain James mcevoy Bill Hater Isaiah Mustafa Jay Ryan James Ran Soon Andy Bear. Some of these people have to just be happy their names on a poster oester. I mean who the hell some of these guys the old spice guy because his name above the title and Bill Skarsgard as pennywise directed by a Andy Machete this is Arnie Coz now playing and the fun is just beginning Ed Stewart and this is the host who still insists he sees the ghost Jacob it aftermath aftermath wow as Stephen King Fan as somebody really into Stephen King around the time this came out of you. Remember dark tower came out right before this. I was actually buying a couple of Stephen King Trotsky to go on my bookshelf with all my Stephen King Books. They're made like a Jack torrens action figuring things and I'm like you know they don't make too much of this so I'll get a couple of these and put them up there. It exploded merchandising for every Stephen King thing. There's a hot wheels Christine. There are more pennywise figures that I can count what I'm not kidding. Wow Yeah so ooh many pennywise toys of all price points this has opened a floodgate on Stephen King that has never been opened before merchandising him to the Gen xers. I think so what does that mean. I mean we all know what merchandise meant and fanning the love of Star Wars. What would it mean to hold a bobblehead. Ah pennywise Ernie called GEN-X. You GotTa Buy Your Co.. POPs gets by stuff by toys by Chachis of stuff you like and Stephen King's. The big caught thing now so let's just how the market is. Is it selling yeah okay. I mean I didn't buy any of it. The moment you know what I liked about it when it was niche and there was like two things I loved it when every week. I'm getting an email this new pennywise doll for two hundred dollars. I'm like fuck it pennywise varian Syrian funk. Oh pops are there. Oh my God so many long tongue pennywise bloody pennywise smiling pennywise frowning penny wise spider pennywise okay this kind. It helps me understand why you were so into skarsgard. They've really been able to magnify what was a very small part of the film really wasn't in that many scenes and by my impression Russian he was only good in about half of them so how he has lived on in the minds of the viewer is through merchandise he made an impression he scarred us and and now two years later he's coming back to finish the job yeah and again. I'd equate to a Freddy Kruger. I'd think it's the closest thing we've had to a horror icon. In a long time and Freddie never had that much screen time it was people talking about Freddie and Robert Englund Cameo films. You know so and I think merchandising we've made every Jason we've made every Friday. Oh my God pennywise we have something new to sell but the highest grossing nightmare on Elm Street movie wouldn't begin to touch the gross of of this fill it goes well beyond the reach of a horror audience. I mean this. There were people in my neighborhood I walk my dog and churchgoing folk who I would never suspect suspect to have opened a cover of Stephen King said. Oh it's coming out soon people. I would not imagine demographics that do not see any other horror. Film are are coming out this weekend and why the impression I got was they really loved the kits. Yeah I think that I it was huge and almost every viewing was sold allow. When I went to go see this Friday night theaters packed yeah you can keep going on about penny wise and I think you're right for a certain level of people that loves horror ICONOGRAPHY. That's a thing thing but I feel like in mass. The reason why this is so beloved because it goes those children were so good and it connected to childhood so well and that's the struggle of chapter or two. I know that the kids are coming back in some role but the torch is being passed. It will now be for new actors. That didn't even have the job when the first movie he came out. What's funny is before it chapter one came out the sequel was in pre production. You know the studio knew what they had right and so when they were you're doing pre release interviews with the cast they asked the young kids who would you like to play you and Young Beverly said Jessica chastain and that kind of makes sense I mean chastain had had worked with Michetti before and I mean how many red headed actress sent me as I mean. It's either her Dallas Broward Sophie Turner from X. Expend Dark Phoenix twenty seven years later. That's great highlight store here. Maybe and then Wolford said Bill Hater. Those actually happened yeah yeah. I don't know how much they had already envisioned for chapter to win. Two years ago it blew up. They had talked about it. The whole way through one is what it was. They kept saying if we do a two. Let's leave this hook here. Let's leave this here. Let's leave this vague enough here. They knew if the movie was successful while filming part one in sixteen. If this did well we would want to bring the kids back would want to have some flashbacks but we're gonNA focus mostly on the adults and they had vague the ideas but they did never script yeah they knew the parts of the book they had left behind and so that was a lot of material is a big ass book. They could make lots of movies out of what was remaining remaining of that but they didn't have a script. They didn't have a cast again. It wasn't called Chapter One. They shape the experience as total you could just watch that movie the and be done and that was the studio's. Choice Warner Brothers did that the makers want to call it the losers club so that it had a hook there for a second one and and I think the compromise was chapter one at the end credits. I stand by that. I think that movie does work as a standalone if it had bombed and we never got chapter two I think that would still be a satisfying the movie as far as the art goes and I appreciate that I like it when movies tell a story instead of teas another film to come out at some other point I also think I think that there is a lot of ret conning done in the film. We're here to talk about today. Oh yeah they didn't create a first chapter that set up a lot of things they're we're going to do in this film. That's why there's so many flashbacks yeah they had to correct it by bringing the kids back and they did d. h. them with CGI because kids at that age you know two three years later look very different. I noticed height differences. I noticed like some who were shorter than beverly in part one out taller than beverly only in part to but they made the faces look younger yeah. I noticed that at times. They look a little bit plastics. Oh okay that makes sense because they D- aged Regata de age. These teenage kids not only like that but I noticed some of the lip sync work. That ain't his voice. You know your voice changes to three years later. They can't say the lines like they would've in the summer of one thousand nine hundred nine so oh yeah you just get people that kinda sound like them but are not them. Jack Dillon Grazer was the one who looked most distracting to me like for some reason his face just look blake an old man made into a child and but this is expected to be huge based off the first one I mean the first one broke records chapter. Two is breaking a record. It's the Whitest ever released for an R rated film with over forty five hundred screens in the US alone and they were saying hundred ten million two hundred twenty million this weekend. It's already falling short of expectations though it is it made less in preview screenings than the first film. It's estimated now. It's going to make less over the weekend than the first film. What did the first film do. The first film got one hundred thirty five million the first weekend. I guess I didn't see that opening weekend side there. Wasn't the big crowd. I didn't realize I was so big right away. I thought that kind of had a slow burn so it's looking like this will be perhaps second-biggest and they're now readjusting estimates down to ninety ninety million. Maybe as low as eighty million compared to one hundred thirty five million for the sequel. I gotta think some of it is you don't see kids and is not an eighties period piece. The nostalgia culture isn't there to draw in the big audiences. I know when I saw it chapter one opening weekend. Neri empty seat in the house. When I saw this opening night it was about a two thirds full on the APP but a lot of people didn't show up like all the seats around me were Phil on the APP and people just didn't come. I think that's the result of that. AMC stubs premier as you can buy tickets for no money so you reserve seats and like I'm decided not to go interesting house in the same screening as you Arnie for Thursday I max we didn't see each other until after after it was all over with but I did also go back and saw matinee on Friday. There was almost nobody there so I have not had the experience that this is something the masses asses are turning out to but the numbers are saying something different even at one hundred million if that's less than expected. That's an amazing opening. That's huge yeah for an R rated Orville. Matt is amazing and like I said packed when I saw it. I do wonder when the reviews started coming out and I always avoid reuse but you always see headlines in that. There were some concerns turns and I wonder if that scares some people away like they were not buzzing like with chapter one. I didn't hear anything I didn't see any reviews before going in but this movie cost cost twice as much as the first one bigger actors in it so if it makes less this one costs seventy million dollars they had budget built in for de aging kids and they had named named actors who we know and some of whom need to redeem themselves from an earlier x men film this summer and needs a show they still can do good budget built in so they didn't have that crap. Raffia from the TV series and it's also longer they can't screen it as many times in a day because it adds. It feels like another hour. It's not quite that it's more more like forty five minutes but still it's two hours fifty minutes. It's almost three hours. We're talking to vendors level length here well. The first chapter one was also over two two hours but this goes beyond that by at least forty minutes so again for lots of reasons. If you know the book and hold the opinion I do the best stuff.

Stephen King Jessica Chastain Stephen King Trotsky Bill Skarsgard Young Beverly Arnie Ed Stewart Christine Jacob Freddy Kruger Freddie Warner Brothers United States Andy Machete Isaiah Mustafa James Mcevoy Jason Dallas Orville Jack Dillon Grazer