26 Burst results for "Kron"

Why the Left Hates Clarence Thomas

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:10 min | Last month

Why the Left Hates Clarence Thomas

"ProPublica has a hit piece against clarence Thomas. It's all about tuition payments. This whole thing is super bizarre. So clarence Thomas, being a good Christian, a very devout Catholic, by the way. Fostered his grand nephew Mark taking custody of him and essentially raising him from the age of ten. As part of that, he sent them to hidden Lake academy a boarding school in Georgia. Dallas based Republican donor and a good man Harlan crow paid for two years of tuition at that school and once again, the complaint is that Thomas did not report this as a gift. That's just nonsense. It's well known that Harlan Kron clarence Thomas are very good friends. Harlan Crowe, for anyone that knows this, he's an incredible collector. He loves American history. And he has a friendship with clarence Thomas. Are you not a lot of friends? If you're on the Supreme Court, the only statement Thomas has made is that he and his wife are very close friends with the crows. That's well known. And then his understanding was that he wasn't required to report any of these things. And on both points, he's correct. There's no evidence of any bribery or corruption. But they're coming after him hard. They want criminal investigations. They want indictments. They want the whole thing. Mika brzezinski on payments to clarence Thomas wife because then it somehow involves something around Ginny Thomas. They're going after the entire family, everybody. Play cut one 16. We're going to talk now about the new reporting on payments to the wife of Supreme Court Justice clarence Thomas. Citing documents, it reviewed The Washington Post reports that conservative judicial activist Leonard Leo paid Ginny Thomas tens of thousands of dollars for consulting work, but gave specific instructions that her name be left off the paperwork. The same year the nonprofit judicial education project filed a brief to the Supreme Court challenging a landmark civil rights law aimed at protecting minority voters. That's the real key, isn't it? They don't like how he votes. They don't like his decisions. They don't like his opinions.

Georgia Mika Brzezinski Thomas Ginny Thomas Leonard Leo Two Years Mark Harlan Crowe Both Points Clarence Thomas Dallas Harlan Crow Propublica Supreme Court Harlan Kron Tens Of Thousands Of Dollars Lake Academy Age Of Ten The Washington Post 16
"kron" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:56 min | 11 months ago

"kron" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Get a second COVID-19 booster? That is what the Biden administration is trying to decide right now, whether to significantly expand booster shot eligibility this summer to protect more people against the latest noma Kron surge, NPR health correspondent rob Stein is here to explain rob, this has gotten really confusing for some people. So if you could just remind us, who was already eligible for another booster and what's being considered by the administration right now? Sure, this is all about second boosters. We're talking about fourth shots, you know, anyone age 50 and older has been eligible for a second booster since March, same goes for anyone aged 12 and older who has a weak immune system, but that means that most people younger than 50 haven't been eligible for another booster, even though the immunity they got from their first three shots has been wearing off. And now the most contagious strain of the virus yet, the omicron sub variant called BA 5 is fueling yet another surge. Here's Michael osterholm at the university of Minnesota. When we look at what's happening with this widespread transmission right now, BA 5, it's just really I think cries out for what else can we do to reduce the likelihood of serious illness and boosters are I think the obvious answer. So NPR confirmed that federal officials are debating whether to make second boosters available to all adults to protect them through the summer. Okay, so tell us about this debate who doesn't think that this is a good idea. Well, you know, some people think the extra shot should just be offered to those at high risk for some reason. I talked about this with doctor Anthony Fauci. I don't think it would make much sense for a perfectly healthy 25 year old person to necessarily get a boost now. There's a difference between a perfectly healthy 25 year old person and a 43 year old person with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Or heart disease or asthma or pregnant women, but others say all adults should at least have the option. Here's doctor Robert walker at the University of California San Francisco. People are no longer being as careful as they were. We know that immunity wanes over time. We have a variant that is capable of evading the immune system. We have good evidence that the second booster lowers the probability of severe case. And you put all that together and it seems to me that it should be offered to people as an option. But others just think there's really no need to open up booster eligibility broadly at this point. And rob given how contagious you've said that BA 5, this variant is, why did they say not to open up booster eligibility broadly? Yeah, so some say there really isn't good evidence that a second booster would really do much for most people. Three shots are still keeping most people from getting really sick or dying, and there is concern that if you keep giving people the same shot over and over again, it could backfire by kind of training their immune system to only try to fight off the

Biden administration noma Kron rob Stein NPR Michael osterholm rob university of Minnesota Anthony Fauci chronic obstructive pulmonary Robert walker heart disease asthma University of California San Francisco
Grichuk, Cron power Rockies to 8-5 win over Padres

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 11 months ago

Grichuk, Cron power Rockies to 8-5 win over Padres

"The Padres are four and 9 this month following an 8 5 loss to the rockies Randall Gretchen doubled twice and drove in three runs and CJ cron had two hits in his return to the Colorado lineup Crone set out three of the rockies previous 5 games with a wrist injury suffered last Friday Kron and Richard were instrumental during a three run 6th that put the rockies ahead for good Winning pitcher Julie chassis worked two scoreless innings in relief of Kyle Freeland San Diego's Blake Snell walked 6 while allowing 5 runs over three and two thirds The pod raised her three and 13 of course field since the start of last season I'm Dave

Rockies Randall Gretchen Cj Cron Padres Crone Julie Chassis Kron Kyle Freeland Colorado Blake Snell Richard San Diego Dave
"kron" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"kron" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Years It's something that I wish all of corporate America would embrace because what you see and there are more and more studies emerging on this innovation and creativity fall in a remote remote workforce And for us so much of how we create value in one form or another involves creativity innovation and having everybody back together has been really powerful in driving forward our overall business And it hasn't hurt keeping talent or hiring You know what We lost a handful of people over the course of this journey You know let's be clear The first two or three weeks back for most people is like I can't believe they made me come back to work And then in December when we saw amna Kron reaccelerate we told everybody in D 14th go home for the holidays And most people kept coming to work So what it's really a statement about is we're creatures of habit And when your habits turn back into I go to work you start to say things like I actually enjoy the separation of my personal life and my professional life I mean I can't tell you how my colleagues are like you know it's actually really nice to be in a room and not have to deal with managing 25 different attractions at home So I think most importantly we're creatures of habit whatever those habits may turn out to be But for us the chance to collaborate the chance to work together the chance there's been so many meanings over the last two and a half years in front of whiteboards with new insights new concepts that would never happen in a Zoom based world Citadel has made money when a lot of people haven't What's your secret sauce Look I think I just spoke about the most important one It's the fact that we work together as a team That's certainly all CEO Ken Griffin speaking with Bloomberg's francine LaCroix coming.

amna Kron America Ken Griffin francine LaCroix Bloomberg
"kron" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

08:55 min | 1 year ago

"kron" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"China's largest and most important business centers But today most of the 26 million people there are on COVID lockdown Omar Kron case is a rising and even though they're far lower than many countries China is staying with its zero tolerance COVID policy Let's check in now with Eva do she's business and economics correspondent with The Washington Post our editorial partners and she is in Shanghai Eva hi Hi thanks for having me here Great to have you So it seems Shanghai has been deemed too big to shut down The plan is I understand it was to shut down one half of the city at a time The eastern part first and then the western part But that's actually not what is happening is it Exactly the original plan was to shut down half the city for four days and then to switch and shut down the other half of the city before four days And in this process to COVID test everyone and be able to pull out the people who are infected into quarantine centers But I guess what officials have found is they are finding maybe more cases than they expected and they are keeping areas under lockdown that were supposed to come out of lockdown today So as of today close to all of the city is under lockdown So is it clear what the situation is in terms of cases We've been reading the numbers rise but also seen reports that cases and deaths may be being covered up Yes so the official number is somewhere south of 5000 new cases a day Which the way China reports it the vast majority of those they count as asymptomatic cases So they only claim a few hundred a day are people with symptoms of COVID So from sort of reports on the ground it seems like this is maybe underestimating the actual situation Yeah and do we know anything more about this I think it's a nursing home at the center of a story with very suspicious cases and deaths potentially People inside and the workers inside being sealed off Well there have been reports of deaths at one nursing home in particular and Shanghai And what we've seen in the last few days is sort of this surreal scramble for people who have medical conditions or loved ones with preexisting medical conditions to get them to hospitals and to get some sort of medical care because the lockdowns did happen with little advance notice and a lot of places like nursing homes ended up Understaffed employees ended up locked down at home and couldn't get to work a lot of hospitals just weren't taking people if you didn't have a very recent COVID test So a lot of people ended up in a dire situation So stepping back economically what did the implications seem to be of severely lockdown Shanghai We've read some of the big Wall Street banks downgrading their forecasts for the Chinese economy and read about big auto plants in Shanghai in northeast China being shut down This does raise concerns about the path forward for trying to out of the pandemic Shanghai throughout the pandemic was a city that was seen as more on the opening upside And so it's so interconnected with the world So for Shanghai of all places to be completely shut down is quite a worrying signal for how China is going to be able to get out of the pandemic in the near term And despite the official shutdown are some plants offices still able to keep going I've read some anecdotal stories about workers sleeping in their offices because they're stuck there may as well work workers sleeping at factories Yeah well some factories have to be able to keep production going They've required that their workers stay there for this duration and so they live there They spend their spare time there They sleep there at night And so those factories reportedly are still going for most other ones they've had to shut down because it's just not been possible to get the people in and out each day Eva dough is corresponding with The Washington Post our editorial partners and she's talking to us from Shanghai which is on lockdown Eva thank you very much Thank you very much Earlier this week I talked to an old friend of mine Kent kettle He's a minnesotan who has been living and working in China since the 80s Kent Lewis on the west side of Shanghai the part that went on lockdown today and he checked in yesterday with some recorded voice memos In other parts of the world you hear about panic buying and toilet paper and things like that Here in China people are very practical The panic buying has been on vegetables and things like that And so for a couple of mornings I've gone to my local market here behind my apartment I'm almost two meters tall and I'm a pretty big guy But old ladies half my size are bowling me over to get out the vegetables They're quite determined Now Kent is assuming this lockdown at least in his neighborhood will be pretty strict They're saying that when the lockdown starts on Friday we are not going to be allowed out of our dwellings at all We have to stay in our apartments We're not allowed to go out take a walk people who have dogs can not go out and walk dogs I have that problem I've got two very large dogs One of them is about a 130 pounds 65 kilos And they need to get out a couple of times a day I'm really not sure what I'm going to be doing At this point I've gone out and collected two large boxes of dirt that I'm going to if I can't get them out Spread out on my balcony somehow and create some kind of outhouse environment for them to use We'll see if that works It does make me wonder about apartments with dogs and no balconies In any event shutting down a city of 26 million people is testing China's zero COVID approach Thing is there may not be a good alternative The rest of the world is criticized China for attempting this zero COVID approach And certainly there have been challenges However what is not always known is that China can't afford to do anything else The healthcare infrastructure though improving in China still is not able to handle massive cases number of cases And so the very rigorous approach has been an attempt to not overburden the healthcare infrastructure It's worked for a couple of years Now that omicron is here that is starting to really test the limits Americans have seen their own vaccine supplies in hospitals overloaded But in China Kent kettle says pandemic life has been pretty good We have to remember is that for most of the past two years we have been able to live life normally here in China While much of the U.S. was shut down Europe was shut down And you look at Singapore and maybe for a year almost two years at a time you couldn't go out you couldn't socialize you couldn't do anything We could do that here in China It was a bubble and it was designed to be that way And as long as we didn't leave and we didn't allow people in we could do things normally So I traveled all over China It was a social time inside of a bubble But if you didn't pay attention to anything outside it actually was pretty good here Now the cost of pretty good is surveillance in China being watched and monitored by apps There's actually a couple that kind of track you and track where you are there's a kind of geolocator based app So if you are within a certain range of someone who is identified as being an infected person you're called a close contact And then there's a process to handle that Your tests and your vaccinations are also loaded on the app As an American initially it was a bit of a shock I guess to kind of be tracked that closely However in a pandemic you realize the value of that You realize that being tracked like that most freedom Of movement ironically And it's taken me a while to kind of get there But I think it is true.

Shanghai China Omar Kron The Washington Post Eva dough Kent Lewis Eva China Kent bowling Kent Singapore Europe U.S.
"kron" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"kron" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"DRAM process integration is tran It's great to have some time with ET and where might Kron has managed to dominate and survived and become one of the few well it's an older gopali now Is within the memory space is within DRAM What is it now that you're doing to differentiate yourself Because everyone says commoditize space But it's not right Exactly Exactly So we basically develop our memory technology to be industry leaders in both DRAM and nand flash memory And we do that to provide a wide flexibility for product portfolio And we continue to shrink so that we can reduce the cost and increase the density of our memory chips And I've just been inside some of your fab here R&D fab which is phenomenal I mean I got in my bunny suit I went round to keep it clean and the machinery that is needed to just talking about what is it sort of 60 or 600 different chemicals different gases that are needed to produce this tiny piece of wafer Just talk to us about the intricacies involved in continuing to shrink shrink shrink semiconductors Yes absolutely It's gone to be so complex that it's over thousands of steps and we basically use almost all of the elements on the periodic table and my team takes it from paper studies to defining the structural dimensions the physical dimensions and the electrical requirements to meet the customer requirements for market demands And it's basically if you think about building billions of LEGO.

Kron LEGO
"kron" Discussed on Security Now

Security Now

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"kron" Discussed on Security Now

"Linux is set FA CL ACL as an access control list is used as you'd expect to set modify or remove the access control lists which are used to control access to regular files and directories. Once again, the kin sing malware that seems to be all about permissions, uses set FAL FAL to set executable permission on bin CH mod in the in the defensive Asian phase of its attack life cycle. And I wondering, I didn't dig into it any deeper, but CH mod certainly already has its executable bit set because it's a command. So maybe the normal CH mod, the real one, resides in a different executable directory, not underneath slash bin. And so this thing is putting it is naming itself CH mod and sticking itself under slash bin and then using said FAL to turn on the executable permission. But in order to be runnable. And of course, the ever handy set it and forget it, cron tab command, easily opens the cron table for editing the list of tasks to be scheduled to run a specified times and intervals on the system. You know, it's very much like Windows scheduler. It's sort of the same thing. Many a malware has arranged to come back from the dead through the clever manipulation of Kron tabs time delayed command execution. In particular, cryptocurrency minors have been seen accessing cron entries to delete already installed cron jobs, meaning get rid of the competition and to install new cron jobs to keep themselves running. And nothing says erase your own footsteps like RM. Linux's short and sweet file removal command, many malware families, including the mirai and gavit IoT botnets, as well as many cryptocurrency miners depend upon RM to self destruct and delete their tracks. Of course, the most classic of all hacker tricks is to.

bin cron jobs cron Kron
"kron" Discussed on The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"kron" Discussed on The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

"All right, my Friends, the time is now. Let's go do it. Let's go talk to the brilliant and wise. Ian Morgan Kron. Would you mind sharing what the enneagram is just to set the table for everyone that's not familiar hasn't heard of it before. Sure,.

Ian Morgan Kron
"kron" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"kron" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"A crime was basically announced right after Thanksgiving. It was the new variant. Made the stock market plummet. New York in anticipation of a Macron decided to re-engage and lockdowns, mask mandates vaccine mandates on a cron is something that we must be very afraid of is what we're told. Oh Macron, if you just watched Fauci, the NIH and the CDC, it sounds like this is COVID two. It is mutating in a more vicious, deadly and aggressive manner. What's really going on here? How many people have actually died? Of all Macron. Is the virus getting stronger or is the virus getting weaker? Well, according to Neil Ferguson, who was the original lockdown artist, he was the person that originally, the imperial college study, way back at the beginning of the pandemic in March of 2020, he has even come out and he said that Amy Kron is 45% less likely to cause hospitalization than delta, by the way, that's without factoring an Ivermectin hydroxychloroquine azithromycin vitamin D levels vitamin C, obesity age, underlying health conditions, intravenous intervention, aspirin melatonin or Qin. And if you're not able to rattle off all those treatments, I encourage you to listen to our podcasts and equip yourself. Your government wants you to be scared and unprepared. Your government wants you to be fearful and confused. There are legitimate interventions and treatments that could potentially help you. Get to know them. Do not leave yourself or your loved ones helpless, trusting the federal government or the bullet bureau going into Christmas. 45% less likely to cause hospitalization than delta, according to a major British study by Neal Ferguson. Among the previously infected, the risk of hospitalization from a drop by as much as 69% for both the vaccinated on the unvaccinated. So what does that tell us? That means that if you've had COVID before, even if you get COVID again, it's likely not to be as intense.

Neil Ferguson Amy Kron Fauci NIH imperial college CDC Neal Ferguson New York obesity army Kron federal government United Kingdom delta Alma cron HSA AstraZeneca
Why Omicron Can't Cancel Christmas

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:13 min | 1 year ago

Why Omicron Can't Cancel Christmas

"A crime was basically announced right after Thanksgiving. It was the new variant. Made the stock market plummet. New York in anticipation of a Macron decided to re-engage and lockdowns, mask mandates vaccine mandates on a cron is something that we must be very afraid of is what we're told. Oh Macron, if you just watched Fauci, the NIH and the CDC, it sounds like this is COVID two. It is mutating in a more vicious, deadly and aggressive manner. What's really going on here? How many people have actually died? Of all Macron. Is the virus getting stronger or is the virus getting weaker? Well, according to Neil Ferguson, who was the original lockdown artist, he was the person that originally, the imperial college study, way back at the beginning of the pandemic in March of 2020, he has even come out and he said that Amy Kron is 45% less likely to cause hospitalization than delta, by the way, that's without factoring an Ivermectin hydroxychloroquine azithromycin vitamin D levels vitamin C, obesity age, underlying health conditions, intravenous intervention, aspirin melatonin or Qin. And if you're not able to rattle off all those treatments, I encourage you to listen to our podcasts and equip yourself. Your government wants you to be scared and unprepared. Your government wants you to be fearful and confused. There are legitimate interventions and treatments that could potentially help you. Get to know them. Do not leave yourself or your loved ones helpless, trusting the federal government or the bullet bureau going into Christmas. 45% less likely to cause hospitalization than delta, according to a major British study by Neal Ferguson. Among the previously infected, the risk of hospitalization from a drop by as much as 69% for both the vaccinated on the unvaccinated. So what does that tell us? That means that if you've had COVID before, even if you get COVID again, it's likely not to be as intense.

Neil Ferguson Amy Kron Fauci NIH CDC Imperial College New York Obesity Neal Ferguson Federal Government Delta
"kron" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"kron" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Tom McKenzie Joining us now is Jamie Sanderson's investors portfolio manager of UK equities in reality India good morning Let's start then with the question of honor Kron and whether the markets are becoming more agile and better at pricing in the risks of this pandemic or are we seeing a bit of an overreaction I think you always see an overreaction to these big headline stories if I think about the day that on the crumb was announced globally on the 26th of November market sort of fell 3% What you're really seeing from buyside investors is everybody just signed to understand that actually with every wave of COVID that we've seen the impact on economic activity has been far lower and more nuanced than the first wave It's really hospitality and transport that takes the hit Good market has adapted to remote working It's the services market that has seen the limited flex So what you tend to see on big negative underground days is that Trump porn leisure and retail stocks go down And these stocks are now trading in a really big discount pre-pandemic Despite the fact that their balance sheets are actually in really good order because all the recapitalization that happened in the first wave but also the strong trading that happened a strong and robust training that's happened since then Here more conversations like this one on Bloomberg television streaming live on Bloomberg dot com and on the Bloomberg mobile app or check your local cable listings We are going to work with anybody who's interested in taking steps to lower costs for the American people whether it's on child care or elder care or healthcare We want to get built back better done because the comprehensive package is going to have an enormous impact according to dozens of economists across the board The White House wants to build back better The question is can they get it That was Jen Psaki White House press secretary speaking yesterday as there is a massive question.

Tom McKenzie Jamie Sanderson Kron India UK Bloomberg White House Jen Psaki
"kron" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"kron" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"It's just below the village of May now and the villagers hearsay if this dam gets built Their entire village is going to be underwater and they are not happy In May now farmers in Kron runhall who's lived here for 30 years Remembers when proponents of the dam came to sell the idea just before COVID hit They only told us of the benefit to the project and they didn't let us ask questions They said only four families would have to move but we don't believe that We all live next to each other So we know we'll all be affected His neighbor tung chai led be chin by boon runs the local grocery store I'm worried my shop will have to move but to wear And what about the environment Yes We catch fish from the river and eat from the jungle What will we do if they're gone Of the environmental group international rivers is also concerned She says there are less intrusive alternatives to blasting 60 kilometers of tunnel some of it through protected forest 30 to 40% of the water irrigation system in Geoffrey are based in belief So why don't we fix our system so that we can step in our water and we don't have to destroy this forest and water ship And she says there's another question Why do we need to invite Chinese company to build such huge projects in this area Is there any other political or financial reasons Maybe both The Chinese have perfected the art of underbidding undercutting other bids by other countries other companies in the region even on infrastructure projects that on their face do not have a strong chance of paying economic dividends The Asia foundation's Benjamin is author of the recent book Thailand shifting ground between the U.S. and a rising China Its addition by subtraction if they can get a project in one of the Southeast Asian countries Doing prevent the Americans the Japanese or the Taiwanese from getting the project that's a plus for them In geopolitical terms especially in Thailand which has been more wary than its neighbors of embracing China's big infrastructure projects But the ties are pragmatic he says Both the government and its people For example if Huawei is chosen as the vehicle through which to roll out 5G in the country there'll be no blowback whatsoever so long as it works well As long as it's fast as long as it allows ties to do what it is they want to do it's only when those things fail that allegations of.

Kron runhall tung chai Asia foundation Thailand Benjamin China U.S. Huawei government
Botswana Health Director Reiterates That Omicron Is Mild

The Dan Bongino Show

01:54 min | 1 year ago

Botswana Health Director Reiterates That Omicron Is Mild

"Botswana which is having a little bit of a problem with the coronavirus They've had a few cases of aron So they'd be good people to ask right Well here's Botswana's health director Pamela Smith Lawrence talking about cases of a crime now You've heard in the media from everyone else Oh my gosh I'm a Kron reverend Kane Jim Put your mask on get your facts back deep Get your vaccine and shut your pie hole shut your soup cooler Say nothing else There it is reverend Kane otherwise known as Joe Biden Joey bots Here's Botswana's health director Like yeah we've had a few cases of not that bad A couple people had symptoms some people had no symptoms at all I bet you don't hear this anywhere in the media outside of this show and like Fox Maybe newsmax and OAN two That's it You want to hear it anywhere else Because it doesn't contribute to the ongoing fear campaign Here check this out Listen to her own words I don't total of 19 of these cases including the first four 14 or foreign nationals and we only had 5 who are local local residents and citizens So far what we are seeing from most of the context of these first 19 cases most of them have tested negative And we are continuing to follow them up during their quarantine period to say on completion of quarantine have they actually incubated the virus But so far all the contacts have tested negative and most of the cases themselves really nobody had any symptoms One or two people might have had a few mild flu like symptoms but resolved in one or two days At the rest really nobody has been

Botswana Pamela Smith Lawrence Kane Jim Reverend Kane Joe Biden FOX FLU
"kron" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"kron" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"A platforms is the worst performer among the 11 main industry groups in the S&P 500 Then comes consumer discretionary That's where you find Tesla and Amazon So you know you still got that big tech element at work here But what's going on Do you feel like it's much more COVID Omni army crime forgive me We've all been working on that one Ami Kron Is it ami Kron Is it more of what Jay Powell potentially getting more hawkish as people have described him at this point Well a little bit of both It's all part of the mix I mean what was interesting is just to see the kind of sawtooth pattern that we've had in the markets really going back to the day after Thanksgiving down on Friday up on Monday down yesterday And we had seen up today you know at one point the S&P 500 was higher by almost 1.9% given back most of that gain So we'll see if the pattern holds or you get into perhaps some more sustained weakness here All right Dave Wilson we're gonna let you go for a moment We know you're gonna be back in a little bit later on with your chart and stack of the day Honored Listen Thank you So my Dave Yeah dates back with us in a little over an hour In the meantime check of the trading day here is Charlie pell and I thank you very much and here's what's going on stalks of paired gains another volatile session Traders assessing the latest developments about the omicron coronavirus variant You heard it live on Bloomberg radio the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has confirmed the first American case of amiran as the new variants spreads around the world this case in California Here's where we stand very volatile day with the Dow swinging between gains and losses have been up as many as 520 points a couple of minutes ago It was negative right now hire by 8 up by less than one tenth to 1% S&P up 11 up three tenths NASDAQ though on the minus side down 47 down three tenths of 1% as that 100 index virtually flat on the day Tenure up one 32nd ten year yield right now 1.43% gold up three tenths 1779 the ounce and West Texas intermediate crude lower now by 1% 65 55 apparel I'm Charlie peloton so Bloomberg business flash All right Charlie thank you so much You are listening to Bloomberg businessweek Carol masser along with Tim steine I know who you are I'm.

Omni army Ami Kron ami Kron Jay Powell Charlie pell Tesla Dave Wilson Centers for Disease Control an Amazon Bloomberg California West Texas Charlie Carol masser Tim steine
Joe Biden's Africa Travel Ban Is All for Show, for the Media

Mark Levin

01:10 min | 1 year ago

Joe Biden's Africa Travel Ban Is All for Show, for the Media

"How many times yesterday did President Biden botch the term oh Macron He made up a new word Omni Kron Omni Kron which is like a transformer or maybe a bad guy in the new Avengers movie Omni Kron And did any one of the media call him out on it Nope Not at all He's banned travel from 7 African nations And all the nations in Africa turned around to the exact same thing Why are you doing this to us What are you doing here Why are you doing this President of South Africa came out and said this is crazy I mean we found the virus we sequenced the variant We told you about it Why are you shutting us down All this is going to do is hurt us economically You imagine if Trump did that to 7 countries in Africa Could you just imagine the media outrage Maybe asking what do you think these are S whole countries mister president Biden gets a pass even though the travel ban comes in three days after busy holiday weekend People are traveling all over the world from these countries to other countries and then back here in the United States of America but it's so dangerous to travel ban can wait until Monday Right So it says nothing to keep us safe Nothing at all And everybody knows that It's your show but the thing is the media just lets him get away

President Biden Africa South Africa Biden United States Of America
"kron" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"kron" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Senate hearing this morning we will bring that to you live later this hour Plus we're also gonna check in with Ira Jersey He's the chief U.S. interest rate strategist for Bloomberg intelligence What is the fed thinking about here as we go through another phase of this pandemic any change to the outlook But first let's check in with Greg Jarrett and get a Bloomberg business fresh We've got a red headline coming across Paul The U.S. November consumer confidence is at one O 9.5 the estimate was for one 10.9 more and that is the day goes on Stocks are down and bonds are up as concerned about the efficacy of existing vaccines against the Omni crime and coronavirus strain pushed markets back into risk off mode Howard ward at the belly tells Bloomberg he is one of those who is concerned about the Omni Kron news coming out today Obviously the comments side of the Moderna CEO in the FT this morning are alarming But again there is nothing new Data wise it's going to take a couple of weeks I think for them to have a good handle on just how good the existing vaccines are and how long it will take to develop one that's more focused on the variant Let's check the markets the S&P 500 is down one half of 1% down 22 The Dow is down 8 tenths of a percent down 298 and the NASDAQ is just about a tenth of a percent up 11 The tenure is up 2030 seconds the yield 1.43% Was Texas intermediate crude has been hit by the latest on the news It is down 3.6% at 67 42 a barrel while comics gold is up 1.2% at 1806 ten per ounce The dollar yen one 1261 the Euro dollar 1377 in the British pound 1.33 59.

Greg Jarrett Bloomberg Howard ward Omni Kron U.S. Senate fed Jersey Moderna Paul Texas
"kron" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:08 min | 1 year ago

"kron" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Very high level of confidence that we can manufacture it by billions The CEO of Pfizer there Albert borla earlier today with concerns quickly growing about the latest variant of COVID-19 and that is Amy Kron First discovered in South Africa There has been a rush to block entry from certain countries in South Africa but also optimism given the advancement of vaccines and boosters at this time For more now I'm joined by new Barra fan founder and chair of flagship pioneering also the cofounder of Moderna and chair of the company as well Great to have you back with us So look we're hearing a lot of things about omicron symptoms are milder patients are younger The Moderna CEO has said that it's already probably in every single country Given what we know about antibody levels right now how worried are you about Amy Kron in the state of the virus Well Emily thanks for having me on You know I think worried are optimistic luxuries that the last 18 months should have got us kind of to begin to move away from as opposed to being determined to protect ourselves and very vigilant And so I definitely think that this threat is something that we have not seen before The number of variations mutations on this virus are surprising they're not theoretically impossible but extremely rare And so we have to take it from a serious threat that it poses Now we have a lot better weapons to fight back against it than we did 18 months ago But that I think that again worrying we always should be worried when we're under attack I think it's what we do about it that matters So what should we do about it and what will Moderna for example have to do about it Will this strain elude the current vaccine And what are the challenges if that's the case Well you know Moderna issued a statement on Friday afternoon with a comprehensive plan that we already have prepared for this eventuality that comprises the number of steps One quite rapidly verify whether the immune response that a boosted patient will receive from our vaccine is efficient to protect against infection from this amaran variant That will be known in the next couple of weeks we've said Second we have activated additional tests for multivariate vaccines that we've already got under testing In this case the original 1273 plus the beta variant and then the 1270 plus the delta So we're already human trials there and we've already got data And that might be the very quick follow online of defense In case of 1273 alone does not do the trick And then of course we've already started and we've said it programmed that we think within 60 days or so we'll take us to a place where we have a fully variant specific arm across specific vaccine should we need it But this is yeah I don't think there's going to be one solution to this is going to be a number of defensive steps that will take to make sure that we're fully protected What's the fastest possible timeline that an omicron a Moderna omikron booster could be available Availability to the public is a function of regulatory approval on the emergency use And that will be largely determined by the FDA which I'm sure will look at the data the facts on the ground the level of threat and decide how much additional data need for this sequence variant to be able to allow it to be more broadly available I can't speculate on that I think the piece of it that we control we've said the CEO said we think we are in a position to do based on the ten years apart from development We've done already with mRNA and mRNA vaccines I think we're in the ideal position to respond within the kind of 60 day time frame Talk to us about the new science involved here and what we know about antibodies and antibody levels right now and how that's informing your work Well it's a very good question Emily because I think this whole question of anybody levels is a very underexplored or I would say under measured aspect of this pandemic We talked about antigen testing to see if you've been infected but actually what you really want to know is how strong is the antibody response in your body in response let's say to a vaccine And that's something that we have relatively little activity in other than the fact that the people are publishing papers academic centers showing very strong correlation between antibody levels and vaccine breakthrough so that the heart antibody levels very clearly correlates to better protection And of course the FDA is making decisions for booster approvals and the like all based on anybody level So I think that as we enter this third phase of the pandemic hopefully not a very serious one but it could well be we need to be mindful of how the virus is varying itself and how anybody level is adequate or not to protect us And it's really those two measurements that have to happen side by side And when all the manufacturers have said over the next two weeks we'll tell you if our vaccine is still effective essentially it will be by measuring neutralizing antibody levels against this new threat And I think that should be more broadly available and more broadly deployed because let's face it if we do have a big threat we're going to have to take protection in terms of masks and separation and curtailing travel but importantly we're going to want to make sure whatever boosters we have We make available to the most vulnerable Well the most vulnerable turned out to be the ones that have the lowest levels of antibodies That's where the government I know you gotta get to another meeting but one last quick question Do you see the need for a COVID shot like we have the flu shot year after year or will variants start to become milder and milder Like which way is this disease going to evolve You know Emily it's an interesting thing on the one hand we know more about this disease than all other diseases combined in history I believe in terms of just the sheer number of people that it's impacted in that we're treating and learning from On the other hand we really don't have good experience of how a pandemic becomes an endemic threat And that transition is what we're all guessing So it's really guesswork to say is this going to become tame and become like a common cold Or is it going to be like the flu where there's a seasonal vaccine I'd say there's a third alternative that we haven't seen before And so we have to be pragmatic Look this is the first time you're not spoke I said this is an evolutionary battle between a pathogen virus that is attacking our social nature and the collective immune system of humanity That battle.

Moderna Amy Kron Albert borla flagship pioneering South Africa Pfizer FDA Emily flu
"kron" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"kron" Discussed on KOMO

"Chuck sievertson the new strain of COVID known as Omar Khan first detected in South Africa may say infectious disease experts be more contagious than previous strains South African president Cyril ramaphosa The identification of omicron coincides with a sudden rise in COVID-19 infection Some European nations in Canada now announcing the arrival of uma Kron cases not yet in the U.S. doctor Anthony Fauci chief White House medical adviser says it's only a matter of time but South Africa's information helped the world by sometimes as the doctor It's going to give us a period of time to enhance our preparedness I think we have to give kudos to the South Africans for being so transparent so quickly by giving us this information About you urging more people to get vaccinated Another killer not killing less in the U.S. The head of the DEA and Milgram tells ABC's this week fentanyl is responsible for most of the opioid deaths in the country We are now seeing other drugs cocaine heroin methamphetamine being laced with fentanyl She says drug dealers are making pills with fentanyl to look like prescription drugs and many users don't even know Talking about it works So we know from the research that just making individuals aware that the only pill they should take is a pill that is prescribed to them from their doctor Last year a grim milestone opioid deaths in the U.S. topped 100,000 Americans Derek Dennis ABC News By the time today is just another cross off on the calendar and soon to be Gauzy memory more than 2.4 million people are expected to have flown today around the U.S. making this not only the busiest day of the year but also the most passengers screened in one day.

Chuck sievertson Omar Khan Cyril ramaphosa uma Kron South Africa Anthony Fauci infectious disease U.S. Milgram White House DEA Canada ABC Derek Dennis ABC News
News crew guard dies after being shot in attempted robbery

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

News crew guard dies after being shot in attempted robbery

"A security guard shot while working on a crime story with us San Francisco area news crew died Saturday Kevin Nishida was shot in the stomach during an attempted robbery of crown TV's camera equipment near downtown Oakland on Wednesday afternoon according to police the crew was covering a smash and grab theft part of a rash of organized retail crime in the region kron TV says it's devastated by the loss Nishida is a former police officer and was an armed guard for star protection agency which provides security for many reporters in the region a common practice since camera theft became an issue I'm Julie Walker

Kevin Nishida Kron Tv Nishida San Francisco Oakland Julie Walker
"kron" Discussed on Radio Free Cybertron - All of our Transformers podcasts!

Radio Free Cybertron - All of our Transformers podcasts!

05:03 min | 1 year ago

"kron" Discussed on Radio Free Cybertron - All of our Transformers podcasts!

"Pin li like that the that they went that direction and seeing the other toy box are in this forum. Two is cool but like they picked that one of all things they could pick. Yeah ravage bounding toward the viewer is like an iconic thing because so much Print media basically traced. That box are as a character models. So you'd get that in a bunch of different comics on both the marvel. Us and uk side for instance. Like i'm surprised. They didn't go with that for one of these. Just date brian I think maybe a heavy beat because the macron lamp on ebay is running from seven hundred dollars by now with nine hundred dollars shipping. Oh yeah to four thousand dollars and one hundred and thirty five. That cost ten dollars when it first came out though. No the lamp macron land about nine hundred dollars so dun dun dun dun dun dun dun trae predicts agent has gone between twenty and twenty four times originally retail price that year kron is not so that doesn't that doesn't surprise me. It's a lot but it doesn't surprise me. See four thousand dollars is kind of expensive. But that's like four times as much back then. Dogs were ten bucks. Yeah what added to my wash. Lists trade predicts that he came out in parallel with robots. Guys was were not. where's it. Beast machines robots in disguise. Really that try. Predicates agent was the very last be stories toy of the original run Okay yeah i. I was thinking that came out. Contemporary with beast machines okay. No contemporary with beast. Machines was the beast wars mutants. Which was the sole beast wars branding on the shelf for two thousand predic- agent which was the one and only beast wars thing new release that year and was the last original piece so i i'm a little fuzzy on like the mutants i didn't have regular access to kb. So i like I might. I might run across those on the shelf. Once we're those were well see. They came out at walmart. And i never saw them. I only saw the maccabee. So i saw mutant sound in in store once and that was a walmart and then i believe the water than names. poison sting and razor claw. I got from a toys r. Us say maybe a kmart even back then. I had like no access to anything other than walmart and walmart and carry it. It was basically that was like on an island effectively. You have so but it worked out for you with those transmittal rat traps sure. Did yeah that.

Pin li dun trae kron ebay brian uk walmart Us kmart
"kron" Discussed on DSC On Demand

DSC On Demand

05:42 min | 2 years ago

"kron" Discussed on DSC On Demand

"Pirates all star second baseman. Adam frazier whose batting three twenty four and leading the major leagues with one hundred twenty five hits existing padres all star second baseman. Jake cronin worth must be thinking. Hey what up with that. Trading for another all star second baseman. Well frazier plays other positions like left field and kron worth has started twelve games at first base so manager jas tingler can move guys around to which padres regular leftfielder tommy fan first baseman eric. Hosmer saying hey what up with that which. Jj prowler is saying. Hey maybe we could trade those guys for a starting pitcher so Wow yeah..

Adam frazier Jake cronin padres Pirates jas tingler kron frazier tommy fan Jj prowler Hosmer eric
"kron" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

Techmeme Ride Home

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"kron" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

"At cyber reason dot com. Hey would you like to trade. Shares of companies like apple amazon. Or tesla but robin hood is too staid and old school platform for your tastes. How about trading them on the blockchain instead one big catch however you're not trading real shares of stock your trading synthetic stocks and in theory. These synthetic stocks have just track the price of the real stocks. You actually own nothing. It's sort of like an teas but for stocks which depending on your point of view is either amazing or the worst idea ever quoting bloomberg fake versions of tesla apple amazon and other big stocks as well as a few popular exchange traded funds have been created by the projects mirror protocol and synthetics over the past year. The tokens and the programming that allows them at a trade. Our engineer to reflect the prices of the securities they track without any actual purchases or sales of the real stocks and atf's involved so far volumes are just a tiny fraction of those on regulated exchanges but for crypto enthusiasts. The potential upside is huge. At the moment it's a case of innovation that's way ahead of regulation which is exactly how dough kwan likes it. The co founder and ceo of tariff form. Labs the south korean company that created the mirror protocol on. Its tara blockchain kwan. Fancies himself as a sort of modern day. Robin hood of finance. In the mode of vlad. Ten ev or trauma polly happened. Tia defy is quote so powerful. In unlocking financial services for disenfranchised people around the world he said via email that quote. It's better to move fast and break things. Waiting for fragmented regulatory frameworks to crystallize before. Innovating is counterintuitive and quote for john and other proponents of these new synthetic assets avoiding the various rules and barriers of the financial world is a feature not a bug. It opens up opportunities for wealth creation. Currently only available to a fortunate few. He said users can trade. The tokens anonymously. Twenty four hours a day. Seven days a week from anywhere on hindered by capital controls. Know your client. Rules imposed on broker. Dealers and other frictions of the traditional financial system kron said tariff warm labs doesn't generate any revenue from fees charged on the mirror protocol those go to users as an incentive to provide liquidity rather. The firm profits via eight cryptocurrency. It created that tends to increase in value as projects like mirror grow in popularity. So how exactly do these synthetic equities work. Well it's complicated. But to oversimplify under the mir protocol the idea is to keep prices of the synthetic or mirrored equities in the ballpark of the real thing by offering incentives for traders to arbitrage price discrepancies and manage the actual supply of tokens users. Can create or meant new tokens when prices are too high by posting collateral. And destroy or burn tokens when prices are to low driving the price up or down through these incentives the sense closely track the price of the real world asset. Kron said. But they're still only tokens on a blockchain providing explicit price exposure and quote so far trading volumes likely aren't high enough to cause executives at nasdaq or the new york stock exchange to lose much sleep. Mirrored apple tokens for example have a market capitalization of about thirty four million dollars according to coin market cap dot com that compares with about two point three trillion for the real stock and as around one one thousandth. The size of the novelty cryptocurrency. Does coin a comparison of prices between various mirrored equities and the real securities at various times over the past week shows that the difference between the two can range from a penny to several dollars for example in afternoon trading on june thirtieth the price of mirrored tesla on coin market cap dot. Com was almost six.

tesla robin hood tara blockchain amazon Tia defy apple atf kwan bloomberg kron john Kron new york
"kron" Discussed on Data Engineering Podcast

Data Engineering Podcast

09:24 min | 2 years ago

"kron" Discussed on Data Engineering Podcast

"The code is actually delivered to your compute through an agent and the agent runs the code wherever it exists on whenever host machine is running on and kind of the impetus of it was you know i. I've been working with distributed data systems for a long time. And i saw people reinventing the same stuff over and over and over again in one of the big things is i saw people torturing jenkins to build distributed automated systems. And i said if people are using jenkins which was never intended for that purpose to do automation. There's a big hole in that space. So that's really how it got started in terms of the main use cases that you're focused on you mentioned that some of the inspiration comes from the big data ecosystem but from looking at it. The actual applications are much more generic than that. But i'm wondering where you're actually directing your main efforts in terms of the use cases that you're enabling and who you're targeting as your end users. How all of that focus influences the feature set and design of the platform. Our main target has been data engineers roles that rich were was kind of in so large data pipelines complicated but as we started showing it to people and as we started using the product ourselves over several months years. It's been an evolution. We've found that that it's much more open ended than that and we found that we can easily tied together. Existing tools for build pipelines quite easily as we these the product ourselves we actually deploy sascha with sask clue itself and we found that as we've had to do several tasks we've often started doing it kind of with a different mindset of the old mindset of how he used to do things with our old companies and we would spend like an hour to starting to go down that route and then we'd say hey stupid guess what sas cliff. You knew that much easier so even for us. It's been a mind shift and so that's kind of a long rambling answer to say that our target audience you know who could actually use. It is still kind of open ended which makes it kind of a hard product to describe in. Get out there. Our main target audience is data engineers but the product is pretty open ended. It can do a lot of other things that were even learning ourselves and just to follow up on that. You know a lot of the automation or some of the automation products. That are out there right now. Were products that were built for a company right to meet the needs of that company in that environment whereas with sask glue we build it from the ground As a general purpose automation tool. So it's really more of a platform which doesn't make it a bit on the one hand it makes it really powerful on the other hand. It makes it a little bit difficult to say. Is it some of the specific use cases that people are using it for cloud based crown right. So krahn is simple until it's not right. It's really easy to set up. But then you start having to worry about dependencies between different krahn. Jobs fail over logging notification that kind of stuff with sascha lou. You get all that kind of scaffolding for free and you have a central place that you can manage all your crown jobs rather than you know having krahn proliferation with kron jobs. That have gone all over the network to not really knows where they are. Another use. case that people have used it for a software build pipelines. Obviously there's a lot of software build tools out there. Sometimes you run into a wall with those tools in sasquatch in sort of in those gaps and obviously the big one is of pipelines as far as the actual orchestration and automation and workflow management. Space that you are working within that something. That's obviously been around for decades. At this point there are a huge number of players with different areas of focus in different industries or verticals that they're targeting or specific languages or tool chains that they're looking to integrate with them wondering if you can just give your characterization of where glue sits in that overall space and some of the ways that you're seeing integrated into data platform specifically that is a challenge of this market. You know it's new it's fragmented. There are just tons of tools out there at one point in the sort of the life cycle of this project. It was pretty far along at that point. We're trying to decide. How do we explain this to people. What is it that it does and bar came up with this concept. That really what it is is. It's so flexible and so good at integrating with other software applications and services that it's a great way to sort of glue those things together so many of the trends right now are low code. No code right. Yeah there's this concept of leaky abstractions right where you know you hit a wall with that solution and you need to go to lower level of abstraction and sas. Flu can sort of tie those things together so barking up with the name. Hey it's ask faced it's glue sask lou. Another way you can think of it is like a backbone for a service based architecture where you only need to write the code or supply the application and allocate the compute for each service and then sask lives sort of backbone ties simona yetter and you know. Why is it glue. What makes it so flexible. And we'll talk about the architecture a little more further on but there. No firewall exceptions required right with a server based automation architecture. You're almost always going through firewalls if you want to automate something outside of the local network where the server exists. It's completely unaffiliated when it comes to do programming language so you can use any programming language software. So that makes it very easy to integrate with other tools. Yeah the glue. Concept is important. We don't really see anything that does this out there. And there's a lot of fantastic tools out there for build pipelines and data engineering like airflow or instable or careful research like that. This isn't meant to replace those it's meant to augment them and be able to create a central place for monitoring them and kicking them off and hooking them up together at runtime. We've looked around a lot and we don't really see a competitor because we didn't see anything else that does that sort of the python of the cloud where it's not the best at anything but it's the second best at everything you are correct. Excellent excellent we hope to change that going forward but that's probably pretty accurate and as far as the core elements and concepts. You've mentioned a little bit about the agents in the fact that there's the backbone layer that helps with the orchestration aspect but i'm wondering if you can just talk through some of the main concepts that you've built the size glue platform on top of and things that customers need to be thinking about. As they're deciding how they want to deploy sask lou and integrated into their systems. Yes so i mean rich mentioned when you hit a wall with your tool that has a dsl right so a lot of tools have like configuration by dsl whether it's similar or something like that where if you're running up against that wall and you're like i needed to do something else. That's more dynamic. Sask lose very imperative right. Our main important point was designed philosophy. Really because we said let's do the parts that nobody cares about and they're not getting paid to do which is the distribution the central monitoring. Having a record of what you ran yesterday seeing what happened with it you know a central place for kron security notifications notifications yet and so we thought when a data engineer or a build engineer or developer are getting paid to do something. They're not getting paid to do these things. You know the companies that are paying them. Don't really care about this. They just kind of expect it to happen but a lot of people out there they have to kind of reinvent that heart and so one of the most important design philosophies for us was to say. Let's do the boring stuff that people don't want to do. And let's cut it off there and not take too far where we're starting to get into. You know the guts of what people are trying to do in the business logic right and so we've tried to keep it simple in design as far as architecture you are correct. The api on the back end is the core of the product as well as the agent which took a long time to develop to make sure that it was really robust. Those things working in tandem with each other and then we use technologies like message queuing in databases like that presented in standard security things. Like oh off so yeah just one thing to follow up on that as far as you know what users would expect as far as you know prepping to use it in that kind of stuff you can literally be running your first script in saskatoon five minutes. There's no server to set up. There's no plug ins. You sign up on the web console. You download the agent..

krahn jenkins sascha lou kron jobs simona yetter Jobs Flu kron saskatoon
You thought herd immunity would save us? Maybe not

Coronacast

05:06 min | 2 years ago

You thought herd immunity would save us? Maybe not

"We're talking about pandemics norman one of the phrases that was bandied about a lot especially at the beginning was the idea of herd immunity that we get to a stage where the virus con spread willy nilly through the community anymore because enough people have had it that it doesn't spread as rapidly anymore and the theoretical threshold for that based on how much a single person with covid sort of tends to spread to was about sixty seventy percent. So what do we know about places in the world where there has been a lot of cover transmission whether we're reaching this community threshold and it's actually making a difference. Well funny you should say that because a couple of days ago in the lancet published a report from brazil which is actually quite disturbing. So the reported from a city in brazil called monas- who are monogamous. Which is in the amazon northwest brazil. I think it is and they had done a study of blood. Donors indicated four seventy. Six percent of the population had been affected with sars cov to by october of last year. And therefore you would assume with fat pie attack rates. You've got herod immunity which is above sixty as you said between sixteen seventy percent except that happened in january in other words just this month between the first of january in january nineteenth compared to december first two thousand nine hundred they had three thousand four hundred thirty one hospital admissions for sars coffee to for covid nineteen compared to five hundred and fifty two in the first twenty days for three weeks of december right. So they've had a big spike last year. It's dropped off. And now the saying a big spike again now. This and hospitalizations had remained low for about seven months. And you've just seen this spike in january and The question is what's going on here. So you could have overestimated the attack rate and the haired immunity ratio so possible that it's a high estimate in terms of when people were immune but even their low estimates based on perhaps errors in their assumptions of Wayne people what antibody response. It's still about fifty two percent as their low estimate there and that should still can fair some degree of immunity. But they do say that when you compare. The blood donors to average population. There was no difference in the university seems to be quite a representative sample of the general community. So they assume but seventy six percent is accurate so then they go onto looking at whether or not. There's been a waning of antibodies. During that time that could be other response but they showed that you and british healthcare workers reinfection was rare up to about six months after the primary infection. It could be due to variance because we've talked a lot on kron cast by the variance in brazil and they've really got to three lineages of variants in brazil which could be both more virulent and indeed war contagious. So the worry here is that we don't really know why they've had a resurgence in a community that should be pretty immune and it's not that these people are getting a model infection the second time around either because the measure that they looking at his hospitalization so presumably people quite sick. Yes and there is growing evidence that some some of these variants are were virulence. Although that's that's not been confirmed in any pure view jr journal. In fact one thing i need to say. But this paper is that it's in the lancet. And therefore it has gone undergone some degree of peer review rather than some of the other pre publication papers. We sometimes court from. So what are we. Take away from this. It seems like a pretty scary fact is is heard immunity. A false goal. Do we know whether vaccination is going to have a long long lasting immunity associated with it like this kind of worrying. It is kind of wearing. The good news is that consistent evidence from immunization at least with the astro vaccine and the fis vaccine even though the astro vaccine may be less efficacious at preventing all disease is that they do seem to generate an immune response. That's bigger and deeper than you get from alive infection which is very unusual. 'cause usually live infections. Give you a better degree of immunity particularly with influenza. But it seems to be contradicted in this. So it's likely that vaccination gives you a better immune response that lasts longer. But you'd have to say that from the study you don't have to watch pretty closely whether or not immunity wayne's faster are your vulnerable to variants more than people have thoughts. I mean it's it's mystery could be wrong but it's a it's a real warning sign.

Brazil Norman Amazon Jr Journal Kron Wayne FIS Influenza
Brazil Angrily Rejects Millions in Amazon Aid

America in the Morning

01:18 min | 4 years ago

Brazil Angrily Rejects Millions in Amazon Aid

"A global crisis unfolds unfolds in in the the Amazon Amazon the the Brazilian Brazilian government government is is turning turning down down twenty twenty million million dollars dollars offered offered up up to to help help fight fight the the fires fires burning burning up up the the forest forest known known as as the the earth's earth's lungs lungs Camilla Bernal is on the ground in Brazil with the latest crisis so large that the scars in the Amazon can be seen from space but Brazil's presidential you're also Gnarls saying he won't accept a twenty million dollar G. seven offered to help fight the fires under president Emmanuel kron apologizes to him this afternoon crying criticizes handling of the crisis Wilson are also questioned reporters as to why their country's care saying quote why do they have their eyes on the Amazon what do they want their Boston RO says he's deployed forty three thousand troops to tackle the fires the defense ministry says twenty five hundred are fighting the fires and the number of affected regions is down but the massive inferno is threatening to burn through the home of the indigenous Y. P. tried deliver world on touched by modern man and the YP say they will risk their lives to protect their home not everyone believes fall tomorrow is to blame for allowing to deforestation that many feel has added to the crisis president trump tweeted his support for Boston RO saying he's working very hard on the Amazon

Amazon Camilla Bernal Brazil Emmanuel Kron Y. P. Donald Trump President Trump Wilson Boston Twenty Twenty Million Million Twenty Million Dollar
Kron Montana, Swiss Alps And Fox News discussed on America Tonight with Kate Delaney

America Tonight with Kate Delaney

00:14 sec | 4 years ago

Kron Montana, Swiss Alps And Fox News discussed on America Tonight with Kate Delaney

"Fox News. An avalanche at a popular ski resort in the Swiss Alps injures at least four people one seriously avalanche hit Tuesday at a slip and Kron Montana. Officials say that more than two hundred rescuers are searching the scene overnight for as many as

Kron Montana Swiss Alps Fox News