20 Episode results for "Kristof"

Are you making online reviews work for your business?

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

00:28 sec | 8 months ago

Are you making online reviews work for your business?

"Welcome to another episode of the business storytelling podcast where Kristof trap share tips and tricks around marketing and is joined by experts from around the globe. Don't forget to check out his new book. Content performance culture, available worldwide on Amazon and on authentic storytelling dot net. Enjoy this episode.

Kristof Amazon
How to turn around a bad day:  Part Two

The Positive Vibes Show

06:34 min | 1 year ago

How to turn around a bad day: Part Two

"Hi, I'm Nicole, the Kristof RO, I'm a love mentor intuitive guide, and also I do energy healing work. And I wanna talk a little bit little short video here on how to turn around a bad day. We all have them. I have them. I do a lot of spiritual work on myself in practice, meditation and yoga and really connecting with my inner wisdom, my highest guidance myself and happens I have bad days. We're human we're we're humans how human experience, but what I do. And this is something that can change from time to time involve, but you know, one I need to be nature, and for me, my happy place the place where I can really kind of just feel cleansed and let things go is the ocean. So I think for a lotta people you everybody has their own place. Where they feel really good in they feel grounded and connected. And when I go to the ocean, I definitely do a grounding practice and grounding helps us not only to just be more present and here, but it also helps you release some of the negative emotions or energies down into the earth for like the cop major composting, you know, mother earth is a great composter. So that's what I do. I like go, and I close my eyes and focus on breathing. I send a grounding connection from my root shock run down into the center of the earth. I picture like some kind of symbol for that. Grounding connection. Sometimes it's a big stone pillar other times, it's like, I'm Dr dropping a golden anchor. Sometimes it's a pyramid like an inverted pyramid. Whatever it is. But you everyone's different. So you kinda have to just ask intuitively. How can I be grounded in my body right now? And then I imagined dropping all of my emotional energy low to the ground in and just like releasing it all into mother earth. And as I do that. I usually immediately feel like a sense of relief. I feel lighter I feel this heaviness go whatever it is. I was holding onto anger fear, sadness, judgment, whatever just goes. And I just take some really big cleansing breaths. You know, near the ocean, I take big breasts of that beautiful saltwater. I imagine a symbol of my life force energy above my crown Shaqra, and then just infusing my body with pure divine. You know, high vibe light, and it just goes through all my shocker systems throughout my aura. And it just feels like amazing. I just turn the day. Around doing just that. It's very simple in its what I teach others to do. And I hope that will work for you as well. Given a shot try it by hey, it's the two Smith from heavy toll. We'd anita. And I wanted to share we use how I turn a day round. Because let's be on us. Whatever is do. However, happy we aim to be there will be days, and they suck. But there is a really quick way that I- many to turn my bed days. Right. Well, I've got few tips for you, actually, the first is I have constant reminders on my phone to shift. My mindset and today's is I'm willing to give up self doubt unwilling to surrender to self love. And it's from Gabby Bernstein, actually, probably, you know, and heard of so that's the very first thing. I do every morning. Set my alarms for every hour. Not on the hour. I like to be random that every hour. My alarm goes off and tells me to shave my focus and that little bit of reminder can actually put me in a lot better state because a feeling to it. Okay. How would it feel today to really fully without any doubt, accept and love myself? And then I feel into this rush of love. And that really makes makes me feel better today. That's my today's mantra to will be two tomorrow will be another one and the next AS to step into gratitude. We when we have a bad day, it can be because of something makes excuse me. Something we experience. But also that something that triggered us something that we are frayed of and we've really stepped away from love and falling into this fear space. So. When I feel okay, I'm rushing when I feel overwhelmed. The when I my heart beats faster when I feel anxious to stop take a breath and up with three things that I am really grateful for and I got an failing to these gratitude gratitude, there is always something to be grateful for the trees the sky, the wind us to being a live and not being born as I dunno had joked, beautiful amazing, wonderful human beings. And that's that is self is something to be grateful for and these things you can do yourself. You know, set your alarm, find your favorite find the favorite mantras, find something that resonates with you and something that is true for you. And then when you feel out of space out of alignment, they like saying out of flow when things feel not right to step and get in. Into this gratitude space, nor up well, these tapes hope you enjoy them. And I know they will help you to turn a day van.

Kristof RO Gabby Bernstein Nicole Smith
Ep. 369  Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

59:29 min | 1 year ago

Ep. 369 Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn

"And now from University of Chicago Institute of Politics and CNN audio the X. Files with your host. David axelrod Nick Kristof. And Sheryl Wudunn or two of America's most letter journalists they received the Pulitzer Prize for Journalism in Nineteen Ninety for their coverage of the Cinnamon Square protests as China correspondent. For The New York Times Nick Kristof is of course the longtime columnist for the New York. Times he won a Pulitzer Prize for his commentary. There too but now they've turned their attention. Closer to home with a book called tight rope Americans reaching for hope and it's a really personal examination of what's happened to the middle class. In many of the small towns of America including the one in which Kristof grew kristof and Wudunn who are married came to the Institute of Politics a few weeks ago for a live recording of the X. Files to discuss their journey this book and the State of our nation Nick Kristof and Sheryl done welcome to the Institute of politics in keeping with the time. I'm going to hand my questions to the chief justice and he will ask them for you know really in this very very powerful book tight rope. You're talking about the journey of Americans in small towns and rural areas and inner cities and forgotten places all over this country. But I wanNA talk about your Stories Nick. First of all let me start with you like myself. You're the son of an immigrant from Eastern Europe. Who had his own Harrowing Journey to get here? Want you share a little fat? Yeah my my dad's family. They were Armenians who were living. It was actually kind of funny. My my dad would describe him. If you ask his origin he would say who was from Romania. His sister was hey she was Armenian and his brother would say Polish and my dad's spoke to his brother when he would call and Polish into his sister when she would call in Romanian mixed up family. Flag would change periodically overhead and then in nineteen forty the area which was at that time. Romania were seized by the Soviet Union. Family was meanwhile a busy spying for the free. Polish government part of network sending information back to London and so the family ended up. Being various people ended up getting executed by either the Nazis or the Soviets. My Dad was in prison for He he fled was in a concentration camp in Yugoslavia for a while and eventually made his way to France and decided that France was not a place that had a future for a Slavic immigrant and began to dream about coming to the US and eventually made it not speaking his name when he came over here was Vladislav Christoph bits of it all right okay. Three attempted that and he showed his name to create. Yeah he arrived and he would say his name. Whiskas DZAFO VEG. And you know people tried to spell it and that was pretty helpless shortened it to Kristof. I thought it was because he had the foresight to know that Kristof would look better in a bio byline. We'll his first purchase on arriving in the US to teach himself. English was a Sunday New York Times. There's something poetic about there is there. Is He ultimately became an academic? That's right he and your mother were both academics. That's right so my dad arrived in Oregon not speaking English and worked at a logging camp for a year or to earn a little bit of money to learn English and then went to Reed College and studied political science then applied to University of Chicago. Political Science Department and was initially told it was not accepted the HD program. His professor appealed and said this is a brilliant get and so they took him and my mom was studying here at the International House. One more marriage produced excellent and they ended up at Portland State and then they were both at Portland State. My mom teaching art history. My Dad Teaching Political Science you ended up in Yam Hill Oregon. The way you described in this book and I want to get into the details of the book untold bit later. Because we've got some other business do Cheryl about your story and how we got to this place but it didn't sound like a haven for academics. We were real. We were way beyond the normal commuting range so most people in Portland. You know lived in Portland or nearby but my parents really wanted to have a farm and so we had this farm and Yom Hill and they were pretty much the only people commuted to Portland and so it was I mean I obviously had this connection to that larger world but I was deeply embedded in the community. I was very active in future farmers of America and the school was a you know kind of very typical farm town school. You knew you want to be a journalist way back then why so when I was when I turned sixteen and got a driver's license. I the local county newspaper hired me to write and it was. I just couldn't believe that I was getting paid to go. Talk to interesting people and write stories about it. It's not the usual teenage about what you do when you get your first drivers. Go ahead but it was but it was a great way when you're sixteen. That turned out to be a great way to impress. Sixteen year old girls and it. It really was a I love. I love the writing. I love the just aesthetic pleasure from writing. I like being around interesting people and the idea of being paid for it was truly incredibly cool. I was later in danger coming law professor but I escaped that fate fortune. Yeah good for you good for you. As journalists I applaud your Judgment Cheryl. Your family had a classic immigrants story as well only one generation earlier. Tell us about that. We're actually trying to prove are working class credentials. I would say that I actually even come from the peasantry. China my grandparents were from tiny little villages In Very Agricultural Guandong province both of them escaped to Macau and then to Joe Johns and the Golden Mountain here in the US One. You say escaped escaped from well. They were playing really poverty. I mean everyone was trying to get to sort of the promised land here in the US and So because it was extremely impoverished there and so they were able to scrape their way to get to to the. Us Let me ask you both You tell these stories and they have this common element which is people who wanted to come to the promised. Land wanted to come to America. We're in this period now where we have a sign on the at the border saying refugees need not apply immigrants discouraged. Do you look at this. Current debate through the prism of your family experiences. Oh of course. Clearly the American dream still exists for the most part for people outside of the US. I think that what we actually write about in tight rope is that for many Americans. The American dream is broken but the allure and the magic of the American dream is still alive and well and the rest of the world which is why so many people want to come here. But what does it mean? If we closed down and say don't apply in today's context. My Dad were never be admitted. I mean people would see him as somebody from potential saboteur potential spy from an enemy part of the Soviet bloc and said we don't need more refugees. I mean I'm struck that when my dad was on this ship. Arriving in New York there was a woman from Boston who was on the deck watching with him and my dad's no English but she said him Welcome young man and then she corrected herself and said welcome young American and he was just so blown away that here he is. He's never set foot in America. He can't speak English. And this American woman is welcoming him as a already as a young American and that deeply moved him and he spoke about it. And it's kind of the opposite of the attitude that we're seeing your grandparents certainly would have failed the current tests now especially as established by the Supreme Court just in the last few days because they were peasants they were probably not educated for they're worth would be absolutely in fact my grandfather on my father's side had someone else's papers when he came across didn't even own papers but it's remarkable that in my my parents went to college so in that one generation You know they went from rags to really intellectual riches and so. It's still possible to do that. And it's really a shame that we don't think that people who look though they're grovelling INS and starving and can't get anywhere. We don't think that they can actually rise up when they really can. Well speak to me from the standpoint of you're steeped in business and economics speak to me. About what the impact of it is to the country beyond what it means to the people who get to come or don't get to come but what does the infusion of immigrants mean to the country. Well it's a lot of different things on different levels so of course you have technology people who are technology experts. We are homegrown. We are home growing of people who study stem but there are a lot more people in Asia who study stem much more intensely and so we are obviously the technology companies. Want more people who are intellectually. They're gonNA move towards the Canadian model. Where you're GONNA get all those people that's one thing but still there's a restriction on that but in Japan we actually when we were there because Japan also very fearful of immigrants and they started letting people in partly because they had to do the jobs that no other Japanese wanted to do The the three Ds Dangerous Dirty and disgusting and here. We have a similar phenomenon because what are the jobs that a lot of the immigrants are taking their jobs that Americans really don't want to do so in Oregon? We see that. There are huge numbers of immigrants who are incredibly productive doing jobs and actually we have an experiment on her own farm farm. There you you family farm. My mom is transformed the farm and purposed it for weather uses and we still. We still have been an orchard for a long time a cherry orchard. Now we're actually changing over to making growing grapes and apples and we kind of did an experiment and that we hired middle aged white men who we thought okay. We want to give them jobs. They're struggling so we give them jobs. But you'll also have some immigrants who are on on the farm to working and the contrast is unbelievable. I mean it's and we've had other businessmen tell us that if I'm GONNA pay a local worker an American worker thirty dollars an hour. She takes him twice as long to do anything. And if I pay a Mexican worker fifteen dollars an hour I get so much more productivity out of him it makes me. It makes absolutely no sense for me. Ever hire the local American worker. My business could not survive. The local American worker probably looks at this an entirely different way which is and. I'm hoping they don't listen to your podcast. We're trying to build audience. You guys met as competitors. You went to business school. You got a masters in business from Harvard. You went to Princeton and we're Rhode Scholar. You went to Harvard. Where Rhodes scholar and then you both became journalists. I don't have time to ask you how one goes to get an MBA to become a journalist but nonetheless there we are. You're in Los Angeles for the Wall Street Journal. You were there for the New York Times and you you met. There is that customary for competitors to Hook Up. It was a little a little like a romance between the CIA KGB. We go out and you know neither of US could talk about anything. Either of us was doing and but it was good in that way because we didn't talk about work things and so we found out that we were before and it was before cell phones so you weren't occupied with those either so you could rate full relationship you got married and you were signed to Beijing and you went as a correspondent as well. Well I followed along for a while the of but then actually it was really insightful. Because we discovered how the Chinese work I was GONNA actually try and go into business there. Three choices go into business work for a local bank or a bank or trying to go into journalism and so going to business. I mean it was pretty communist Socialists. There and so I was just going to be too difficult. The second one is I actually did interview. I talked with some banks but they didn't have licenses their foreign banks licensed there so that wasn't an option that was very interesting and so then journalism basically I had to do the Chinese Foreign Ministry into giving me credentials. Were you the object of suspicion? Because you're Chinese American. I there were multiple reactions. One is that people I was trying. Someone tried to recruit me to be a spy for four between China and Taiwan and others. I wouldn't say necessarily too much too much travel know I would say that. I wouldn't say that they were suspicious. but they didn't want another liberal. New York Times writer writing about Communism in China so I actually positioned myself while I have a background in business and economics so actually I position myself as I'm going to write about China's growing economy and they love you'd be good politics. It turns out that you you were there. At a very very momentous period in the history of China including Tiananmen Square and The revolt was crushed. And you wrote about it and you wrote about it in such a way that you shared a Pulitzer Prize for writing about. But I'm interested in. What your personal reactions were at that time covering that that moment that was so heartbreaking and inspiring at the same time my single most powerful memory when I was out on him. Square in the troops were opening fire. Had to do with the fact that there had been a lot of debate among American observers about whether the Chinese people were quote Unquote Ready for Democracy. And the idea was that people who are poorer who are less educated may not be really ready to sustain democracy and there was commentary that they may have had protests clamoring for democracy. But they didn't really know what they meant by democracy and then that night watching people die for democracy and watching in particularly the bravest people that night on Tenement Square. These rickshaw drivers who whenever there was a pause in the shooting they would go out and pick up the bodies and kids he'd been killed or injured and then drive them to the hospitals on the back of these open rickshaws and these were guys from the countryside. These were peasants. They they certainly couldn't have given you some grand formula for democracy but there they were in some cases dying for these principles and it taught me just a deep lesson that when you are when people are risking their lives for something they are ready for. It also probably should teach people who have it to appreciate it absolutely for me. One of the most striking memories I have is when it started happening. I was talking with the foreign editor and at the time he said. You've gotta start counting the bodies and I you know I was jarred at first as a counting the bodies because he knew that in history you need to know the facts of how many people were killed and so before there would be a lockdown You have to go start counting the body so that meant going to the hospitals and sort of talking to them and finding out what the numbers were and so we started doing that and between what we learned and what the Red Cross had come up with we were able to have a really fairly accurate estimate of what the range was because as soon after they had locked down then people started throwing out numbers. Ten Thousand Two thousand and you just have to get sort of focused on what really the numbers are and I can imagine right now with the corona virus Going on that. There's a lockdown already on numbers and it's only going to go through official channels. We won't know what the real numbers are. And they may not be a similar to to what the official numbers and you can set out into rural China into the countryside after Tiananmen Square. To find out how much the democracy movement had penetrated. What people knew about would happen there. What did you discover surprisingly that propaganda work pretty well in the countryside and that there was this the peasantry there was this deep desire for order and stability and a certain amount of suspicion of rich educated. People in the cities were clamoring for things. They didn't really understand in the countryside which supplied the troops for the People's Liberation Army. There was still fairly strong support for the government. You guys were there for three years. Five years five years and ultimately you probably weren't on the sort of top of the list of most admired people by the government there. Yeah and you ultimately chose to leave. What was it like as a journalist to function in an authoritarian environment in which there's state control of the media it was extremely difficult and certainly foreigners were at least journalists. Were much more circumscribed. We had to notify anytime you want to have any traveling to notify them. The three days in advance the the government And there were all sorts of regulations. And they can you know. Pull levers anytime they want. So for instance. When I had my first child in Hong Kong went to Hong Kong even though a million beepers worn in China I decided to have my baby in Hong Kong. I went to Hong Kong and they wouldn't give visa for my son knowing that that meant that I couldn't come back to China too and that was a way you know that I couldn't come back and go to work. So they're very good at pulling those levers and so we know what it's like in also just having lived there to live in an environment in a country that is really socialist. And there's an abuse of power. I mean dictators there. Yeah do you presume you were surveilled? And Yeah we were. I wrote in particular one article about Prime Minister Li Peng and mentioned that his mom had a very dim view of him and he was furious and take that well he did not take that well and so there was mom filter back. There was some discussion about kicking us out. And then they. They put us on incredibly intense surveillance of every time we went out. I would go out jogging. And I'd have several cars and motorcycles tailing me and not because you were a superior athlete. No they weren't trying to learning techniques on. That's probably the point when they began to regret giving Cheryl the visa because it was a lot easier for Cheryl loser tales than it was for me but you know the night I remember we hate. We're just deciding whether to leave and a Washington Post reporter. The state security arrested two of her best friends and Chinese Chinese friends a couple and ended up sending them to prison for something like ten years in seven years and as suspected sources as sources for giving the materials and we had Chinese friends who were giving US classified materials. They and that they were breaking the law. Nobody had gotten into trouble but I remember we. We couldn't sleep that night and we thought at point this will happen to us. We will get our dear friends in trouble and destroy their lives and we decided we wanted to go now. In a period of great competition that far surpasses what we saw then and the Chinese are basically making the argument. Globally that the Chinese model. The authoritarian model is more agile better suited to compete in. The Twenty. First Century unfettered by this clunky democracy. Where it's hard to get anything done? They can plan. They can act. How compelling the story that they're telling you think how do you see the competition between the US and China right now right so I would say that? On certain Brent's China is very very competitive and we as democracy. As a capitalist model have really failed we are not as flexible as we think we are. I mean the US thinks of it at self is number one but according to as right and tight rope. According to the Social Progress Index which actually measures many different categories personal safety access to Internet Education Healthcare. We overall ranked number twenty six. So if we think that we have a flexible capitalist model we don't we have a capitalist model that actually is exclusive capitalism now China. They obviously have their own problems as well and they're very capitalist and they also have a crony capitalism but they also have lifted hundreds of millions of people out of poverty which is far better than what we're doing because we have people thinking we're improving supposedly on the very very low level of poverty but we actually have people a lot of Americans sinking into a situation where they're struggling and cannot make ends meet and so I do think that China's threat to US really should force us to evaluate our model of capitalism. You have a foot in both worlds. You're a journalist. And you reporting on the condition of large segments of Americans here and you also the managing director of Investment Bank. And you live in the Wall Street world in this book. You both are very clear about the failures of policy government to do its heart. What about Corporate America and Wall Street? And how much awareness is there of these deficiencies that threaten the social fabric of this country and ultimately threaten capitalism and democracy? I think there is growing awareness and I think that some people have seriously thought about it and are trying to make changes but it is like moving a huge aircraft carrier. But you have someone like Jamie. Dimon who is trying to move from the idea of shareholder capitalism and I know that that's sacred here but to stakeholder capitalism which you know it makes a lot more sense it is something that Asian countries have. Actually sort of you know intuitively or informally subscribed to and I think that you know rate even Dallaglio has said that capitalism is broken so I do think there's a growing recognition. The next question really is. How do we get there so when the business coalition says okay? All these people all these. Ceo's have signed up and say we should focus on stake over capitalism. There were some interesting research that showed that if you looked at the distance companies that signed up there. Actually companies actually probably do worse than those people who didn't sign up stakeholder capitalism and so maybe it's more aspirational. These people want to actually try to move in that direction with aspiration but I but do think that we are holding holding back. Gdp because if you don't have all Americans Firing Pistons that they're not contributing to the GDP and you have China with one point four billion people and we read about this entitled and India soon to have one point four billion people. How are we ever going to compete? If we don't have all Americans really charging spending seventy percent of the drivers are still only three hundred. Twenty million people unrelated point. You mentioned your first child when you were over there and people reacted to you in China. They ask you a question that their one child policy and they ask you a question that actually set you both. On course about examining how women are treated and how girls are treated around the world it led to one of your five books. Talk about how provocative that was right. When I first had my baby I would tell my Chinese friends and the first question they said before. Congratulations they said Oh. Is it a boy or girl? Then I said it was a boy they'd say. Oh congratulations like what does that mean thorough. They would actually take pity on me. I mean it was it was it was even then it was so visceral that even my friends who are my age were asking that question and so you know. I think it's loosening now. It's changing a little bit more because now there is a Chinese saying that will the girls will look after their parents and the boys won't so it's better to have girls and and so I think it is changing and now that there's two child policy that I think that's helping a lot too new again you guys wrote a book called half sky from oppression to opportunity for women worldwide that you've traveled widely. This was not only a phenomenon of China and highly. Recommend that by the way you guys have written for. I mentioned five books together. That doesn't sound like a prescription for domestic tranquility. If you can raise kids together and marriage survive book as a piece of cake it really is. Yeah You can put a book manuscript down to bed at night and it stays asleep back to you. Yeah doesn't play you off each other so much easier than kids. Yeah it sounds sounds hard though I mean. Collaborations are hard in any case. But you guys obviously have found a prescription for it. I mean they. K- is not minding someone else editing. You Yeah and surrender frankly okay. Different perspectives so one of the reasons. You have such celebrity as a journalist is that you've reinvented in a way the position of the OP. Ed columnist you're not simply and I don't want to impugn any of my friends. Who are up ED columnist? But you're not sitting there everyday. Thinking great thoughts with your feet on your desk traveled all over the world and you've used that position to shine a bright light in the darkest corners of this planet places like Sudan and Darfur. Were you exposed the genocide you WanNa Pulitzer Prize around that work and human trafficking and a whole range of other issues health issues. In some cases it wasn't safe. I mean you your life at risk. Tell me how you envision your role will ending. Part of it was that we had spent many many years as reporters before I became a columnist. And when I wasn't reporter and especially a foreign foreign correspondent I learned to have a deep suspicion of columnists who participate from inside the bubble and I saw how we of course are commenting on your colleagues at the time. Not at all not at all but just important it is to get in the field and get outside the Capitol and talk to people and I think that in addition one of the things I learned after I became a columnist when I first got this real estate on the op-ed page. I thought wow. I'm going to be changing people's minds twice a week and and it turns out. That isn't the case at all that if I if I write about things that people have already thought about so if I write about the Middle East peace plan if I write about impeachment whatever then I essentially don't change anybody's mind people who start out agreeing think it was brilliant people who start. I disagree. Christoph Office rocker again. That where you've been reading your social media ware. I think a columnist and maybe any journalist really has influences not so much changing minds on issues that are on the agenda but actually helping change. What IS ON THE AGENDA PROJECT. We we have spotlights and if we can use that spotlight to project it on something and hence elevated to the agenda then that is a step toward getting it addressed and so it was interesting about my reporting on. Darfur sex trafficking was not my opinions on it. I mean they were pretty banal but it was it was making people spill their coffee as they read about what was happening in. Darfur in brothels whatever or and in our own backyard. Which is what we do right. Yes. That's what was so surprising. Is You contrast it? It really is pretty bad here too. Yeah although the less risk associated with the going nervous when he'd go off on these the Dr Four oh two yen not to talk to Darfur. Yeah no there's there's a real risk and he actually didn't tell me all the time where we was going and so it was only when he was with George Clooney that I was a rest assured because I knew that George Clooney with not go into a place I was very very very small kids and right right now absolutely got into trouble once because after a plane crash I I thought I would best tell Cheryl after I got back home you were in the play offs and the hard thing to keep it. Well I thought it'd be best to tell in person after I got back and but I had to tell the foreign desk why overhead and I wasn't where I was supposed to be and shortly afterwards. Jarrell spoke to somebody in the foreign desk. You said that was terrible and explain crash and I was completely completely blown and I learned a fruit is indeed truth is transparent. Truth is a central. Yeah we're GONNA take a short break and we'll be right back with more of the X. Files he there poppy harlow the host of. Cnn's boss files podcast. Are you hungry? Have you ever had shake shack? Our latest episode is with the men behind the Burger business. Founder Danny Meyer and CEO Randy Rudy. Shake Shack was born. If you didn't know as a hotdog cart in two thousand one and the whole thing actually started. Danny Meyer's says by accident so we dive into that. What'S THE STORY BEHIND? What is now a publicly traded company? And what are they trying to do? When it comes to equality and wages and their experiment with four day workweeks also. Are they planning to offer plant based items on the menu? That is a big question. Also some of their favourite memories like when President Obama came to eat checkout boss files subscribed today and now back to the show in doing the work that you've done including this work that we're about to talk about. How much are you personally impacted by a friend of mine? Alex Kotla wits has written a number of books. Here one call. There are no children here. He just wrote another called American summer about the violence problem in Chicago. And he allowed in one of these conversations that he had to actually go into therapy after writing the last book because he had like secondary. Ptsd from spending so much time with people living there tragedies with them and so on you've written about some ghastly things both of you have. How do you insulate yourself emotionally from that or do you? I'm I mean I I certainly have been deeply shaken by a Darfur for example or some of the things in south Sudan for example. But I think that one thing that has fortified me and reassured me that maybe doesn't come through enough. Is that side by side with the worst of humanity you invariably come across the best of humanity and so you know in Congo one time the most lethal conflict since World War Two. I spent time with the warlord who was as brutal as anybody could be and covered his predations but then the person who had the deepest impression on me from that trip was this little Polish nun. Who was working in Congo and all the other aid groups had fled and she stayed behind and she was single. Handedly running an emergency feeding center and an orphanage and negotiated. Keep the warlord out of her town and she was just so strong and courageous that I returned from Congo actually feeling better about the about about human nature capacity to do the right thing when challenged well one of the things that is noteworthy about your works is that they're both bracing and sobering and hopeful and that is the case with this book as well tight rope which was inspired as we said at the beginning what happened to people in your home town of Yam Hill and you tell the stories of the NAP family. A family that you grew up around young people on your school bus really devastated over time caught in the switches of this changing economy. Tell us a little about that. The naps live just down the road from me. They got on the school bus right after I did far line was my grade then Zealan Regina Nathan killing a little bit younger Mr Nap Had A union job laying sewer pipes. Mrs Nap was attracted driver on a on. A on a hazelnut farm. They bought your own place. The kids were full full of life very and kids and win. Farland turns sixteen. We were all jealous because he has family had saved up and got him a Ford Mustang for his birthday and we were so jealous if Arlen and and then you know all told a quarter of the kids on my number. Six bus died from drugs. Alcohol suicide related pathologies and foreign died of liver. Failure connected to drug alcohol. Use. Zealand died in a house fire when he was passed out drunk. Regina died of hepatitis from needle. Use Nathan Bloom assault up cookie. Math and the only survivor was Keelan who survived because he was spending thirteen years in penitentiary and just to one after the other and they weren't I mean they were obviously out wires in some sense but there was another family on the bus also with five children and then that family as well for the five are now gone it just it was found as you did. Your work was. This is an extreme example. But not all that extreme you talk about death of despair. A year death certificate says died of drug overdose or other things Symptom a symptom. But but really it's despair that you're suggesting well there's some seminal research by Angus Deaton and incase at another university and they actually looked at Census Data. We RECOGNIZE OTHER UNIVERSITY. They looked at census data and they discovered that while. Everybody's mortality rates are dropping all segments of society. There was one category which was middle aged whites men and women where mortality rates were actually rising. That means they're dying earlier and it's for three reasons which they call the depths of despair one is deaths related to alcohol to death related to drug overdose and three suicides and we are at historic highs for suicide rate since World War Two and deaths of despair really captures what it is because so much of it is. They've given up on life they they don't have hope anymore and it's not so it's not just in the hill this is across the country and it is so impactful that it's actually reduced. The life expectancy for all Americans such that for the three years in a row three years in a row we have declining life expectancy average life expectancy and we haven't had that for one hundred years since the pandemic flu in nineteen eighteen. Even in the Great Depression there was rising life expectancy. So we're kind of like in this. We call sort of a a social depression where life expectancy is drowning. And what drives this? We talked before about the failures of our economic system. But you you guys make very important point here in that we tend to treat these things as failures of character. But you feel these. These are systemic failure when Yam hill which is largely lily white and I think probably in a lot of white communities people in the nineteen ninety s looked at struggles in black community around the US and said Rather patronisingly that this is because of black culture and a deadbeat DADS and people making bad decisions about drugs You know having children out of wedlock was this kind of thing. And meanwhile the Great Harvard sociologist. William Tool yes Wilson was saying no. It's about jobs. He was exactly right. Because when jobs left places like Yam hill or main or Appalachia wherever it was the same policies unfolded and it was both that in places like Yam Hill. It was partly that the traditional good union jobs left and that when people could get work it paid much much less than before and so For the bottom half of the distribution there has been this this plunge in ability to live a good life. You've pointed out that incomparable situation. You talked about for example. The auto industry leaving parts of Canada. The same effect wasn't felt what was the difference. It's very interesting. So after the financial crisis you had auto makers laying off workers both in Detroit and Windsor Ontario Canada so we had a chance to compare what the response was so in the US because of the unusual circumstances as you well know you extended unemployment benefits and so they got more cash but because they lost their job they also lost their healthcare. And so these families were just. You know doubly stressed over in Windsor Canada. Well first of all those families didn't lose their healthcare because there's basically universal healthcare in Canada second of all the government takes a much more active role and they saw that there were layoffs and immediately within twenty four hours. What they call these government. Active centers kicked in and started looking around where the demand for different types of jobs were and they discovered that it was in nursing and there was a nursing program already training people but it was full. So they actually. I'll arranged another training program retraining program to take these auto workers welders and all sorts of auto technicians to train them to become to go into nursing and that really helped and so years later. You have not only these. These auto layoff auto workers had reintegrated into the workday world much more quickly but also they didn't have the problems years later like self-medication depression the PDF St. They just didn't have those in the same way. That the the People in Detroit did. I think there's a misperception in the. Us among affluent Americans that these are tragic but this is inevitable consequences of automation globalization and. It's not it was the consequence of bad policy over fifty years in the US and bad policy driven by a bad narrative that this is all about personal responsibility and that produced a much harsher line policies that meant that the US in contrast to other countries invested less in human capital and lessen social safety nets and ultimately that I think is what led to those depths of despair and is partly why the napster no longer with us. So here's a paradoxical thing you mentioned race before. And you write about people in the inner city as well as people in these small towns and rural areas whites and blacks and and in some ways the similarity between their experiences between the loss that they've encountered and the ramifications of that but people in Yam Hill. They don't see themselves as we can't have this discussion without talking about the complicated issue of race because what people in Yam he'll don't have is the the weight of this legacy of race. But if you have the discussion with him about white privilege they'd get very angry about it because they don't feel privileged code for poor minorities are going to get stuff. I'm the one who's GonNa pay for all this is sort of a caricature and but it's striking bobby. Kennedy made these heroic efforts in the sixties to knit together the black working class in the white working class and create this common front and for a while it might have worked and then really with Nixon southern strategy there was is very successful effort to woo the white working class. Partly I think by playing on fears of competition from African Americans and the upshot is that today there is this this this tension you know having said that. I mean the white working class like the black working class tends to be socially conservative on issues like abortion in the case of white working class guns but on economic issues they actually tend to be fairly liberal so talk about raising the minimum wage white. Working Class strongly believes it should be raised. Parental leaves early childhood programs. I mean there there are I think it becomes really important for Democrats to not give up on those voters and to Try to win them. On economic arguments and a particular example because expanded Medicaid. We ran into so many cases where people really were. Were they needed that? One of your colleagues Eduardo. Puerto wrote a piece just the other day that was really really interesting. Called how the GOP became the party of the left behind and he said by two thousand and sixteen. The Republican Party won almost twice the share voters in the nation's most destitute counties home to the poorest ten percent of Americans than at one in the richest by two thousand sixteen. The Nation's political map correspondent neatly did the distribution of prosperity. Mr Trump won fifty eight percent of the vote in the counties with the poorest ten percent of the population in the richest. His share was thirty one percent. He is in some ways. Weaponized this sense of loss and agreement and anger at the Democratic Party for not delivering more in terms of assistance. I think that among Democrats have these conversations. I think they're they tend to be too glib about how the problems are all the Republicans and these are Biparti. I mean we have fifty years of failures. Bipartisan Failures Democrats fingerprints on them as well. But having said that I think it's still true that when people in counties that had higher rates have depths of despair were substantially more likely to vote for trump and that I mean that correlated and yet what would reduce deaths of despair. Well one thing is access to melt to medical care and the one thing that president trump did particularly aggressively was trying to erode people's access to healthcare. I mean you really do get the sense of a lot of people desperately desperate for better outcomes and then as a result voting for president trump. And then what does he do? He rose access to healthcare. We in tight rope. We talked to my Mary Mayor. Who wonder if this friend of mine. Wonderful woman she was homeless for seven years at one point. She put a gun in her mouth to to end it all And I asked her whether she ever thought that there was a political solution or at least a political answer to some of these difficulties. An argument and she said traditionally she hadn't she hadn't originally been interested in politics and finally in two thousand sixteen. She thought got engaged in voted for the first time in voted for president trump. And but a lot of it I think is that Some issues are so systemic in gigantic. That they just don't even try analyze it because there is an education distinction a lot of these people maybe if they do have an high school education. That's about it. They didn't go to college. They don't analyze politics. The way we all sit here and on our screens following every. I think about this often because I sit on television sets and I talk about non college voters and I realize how much sound to voters who didn't go to college like somehow they're less bright or thoughtful or and they feel like hey we have good reason to vote for. Donald trump or vote for a candidate who is GonNa take a blow torch to the status quo because the status quo failed us. The status quo is what led us down. There is definitely that attitude. I mean for instance. They'll say you say. President trump is corrupt. I mean he's actually monetize the president. Oh they all do that. They do feel that but then when it is such a large problem then they start to focus on issues that they care very much about so for instance will one person. I like my guns. I don't want I don't want anybody who really wants to take away my guns and another one said know. I don't like immigrants and so that's really contain issue that they can deal with and it's it's the issue they'll vote on and the other woman who it's very hard to explain. But she is a pastor. She's really a very down to Earth. Person upstanding person in her community but she said. I vote for trump because I think he represents family values because he he he. He's up on. Tv's got his beautiful family there. And so I think that you know He. Projects varies accessible. What projecting this image. And it's something that really strikes and he's been embraced around issues like judges abortion by evangelical community. Which is his strongest core of support? I said that you wrote also a hopeful book. Talk about the things that gave you. Hope one is that we know what works partly because these issues are ones that Germany dealt with Canada dealt with life expectancy is not falling in those countries. Portugal decriminalized drug possession including heroin cocaine and mounted a public health effort. Then you write a lot about this. About how pervasive. The drug problem is and how drug diversion programs that decriminalize drugs and use the resources to move. People into treatment programs have been very affect so much more successful. You know we get. We still deal with drugs. Basically a law enforcement toolbox when it is cheaper and infinitely more humane and successful to deal with with with the public health and the treatment toolbox. And so we've seen programs that work and we we write about in Tulsa Oklahoma a incredibly successful program that deals with women who had addictions for fifteen years on average facing prison. Instead they go into a program that provides counselling provides treatment and gives them jobs. And we've also seen that we can address some social problems when we put our mind to it. The Obama Administration in Two Thousand Ten address veteran homelessness. And this was. The country was embarrassed that there were so many veterans on the street and we put our minds to it. It became a priority and over six years veteran homelessness was reduced by have if we were similarly embarrassed by child homelessness then we could reduce child homelessness by half as well. You know. This is the age of innovation in these in these areas. I mean it's incredible. How much research has done all universities across the country trying to prove what works? And what doesn't work in terms of dressing these social problems so we? We have a plethora of examples of randomized control trials that I could show what works what doesn't work. We are funding some of them. But they're all done on sort of piecemeal basis would really need is a systematic approach. That allows you need government intervention. You just can't you know cure all of society's ills with these patchwork of philanthropic endeavors. We need much more systemic. Let's return to economics for a second. We've got historic levels of inequality you write about this. I think you wrote that. The annual bonus pool for Wall Street exceeded this popular around town exceeded the income of minimum wage. Workers in this country collectively. That's a stark statistic. Can you solve these problems without solving that problem? I Say I think you definitely can solve these problems. And it doesn't necessarily mean taking away from other people that means lifting the bottom half we need to focus on addressing the lack of opportunity and the lack of investment in human capital at the level of the fifty percent of people at the lower income level. Those people we need to lift them up. But but I mean doesn't it also require those people who've done very very well to recognize their responsibility to make those investments. And how do you we are so silo? D- I mean the the thing about this book and why so recommend everyone read? It is that there is a crisis in this country that we can't see from the apartment towers of in Chicago and San Francisco and New York a mile or two from here. We see all of these problems that you're writing about in communities in Chicago and yet they seem distant. If you live downtown how we create a national sense of interconnectedness and a national conversation about these to the point where it becomes politically tenable to do big things. I mean that's terrific and I really do think a lot of it has to do with improving. Empathy is really recognizing that we sort of lost empathy because because we live in bubbles and we don't see people outside of the bubble was very interesting is that you know people in the top twenty percent. They contribute in terms of charity less as a percentage of income than people at the bottom twenty percent. And you're thinking how could all these people who are so poor? How can they contribute? Moore's percentage of their income and it's partly because they live in neighborhoods where they see need and people who and the top twenty percent. They don't see the need so much and so when people in poor neighborhoods confront the need they give they respond and I think that if we saw that also with the top twenty percent if they saw the need they would also respond. Nick as I said you've written about some extraordinarily difficult challenges all over the world that people are facing. You've shown a light on these kinds of challenges and yet often you write that. You're optimistic in fact you wrote about what's happened around the world in your urine column. Are you optimistic right now? Yeah I and don't feel pressured I know I am. I mean for a couple of reasons one is that I think the. Us really took some fundamental missteps fifty years and that involved cutting taxes and cutting investments in human capital in safety nets as they look at the that trajectory. I wonder if Kansas under Sam Brownback mark kind of the governor who cut taxes dramatically and was ultimately ultimately. Kansas voters rebelled. And because there are schools were doing too poorly and when Kansas voters rebel and want to raise taxes that strikes me as a really interesting moment. Likewise you have red states like Idaho Utah that are expanding Medicaid so. I wonder if there isn't something of a of a mental switch. You Begin to see as a lot of white suffer from drug addiction. A change in the frame of reference is a sad commentary which is normal hypocrisy and double stand but but maybe a step toward a better policy so as Kansas goes so goes the nation. Let's hope I mean. Let's let's hope that that's the case and you do see that. People are reaching four some big ideas and new approaches as an Oregon and Oregon. We were always raise on this and a pioneer mythology. Are these Perot. Eric Ancestors you cross the country and they would never relied on benefit plan. Well it of course the whole reason that the pioneers went to the Willamette valley was because of benefit plan every benefit plan. It was the homesteads at the end. My area was transformed by these big ideas for homesteads rural electrification. Gi Bill of rights. And that is what I think can indeed again transform the opportunities for the kids on the number six bus well Nick Kristof and Sheryl Wudunn thank you so much for shining a light on this crisis and thank you for listening to the X. Files brought to you by the University of Chicago Institute of Politics and CNN audio the executive producer of the axe files. Is Emily Standards? The show has also produced by Miriam. Annenberg Samantha Neil and Allison Siegel and special thanks to our partners at CNN. Including Courtney Coop Mega Marcus and Ashley less for more programming from the visit politics dot EU Chicago Dot Edu.

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Global Brands with Kristof Neirynck at Wallgreens Boots Alliance

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

41:12 min | 8 months ago

Global Brands with Kristof Neirynck at Wallgreens Boots Alliance

"For All of us. It's about predictive. Where the consumer is going and getting Catholic right. One of the things we want to do is create odds that don't suck then embracing change creates great possibility Malan Heart. This is marketing today today on the show got Kristof near Inc. The chief marketing officer global brands at Walgreens boots alliance on the show. Today we talk about how Walgreen's boots alliance is responding to covid nineteen. We also talk about Kristof portfolio of brands that he manages both store owned brands as well as their global. Cpt Portfolio we talk about the entry differences for market to market Were there may be a leader position in the UK and how they've entered the US market or the Chinese market in most recent history than we switch gears and talk a little bit about his personal background and career trajectory and twists and turns in a moment in time actually The you'll hear soon enough that defined his career trajectory set forward. We also talk about his love of plants and I'll leave it to him but It it's one of the most impactful purchases he's made in the in the recent history so I hope you enjoy this conversation with Kristoff Christoph. Welcome to the show while. Thanks for having me. I thought it would be interesting to start with where you grew up. Everyone can probably hear a slight accent. Give start there. Yeah Yeah exactly. I mean I grew up in in Belgium which in Belgian standard to the big city. It's kind of a third the second biggest city in Belgian Actually but it's only two hundred and fifty thousand people in the Middle Ages though it was the second biggest city in Europe but it went a bit downhill since then the Middle Ages and that's our claim to fame. I love that because in the US. We're such a young country I think all Europeans look at us. And go little babies. Your goes all the way back to the Actually every my mother tongue is actually Dutch. So so that's where the funny accent comes from. Although I haven't lived in Belgium probably for the now. What fifteen sixteen years now? So we'll from GANT TO WALGREENS BOOTS ALLIANCE. What's been your Your career path. If you yeah I mean maybe let me start off with the style. Which is I'm actually even though the CMO not even marketing train election electronics engineer. So But I kind of realized words the end of my studies. That's not necessarily what I wanted to work on microchips etcetera so actually Straight out of union. I in Belgium that at the time. It didn't tell you which brands you're GonNa get was kind of the Oscar ceremonial my first day Always always which truth be told. Were not necessarily the dream brand witness the hoping to sell kind problems but they go but in the end. I ended up spending five years in Kentucky Recchia two years in Belgium than I moved to the West. Your headquarters in Geneva. Where spent another three years on the reason. Why is actually? It's one of those categories where you make a meaningful difference in women's lies because you allow them to get on with their life whether they're on their period or not so so that's why even though initially my reaction Quite sure a Jack enjoyed working on feminine care. Category as Pin J. calls it then. After five years of glamorous sanitary towels tampons I basically moved onto iniquity glamorous category being laundry detergents where a spent another five years and started on on brands. Like bowl. Lenora am basically goal the keys to the castle as I basically lead as as a marking Director Area Western Europe which for people in the US. It's like tied. Us So this is a massive business for PSG. So that was a really exciting. You can assignment Being able to such brandon so that brought me to nearly ten years at PNG at that point in time was like. I'm ready for something else. Something different because I would say these I nine years probably conclude the first stage of my career which engineer becomes marketeer thing. Stage two was just learning. New SKILL SETS and stage. Two I went full was actually I went from sanitary towels and Tampons to Gucci beauty luxury beauty which was super interesting for a number of reasons first of all until and ahead only lead Western. Europe nine all of those diverse markets would invest in Europe. But then it was a true global business where you know I now also had. Us Asia Middle East. Latin America so all very very different. That was the first bit. The second bit was the business model. Because you're in luxury beauty. Which means you have counter business etc. So it's not the usual. Cpg and I would say within that. It's it's a licensed business so because PG had the license at on those products from the chief fashion house so it's it's a super exciting dynamic because in you don't you don't have many decision rights. You only have influences skills to use the convince sometimes not that rationally Italian Fashion House. That what you're proposing actually the right thing to do because PNG super rational of course in Italian fashion house whilst of course they're doing luxury. Fashion might not always come to the same rational arguments. Jere with that was was super interesting. I was just consider this quite the transitions just within P. and G. I mean within one company. Yeah that was an amazing opportunity. Frankly because you know I had done core brands core businesses and it doesn't get much more corden. Pg's laundry business in their flex brand and then within PNG to have that opportunity to actually work on such an amazing. I like the cheap brands. And the next you work in meet with the Fashion House on a weekly basis to design and create new products advertising new in store furniture. All that stuff is is super super interesting will. In what was the impetus that brought you to Walgreen boots yeah. I mean there was a personal and business element to that. I think on a personal level. My partner was moving to London and within P. and g. The wasn't necessarily the right opportunities for me. It also coincided with a time when actually Kotei took over with mixed success when my argue the G. Prestige business so I felt it was just the right time to move on and and as I was moving on I was carefree looking at. What do I want in line with because this is probably the third stage in my career where I wanted another completely different skill? Set as a you know how about going to a company that is both a retailer anesthesia. And that's what walgreens boots line says. They're one of the world's largest if not the world's largest pharmacy chain group whilst at the same time we have our own brands that live within our own retail footprint but also outside that creates a whole heap of opportunities that you wouldn't have CPG so so that was super interesting. And I spent two years there. I leading their skincare portfolio. And then now more recently or two and a half years ago to over the CMO role leading all of the brand portfolio nets. Both our brands that I would call our. Cpg brands that live out an inside of our own retail footprint as well as our own brand business which private labor one would call. It is boots and Walgreens brand that that stands on our shelves perfect. Perfect will we're living in this very unique time Talk about we may have to go back to the Middle Ages to have had a global pandemic at this point with covid nineteen and just curious I mean. It has to throw many wrinkles into business or probably both actually sitting at home doing this recording at for one one example but just curious how you may be yourself and walgreens boots alliance have been responding during the crisis. Yeah and definitely mean. Unprecedented is definitely the word that comes to mind. I mean who knew that you know what started off in a market in would have created this right so and indeed I am sitting at home have been for the past Vienna off weeks and it looks like the few more weeks to come but you know an and I must say I mean within these unprecedented time quite proud actually to work for a company walgreens boots alliance because that's when the purpose of our of our business in terms of helping people across the world lead healthier and happier lives as never come through her because in our pharmacists are on the front line of this crisis we are also one of the world's largest with wholesale companies as part of this group of the alliance healthcare out of the business they're keeping pharmacies worldwide in stock of essential medication. Ppo of that stuff. So and at the same time. We'RE HAVING DRIVE-THRU Centers on our premises both in the US in the UK. So so again. Some amazing work that is happening by our colleagues worldwide. So it definitely in a time like this company like ours intrusive. Its purpose in a way. But of course I mean not to say no with the social distancing measures etc clearly businesses stuff in these signs Extended IF I speak more to my own side of the business. I think you know what we've done. Is You can categorize almost in three phases. I think the first phase is make sure that your employees are healthy are safe and are all set up to do their job that call in the middle of having to do home schooling again having the IT infrastructure set up you know get on Microsoft teams and all of those tools as well as you know. We have our own in house content studio while the studios closed right. So how do you stay? Still create high quality content whilst people are at home in There's a number of really good. It solutions et CETERA. Found for that. But that's probably phase one which is trying to grapple with the new new new world. The second phase for us was a combined as do. Don't do any stupid stuff and do good in the I mean at this time. It shouldn't be spending mass marketing money because stores are closed at Vets just a waste of money. So you know it's about pulling back on spans that in current context wouldn't be Roslyn but equally than just your message in your style and your content to the new reality show. Compassion show consideration. But it could do some good like for example if several CSSR partnerships donated about two hundred thousand products here in the UK to the Hygiene Bank into the NHS workers that are on the frontline to really helped vulnerable and the people who are on the front. And I think it's important that we do the we are also sourcing over four hundred million pieces of masks and you know for all kinds of purposes and sanitize you just crank that up Luckily we have a good sourcing office in China in Asia that helps us with. That's pretty face to which is don't do any stupid stuff and do some good stuff show that you as a brand care and contribute to society and then phase three is you need to drive some growth because as a brian going to survive on And so you need to make sure that your digital plans are stronger because with the shift to online make sure that you you you do of performance markets a you potentially expand your digital footprint if you're in beauty approaching needs some tools with which people can try on products in a virtual way when they're at home rather than in store a new creating products that are more relevant because the situation is here to save you think about immunity sanitize Asian protective equipment mosques. You know what what are brand's GonNa do in that space and where they mike portfolio clearly which is a combination of beauty and health care and wellness. These are times when we need to make sure that we bring the relevant products to the market. So I guess that's that's probably the three stages that that we're going through as a business. Yeah no that's that's awesome. It's awesome you know the you mentioned you know your your scope if you will is the CPG brands as well as the owners in private brands. If you will or folio how do you think about managing? Those are very different but similar. It's it's very. It's a unique construct. Having brands they can stand on themselves. Stand on their own Maybe sometimes outside your own channels and then having you. The typical store brands on shelf as well executive It is and I think you know if that's why the it's the right way of looking at it and splitting the portfolio in two in the sense that you have the BG brands and this one unique feature that we have as a retailer or being both the CPI Gina retailers that we have lots of customer data from our loyalty programs. If you think about the boots at car program or the the walgreens balanced re barred if you although suit together. We have more members than than Amazon prime. So so it's it's a huge wealth of information that we have and so in the insights we get out of. The help is not just on the brand product creation side but it helps us also really on the marketing side. Because then you can sure that you can use at first party data which oversees don't have because I don't have a big BTC business but that's where you know leveraging that gives you a precedent to the opportunities and and we truly builds a strong brand portfolio on that CPG's side where we have a loss of insights and you know we have number seven which is a an amazing anti-aging brand X. number one in the UK and During certain periods in US running up to number three and four in skin care anti aging skin care we own the array. We have LISERA L- which we acquired which was a premium naturals brand we have botanic which is a moss naturals brand we have been glory. Which is an incredible personality. Brandon beauty in personal care. We have sleek at all in East London born brand which is all about high impact high color payoff than pigmentation in. Matic's we of your good skin which is in the healthy skin territory. So we built up when I started in this business. We pretty much had one brand. One Country in the mission was billed as out to relevant brand portfolio before that I just mentioned and then turns into a formidable global. Cpg Business and because we have all of that richness in in First Party data that gives us a law of inside the Other CG companies don't have or ferry Have many difficulties in accessing those just one additional practical question here? Because I'm just curious how you manage it you've got the store brands You know the pro boots in the walgreens branded merchandise and those are. I'm assuming confined. Here's store footprint retail locations. And then you've got the brands that may sit across those frankly. Ma and then you have brands. It may even extend beyond that. Do you structure your team in that manner. Curious how you people management side of it. If you know you're I I think you know and and it also depends geographically but indeed. I do have what I would call the own brand team and then we have the beauty team which is those beauty. Brands have just mentioned but but even geographically you think about to your point you need to make some decisions on where you go outside of your own footprint where you don't and you know the logic simple logic there is if our own retailer has a big share of market like for example beauty and we have a strong brand like number seven. Actually it makes more sense to keep that brand in our own retailer because it's a footfall driver and that external footprint is forty more limited whilst when you your own retailer has potentially a smaller share in beauty than probably bring it outside of your own retail prince and that's what for example is the case in us where we are a sole targets alter as well as a walgreens of course so so that's where an even dt see there we have as well. Arctic to consumer website Dot Com. Numbers have come that we have in. Us as well. Let's let's talk a little bit about number seven because it is beloved in the UK in like you said maybe exclusively in boots stores and you're selling this in the US in Walgreens like you said with target Ulta in the near DC presence at just curious managing this two very different markets to very different. I'm assuming like market penetration at this point. What are the big differences as you look at the two different markets just the US in the UK an curious about your perspective on DC as well and clear there is differences? I mean I'm sure everybody's familiar with the seat concept where you see the brandon than life stages of brandon and clearly in. Us Many of our brands are earlier. Stage in particularly in China's we've entered in China's well. But you know the I think ultimately it's about finding the locally relevant insights as well as marketing mix if you think about in the UK will parade today you know. Tv prints everything all the way down to performance mark the upper funnel mid funnel in lower phone whilst when? I look at for example how we built the brandon in us. If I think number seven for example originally there was only you know online advertising. We did have some localized occult TV integrations. Which is like programs like in the doctors etc in relevant programs that went about clinically that could have angle into clinically proven skin. Care which what our skin caroline's do on the seven basically that you would just integrate your product there and you know you have the doctors talk about your product. And how amazing it is and that was the right marketing. Mix at the time. But then as the brandon rose and develops within the TV tests. I than we did one way in like a region than we built it out into a one month national. Tv testing now we're doing more and more TV as the brand grows and grows and priests to say actually when I joined. The brand wasn't even talked twenty in the US but by now that brand has become in moments in time when all the stars align we are actually number three or four in skin care in the US which is a massive achievement for a brand that was not even top twenty four years ago. That's that's amazing congrats That's a great accomplishment in especially as a new player relatively new player coming into this market. You asked about the DC as maybe I'll give a few words on that as well because clearly you know we were at target Ulta Walgreens in their respective dot com but I would say those dotcoms are more about transaction so they don't provide a very rich consumer journey Customer experience. That's where that was probably the predominant reason for us to look at a DC where you can offer a much richer consumer experience. It's truly introduced. The brand it's heritage. What makes it special about on the retailer website? You can't really do that now. We could have just calling for content website. Which is what many of our competitors do. But you know again. I mentioned this before as well and talk about that later as well. Which is this whole data and the importance of data to improve the personalized experience of your consumers? That's why I think. Dt SEE is an absolutely crucial part of that makes why by re indeed launched DT see even though said we do have a green commerce. Allow will. Let's let's talk about it because like you said you've got this huge strategic advantage of having first party data. Cpg World where were you? Typically though edit seems Kinda brilliant frankly to have the combination to be launching into a new market where you can leverage that first party data in near DC environment. I guess how do you think about capturing the opportunity? That's there yeah. I think I mean that's where you know when when you think about a traditional CG of course get information of face broken. You know what we call second today and third party data and so the try to target their media based on that and clear effective to a certain level you know just putting that in that will definitely result in our allies because you you provide consumers with more relevant content at the right time in the right place l. Ever when you have I party data that just takes it to complete need a different level because you actually it's not just based on hypothetically what consumers are interested in what they might do. It's actually you know what they're doing. You know what they're buying because you have that first party so you know just to bring that to life with actually l. Choose not to reveal too many trade secrets. But you know to. I'll use an example of Netflix Very similar example. And you know there was this narcos. There were launching our coast as a as a show. And so what they did actually is of course. I know what you're watching on their platform and that's what I would call. First Party data. You know the you know the type of show they know the type of shows you're interested in the current users of their platform. What they would then do is an all in the data compliant way. Gdp are compliant way. They would pass those email addresses to facebook or instagram and what they would ask facebook instagram to look at A. We're launching a show called narcos. We think these people would be interested in that. Can you find out what other things? These people are interested in based on their facebook likes their instagram behaviors etc. And then once you know that can you find me? The look alike profiles of those people and multiply that and then basically use than they know. Exactly what these people are interested in what they did is they had little snippets of trailer of specific things. Like for example. If somebody's more interested in romantic scenes they might show Pablo Escobar having a romance. Whilst you know if somebody's more you know interested in murderously have you. They show killing scene or whatever. Something violent need. Somebody's interested in Sports Florida. So something sports car. If somebody's interested vintage cars show vintage cars. What a piece of artificial intelligence within do is they would literally look at Okay. First Party data. Second Party data. What do we know consumer and then in real time stitch together a trailer that is based on your interests and then serve that to you at the right time in the right place which means that? Netflix's had running at any given point in time. One point five million different variations of their trailer that they were serving up based on that data. Now if you don't have that First Party data contra the activate that whole ecosystem can only follow that through up to a certain left. That's the kind of stuff that we're doing at walgreens boots alliance as well when it comes. You know just to give a simple example. If somebody's not interested doesn't have hemorrhoids. What's the point in Advertising Hemorrhoids For example that's funny. Yeah that's phenomenal advantage. That you have just the Netflix's example alone is making my head. Hurt one point five million variations of a trailer but that's personalized marketing at mass. And that's where. We've we've run similar things for our flu campaigns because you know not everybody has the same needs in that space because you know. Some people are more Have the same drivers of why they wanted. If you have the flu goes you have a certain. But if you're a carer it's maybe more about prevention of your elderly parents getting flu in the first place and so making sure that we know Makes THEM. They are caregiver on a just a health conscious shopper. They WANNA go into prevention or the value secret convenience seeker than is their local outbreak. Them connects you. Say people a this low cloud bring you might. WanNa get your flu shot so it's it's really a personalized versus experience. Does actually these are not our data. Some some industry data that shows that when you look at personalization see a massive uplift like this some data that we got from our agency partner. Wpp that show that average order value goes up with one point four basket size. Thanks to point one and the net promoter score on the Vaclav serving personalized content to your consumers actually goes up with one point seats. Those personalized experiences enabled by First Party. Data are only going to become more and more important than that's where we as a hybrid company between the retailer and the CG have I think Incredible advantage lunar. It never thought about personalization. I don't know why haven't thought about it this way but it seems like what you're doing is it's personalization for sure because it's tailored to the individual or at least their interest that you can identify or understand from a signal of some sort but it's really about delivering relevant content and that makes perfect sense that you'd see some of those metrics because relevancy for no other reason. I'd almost say good personalization is when you don't know that you'll be personalized to because you know it can get creepy. You know when you on one device do a search on a trip to idea. Whatever you're going than all of a sudden in the middle of the device facebook feed you see that same thing cropping up. That is a bit creepy like somebody's tracking movements. Or you know even all the rumors about is Alexa listening or not all of those things. But I think the best personalization is when it's just feels like Feel it's intruding on anything. I love it I love it will. Let's switch gears slightly. You mentioned China earlier. You're launching into that market as a very different geography. And just you're interested you know how. How do you think about geographic market differences especially at launch curious? What you Yeah I think it's a good question because I mean particularly China's many companies have tried and very few have succeeded when dark. You think again. It's about relevance and and if I would say one thing is of course makes your product is relevant and don't necessarily try to assume that there is a one-size-fits-all you know if you think about global brands like Fanta or other brands. They do Taylor deported. to local needs male fantasize face ever so slightly different in the US versus Europe versus Middle East. For you know they just make sure that the product is locally relevant so that's off course amassed. So that's the first thing to start off with. But then once you have that basic elements in basic needs covered. It's about how'd you launch your brand in in relevant for example in China Jordan do that on TV or or any of the techniques that we typically for my CG posit being Gina where just massive distribution in the copper bond market with mass advertising. That's not necessarily the right approach of entering China and so you know China. It's very online driven cult. Kol's key opinion leaders which is basically people call them influencers in the West. That is one of the key tools used to actually market in China so whilst you know in UK. I more traditional full funnel mark thing makes the US more digital with a bit of TV accident in China. It's about one hundred percents online. Ko L. so again it's about getting that mix rights and also getting the relevant content because if you don't know a brand new Proof that this product is going to work you know in the UK. Number seven is very well known for it's clinically proven. Skin Care in China. It is not as we need to make sure that we get derived continent out there that proves to consumers that is brand has the right credentials behind it whilst in the UK. No can almost take that for granted associate. It does need to be different approach. And it's quite well for us so far We've launched through cross-border e-commerce food stuff with Alibaba team and the first year of trading two thousand eighteen. They give this kind of rising star awards. Two brands that reach have different levels of sales at level one to ten where ten is the highest and so within the first year would reach level. Five is only twelve out of thousand brands. At launched that year on Alibaba team that reached that level. And so we were one out of the twelve awarded a rising star award so again. It's it's doing it right in right way with right marketing. Mix of course products locally round right. Now that's awesome. I'm curious now that you give away your secrets if you were advising you other marketers may be outside of your category to enter China. Is there any any learnings that you've had you feel like are important too to note? I mean you've already hit obviously relevance for sure but I think I mean it's Inter- I mean. China is light miles ahead in terms of online penetration so know bricks and mortar can be quite tough gig and not just within beauty but in any category and it's quite fragmented still cetera. So mikey advice is particularly relevant these times where even we in the West on. I think making a leap for massive jump into into online sales China's already. They're they're online penetration many categories double of that in West. So that's probably a top tip I would give to anybody. Yeah that's great. Let's switch gears entirely one of the things I love to do on a on. My show is to get to know the person behind the microphone so to speak in One of my favorite questions to ask is. Has there been an experience of your past that defines in makes a yar today. Yeah I mean of course your main by many experiences that make you into the person year now but but since his wound that sticks up it's more from a say a leadership believing in this A little bit of a story around it but am not a very big book. Reading person pulled away better or not. I assume you agree via yes but it was was still a very junior brand manager and so had lots of questions around mine. Either ships finding the right style that was offensive to me and so and my boss had told me at the time you need to read. This book was seen Coif Great and I just don't read those and so after the third time he said crystal. I know you're not going to read this book so I copied these ten pages of the book that are relevant so please read this so he went very directed it talked about the level five leader and importance of of humble leadership and again they say it needs to be the Leadership which is about not being humble and listen to the people around whilst at the same time of arrest determination to make things end this one example that really marks me in that space it was when I was To even convince me that this was a leadership style. I want to adopt. Which is was even before when my boss forced me to read this ten pages. It was action example When I was two and a half years in PM Jia was had just been promoted to manage euro as a senior assistant brand manager and so I was working on a project called always silk and unfortunately the global group president had declared that she was gonna can the project she felt. It was not right. that woman was actually Melanie. Healy president at the time at the G and she was actually in the fortunes of the fifty most powerful women in the US. She was number thirteen. Actually and so she can my project and so my my VP. At Time said like look crystal. I know your brand manager wasn't a system brand manager because my brand manager was on holiday. My marketing director was Leave so it was just made any said he said look. I need you to fly with me to Rome. We need to convince Mel as we call that. We need to keep this project so there was a two and a half years in the company in front of this woman that was number thirteen on the fortune though fifty trying to convince her not to can my project but then that meeting was the most amazing of course super nervous. I came in but my slides my fact books and all of that stuff and I did my presentation at. She was generous. She listens yours. Lots of questions at the end of the meeting. She said all right. You've convinced me. Let's let's do this. And so she put the project back on the tracks and even a year later. We won the P. and G. Global Brand Building Award and I'm sure behind the scenes. She was the one pushing it but in a she could have easily said. I'm not even going to bother just it but her generosity or listening just made me feel like committed in dollars. And that's how I feel. I WANNA be with people and so that was very inspiring to me the way the way she did. Yeah no that's a that's a beautiful example of great leadership and for you to take the initiative given you gotta fight for the brand in spite of not having your your management team around as well. That's phenomenal. I do WanNa you said good to great and I think you mentioned Stephen Covey. But it's James Collins is the authorize there you see. I didn't read it but for those listening. Want them to be like wait a second. What are we talking about? So yeah is James Collar link or link to it in the show notes for sure for for those that want to check it out and maybe maybe of the exactly exactly the worries worries. We'll just curious. I mean that was a phenomenal experience in early career. So I'm really interested to ask you. This next question is what would you have told your younger self? If you're starting all over again I think the big thing and I did sometimes. Sometimes I didn't do it but it's the big thing for me would be swing big. You need to set yourself Goals than go for it. I mean I think it was Leo Burnett but you might correct me again. Who had this saying that said you know if you reach for the stars you won't end up with a handful of and I think it was. It's super important. Said those of the issues goals because when you do I think the universe than magically conspires to make it happen somehow but if you don't have that this new for every moment of every important thing in life is a multi pied clip but this one clip of Monty Python. I think it's called the Olympics for running for people with no sense of direction think is is the title of the clip. You might go but basically says he all those people in the starting line all of those runners and then the gun goes off and then they run also different directions. And that's that's the point if you don't know where you're going and you make a big hairy goal than you won't get there very fast into it won't achieve much and I think me that swinging big in that setting does salacious goals in Gopher. I think is is the most important thing that I think anybody can do to. Also just get some satisfaction out of job grid by scrape ice I'm waiting for the book is titled Everything I needed to know in life. I learned from monty python so a silly question but one that I've started adding to the mix of for guests like yourself is curious if there's been impactful purchase you would like to share with us of one hundred dollars or less in the last six to twelve months. It's it's really helped you out right more recently. Probably face masks Hand sanitizer in vitamins. Were probably the most impactful emphatic For like I think you know beyond that I think is going to sound very These plants the cold the mother-in-law tongues. But I just I just love them and I'll talk their their plans that the NASA is GonNa take to Mars so I thought you know it's GonNa take them to Mars a good enough for me but base in their plans at get lots of I live in the city centre so they get a breakdown all kinds of bad stuff next give oxygen day and night and so which is unusual for a plan because usually plan skiffs. Yo to a no. It's not necessarily the brand that space but actually have forty of those plants they lined my whole flat so one could argue gone overboard a little bit but I love it. I need to check that out especially when we were working from home having a little extra oxygen execs and I get a lot of comments on my plans. Because they're behind nine when I video call Nice. Nice little to marketing ish questions for you if you can step back from the day job in all the great brands that you're managing yourself. I'm curious if there are brands or companies or causes that you are following or or taking notice of you think other people should should notice as well there's many Of course not doing great stuff. I think this one that probably it is in a beauty. But I don't want to call out because nobody saw that one coming. It's rolling field. Basically six years the below six years ago they were twenty four million dollar internal and then six years later. They were one billion dollars through a massive Scores when you have Kylie Jenner doing her cosmetics line elevate stuff I get it. Why what that stuff takes off. But basically they built of their backyard. She wants a massive skin. Cameron Action Two thousand. Seventeen became the number one skin. Care Brand. Us nobody saw that coming and the way they did. It is is even more amazing. They did it through completely new. Business Mogul They did it through social selling which is basically like tupperware parties but online you know facebook and they built it out of nowhere and I thought it is. It is quite an impressive way House. Of course great products great credentials but a completely new business mobile. They've completely disrupted the market and I think sometimes when we do product I think we should start with. What's the business model before we go even into we have this product idea? I think For me that they're a great example of that. Yeah as a really good example will last question for you. Curious what feel like is either the largest opportunity or the biggest threat ahead for marketers today. Yeah for me Probably the on a different flipside of the coin. But it's it's for me. It's around no market here. You need to stay relevant. And the only way you're gonNA stay out of in current times. If you drive growth you know as a marketeer Yukon. Just be pretty picture department You need to drive growth and you need to be seen as an engine for growth because I think I saw some stats recently. That says that thirty percent of CMO's only is a job for less than twelve months thing. The average CMO tenure is like many seven months or something like that. So as was another. Cy I believe that fifty percent of Co thing that's effective me wanting to things. That is a bit useless. So that's where and being the engine of growth in the company by teaming up with the other C. Suites people in the company. You know being a growth hacker like the rolling example that I gave into himself. You know disrupting your own business finding business models but he cruelly connected this is antithesis sets what we as as a marketing organization are uniquely placed to do that as well as personalization and I would say cultivating unique or nothing goes up property my mind UNICORNS. I mean like the tech people like all of the data. Bits that you need to be friends with people and have done in your team in cultivating and through those things. I think you can truly become a growth engine. But it's no longer being the predictions department. The Madman days are over the crystal. Thank you so much for coming on the show. It's been Been Fascinating conversation. Calm my pleasure thank you I. It's Alan again. Marketing today was created and produced by new marketing. Today please feel free to write us a review on eighteen or your favorite listening. Don't forget to subscribe. Tell your friends and colleagues about the show. I love to hear from listeners. And you can contact me at marketing today. Podcasts DOT COM there. You'll also find complete show notes of links to anything we talk about. Any you can also search our archives. I'm Alan Heart and this is marketing.

US Walgreens China UK facebook Europe brandon rose Belgium DC Netflix Middle East Malan Heart First Party Ulta partner Kristof chief marketing officer brand manager flu Kristoff Christoph
249: WMT Radio Replay: How to keep a balance in this digital world when we work at home

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

05:23 min | 2 months ago

249: WMT Radio Replay: How to keep a balance in this digital world when we work at home

"This is the business storytelling podcast with christopher tra- available on google spotify apple and dora and other podcast channels. Want to play it on your iphone. Just ask siri to play the kristof trap business storytelling podcast also available on alexa. Here's kristoff today's episode. Mt join us maker. Line by kristoff trap doug wagon with you on the wmt morning show. Twenty six feels like nineteen is six fifty three tuesday november seventeenth christoph trapped. Good morning to you. Who would've thought that during the coronavirus pandemic with people working from home a lot more that we would have issues separating work and home and getting a balanced there. Well i knew it. But i have to. I hate. I hate to admit it it. Hey thanks for having me. It certainly has been a challenge. I mean seriously. I haven't left my home in. Who knows how long it of course now we got the new requirements recommendations by the governor coming out last night with with Cases going up. It's a challenge. You have to you have to figure out how do you set boundaries said limits. You know it could be as simple as making sure people know. What are we working on school things. I put my kids Both of them are currently Quarantining and i. I put in my calendar. This is what i work with you on school things. It's not a bad thing though. Because you mean you almost have to set those boundaries because otherwise you would just be mainly going back and forth from me. I have more time sitting there with my laptop doing stuff in fact cortana to yesterday that thirty percent of my off hours or sped doing work things yeah i. I'm not surprising. I'll tell you. This is the teachers especially shout out to the teachers. They're working at working at working at teaching three times as many Sessions i guess as they did before with people being promoted people being at school. I don't know how they do it. But but on the other hand we also want to think about. When is it time to stop working right right. Turn the computer off. And and co carlos hidalgo. Who actually wrote a book on. It's called the other american dream. Which means you know. Find the right boundaries in your life and i got up at five o'clock at night from my computer and i say i'm done. That's that's the boundary you're done well it's got to figure that out. What are some of the things that can happen if you do not follow this and you let your work life balance. Get out of kilter when you're at home rather than physical workplace well it can affect your relationships of course and right now with people being so close to each other nonstop all the time. That's of course important dryades That we keep those intact. The other thing is you can get burned out. Because if you're working nonstop it is really hard to shut off and Kyle ac Over as he actually tweeted this the other day he said on monday through friday my goal is to the ten minutes. A yoga No phones after six pm. And maybe that's a really good idea you know. Put your phone down. Put your ipad town focused on each other. Whether it's six o'clock with seven o'clock or five thirty at the time that works for your family but you know you gotta step away and it used to be easier because you would drive home once your home. You're at home and now we're connected nonstop exactly. It is a nonstop connection. Chris kristof trap joining me here on the wmt morning show. You can find out more about what he does on a daily basis. There's so many things that you do it your master marketer. Your travel schedule is completely changed as far as used to be international. Travel all these conferences. You just zoom in For the most part but You've been able to maintain a reasonable work life balance. Authentic storytelling dot net. That's the website. Yeah check it out and certainly travel has changed. I now do keynotes in singapore from basement. You and joe biden from the basement. Okay getting not. That's it's a remarkable thing. Authentic storytelling dot net. He's got a number of Handles on twitter c trapped your ap and then. What's the travel one that you have to travel podcast with krista. Thirdly right now there's not much happening are there because you know travel is very minimal. But we'll see one point Things will get back to normal that it will and we will talk again soon kristoff. Thanks for joining me here. The w i'm currently accepting requests for future virtual and onsite keynotes and workshops in twenty twenty alone. I've spoken in singapore and istanbul. Virtually of course thanks covert. I can't wait to get back on the road. And if we still can't get on the road in twenty twenty one. I would be happy to speak at virtually feast reach out to me see trap at gmail.com wore authentic storytelling dot net.

kristoff christopher tra thirty percent carlos hidalgo kristof siri christoph doug apple Chris kristof google ten minutes Kyle us joe biden singapore krista twitter istanbul
Spoilers are good for you

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

06:52 min | 1 year ago

Spoilers are good for you

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by indeed. Are you hiring with indeed? You can post job in minutes. Set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist qualified candidates using an online dashboard. Get started today and indeed dot com slash marketplace. That's indeed dot com slash marketplace. And by the Michigan economic Development Corporation, Evan Lyle of rush enterprises is a big fan of Michigan as he put it the future of mobility, is going to be decided right here in this state, visit planet dot com to find out why that's P. L. A. N. E T, M dot com. Facebook uncovers a fake news network in Africa. Live from London. This is the marketplace morning report from the BBC World Service. I'm the Shana street Hochner filling in for on your on. Good morning. Hundreds of accounts on Facebook have been removed after they were found posting fake news during elections across the African continent intentional. Two hundred sixty five accounts removed in countries like Nigeria Senegal Antonia face, but spot the I tippety to accompany in Israel, which was found to be creating fake accounts on posing as locals in these countries. The beam sees Larry Maduro is in Nairobi. This was a major issue, cross Africa, the shallow because Facebook is very popular in on the continent. In some parts of the continent. Facebook is given for free by mobile network. So in many ways, is the version of the internet that many African see. And if there are people who realize that this is the case, and then they try and take advantage of it. It's an issue of huge importance from South Africa to. Egypt and every between Africa and say, banning these accounts, how much impact will this have on what they do in terms of illegal activity? These hackers bonding. This account is just a start. Facebook says they're investigating if there any other out of the business platform. However, there lots of other pages who might be doing similar things the impact on elections across Africa is significant. I just came from South Africa covering the election, then Facebook, did tell us a few weeks ago that they were specifically monitoring misinformation, especially on what's up, which is very big. So they realized that outsize influence, they have democracy in Africa. That was Larry mcadoo. Let's do the numbers. Here in the UK the pound fell to full month low against the dollar ads on set. She as Brexit continues Australians are preparing to head to the polls this weekend. Prime minister Scott Morrison is hoping for re-election, however, economic growth is slowing. And after the country's hottest summer on record climate change is becoming a major issue. The BBC's Phil Mercer reports now from Sydney. Stop driving climate. For many Australians, the environment is then, number one concern in this election, a lightning rod for conservationists is the calm, I call mine in the Galilee. Basin in Queensland that's proposed by the Indian company Donnie right now in the run into this election. Let's stop Edadi now it would be one of the biggest coal mines in the world, if it goes ahead, Mary Carroll who runs a tourism agency in Rockhampton says the region needs the resources industry seven minds at the moment, they're all going through their approvals prices at the moment. And I think one of the phase out via with all of the talk about one particular mine, I the comical mine is that if it doesn't proceed, perhaps, the Abbas white Australia's climate council. An independent campaign group is warning that if left unchecked global warming could white more than two and a half trillion dollars from the domes-. Economy over the next eighty years, you'll vote will help shape, stralia sixteen million Australians are eligible to vote many yearn for political stability in a country where it's been more than a decade since prime minister served a full term in office in Sydney on the BBC's Phil Mercer for marketplace. Cooling, all game of thrones founds the final episode as this weekend. So if you didn't want any spoilers fingers in, as now only Jacob, I have no idea what happens. But apparently, many of us do like to find out ahead of watching a drama. That's right. Spoil his don't spoil apparently results of a study by the university of California showed that spoiled us can actually enhance enjoyment. Professor nNcholas Kristof out is one of the authors, people do think that's the critical partners the, the creator of it has gone to some trouble to hide it. And you think there must be a reason that, that must be the secret of the pleasure? And they have say after this finding came out about ten percent of. People were overjoyed people who like spoilers. Everyone's been telling me, I'm crazy. My whole life. And finally evidence that proves that I'm the reasonable one and then ninety percent of people treated it with complete skepticism all the way up to derision and mockery. And I when they do it to my face I asked them, you, when you went to see hamlet, did, you know how that ended like, of course, you know how that ended and it doesn't ruin your pleasure, and then I'll ask them something like, do you like the usual suspects, by the whole thing depends on who Kaiser says as and they love that movie I am the second time you should. Oh, I loved it even morning. That's the point. Right. That really in your own life, you have all of these experiences of things that are spoiled that you enjoy. And yet, people persist in believing that spoilers spoil things, and in this age station. Megyn technologists phase. It's quite hard to void. What happens next in some ways, the promise become vastly worse in recent times? So decades ago everyone could wait for the moment when who shot JR was revealed, and now viewing is just so a synchronous that is you can record. It shows or dumped, all at once you're when is it possible to talk about the final opposite of game of thrones or even sports events? People record them and watch them later, so come I say who won the World Cup as happens or do I have to wait some period after that. So people who are at work at that time, taking a nap and watching it later can catch up. And so the spoiler problem just gets worse and worse that was nNcholas Kristof out on finding a what from anew on until we buckle Monday with another special show from India. Hi everyone. We've talked about the tough competition for jobs in India. Tune in Monday to hear how that pressure starts early whole parts of India's economy are geared towards helping students from up to fifteen hours a day to crack university entrance exams. But he's that the best way to train new workers. That's Monday in London. I'm shot three Papa with the marketplace morning report from the BBC World Service.

Facebook Africa BBC World Service Phil Mercer prime minister BBC London India Sydney South Africa South Africa Michigan economic Development nNcholas Kristof Professor nNcholas Kristof Nigeria Larry Maduro Larry mcadoo Egypt Evan Lyle Mary Carroll
275: Virtual Presentation Tips: Keep These Things In Mind When Presenting Virtually At Conferences

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

15:02 min | Last month

275: Virtual Presentation Tips: Keep These Things In Mind When Presenting Virtually At Conferences

"This is the business storytelling podcast with christopher tra- available on google spotify apple and dora and other podcast channels. Want to play it on your iphone. Just ask siri to play the kristof trapped business storytelling podcast also available on alexa. Here's kristoff today's episode. Business storyteller trap here you're hosting author of content performance culture episodes to seventy five on deck. Hope everyone is making it to the holiday season and looking forward to twenty twenty one. It'll be here before we know it. Hopefully you have some time. You can take off and go from there. Kick the year off with a bang all right so today. I wanna talk about virtual presentation tips. What can you do better when you present at conferences. Virtually so we have talk about this before. There's more more virtual conferences. In fact i get asked to speak at so many i. I just turned down. Because i can't be doing a webinar. Every day of the week. I do have a day job. I do have a family I do have things to do. So let's talk about what to keep in mind when it comes to presenting virtually. I'm not talking about some of the standard tips that you've already seen out there how to look good on zoom meeting etcetera etcetera. Don't shoot up your nose when it comes to a framing yourself. Camera straight ahead. Mike camera times is off to the side just by the way my office set up and that works to. That's fine but what i'm talking about is what will the final product look like it. Here's what's interesting about that to meet when you speak at a conference not virtual but at the conference venue. It's almost always the same furry very similar right. you have a state. You've got a powerpoint up you're in control of how many slides what slides If you don't have slides you can just have one slide for the whole time. And that's fine. But what i've noticed is when it comes to virtual conferences. We have thinks that are all over the place so let me walk you through. How virtual conferences work so one is we have the split screen and we do have an article over on authentic storytelling that net. I will link to it from the show notes then storytelling dot net forward slash virtual hyphen presentation hyphen tips. And you can look at the pictures there. What i'm talking about here but the the first option is it's specically you powerpoint you and the powerpoint fifty fifty equal partners in crime but so people can see a powerpoint but they can also see you at the same at the same size and That's actually something to think about the other options out. I'll get back to the future here at the end reminded me if i forget. Ha ha this is not life so that's a split screen and then we have the presenter smaller deck larger and this what happens here is you got a little bitty picture of the presenter and then you have the deck taken up most of the screen and the problem that i find with this one is. It's too dependent on your deck and lend. Let's be honest even if you have a look and deck. I don't wanna look at a deck while you're talking about the one powerpoint slide for three minutes. Just i want to see. The people. People relate to people guys seriously. Humans relate the humans. Humans don't relate to powerpoint decks now. There is some caveat here because guess what if it's a super technical slide. Sometimes you have to show something visually. I mean i get it sometimes. That does happen. Sometimes that's important but if you just have a slide with a stock art image. What a waste of real estate now. Sometimes i get it. That's part of the platform that we use for the conference but just something to keep in. Mind as you're picking the different platforms the split screen by the way Super easy to do in switzer studio To do the one that's in here. You can record you can stream directly to it And that one does work for that. This other one were I have a screenshot in here. That's the one they used at Context summit in content marketing world. And i don't hate it to the extent. How i hate the one where you have the little picture in a huge powerpoint. This one is actually pretty good. And the reason is because it has to chapter links on the left so i can go to the left and i can click on a chapter of what you're talking about in. I can't skip ahead. So i can skip the intro. If i already know you can skip sections of our to know everything. I think i wanna know about that. Section and move forward. Now this is we did have a episode with with a company Kanobi dot com. I talked to their chief content officer that was episode two fifty seven. So if you go back Whatever that is twenty eight days so about a month That's that's what you can listen to that show The one thing that i found interesting about that Technology is you have to be aware how it's going to be displayed. Because i'm not a powerpoint whiz. I'm not a big fan of powerpoint. Slide kinda rush through getting done. Get the bare minimum. Quite frankly i don't try to use Too many stock images you know like this makes my audience happy so i have a picture of some unrelated happy woman not my style serously but anyway i didn't realize i knew about the platform but i didn't necessarily realize how it gets pulled together so i didn't have the right chapter headings really and i'm guessing the chapter headings or just the section titles but i don't know i didn't ask i don't remember seeing it my point is i should've asked and this is really the takeaway here as you're thinking about speaking of virtual conference find out what the system is find out how it looks. There's a big difference between giving a keynote. Offline now a keynote into an roundtable right so just something to think about. Make sure you ask. And i probably could have done that little better and probably would have then. Of course the next option we half powerpoint only so this is probably the worst one honestly. I mean this is even worse than just having a little picture and then and then the big powerpoint of From the presenter and this you don't even see the presenter you can't even make a connection. I mean you might as well listen to a podcast seriously. Right because most powerpoint decks. They're not technical enough to truly be needed. They are there to compliment the compliment the rest of the presentation so something to think about. How do we make that You know what's the set up if you're speaking so if it's a powerpoint only you probably need to get a design look really good and maybe even have. I listened to guy. I think it's guy he'll leave and don't remember how to pronounce his last name. A conference a few years ago. We spoke together on a panel in. He had a ton of slights in every site was like four seconds. five seconds. i mean super-quick super-quick so of course the problem is not to build that slide deck. So again you got to pick your battles but but his slides moved and moved and move so if you use that kinda model in your debts style this could work but for me who actually You know i I have a lot of interaction with my audience. Which i get it. It's harder and harder when they're not right in front of you but now they can't see me not really a good model for me even though i'll make it work if that's the only way to do it then the other one i'm not necessarily saying this is good either but it's good to know. I did the presenter only so there was no powerpoint was talk to tell did hold up the book a couple times and You know there's kind of that's kind of how that went but it is important to ask. It's also important to find out what the event planners expectations are. What are they like. what don't they like. Are they going to nitpick your powerpoint to death Typically if that's the case unless they pay me. I'm not even interested because it just takes too much time quite frankly And you know a lot of these talks. They're similar talks for different audiences. So it's not like i create the deck from scratch. And you know. Sometimes people ask you to add some some stock art images. Sometimes i do that. But it's not on brand you know. Of course you can always updates stock stock art images. Also it's good to understand the technology. How will people interact with you is. They're cute who monitors monitors that is during the session. If i'm in front of a live audience. I can of course see them when they have questions than i can have a conversation so it's good to know how that works really quickly. The other thing to think about is who's going to do the introduction. I happen to conferences where i thought somebody was going to do it. And then nobody did so introduce myself. So i do have a little slight up at the beginning. Where can do that if i need to. The other thing is an introduction to somebody to read. Make sure you sent them like a tv script. Something that's actually readable I was moderating a track at a conference a couple of years ago. At all these long long introductions they were super hard to read. I mean seriously and they were not written to be read. They were written to be read quietly to yourselves right. They weren't written to be announced so to speak do phonetic spelling so kristof trap. For example would be chris and then a new word cough t o f. F trap t. r. p. and so highlight Bolt some of the key phrases It really should be like a tv script right. So if you're gonna say christoph was born in nineteen sixty five which wasn't but if that was the year you'd spell that out because that's easier for people to do so just something to think about That's another problem. Of course future. I do think the future will be full virtual reality for example. I'm right here in my office. And i am being shoot my presentation in vr. That's doable very doable. Now just with an iphone and The camera that i mentioned Let's see i do at three sixty nanno the lincoln here in the article. You can just put that on your phone. Not a big deal. No problem Good to go and then at the conference you know the people sitting at home. They can watch life with their headset on. So it's almost like they're sitting there with you. Of course the problem today is my office. It's a good size. But i'm i'm not on a stage right now necessarily set up like you can sit around me even though the couch in my office and there's is a good amount room but it's not like stage so it's just something to think about. How do we make that actually useful so you can already do that. You can already do a virtual reality event that is shot in v are so that's possible Get the camera. It's like hundred eighty bucks or something like that. Currently was down to seventy two point so kind of goes up and down But that is a way to to do that. Down the road and i did. Actually i do have a video in here last year or two years ago when i spoke et de madrid. I shot that talk in vr. Now it's kinda boring right. It's just people said around. And i put the camera in the middle of the audience but you can literally just look around the room and listen to me and then you can also see who is looking bored. Who's enjoying themselves and that kind of thing so We're getting there but the key takeaway is as you're doing virtual presentations at conferences. They are some tips that you want to keep in mind and that you wanna make sure that you use and you're aware how it's going to work with that particular conference because there's only systems out there. Some people use zoom. Some people you switcher. Some people use webinars webex or whatever it's called a go webinars. Some people use something totally different. There's hey summit. There's other tools so just be aware how it works and then tried to figure out a way to adjust your presentation to work for that specific audience. Thank you for listening to this. Episode of the business storytelling top cast. Today we have episode to seventy six. Should you really be doing influence or marketing With my good friend jason falls he is the host of the influence podcast. He'll fill us in on that topic of course Keep an eye out for his latest book. Seventy should you really be doing influence on marketing. Ondeck tomorrow probably less than twenty four hours by the time you listen to this really appreciate you tuning in any guests recommendations drop me an email see trap edge email dot com always happy to consider people that have stories to ask them to come on the show and share them with all of us. We can learn together. We can grow together. We can be better together until next time.

christopher tra kristoff kristof siri alexa switzer apple Mike google christoph chris lincoln madrid jason falls
Christophe Rocancourt Pt. 1: Swindler of the Stars

Con Artists

45:41 min | 5 months ago

Christophe Rocancourt Pt. 1: Swindler of the Stars

"On a Balmy noon in late nineteen ninety-one twenty-four-year-old Christoph broken coal wanted aimlessly up Las Vegas Boulevard in Los Angeles California. As a native Frenchmen who had never traveled outside of Europe. He was in as passed by streets. He hit only read about in magazines Beverly Boulevard and Melrose Avenue just as he imagined bleached with sunshine and speckled with palm tree swaying back and forth in the warm breeze. Christoph turned toward the swarm of Paparazzi standing outside a restaurant and washed as a limousine sped away from the throng of flashing cameras. He walked toward the entrance unable to comprehend how anyone would want to stay clear of such undivided attention. The Marquis above the door red cafe Maurice and KRISTOF grinned. A French restaurant Sepah Faye. Kristof said that a table and glanced about the room hoping to spot someone famous. No such luck. He sipped his glass of ice water calmly assessing his situation. First and foremost. He needed a place to stay. He brought a little bit of cash with him but by no means to have enough to afford an apartment or even a hotel room for more than a nights whole to. If he wanted free lodging, he'd need a friend and if he wanted to make a friend in a place like Cafe Maurice, he'd have to pretend to be someone else. No one would be interested in letting Kristof broken coal pool often and wanted criminal sleep on their couch. But Christopher roken core famed European boxer in town for a fight well. That man might be offered a spare bedroom. He turned to the gentleman sitting at the table next to him and produced an incredibly disarming captivating. Smile. Excuse me wellness you. Do you speak French? Welcome to con artists a podcast original I'm less. Every week, we peel back the layers of history's greatest deceptions and tell the stories of the hustlers swindlers in fraudsters that orchestrate them. I'll dive into their psychology breakdown that tricks and explain why anyone might full for a con-. You can find old episodes of con artists and all other parkas originals for free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream. For Free on spotify, just open the APP and type con artists in the search bar bar. This is our first episode covering the rise of Christoph Roco a French conman also known as the swindler of the stars. In today's episode, we'll discuss kristaps turbulent childhood and detail the beginnings of his criminal career which took him from France to Switzerland, and then all the way to Los Angeles California. Next week, we'll cover Christoph miraculous ability to continuously escape a lengthy punishment at the hands of law enforcement despite being hunted for crimes across the globe, we have examined how this prolific con artist. To remain a free man today. We have all that and more coming up stay with us. Christoph, roken core is a gritter who over the course of thirty years managed to transform himself from a poor French often to a rich Hollywood socialite. Everyone thought he was someone different on the West Coast some new him as Christopher Della Rentis and others knew him as Christopher, de la Renta in the hamptons folks thought his name was Christopher Rockefeller. He told people he was a prince, a prize fighter and a member of the French new -bility. He would women left and right which resulted in a couple of marriages, a few affairs and several children. Though one could say he reached the height of his criminal career in the late ninety s early two thousands. Christoph is today a free man. KRISTOFF Tiaa. Danielle. Broken. Cole was born on July Sixteenth nineteen sixty seven in a coastal. Frenchtown called on flew. His parents were Danielle Rowe conquer an alcoholic house painter and an villa, a seventeen year old sex worker. The couple wed just one month before Kristof was born. Along with his youngest sister Angelina, Kristof spent the first two years of his life living with his parents in a mobile home in. A rural commune located a short distance away from the port on flew. His infancy was miserable. His parents fought constantly often over the fact that `unique would leave the babies home alone for indeterminate amount of time while she went to work in the city with her sister. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, nine, Danielle, and nick ended their relationship and abandoned their children. Danielle moved to Belgium, and then he left Kristof and Angelina with her parents who lived in a two room hovel that lacked running water or electricity. Three years later, Danielle returned on floor and reassumed his duties as a FAFA. However, after a string of girlfriends rejected Christoph and Angelina, he gave up on them once again. In nineteen seventy six Danielle placed his children in an orphanage in. Psalm. Shimon village. By the age of nine KRISTOF had already experienced significant amounts of abuse and neglect. These painful experiences may have influenced his proclivity for delinquency. In adulthood. Psychological study published in April. Two. Thousand. Sixteen in the journal Criminal Behavior and mental health sought to discover which forms of harm to children were most likely to be associated with criminal behavior later in life. Psychologists, Catherine Howell Avocado Lauren Miller graph Laura Schwartz and Sandra. Graham. Berman examined data from a representative sample of two thousand, two, hundred and twenty four young Swedish. dolts making sure to distinguish between the different types of victimization each adults reported. This study concluded that childhood experiences of Verbal Abuse Sexual Abuse and property offenses were not highly associated with later criminal activity but the early traumas of physical abuse witnessing physical violence and neglect were all significantly related to criminality in adulthood. krystof broken Cole was an extremely neglected child one who had been left alone as a toddler and then abandoned multiple times by both of his parents. While the adversity he experienced in childhood cannot possibly hold the sole explanation for his later deviant behavior. It may take responsibility for some of it. Off the Danielle ditched Kristof at the orphanage he stayed there for three years he was described as a bright and sensitive child a boy with a definitive aversion to authority and to Talkative charm that always got him out of trouble. Though he continuously dreamt of reuniting with his father in July of Nineteen seventy, nine, twelve year old Christoph was instead adopted by a family lived just outside Lynn Newborn, another small town Normandy. kristaps adoptive father was tough on the boy, a former member of the military he valued discipline above all. KRISTOF tried to run away from home several times throughout his adolescence. In Nineteen eighty-five just after his eighteenth birthday Christoph abruptly left home and moved to Paris where he decided to reinvent himself for the very first time. KRISTOF started introducing himself to people as Prints Dick Galitsin. He told everyone he was a Russian nobleman and began dabbling in delinquency. crease stoves. First Foray into a life of crime did not bode well for his future most people did not buy into his Russian alias and he was reportedly jailed five times between nineteen, eighty-seven and nineteen ninety-two for petty theft forgery and counterfeiting. But kristoff persevered, and in his efforts, he discovered the perhaps he was not meant to run the city committing minor offenses. Perhaps, he was meant for bigger scams. Still posing as Prince Dick Elites in he found himself a rich girlfriend her father owned a large property in the middle of Paris Christoph. Forged the deeds to that building and sold it for one point four million dollars solidifying his neck for the art of swindling. After getting a taste of the big time. Christoph was not interested in going back to the world of petty crime. He had larger aspirations now and a thirst for risk. On September Fifteenth Nineteen ninety-one just across the French border in Geneva Switzerland a woman was held hostage overnight in her apartment by three armed men. Lead the next morning, they dragged her to the jewelry store where she worked and forced her to open the safe. The men's stole four hundred thousand dollars worth of merchandise. Then hopped into that getaway car hoping to escape the scene as fast as possible. Unfortunately the police were waiting for them and the men were forced to flee on foot. It was a tricky situation but a successful one for Christopher Broken, Cole? who was fingered as one of the suspects but never caught. He was however officially a wanted man. He had to make a break for it. And he knew exactly where he wanted to abscond. Crystal broken core had barely landed in Los Angeles. When he sat down at Cafe Maurice and convinced the man sitting next to him a wine salesmen named Charles Glen that he was a famous boxer in town for a fight. Charles was also a native Frenchmen which proved for Christoph who did not yet speak much English. The two men struck up an immediate friendship. Charles let Christoph sleep on his couch for a period of several months, taking him out to clubs and introducing him to other Frenchmen in the area. Christoph repaid Chelsea's kindness by swindling several of his friends. One of them Pierre Lang was in the midst of a long and frustrating remodel of his Bella home and couldn't afford to continue renovations. In Wilson appear to be an altruistic gesture. KRISTOF, offered to buy the property from and take the problem of his hands. He couldn't offer payment rights away, but he would have it ready for PS shortly as soon as the recent investment came through. then. Christoph presented. With a paid vacation to Portugal suggesting that he relax abroad and. Some stress. Christoph promised he would Wyatt Pierre the money for the house while he was overseas. PA took his new friend that his word and left to enjoy his holiday unaware Christoph had paid for the trip by stealing another one of Charles's friends credit cards. Christoph moved into PS Bella home and live there rent free the several months. Eventually. Grew irate at the fact that he hadn't received any money from KRISTOF and decided to return to Los Angeles. Because night the Pierre. Not Kristof could afford to keep the House the bank foreclosed on the property leaving Pierre with a stain on his credit history and without a place to live. Despite Christoph questionable behavior Charles Glenn continued to socialize with him. In fact, it was due to a bet with Charles that Christoph tried to win the heart of a young woman named Cree Park a woman who within a year would become his first wife. Coming up Christoph angry embarked on a whirlwind romance. Hi It's Alistair and I have some exciting news. The new spotify original from podcast is unlike anything you've heard before it's called very presidential with Ashley Flowers and it uncovers the most damning detail. Surrounding history's most high-profile leaders. Every Tuesday through the twenty twenty election host Ashley flowers shines a light on the dark side of the American presidency. From Torrid Love Affairs and contemptible corruption to shocking cover ups and even murder she'll exposed the personal and professional controversies you may never knew existed. You'll hear some wildly true stories about presidents such as Richard, Nixon George Washington Andrew Jackson, and more. Very. Presidential. Exploits you never learned in history class the probably should have. Family Drama Hustle Vices. Dirty Secrets. These presidents may have run, but they most certainly cons hide. Follow very presidential with Ashley Flowers Freon spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. This episode of Cornutus is brought to you by simply safe it was designed to be easy to use. So protecting your whole home twenty, four seven has never been simpler. You can order online with the click of a button once it arrives just opened the box, place the senses and plug it in. Now your home is protected around the clock and that twenty four, seven, professional monitoring and emergency dispatch starts at a reasonable fifty cents a day. Honestly, I, feel very good knowing we have the system our apartment was broken into two years ago, and while we lost a lot of irreplaceable items, it was mostly a sense of security that was stolen. Having simply safe the cameras senses, and even the window decals makes us feel more secure and assured that our home is taking care of should we ever be away for a period of time again? If you want home security, head, simplisafe, dot com slash con artists, and get a free. HD. Camera. That's simplisafe. Dot Com slash con artists to make sure they know that our show you. Now, back to the story. After landing in Los Angeles in September of Nineteen, ninety-one, twenty-four-year-old Kristoff Broken Gore spent the next several months fraternizing with other French. That's. Most of them were introduced to him by his new friend Charles. Glenn. Channels, often took Christoph out in the town where they explored the l. a nightclub and restaurant scene. Christoph was finally living the high life. He had always felt he deserved. One. Night in June nineteen ninety-two Charles took Christoph to the bar one club and as they walked in Christoph locked eyes with a beautiful young woman stationed at the coat check. As they walked to the Bar Christoph. Bet His friend that he could get the coat check girl to go on a date with him Charles loved and readily took that bet. Not only was the stunning woman out of Christoph League, but she had also been reading the Bible while at work. She didn't seem like the type to say, yes to a date with a foreign stranger. Christoph sent Charles OV- over the notes for her describe increased love for the Lord and asking her out to dinner. The woman, an aspiring actress Gre- Park said No. So Christoph roken call came back to our one the next night and Oscar again. One. Small Rejected him. But Christoph would not take no for an answer. Every night for the next six weeks he returned to the bar and sat with gry in the CO check room. He told her he was Christopher Della Rentis the nephew famous film producer Dino deller anticipate, and proclaimed to love the Lord as much as she did. Though he couldn't get her to go on a date. She did get him to accompany her to church where Green remembers him crying throughout the service. She saw him as a desperately sad man with a hard heart, a man who wanted to change. Christoff did eventually wear down and she began spending time with him outside the coat check room. In October of Nineteen ninety-two off to spending most of the previous five months together. Also WLI decided to get married in Las Vegas. Chapel that Gre- learned Christoph real last name was broken core but under the spell of new love she chose to ignore his lie and proceed with the wedding anyway. Back in Los Angeles, they moved into a suite at the peninsula beverly, Hills Hotel and greed became pregnant with their first child. They should have been in a honeymoon phase enjoying their lavish lifestyle and dreaming of their Bright Future. Instead. The couple fought relentlessly. Creditors kept calling demanding money and as grieg closer to her husband she realized she didn't actually know him. It's all she had never met his famous uncle that alone his parents none of his family had even called to congratulate them on their wedding. Eventually she left him. Several months pregnant. She moved out of the hotel suite and into an apartment with her sister all the way in San. Francisco. kristoff fallout greet upstate he moved to Sausalito and still using the name Christopher dentists swindled several wealthy residents after claiming he was in the market for vineyard. All the while he was continually pestering degree. He called her constantly frantically begging her to take him back. Fed Up, with his behavior and worried for her own safety gre- made a big decision and called the FBI. She didn't think anything would come of her call. If anything she was hoping to get more information on her husband. But when she told the operator, she was married to a man named Christopher core and that she'd be willing to help the FBI find him. She was immediately connected to an ancient. Cooling the FBI on her husband was a brave move by agree it's not an action that most victims of stalking can bring themselves to take. In a two thousand eleven study published in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence Psychologists Leyla Dutton and Barbara winstead sought to explore the types frequency and effectiveness of responses to unwanted pursuit and stalking after a relationship has been ended. After extensive discussion with a sample of both targets and pursuers, they discovered that making a geographical change and taking legal action when not the most common responses to stalking, but they were the most effective in terms of getting the behavior to stop. Both the targets and the pursuers felt that other responses such as avoidance, aggressive confrontation and joint counseling were less effective strategies in deterring the pursuer. Though. Grease location change did not discourage KRISTOF. She hopes the contacting law enforcement would force him to leave her alone. But in order for that to happen, she had to help the FBI catch him. Who? Was surprised at the FBI immediate response to her call. Agent Mark Irish explains the Kristoff was wanted in Switzerland, for the Jewelry Heist back in Nineteen ninety-one and that Interpol had recently gotten a tip that he had been spotted in the Sausalito area. Often in spoke contacted the FBI it became agent Irish is job to track down crystal broken coal, but he hadn't had any luck yet. That is until gree gave them a call. The FBI placed an incoming trace on the phone at Greece sister's house hoping to track Christopher down whenever he called to talk. Unfortunately Christoph was too smart for them. He had clearly accounted for the possibility of trace and his cools would always appear to be coming in from different locations. The FBI would scramble to check a phone in Los Angeles one day and in New York City. The next, never finding where Christoph was actually calling from. Eventually they asked me to schedule a cool with kristoff during a specific timeframe. She told Christof she moving and this cool would be his last chance to speak to her again. Christoph called during the appointed time and during his tearful goodbye, the FBI traced his location to LAS. Vegas, where a team arrested him shortly thereafter. Christoph was taken to Geneva to face charges for the jewelry robbery but due to insufficient evidence the case did not end up going to trial. Rather than that, Christoph go the Swiss police turned him into the French, who locked him up on old swindling charges. Christoph was in prison from nineteen, ninety, four to nineteen ninety-five during which time he incessantly cold and wrote letters degree and then newborn daughter. Even. Though Greek claims to have been driven crazy by his constant contact, she still went to Paris to see Kristof released and even briefly allowed their romance to be rekindled. When they came back to California Greece saw the era of her ways and split from Christoph once again, which drove him back to his same stalking behavior. One night while she was hosting a prayer meeting at her house Kristof sat on the sidewalk outside. Our 's. Gre-. Didn't by his act but Marjorie, another woman at the meeting took pity on him and allowed him to stay on her couch the several months. Together, Kristof and Marjorie tried to convince gre-. The Crystal was in new man the God had changed him for the better. But nothing they said, could convince Gre- that her ex husband was anything other than a liar and a fraud. Less than one year later, grease instincts about KRISTOF PROVED TO BE? Right. The man who had professed his undying love for her who claimed to have transformed and found God went off and married to playboy playmate. KRISTOF met Mordovia res- At a restaurant on Santa Monica Boulevard in early Nineteen ninety-six in May they drove to Las Vegas where they were officially married. KRISTOF swept off her feet and into his lavish lifestyle though she kept her apartment the too often stayed in a suite at the region beverly. Wilshire. Hotel where they hosted extravagant parties he drove a Ferrari she drove a Jaguar. creased. Of kept them bankrolled by posing as a French investor while out on the town, he solicited business deals with wealthy men, friends of friends who never knew exactly who he was and kept whatever money he could seize from the phony arrangements. Christoph also swindled his wealthy friends accepting hundreds of thousands of dollars in loans predicated on payback promises that Christoph never intended to keep. He told people, he would help them open nightclubs, boutiques, renovate restaurants, and redesigned homes. In return. Christoph. receive things like his Ferrari or his facade she suits. He even got a friend to bribe in Los Angeles Pasta Clark to issue him a real American passport. He owed everyone around him extraordinary amounts of money and at least one favor and if they ever dead to call him out in his behavior, Kristof might turn the tables on them accusing the people he'd conned of the crimes that he had committed. It was a bold strategy and one that would soon backfire leading to a full scale investigation into. Christoph. By both the FBI and the La District Attorney's office as well as a raid of his beloved hotel. Suite. Coming up crease stuff's time on the West Coast reaches a boiling point now back to the story. From late nineteen, ninety-six through the winter of Nineteen ninety-seven Christoph Broken, Cole was living the high, life in Los Angeles. He hosted parties in his suite at the Regent Beverly Wilshire. And befriended celebrities like Mickey, rogue and Michele. If a French pop singer. He funded his lavish lifestyle by consistently running the same relatively simple con. He would claim to be a wealthy French investor put together business with rich Angelenos and pockets whatever money he could get from them. One such scheme involved kristoff partnering with a man named Showroom Masada the owner of to Beverly Hills clothing boutiques. Christoph got the region Beverly Wilshire to agree to put a clothing boutique in the hotel, a high end, Italian menswear store that would be jointly owned by Christof and showroom. With a handshake agreements in place. Christoph ventured out and procured investors including a woman named Lillian Pino who gave him more than one hundred and twenty, five thousand dollars to invest in the store. Showroom also put plenty of his own money into their venture giving Christoph over two hundred thousand dollars in cash. Christoph also convinced showroom to give him twenty, five thousand dollars, worth of clothes and Ferrari. The store never opened and by the spring of Nineteen ninety-seven, twenty, nine year, old Christoph Social. Circle had begun to seriously question the French friend. Of Friends wanted to confront him about all the money and items he owed them. They often ended up resisting. That's urge Christoph was generous when he could be using small acts of kindness to delay any conflicts regarding his bigger letdowns. Creased bodyguard for instance had grown particularly frustrated with him as Christoph had promised to get him green cod and never delivered. But the Buddy God, a man names Benny, an Wa decided not to bring up the issue off to Kristoff told him. He could stay at P. as old apartment for free while he searched for a new place to live. Benny's faith increased was restored and as he arrived at the apartment, he felt grateful to have a boss who took care of him. After inspecting the place however, he found himself more dubious of Kristof than ever before. Inside P is old apartment. Benny. Found several racks of brands new facade. She suits price tags dangling their sleeves. He also found some hand guns and two hand grenades in the wool heater as well as a couple of rifles with scopes propped up behind the window curtains. Benny left the apartment in a hurry and tried to cut ties with Kristoff and PIA. But his hasty exit indicated his knowledge of the weapons in the apartment which worried KRISTOF. Rather. Than wait to get reported, Christoph whence the authorities himself claiming that the facade she suits in his apartment valued two hundred and seventy five thousand dollars was stolen and that he believed Beni to be the culprit. It was a sloppy panicked move on kristaps part the false accusation angered Benny. So much that he ended up going to the police and telling them about everything he'd found increased offs apartment not to mention everything he knew about crease stuff's various schemes. The police contacted the FBI and officially opened a full-scale investigation of Christoph broken coal. At the end of May nineteen ninety-seven, the FBI raided Christoph Suite at the regent beverly. Wilshire, hotel, they hoped to the connaught is there or at least a clue as to how to locate him. But. All they found was PIA who stood off to the side watching in dismay as six sheriff's deputies carried out several boxes of documents, jewelry and guns. Christoph had been expecting the raid and had already escaped to Hong Kong under the pretense of taking a business trip. He stayed out of the country long enough for authorities to lose any hope of finding him. Eventually Christoph comeback to Los Angeles to be with his wife and child, and he did so by sneaking in through Vancouver and being driven across the border by friends. He and Pierre move from hotel to hotel racking up enormous unpaid players until eventually Christoph moved into Mickey Rourke. where. He hid from the LAPD in plain sight. Though Christoph worked hard to keep the illusion of his lavish lifestyle alive the cracks in the foundation of his schemes and his mental health were growing larger by the day. crease stuff's marriage to PIA was also on shaky ground during his stay with Mickey Christoph began having an affair with a woman named Rhonda Ridell. Christoph told Rhonda, he was the son of a countess and throughout their six month affair she completely believed that her boyfriend was French royalty. Rhonda accompanied Christopher to restaurants and nightclubs and sat by his side as he made deals with L. wealthiest men. She didn't know what Business Christoph was in and she really understood what was happening at these business meetings because Christoph conducted them in French or Italian. Rhonda also didn't know the KRISTOFF was married and that PIA and their son Zeus was staying in an apartment just down the street from Mickey's House. She didn't visit that part of town with Kristoff. Instead the couple went from hotel to hotel with Kristoff. Once again, racking up astronomical bills that would go unpaid. By March of Nineteen Ninety, eight Christoph felt invincible. He was having an affair right under his wife snows. He was continuing to fool Los. Angeles, elite into giving him extraordinary sums of money and he had evaded capture by the FBI. But once you're on top of the world, the only place left to go is down. On the nights of March Fourteenth Nineteen, Ninety, eight, thirty year old Christoph was at the Garden of Eden Nightclub in Hollywood when he noticed a muscular man with a ponytail staring at him from a nearby table. Stuff approached the man and the interaction quickly turns confrontational the man began screaming at Christoph telling him he was going to kill him. Christoph S- friends including Mickey rourke stops the fight from getting physical and Christoph left the club. The next evening Christoph was driving down last Janika Boulevard. Right. Past his favorite restaurant Cafe Maurice when the men from the nightclub and his friends were getting out of a nearby black Mercedes. Christoph drove away and when the men from the previous night noticed they hoped into the Mercedes and followed him. Christoph then got a call from his girlfriend Rhonda and told her was being chased by the men from the club and she needed to call the police. Before Rondo could hang up to do so she heard gunshots from the other end of the line. Kristof left his car on foot and walk to a nearby sheriff's station telling the police that he had just been shot at. When the offices went to look at his car, they did find bullet holes for the bullets had clearly been shot from inside the car from a Glock pistol that Christoph did not have a license to carry. crease didn't have any injuries but a man from another nearby car was later found at a local hospital with a bullet wound in his arm. KRISTOF was held for questioning and windows PIA and Rhonda showed up to support him. It dawned on the women that he had been playing them. crease was held in jail for three months on charges of carrying a concealed weapon as well as passport. Fraud. Rhonda attempted to stay with him, but ultimately ended their relationship citing his marriage as her reason for leaving. Pia eventually managed to wrangle together enough money to post portion of crease. Stuff's one, hundred, seventy, five, thousand dollars bail, and though he was happy to be released from jail, he was scared to live his life as he had been prior to getting locked up. He still engaged in cons, but he traveled with a group of bodyguards and was acutely aware that he was always being watched by the FBI, the LAPD and a private investigator. When the privates investigates got word that Christoph might be planning to jump bail. He waited outside one Christoph Court hearings to follow him in case he tried to escape. But. Christof. And his bodyguards had been prepared for this and shuffled between two rented limousines and the investigates couldn't figure out which one held Christoph. The PI chose to follow one of the Limos, but it got away when he was pulled over by a police officer for speeding. The heat was own Kristof and he clearly had to get off the west coast if he wanted to avoid capture. But he has stopped to make before he skipped town for good. One night in late one, thousand, nine, hundred, Ninety, eight Gre- park and her new husband walked into the La home to find Kristoff and a bodyguard sitting in their living room. A pistol in the body. God's hands. Christoph threatened gree and her husband and demanded that she hand over their daughter. Grease new husband, a filmmaker stayed calm. He offered the men something to drink, and then sat down with kristoff asking if the two of them could have a conversation. Greece husband was about to take a risk with Christoph. He was going to try to use his inflated Ego Against Him. After hearing all about off from Gre-, her new husband had enough information to unofficially conclude that he had narcissistic tendencies. Most con artists as we've covered in previous episodes can be classified as narcissists they are obsessed with themselves absorbed in their own narratives and view the people around them as nothing more than things to be used. Christoph childhood experiences of abandonment perfectly set the stage for development of narcissistic tendencies. In his work with narcissists doctor Samuel Lopez de Victoria found that children who had dealt with major traumas often felt the need to create a psychological barrier. The protects them from outside people because people had proven that they would not be trusted. This barrier is often called a false persona or a false identity and it allows the narcissist to change that personality according to the situation at hand. Outsiders never get to know the real narcissist, but the narcissist is insulated from any real pain at the hands of another person. Because narcissists solely energized by the egos according to Dr. Lopez Victoria there are two main ways in which they engage with us. The first is through aggrandizement where they demand others, feed their egos and make them feel superior. They want to be made to feel special to feel entitled to. Feel important. The second is through victimization where whether egos get fed through sympathy and manipulation. The narcissist positions himself above others by making them feel like they haven't done enough to help them like they don't truly care about their friend or their partners suffering. Several times during their relationship Christoph played the victim to agree he wept in church. He whipped on her sidewalk. He convinced her that he was a sad broken man who couldn't survive without her love and support. But grease husband got kristoff to leave their family alone through a grand is ation. He was a filmmaker and during that private conversation, he told Christof he wanted to make a movie about his life. Christoph forgot all about his daughter the reason he apparently trespassed on their property in the first place and excitedly started making plans for his biopic. When the connaught is left that night, he was in a fabulous mood blissfully unaware that he had just been given a bitter taste of his own medicine. After dropping in on Green Park Christoph and officially left La and no one knows exactly where they were for the next several months. There are reports of the couple travelling to. Italy to Centro pay, and there's actual evidence that they spent some time in Nashville. But by late nineteen, thousand, nine, hundred, nine Christoph Pia and young Zeus with settled into an expensive loft in New York. City that cost six, thousand, five, hundred dollars per month to rent. Increased off and his family only spent about six months in Manhattan but Christoph managed to do a fair amount of damage during that time. Though none of his victims have felt safe coming forward with their stories. There are reports of stuff swindling his landlords out of twenty thousand dollars a businessman out of one hundred and seventy five thousand dollars a retail store out to forty thousand dollars worth of merchandise and two more establishments outs fifty thousand dollars. He even seduced an older wealthy woman combing her out of nine hundred, thousand dollars in cash and two hundred, fifty thousand dollars in stolen watches and jewelry. Off To such a short time in New York City the heat was on off again and he had to get out of town. So in May of two thousand, he moved his family out to the hamptons where he would make the most of the summer by chartering helicopters, touring multimillion dollar properties, and of course, swindling Gullible Rich East coasters. All before being arrested once again. Thanks for listening to con artists. We'll be back next week with two of. Roco we'll cover his time in the Hamptons, the movie that did end up being made about him, and how he's managed to become a freeman today despite his insatiable appetite for cones. For more information on Christoph Roco amongst the many sources we used we found Vanity Fez two thousand seven piece the Counterfeit Rockefeller by Brian Burrow to be extremely helpful to our research. You can find all episodes of con artists and the podcast originals for free on spotify not only to spotify already have on if your favorite music but now spotify is making it easy fee to enjoy all of your favorite podcast originals like con artists for free from your phone desktop or small speaker. To Stream Cornutus on spotify just open the APP and type con artists in the search bar I'll see you next time. cornutus created by Max Cutler and is park studios original. It is executive produced by cutler sound design by Brian Gulab with production assistance by. Ranch. Bureau Collie Madden and Isabella. Away. This episode of autism was written by Ellie read with writing assistance by Abigail Cannon I'm Alistair murden. I it's Alistair before I. Go I wanted to remind you to check out the new spotify original from parkas very presidential with Ashley Flowers. Every Tuesday through the twenty twenty election host Ashley flowers shines a light on the dark aside if the American presidency exposing wildly true stories about history's most high profile leaders, there's torrid love affairs, shocking blackmail schemes, and even murder. To, hear more follow very presidential with Ashley Flower was free on spotify or wherever you get your podcasts.

Mickey Christoph Kristof Christoph Los Angeles Christoph Roco FBI Christoph Pia Bar Christoph Christoph League Christoph roken Green Park Christoph Paris Christoph Christoph Social spotify kristoff Christoph Court KRISTOF Christoph Suite Christoph S Charles
179: First reactions to the new Instagram Reels

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

11:11 min | 5 months ago

179: First reactions to the new Instagram Reels

"This is the business storytelling podcast with Christopher. Tra- available on Google spotify apple and Dora and other podcast channels want to play it on your iphone. Just ask Siri to play the KRISTOF trap business storytelling podcast also available on Alexa. Here's Kristoff today's episode. Business storytellers. Christoph. Trap here your host and author content performance culture. Instagram reels has rolled out. What's INSTAGRAM You ask if you have seen it. Think of it like tic TAC except it's in the INSTAGRAM APP lots of dancing kids some dancing adults. and other short fifteen second videos sounds very similar to vine as well the. Twitter APP, I would shut down a few years ago which of course was six seconds interestingly. I don't mind instagram rails, but let me kind of unpack my experience with it the last few days and. Since rolled out, and then we'll talk about how brands can choose to use it. So first of all. It fits very perfectly. You know with the with instagram stories same What's term here? Same? Angle of the camera, right? It's vertical as opposed to horizontal. No that still a youtube huge debate up there in the content world which way to hold the camera. Well, if instagram is your centerpiece social network, you're definitely hurting holding the camera vertically and not horizontally, and if you don't remember the article over on authentic storytelling net, you can take a look there. I talk about that even when you're shooting video vertically and uploaded to Youtube. Makes no difference anymore quite frankly it's not as big of a deal as it used to. So even as you're making. INSTAGRAM orioles part of your create once publish everywhere strategy. Certainly, that is okay to do to use that same video on other channels. In fact, a lot of instagram rules are literally just take talks from tic TAC creators and the export out of Tiktok and they still have the tic Toc logo on them. So F Y I it's not a big deal even the big big tick Tock Stars are doing it. For the time being here's what I like about instagram Brill's and some of the things I don't like quite frankly they go hand in hand to an extent but basically, the only way to locate instagram reels right now is you have to click on the search a magnifying glass, and then you get recommendations I have not been able to figure out how I can. Add them to my My time line or how that would work as of this recording. I'm not sure that's possible. If it is. Let me know I've seen a few accounts that are aggregating instagram wheels and then they basically showed them in their own posts and you can watch them there. I think you can't share them. For the interruption, do you need helping digital marketing for your small to medium sized business reach out now and drop the message at sea trap and G, mail DOT COM to your timeline. That's also another nice thing when it comes to the Real A, you can share them to your instagram story and they play in them directly. So right now, when you share a post, a video, a video post from your instagram feet. The video won't play people have to click now with real they still have to click to watch the whole video if it's more than four seconds long roughly something like that. But they can watch the beginning. So it's kind of Nice to have that functionality I in fact I. Think they should just show you the whole thing quite frankly then you don't have to click over. Once an account has published instagram real it also shows up on their profile page. So it's not the button on the left. It's the button in the middle. Can't describe it to you right the second recording on my ipad but that's the that's why I've seen it and you can watch people's real stare that's I have seen that I'm hopefully I'm. That correctly instagram royals however, they created basically you open up your instagram story and then you swipe over it's curly on the bottom swipe over two reels. And then you can either upload video or you can record right. Then you can add music, you can add other things an effect etcetera etcetera so. There you go. How does that all tie in with the other things than we have INSTAGRAM TV? I've used a couple of times never really have seen much success with it other than you know it's useful when you have a long video and then it links to the instagram. TV Platform. So who knows maybe that integrates at some point the find ability of instagram Brielle's kind of hard right now but but when you see somebody who who has shared one that's worth watching it is easy to follow them. You just click the follow button at the bottom of that instagram real right there. Willett compete with TIC TAC well, who knows what's going to happen with TIC TAC You know President Trump signed executive order I think that's what was that TIC TAC has to be sold or or something or or cease to operate in the United States in the next forty five days. So who knows what's going to happen there? Personally I haven't used Tiktok in a long time. and. I use instagram all the time I like instagram. I like how visual artists especially for my travel sites that's a travel reviews that online really really like. That part of Instagram so you know having the wheels in now it's just another thing to waste your time quite frankly right. You're scrolling through things. You're checking things out and I mean you can only watch so many renditions of Taylor Swift Song But it's a never ending stream. So at some point, I'm guessing it's going to be organized better right now it's really just so up in search, and then you can scroll through their and see what's going on as far as I can tell, you don't have to follow anybody twitter just the I'm sorry. Instagram just recommends whomever Whoever they want based on who they are or based on what the content is. I have found some fantastic creators. There's one Video Creator Karen something I don't remember her name now but her. You know if you want her instagram link. drop me a note. KRISTOF TRAMP ON INSTAGRAM see trap on twitter see trap. Dot Com. If you WANNA EMAMI US into link. What's really awesome about this is. She shows you how she creates these awesome videos and she's a big fan of the INSTA- Cameras to the virtual reality, three, sixty cameras you may have heard, I've used them before. The eighty dollar model. That you just put on your iphone super easy to use actually twenty nineteen. We won a best immersive video with my vr video of an active shooter training by Link County Sheriff's Office here in Cedar Rapids Iowa. And So those things are getting easier and easier, but they take power because you have to think about how you do things. How do you Dolly shoot this? How do you shoot that and she's really like showing you she's teaching everyone she's creating these awesome videos and how to edit them. So for example. One video. Out of her somebody else they showed how you do an edit to have somebody switch clothes really quickly So if you don't know how to do that now you do, of course, that. Hopefully if people are really that interested in video editing and video storytelling can turn into a career right once you know how to do all those things. Once you know the hacks once you know how to think about how to tell a better story, you can transfer that into professional life. So be interesting to see how many tic TAC creators or instagram creators instagram or creators will make that jump or some of them certainly make money just being not just but being creators on those platforms interested to hear if you have any good examples of. Good instagram? Campaigns do we do we call them campaigns yet Is Anybody A. It seems to me that if we'RE GONNA call it campaign that takes a little bit longer plan than a couple of days but I'm sure. Some fast moving companies have already run things. So if you have any anything, you want to share a C. Trap at gmail.com Oetzi trap on twitter that might be the easiest tweeted me, and then I'll re tweet it If I see if I want to, of course and I'm sure you guys have good ideas I'm Christopher. Trap. Christoph trap on Instagram see trap on twitter authentic storytelling debt net is the blog just some quick thoughts on Instagram Brielle's I. Think I kind of enjoyed it so far probably squirrel through reels longer than any to quite frankly, but that's That means. It's something worth watching I guess at least for. A little while until next time. All. Move your content from happening to performing that's what everybody wants nowadays, and content and content marketing and marketing. All those related fields check out of my new book content performance culture, the number one new release in the public relations category on Amazon Dot Com. When it came out I hope you take a look it's available ask paperback and kindle worldwide.

Instagram twitter TIC TAC Christoph Christopher Youtube Alexa Kristoff Siri Google DOT COM Amazon Dora apple KRISTOF TRAMP kindle
Hope And Crisis On The 'Tightrope' Of Working-Class America

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

47:17 min | 1 year ago

Hope And Crisis On The 'Tightrope' Of Working-Class America

"From NPR WB. You are Boston. I'm Magna Chalk Roberti and this is on point. We've done a lot of shows over the years about how globalization jobs and the pharmaceutical industry took lives. When it pushed opioids on the American people throwing the decline of unions and a dysfunctional all congress and the result has been the collapse of working class communities across this country will journalists Nick Kristof he grew up in? Em Hill Oregon population. About a thousand he left to roam the world as a reporter and while he was away his town classmates and childhood buddies fell victim. To the very scourges we talked about a quarter of his high school class died prematurely so he and his co author and wife. Sheryl Wudunn right about what happened. Christopher classmates with care and compassion Ashen in their new book and Yelm Hill with its despair. But also it's hope is the story of this nation so this hour point Americans on the tight rope and you can join us after you hear the story. That nick and Cheryl have to tell about Yam Hill Oregon. Do you think it's the story of your town or changes in your family family. And what can we do as a nation to truly help each other cross that tight rope. Join US anytime on point. Radio DOT ORG or twitter and facebook. I Don Point Radio Well Cheryl Dunn and Nicholas Kristof. Join me today. From New York. In one thousand ninety they became the first married couple to receive a Pulitzer a prize for journalism for their reporting on TNN square protests. Today show Wudunn is a business. Executive and Nick Kristof is the columnist or a columnist for the New York Times they still right as a team and their fifth book out just today is called Tightrope Americans reaching for Hope Nick Kristof Venturo Wudunn. Welcome to on point. Thank you magna yes thanks for having US magnetic. It's really great to have you both. I was wondering if you could just start By taking us back to what Those school bus rides. Were like nick a growing up the number six bus that you would take to and from school. Every day and Yam Hill. Sure so our family farm was four miles from the account of Yelm Hill and so every morning I'd trudge down the hill to Get on the number six bus and this was an area that was dependent on agriculture culture. Kimber and light manufacturing biggest employer was glove factory and it was never hear that had prospered enormously over the last fifty years or so The Homestead Act we're electrification the GI bill of rights at really transformed families removing much. Much better than before and so One of the Families that got on right after me. they were five kids in it and The eldest was migrate Farland Farland NAP and that he had had for younger. Brothers and sisters and You know lots of other kids getting on and then We were all kind of full of hoping we would assume things things were going on. We're GONNA continue to thrive and and they didn't and that's what led us to write the book and Farland in his His his fresh tofu foreign died after A lot of drug and alcohol abuse His brother Zealan died. passed out Drunk during a house fire His Sister Regina died after after hepatitis C. from Drug use Nathan Bloom South up making math and the only one who survived was the youngest Keelan partly because he was in the orange say penitentiary for thirteen years. And it's just and that you know they were only one of two different families of five kids on the number six bus boss both who in both cases four of the five or now gone and it is just how we were so naive. We thought everything was going to get better. And it sure didn't okay. So there's so much to begin to here in in the detail with which you write these stories but share let me just turn to you for a second and most of the time just going the throw questions and nick you June show decide who's GonNa Take GonNa take them because you are a writing team here but I did one actually specifically ask you since you didn't grow up in ample but you have been connected to it through through nick and he and the two of you still are very very connected to the community right right because of the farm is still there. I'm just wondering what you saw as you got to know this community that made you think that it has. It had a bigger story to tell. Well we had been Reporters in Asia and the developing world in China and we also then were posted hosted in in Japan and covered elements of the developing world there as well and so we had been used to writing about a variety of things economic development element and humanitarian crises. And we would come back every year. We'd go to Yemen. Spent a lot of time there. I'd get to know all his most of his friends and One of his friends One of the one in the family the green family worked on Nick's parents farm He was a a farmhand. They're very very very capable man there and so we watched how his life at least In the time that we saw him changed but as we kept coming back to Yemen. Hell we saw that my goodness we've been covering humanitarian crises around the world and and We come back to Yelm Hill and we see that there is one unfolding holding in our own backyard and it was pretty shocking for us to realize this And it took us a little bit of digging because you know so you see them. They put a smile on their face. But it's when you start asking about what's going on in their home lives what's going on at home. What's happening with their kids? That's when things began to unravel and you realize that The type of pain and suffering that people in the developing world when we write about poverty there are are suffering. It's happening here in the US because it is ultimately about the human condition So let's talk about about the naps more right. So what what was the thing or things that underlies the tragedies that happen to so many members of of the nap family so I think it was jobs and in my I look back and Yelm Hill is basically Louis White And in the eighties and nineties. There were a lot of invidious comments made about the struggles in in the black community. At the time and a lot of discussion Yam hill about. Oh how this was all because of Quote Unquote Black Culture. And you know people blaming What they call a deadbeat be dads and family breakdown and people would just pull themselves up by the bootstraps everything that'd be okay? And meanwhile the the Great Harvard theologist William. Julius Wilson was arguing that had basically the problem is because of lost jobs and you know he was exactly right and that became true of white communities like Yam Hill as well and so far. Len's dad had a good job for a while. A good union job laying pipe And and his mom worked as a tractor driver and a big hazelnut farm and so the parents even though they didn't have a lot of education they had good jobs they they were able to buy their first family home When farland turned sixteen he got a gift from his parents of a Ford Mustang and we were all incredibly jealous And so it was possible then for you know a blue collar family really live a a pretty decent life and rise up and then Dan Mullen Zealand Nathan. Regina and Keelan could not replicate that they none of them graduated from high school and without a high school or even more. You know a college degree You they struggled to find to find work and When I mean farland problems accelerated after he was laid off after Twenty years At at the same company nearby a and People people self I think they there were a lot of self esteem issues and I think they there was to self to self medicate with math. or alcohol or opioids was their self blame too. Yeah it you know. This is an area that had I think very much absorbed the narrative that the pioneer narrative. You know we maybe particularly Oregonians. We talked about our ancestors who taken the Oregon trail and it was all about Out Individualism and being rugged and solving problems and you know what I now realize. Is that those people who took the Oregon trail. Yeah there was tremendous rugged individualism but they were responding to a government benefit program. They knew that if they got to the Willamette valley they will get six hundred and forty acres to homestead is dead and It was interaction of Great Initiative but also a government program but I I think we I think we over absorbed that narrative about personal responsibility and so when people struggled and could not do as well as their parents had then perhaps especially Salihi men tended to blame themselves and to self medicate which got him criminal records which made them less employable will and less marriageable and it just started as this cycle down downward talking to a fellow Oregonian Nick Meghan From it I I actually grew up fifty miles south of you in Corvallis Oregon. Oh Okay yes. I was thinking about the differences that even just a little bit of geography geography and certain internal economic structures. Can make right because Corrales is I just double checked on. The map is literally fifty miles due south hamill but a a larger town. It was like when I was growing up. Forty five fifty thousand people so bigger I and four any university to has a university it has Oregon State University and also when I was growing up it had Hewlett Packard huge manufacturing plant for Hewlett record. So there were these two big anchors of like two big economic engines for the town of Corvallis which really has long sort of. It's had its ups and downs. But it's mostly insulated from the big changes that are happening. The happen all around in the in the communities around me when I was growing up the logging community as you mentioned the farming communities in the in the in the in the Willamette valley in the cascade range. So I just bring that up because it was. It's like this next door example of the importance of the jobs very jobs that you're talking about how when in some communities they don't go away because these institutions institutions but in others. When they do go away what is there to replace? It is right and Meghan. I think we you know I think. In America we tend to think of geography Griffey in terms of the West versus the versus out and so on but in many ways economic geography has been much closer than that in Portland. Just thrived Yelm. Hilla suffered and there Yam hills all over the country well Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl Wudunn join us today. They are co authors of the new book tightrope Americans reaching for Hope. It begins with the story of what happened to many of Nick Kristof classmates from his high school in Yam Hill Oregon. But really it's the story of a nation will explore more of that. When we come back? DOC This is on point. Check out our daily crash course in economics the indicator in less than ten minutes. We tackle important topics fix like unemployment the housing crisis and how Justin Bieber saved the Icelandic economy. NPR's the indicator from planet money. Listen now this is on point Meghna Chakrabarti. We're talking this hour with Cheryl Wudunn and Nicholas Kristof. They a are the CO authors of the new book tightrope Americans reaching for Hope N.. Nick and Cheryl. I was wondering if you could tell us more about foreign Foreign Nap specifically because a little bit more of his life story and then how the economic cratering of his life has also carried on on in subsequent generations shirt So far no one was really talented. Woodworker he we had some ambitions of Of having a furniture store that he was gonNA call Farland's fantastic freaky furniture. Sure some name like that And he I I think the reason he dropped out of school was partly because in the previous generation. Didn't really they seem to matter so much whether you graduated from high school That you could still get good Jobs good union jobs even if you didn't have a high school diploma And then initially he did get decent jobs in. Ed seem to work he He married he had two daughters he. They adored him he He loved them. And you know in in many ways he was a great data. I must say one of the daughters told altus that And whenever baby pictures there's a little plate of cocaine So it was not you know maybe not in. Every way and optimal An optimal childhood for for them but he but he he really tried hard and it then after after he died than and One of the daughters Andrea accelerated her own drinking and she died soon after at age. Twenty nine and the other daughter amber and Gee It avoided drugs and and until then bide she started with anti anxiety medication and then She turned to math as well. Orange Emperor is so so talented and smart. You remind me Farland. And she was working in corporate job during doing. It work and And but then the meth just took over and she lost the job. She lost her kids and we were we when we were finishing up with the book. We were texting whether trae it more photos Farland and then one day. She stopped responding to our tax and finally her daughter responded for her and said Mom's back in jail Cheryl I mean the story about Farley. And his daughter's there is why I ask is because it's a perfect example of how it's not just jobs we're talking about right if these if these if if these tragedies and challenges are carrying on from generation to generation. There's something more systemic right that we have to be facing there is. There's a lot more you too. I mean jobs is a huge trigger and it does mean more than just income it means an identity so it is very important when when people get laid off not got it affects not only themselves but also their families and particularly in the US Obviously healthcare is an important difference. We actually actually compared if you look across the country. We compared what happened when auto workers were laid off after the financial crisis in both Detroit and in Windsor Ontario Canada And what happened was that in the. US they extended unemployment benefits because of the the unusual circumstances of the financial national crisis and so people had cash but they also did never job that didn't have healthcare and they had a lot of difficulty coping in Ontario They did lose their jobs. But of course Canada has a national health care system so they didn't lose their health care benefits and also Canada immediately. They have these things called active in activity centers and they kicked in and looked around The area for local corporations who could employ people they found that nursing was was in demand so they created a program to retrain these auto workers to become nursing Experts or at least develop some Norfolk nursing skills and they were replaced and so You can you find out that Months later years later these these workers are back in society. They are not as entangled in drugs and and alcoholism and depression as as was was the case in the US. So this is why you talk about That we have to reckon with social responsibility as well as personal responsibility right yes. The the narrative shouldn't just be about personal responsibility. I mean obviously still has to have some of that but also about social responsibility and policy policymaking At the top level down to the local level. We don't focus as much on how the rules are made in a way. That really does not favor The the poor the people who are are less educated and That really they don't have voices and so they don't have lobbyists and so Their interests are not looked after magnet. Can I rant about this a little bit. You can rent a lot about it if you want. This is one of the things that we found really frustrating that look they're a better policies and we know how to come up with them. A lot of them are evidence based but it seems to me. The big impediment is often the narrative that we have in this country in a lot that narrative is about personal responsibility about how it's all about one's own initiative that pulling myself by the bootstraps and I mean that So from conservatives that's narrative from liberals people tend to is that tendency to blame those struggling in the white working class for are electing Republicans and bringing problems upon themselves as a as a result as they made their bed. Now let them lie in it. And and this just seems to me so lacking empathy on both sides And when you can predict that a baby eh is going to have worse. Outcomes is going to be less likely to graduate from high school or to go to college Ortega even live a long life when you bet the fifteen year gap gap between the poor and the rich in America Fifteen year gap in life expectancy. Then that's not because of bad choices that some infant is making either either in terms of drug use or in terms of the candidates. They're voting for it's because of structures that we as a country have put in place and and I think unless we change this narrative and show a little more empathy for those left behind. Were not going to get around policies that can help. It's got to be less about pointing fingers ORG offering helping hands but it's also explicitly about policymaking. I mean when you can buy a two hundred thirty eight million dollar Condo in the heart of of New York City prime real estate when a hedge fund mobile can do that and yet pay tax property taxes that are equivalent to a condo worth nine point four million dollars That is a huge subsidy to that hedge fund mogul whereas we actually complained that now Even people who are on food stamps have to have work requirements choirmaster. It just makes no sense I suppose this is time I I do have to ask. Because we're we're talking about the the stories. Yes and the experiences and the lessons to be learned from From the very people that you went to school with and grew up with Nick Why do you think your life didn't follow that path? So look I mean there were plenty of people in Hamill who who thrived and if you look at the National Honor Society Photo in my yearbook. Those kids are all doing great My I guess my best ask friends Dylan. Yam Hill is the local dairyman done. Built a wonderful dairies converted to organic He's he's done great and and so I think a lot of it was about not how much money you had. But how much social capital and how much Human capital the families had and so all the guy grew up in a house that was full of books. My parents read to me every moment And Farland I don't know that there was a single a single children's book can house and so And and so I think some of it was about the environments that we the family environments we grew up in and how much there was registration how important education was in how much focus there was on real. Our our metrics for poverty are based on income but better metrics for long term. Outcomes might be how often kids are hugged or how often they read two inches so I take both points about how policy really really does matter And at the same time time this is not about this is an an and also talking about. I mean you just gave us the example about how the individual human capital within a family also matters is. There's a way to bring the two together absolutely. I think education is extremely important. We actually do neglect early early. Childhood Education when a lot of these problems are much easier to solve an at at a much lower cost. So for instance. When you talk about As Nick mentioned infant's born in a certain zip code where we can predict that they're going to have a terrible outcome It's really important to catch that Baby when he or she is very young because does if they've got drugs in their system when they're born you need to really do a lot of change work that that matters and you can. I was visiting a a preschool circle. preschool in Virginia. Run by Kathy Ryan and she basically took a little baby named Jay who had drugs in his system was a troubled kid always angry fighting wailing constantly and within four months she was able to turn him around and when I saw him he looked like in this happy kid who was playing and laughing and hugging and so you can replicate that across the country and we do need to do that because because if you have a kid who was born with what they called adverse childhood experiences three or four of them within a childhood that doesn't only mean that they they won't you know maybe they probably won't graduate from High School it also means that physically healthwise they will end up more likely with diabetes with heart disease With all sorts of of issues related to their health. Well let's go to a call here. We are talking this hour with Sheryl Wudunn and Nicholas Kristof. They are co authors of the new book tightrope Americans reaching for Hope. Good Alex who's calling from Detroit Michigan. Alex you're on the air. Hi thanks thanks for taking my call so I sort of caught towards the end of Of your guest's comment on how there's this sort of resentment and towards the Republicans for So so so to speak Making their bad and having to lie in it for voting for Republicans and by extension public can policies and so my immediate thought that maybe I need to let it simmer a bit more is And maybe a notch and maybe I'm just not very empathetic person but perhaps they do need to To realize that the bed. They've made the one they're going to lie in that if you're going to vote for socially conservative policies by extension by voting for Republicans you're also inadvertently putting yourself in a bad place economically if your goal is to Hopefully vote for people who are going to make policies that help you. You can't at the same time Look for the same people that are going to Force your Moral views really just us on the public. And so I think social conservatism in America has vastly damaged economic conservative or not so much damage but almost married it really well. Let me just jump in here. Because I'm going to give Cheryl. Nicotine has to respond. But let me just ask you take your point but one of the greatest champions of so oh called welfare reform was a Democratic president. What do you think that sorry say that again? I'm saying saying like you're you're you're you're saying that That that you see if people have voted for for Republican members of Congress for example. They've they've been paved the way for these conservative policies to be put into place And I'm saying that. In addition to that we went through a democratic presidency with with President. Bill Clinton where You know his administration may made a lot of changes to regarding Mass incarceration ration- Regarding the welfare reform. That it's not exclusively. It's not exclusively a Republican thing. Oh certainly not but I think I mean at least in the last Yeah probably about Probably about the last decade. I'm trying to think what year it is now in the last decade. I think I think you've seen a great divide between The Republican Party being the quote Unquote Conservative Party and the Democratic Party. Not even being so the so-called Liberal Party I mean it's like the Socialist Party now Bernie Sanders somewhat to some extent war in Alexandria Alexandria co uh-huh county or Catholic. These new Democrats are are like paving the way for young people to Champion these these social programs Well actually really do really appreciate your call a lot. I don't WanNa give Cheryl a chance to respond to Alex. Thank you Cheryl. Nick what do you think. Think I think that You know it is true. That some PE- sometimes people vote against their own self interests. I think actually you know all sorts of Democrats. Let's do that too. I mean we A lot of people vote against their own self interests. I think it also takes a while for people to recognize that something That the that a person in their vote for isn't actually helping them but in fact is hurting them and they're willing to give people you sort of a break for instance the soybean farmers they're willing to give the president trump a break because they think for the long term. He's doing something right so it only goes so far. I mean maybe ten years is the is the right horizon I certain types of policies. The other thing is that people also sometimes vote on one particular thing so if you are Really Care About having your own guns and having the the freedom to walk around with your guns you're not going to vote for a Democrat. No matter what the rest of the agenda is And as long as the economy is doing very well well at least for the majority of Americans or for a plurality of Americans it's going to cover up a lot of things it is unfortunately for the voiceless group of people in in America. The economy isn't isn't working still isn't working the problem that I have with the argument that people have made their bed and now with them. Why in it is that some all of these are infants? Were talking about a newborn infant in Shannon county. South Dakota has a life expectancy shorter than if that infant were born born in Cambodia Bangladesh and that infant has not elected. It doesn't have the right to vote hasn't chosen anybody hasn't supported any policies and so so even if you believe that is true adults it is children who were paying the price. And so I I think we need a little more empathy all around well so now though that that there seems to be a lot more conversation across the country and the grappling with the fallout from forty years of policies fifty years of policies that have acted in opposition to the well being of so many millions of Americans. I mean now. Can't we say to voters today. Look at your children and your potential grandchildren. The vote you cast is the future bed that people are gonNA. Why can't we say that to people? No we can't and I a wish that Democrats were a little better talking to working class. Americans Bobby Kennedy was magnificent at it. More recently Policy Democratic politicians senator struggled struggled. Sometimes come across the descending. Well we're going to come right back in about a minute and a half and talk about where there's room for hope in this story. Worry so Shell Wudunn Nicholas Kristof standby. Their new book is tight rope. Americans reaching for hope this point they do eat this. Donate that if you feel like. It's time to finally end your war with food. This is the podcast for you food. We need to talk. Subscribe on Apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts this is on point I magnin Chakrabarti this hour with Sheryl Wudunn and Nicholas Kristof about their new book. It's called tight rope Americans reaching for hope And it begins with the story of what has happened to many of Nick Kristof doffs classmates in the town. The small town of Ham Hill Oregon where nick grew up and the story that the bottoming out of their lives has to tell will about The struggles of working class Americans across the country And Nick and Cheryl if I made like to bring into the conversation now Dianne Reynolds old joins us from Dayton Oregon. She's lived in Hill County since nineteen seventy seven. She's an ordained pastor and founder of the nonprofit called provoking hope. Hope she's profiled in Cheryl and Knicks Book Diane Reynolds. Welcome to one point. Thank you for having me. It's really wonderful to have have you. And you're the you're story is quite powerful Diane so before we get to what you do at provoking hope. I was wondering earning. If you'd be willing to tell us a little bit about your life growing up In in in the M Hill County. You didn't have it easy did you. I did not have an easy life and the subjects and Things that shirl and nick of shared Prior ear to meet coming on here would pretty much relate to my life my life experiences And I grew grew up in Indianapolis Indiana just to correct that. Okay Yeah So my mother and my father and my parents are. We're both alcoholics and my mom I didn't know this as a child but she was also a drug user and and my dad was absent from the time I was three until way late in life and So I had I myself. I'm the oldest and there are three siblings who came along Through the course of growing up and and Essentially it was me and them. You gotta take care of them. Yes yes so. My mom worked in a bar and You know and she she lived a hard life and I now understand end as a grownup and having done a lot of You know processing in Intentional sinking into my own childhood L.. Hood I recognized and realized that she was a product of for home and her environment and She did the best she could very much. Like what Nick was saying about Farland You know there were those moments but then there were also these other moments when she was under the influence and she would allow things That were harmful not only for me but for the other my other siblings. I mean you you put you had to endure some pretty awful abuse to put it lightly Yes but Diana if if I may ask you you became an ordained minister worked really hard and now ministering to a group of people all can you tell us a story about how it is. You came about founding provoking hope. Because it's it's it into. Insofar the first Cheryl and nick grade it just sounds like you got fed up with having to lay to rest so many young people who were who had experienced something very similar to what you had growing up correct so it was like the beginning of the summer of two thousand and eleven and and I had been in attendance at yet another of boreal service for a young man who had lost his life to his addiction. You know holding on and hugging his parents his wife his babies. He's and I just started crying. I had to get out of there. It was Something like number eleven or that year for me and I just was so angry and I the thing that came to my mind was Popeye Popeye when he pops the lid off those spinach. Can you know the old Popeye cartoon and I. You know I've done all I can and can't do anymore for. I can't do this anymore. I can't just be the burying person and I have to be a part of the solution or after get completely cleveland out of this. I can't do this and The rest of it is just. It's like I look to the right. There was a forensic Zayn. I called the number. I called my husband. He met me. We walked through this little tiny. Dark basement They also agreed to rent it. I didn't have any great grandiose plan I just I wanted to be a part of and the next day right project. Provoking hope opens. It's doors so she Cheryl Cheryl Nick. What is it that Diane's doing at provoking hope A- as you see that you see as part of the solution set that America needs what one of the critical things that Diane does that she has appear counselors who. They're who help each other and they have street credibility which is really important and obviously Diane has credibility herself as well and There's no judgment passed. I mean this. Is You know you WANNA get better. We're going to help you. We're going to talk about it. Why did you do this? Why did you do that? we sat in on some of the sessions and It it's very freewheeling All the people there You know most of them are in varying hiring degrees of wanting to get better and we saw how in one case the person who really wanted to get better was just you know really you know an encouraging and rooting for all the others in the class. And so it's very powerful and the other thing that Diane does which is really remarkable is that she trusts people One of things. She could probably tell you this better but Diana remember you telling us how you give you go to the newcomer and you say Here are the car keys and here is my credit Eddie Card. I need you to go down and buy some milk from the local store. And they look at her and they and they're like wait. You know I was just in and out of jail and for stealing. And you're giving me your credit card your car keys and Diane Provoking Hope serves the seventy eight hundred people know each year. Just under eight thousand. If I'm remembering from the book correctly correct. That would have been the total for that year. It's risen I would say two thousand eighteen. Our number's going to be closer to about nine hundred and fifty or close to a thousand. So you're making a real difference in individual lives there in your mail. uh-huh county in a lot of them but Dan I. I'm curious at the very beginning of this conversation. Nick and Cheryl were talking about how they're also is is like big systemic and policy issues Across the country I mean. Is there a limit how much provoking hope can do to transform people's lives if we don't yet have those policy solutions in place also. I totally believe that the policies have to be we have to change And it starts at policy we'd be. We need people to begin who are serving our nation to begin shoo. Be Real about what's going on in America The latest statistics or our state are astounding. We are forty eight in drug related problems across the United States and and we're forty fifth at the help that's provided seven Oregonians. A day lose their lives chiefs to This systemic Ignorance I call it. You know blindsided mess. The people who who are making the decisions are not looking at those numbers at my level. I'm looking at those numbers. The week between Christmas and new years we had to telephone calls in the nine one one overdose overdose and one day. It was three in the same day. The this is the reality you know whether you're a Democrat gamma. Crat Republican or Libertarian. It really doesn't matter what matters is there's a solution and lives can be transformed form. Families can be reunified. There is hope if we could in in those in those hallways always if we could figure out how to get They help out onto the streets. That's needed through through. I change in policies. Well Diane Reynolds Joining us from Dayton Oregon and ordained pastor and founder of the nonprofit prophet provoking. Hope Diane. Thank you so much for joining us. Today you're very welcome. Thank you Naked Cheryl we've got about six minutes left here and I want to just be sure to at least get one if not two more callers hours before we run out of time here. So let's go to Herman who's calling him from Green Bay Wisconsin. Herman you're on the air. Hi Yes I. I wanted to comment on the fact that they've been gentlemen in the beginning of the program he touched on the fact that there is A in contrast as black and white as just as well as the The users dance with the OPIOID and the cocaine epidemic is how the response monsters and so now it's not like opioid is not as a criminal is. There's always the treatments and things available to help the people and the children. The epidemic is Israelite like the epidemic I'm a victim of that epidemic of the crack that was breath but into the community and just based on my zip code where I was born in Cabrini Greens it just. It made it almost inevitable that I I would have certain affects in my life from the Cocaine and the air that was in those areas So into today I still suffer from those effects in multiple ways is because the points and times where I was supposed to get certain checks and and growth growth and development because the drugs had consumed all the emotion in the community it. It consumed All the hope you know the only thing we had was was guys you know. That's all we had was. I was crushed. And so you know but Harmon if I if I may and forgive me for interrupting you here but but you bring up a point. I I definitely want to hear more from Nick and Cheryl Lonzo. Herman thank you for your call. Nick You talked about William Julius Wilson Wilson earlier. I guess the follow up question. I have from Herman's personal story here is we have. The nation has been through this before we know exactly what happens to communities that we don't help that that we that we abandon him US talking about growing up in green so surgery and go ahead go ahead. Yeah I mean so I mean there is no doubt there is a double standard and a real element of hypocrisy and that now you know we used to talk about As a country we talk about junkies and now we talk about people who need treatment for addiction and there certainly much more compassion. Now that many more of those struggling are white And you know is that hypocritical absolutely But it is also at least belatedly a welcome improvement in in policy eh but you know on the drug side you still see that and in tight rope. We talked to a woman who had an addiction and was was sent to prison in Alabama for nine hundred and ninety nine years nonviolent drug offenses and meanwhile a African American woman who long history of of using drugs and meanwhile the sackler family was far more responsible Swanson for opioid addiction in America. And obviously not only did not case criminal sanctions but his emerged with thirteen billion dollars talk about double standards. So we've got about two and a half minutes left here and there's a couple of things I want to try to tie a couple of things together in this in the conversation we've been having for the past hour we want. One of them is in a hearing. Diane story about what she's doing at provoking hope in Yam Hill. Right right now. Obviously making a huge difference in the lives of a lot of people but it's still really low coal response because that's as far as Diane can reach and and you do talk about other places where people are finding finding hope. It's local now but I'm still hearing from both of you that we need. We still need national. We need something from the federal government to really shape. Change the picture for everybody. Everybody don't we. We need a mix and basically we do need to have community innovation and you have to have community investment in personal resources investment. They have to WanNa do this at the same time. You need a federal level. National Level Govern government support because they can't do it on their own and it has to be scalable so for instance The preschool You know in in West in Virginia They can build template. They're trying to build a template right now and so that it can be. The methodology can be replicated throughout the country. Provoking hope can also start building a template so that it can be replicated throughout the country but there needs to be the government at the federal level some support system and some guidance so that communities can actually come onto the platform. Yeah I mean it would be crazy to think that America would try to build in interstate. Highway system will little tiny organizations around the country like booking hope and like I mean. They're wonderful Diana's and as a hero but it's likewise crazy to try to address these excruciating gaps. We as a country have simply with tiny Organizations led by heroes around the country. We need more. So what is stopping this country from doing that right now. What's crazy is the thought that we can't get this done? I think there's a lot of dysfunction of course in in Washington. DC But there are some places that one can actually build a common ground between the left the right and that is around childhood education In fact red states have done child education early childhood education very very well and if we can use those as role models and just basically replicate them across the country. I think that's a beginning and the problem is often been invisible. Thank you for helping. Remove that invisibility. Well thank you to both of you for writing this book. The new book is tight rope. Americans reaching for Hope co-authored by Sheryl Wudunn and Nicholas Kristof. We have an expert by the way of at on point. Radio DOT ORG Cheryl a nick. Thank you so much for being with me today. Thank you thank you so much magna. I'm Meghna Chakrabarti. This is on point.

Cheryl Cheryl Nick Nick Kristof America US Yam hills Cheryl Wudunn Diane Reynolds Farland Nick Kristof Venturo Wudunn High School Yelm Hill Yam Hill Oregon Diana Oregon Nick Meghan New York Cheryl Dunn reporter Republicans NPR
Ep. #521: Dr. Anne Rimoin, Nicholas Kristof

Real Time with Bill Maher

54:51 min | 11 months ago

Ep. #521: Dr. Anne Rimoin, Nicholas Kristof

"Welcome to an. Hbo podcast from the HBO Layton Series Real Time With Bill. Maher Start Week before exciting day to tomorrow rare event Leap Day tomorrow and the way the stock market is going. There's going to be a lot of leaping. I market lost six trillion dollars this week. I know pretty soon that adds up to real money. Bloomberg is not even sure anymore. You can buy the country. I mean and of course that's because of the corona virus now look. Is this serious yes it is the CDC is now calling it the Kovic nineteen and you know a diseases serious when they give it a rap name but panic. No we should not panic and it doesn't merit panic first of all we live in. La The air is so toxic. Anything comes out of anybody's mouth is killed immediately. Doesn't germs viruses but will life change. Yes well you just have to take more precautions. Now I mean Just assume everyone is infectious. The same warning. They get contestants on the bachelor. One person in this country was way ahead of this mall when someone tries to touch her hand. Boys sheet slapped. It away knows what now fortunately her husband. Donald Trump is in charge. And when I say fortunately I mean Oh fuck. This would be a nice time. Wouldn't it be under doesn't talk out of his Asan? Think this Dick and eat with his hands. We don't we don't have that. We have a president who thinks this corona virus is a minor annoyance like the common cold or the Constitution of the United States one who appoints as the person to head up this massive medical emergency Mike Pence who doesn't even believe in evolution. It's like making jared embassador to Funky town. No we have one. We have a president who just keeps telling crazy lies that contradicts everything the CDC is saying he says the viruses ending they say of course. Not It's inevitable it's going up. Who are you going to believe? Infectious disease experts or the guy who fuck stormy Daniels without a condom. Because that's from Santa to. Can you blame him? His attitude is I wrote. I wrote Dog Porn Stars. I eat a diet that would gag a raccoon. I want an election where I got the fewest votes. Fuck you science. Fuck you math. It commit crimes and my lawyers go to jail. Reality is for losers. He said yesterday the virus. It's going to disappear one day like a miracle will just disappear really Mr President because just hoping that it'll be gone tried that with you when it doesn't work listen we've known each other a long time right right okay. So I'm going to tell you my message. We're we're GonNa hear some scary and some of them are really going to be scary. Today it was in the news in Hong Kong. They think a dog tested positive. They think it's just environmental contamination. But just just in case I told my two dogs bark into your elbow and do not drink out of the toilet but just please remember with the Great Jimmy. Breslin one said the message of TV. He said is stay inside and watch more TV. It is very important to remember all the Times. That cable news was telling you that we were all going to die. Sars and murders and a Bola and swine flu and bird flu and this flu and that please stay with me now. Flus will not replace this flus. Replace thank you very buck sexton. Aj here a little later. We'll be speaking with author and columnist Nicholas Kristof. At first up. She is a professor a d. I was going to fuck that one. I had a role on it too. Didn't like Professor of Epidemiology Ucla's fielding school of Public Health and Director of the Center for Global and immigrant health. Please welcome Dr. Anne. Remind thank you so much. I was Gonna I was I told everybody. No not even fist-bump the Japanese had the right idea. We don't know where that hair hand has been. That's I mean you in particular but But you know you're okay right as far as you. Now come but look I mean I said it the minute life will change right and and it should first of all you know what I never liked the handshake anyway. It adds anything to anything right. Anybody here you really care about touching you. You don't shake hands with well you know there are lots of other things you can do like. I said you could do the fist-bump elbow Wave yes exactly. They're even studies now are projects where they're trying to have handshake free zones in hospitals just for the very same reason that we don't want to be transmitting disease and this was long before this new corona virus came during the Spanish flu in one thousand nine hundred eighteen. They stopped people will. They tried to stop a big campaign against spitting people used to just pokka lougee whenever still do but we don't as a as a nation we generally don't expect her cracked crab thank you. Life is better post epidemic. Let's talk about the Spanish flu because it got my attention. That they said about two percent of the world died in that one or who got it right and that seems to be the same number. They're saying now for this. I mean I always heard the Spanish flu was roughly and obviously if the numbers of the same would you say. This is a good comparison. Well it's it's not time yet to compare this to the flu and not even the Spanish flu. This is a different kind of virus. And we're still learning a lot about it. I mean listen. It's always scary when you have a new pathogen jumping animals into human population starting to spread and we just don't know enough about this disease yet to really make a strong comparisons because when we talk about the Spanish flu we think we can. We can talk about it from a very long distance and we know exactly how many cases there were no now all about the epidemiology of the of the virus or the disease but but back then we you know we. We didn't and people were just as scared. Then it's not a flu what is it. So it's a corona virus and a corona virus is different from an influenza virus corona viruses or large family of viruses. They also cause respiratory infections. But most of them are in animals not in humans. Yes what is it with humans? We'll put anything in their mouth seriously. I mean there's this distorted when someone eight a bat and I was thinking. Oh these primitives and I remember Ozzy. Osbourne eight bat before every well actually coming directly from bats and Same thing with SARS Or Mars we think that these these viruses originate in bats and then they jump to another species with SARS. It was civic cat with murders. It seemed to be a camel. And in this instance. We're not sure yet. But it seems like it might be a Pangolin. And so it comes a Pangolin which is a very small animal It's actually the most traffic to animal in the world leaving it. They're eating it. It looks like an Armadillo. Well people were were in areas where people were using Campbell's they were as different anyway but the but you bring up a really good point. These things often happen around wet markets. These are open air markets where you have animals and so you can imagine walking into these markets that happen everywhere in the world but in particular in Asia and Africa. Where you'll have you'll have bats in a cage and then you'll have penguins in a cage above it or You know the cats in another one until you're having all of these species altogether stressed and they're spreading disease to each other. It's amazing what the human body can ingest and be okay. It's true. I mean if you ever walked through markets just in this country in certain ethnic Chinatown. I'm seeing you know. Shit on sticks and animals hanging our our digestive system is almost too strong. It can take so much that will just put any pizza chicken. Well you know. I often when I teach a class on epidemiology. I often use the example people because I work on Ebola. It's another thing that I spend a lot of time working on and that is also a diseases crossed. The species from animals to humans will often talk about well. People EAT BATS. And how could they eat bats and culturally people? Eat all sorts of things And most of the time you're not getting a disease spilling over I mean people eat meat but you know there's cow disease Yup. Well Yeah if you were the czar the Mike Pence job Would you crazy idea you with your degrees at a title? I can't even pronounce but okay. So would you stop planes from overseas from certain countries from coming in here I think? These kinds of draconian measures of stopping travel. They don't really work if the day. I mean listen the viruses already here. We know that it's here and it's already spreading and the problem is when you really stop travel and you have all these travel bans. People find ways in and then you can't track them and then you don't know what's happening and so you have to be careful when you really start putting these these rules in place that are supposed to stop people and then people who really to get in they're gonNA find another way Also it has so many problems with trade and and You know all these other dip- diplomatic issues it it. It doesn't necessarily make that much of a difference so there are better ways to be able to twice. That's a good question for this particular corona virus. We don't know there are other corona viruses where people have been able to be reinfected. But with this one we don't know yet but don't you build a in the whole point is he gets something or you get back scene for it and then you have the immunity. Why doesn't it work after one time? You know that. Just certain diseases Do not Do not provide immunity after the fact. And which is why you can keep getting them Strep throat is another example. You could get right so right now. We don't know it's very possible that you could have immunity at least for a period of time with this corona virus. But but right now so many things about this. You're very serious about it. I like that know. That's one reason I wanted to. I I learned this word once catastrophe when you make things. That are not a catastrophe into a catastrophe. And that isn't helpful and we don't really. It's not even appropriate right now. Is that correct? You have to keep everything into perspective here and right now. We are learning what's happening. We do not have transmission here in the United States. We're still trying to figure out evitable you we're probably going to have a fair amount of spread here in the United States. But we don't know how much we don't aware and it's not gonNA happen overnight either. No but what does happen if there are two? I mean we only have a certain number of hospital beds and we're not going to build one in the week like the Chinese right Not that was really a hospital. But I don't know if we could even put up a room with beds. We can't build homing for the housing for the homeless. So I don't have bringing up a assume you're sharing that that's bad. No housing for the homeless. Great what do we do if if all the beds are filled and there's X. thousands more people who need a respirator well so so first of all what is going to happen is we're not gonNA see like I said you're not GonNa have this happen. All overnight had other bad flu season's We had the Vardi had a pandemic year. We had the H One n one pandemic in two thousand nine so we have hospitals prepared to a certain degree. We know what they need to do. They know what they need to do. People been preparing for this. You can set up makeshift hospitals as needed. But I think that this really brings up the important point about pandemic preparedness and how important it is to be prepared and and the problem has been or haven't been there hasn't been good funding for this in a long time in fact more but no administration has been good funding pandemic preparedness Okay Casket. It's a semi political question but it is a political show Bernie Sanders You know when people campaign for president its grueling. They always get sick as you might imagine there in planes all day with that Crappy Air. Recirculating your rundown. Plus he's seventy eight. He just had a heart attack. He's show this picture. He's always in crowds touching a lot of people. What's the over under on him making to electric? Leslie seems like a perfect storm for him. Not well you know. The disease is definitely people don't have as as successful. They don't have successful outcomes In people that are older or who have co Morbidity Bernie. Don't touch him. Well your statue. Touch Bernie Bernie is doing what everybody else should be doing right now. Which is washing your hands. But I into the crowd and touch a million people thinking survive this or she said life will chain and that's yes and that's okay and it is yeah right yeah but ultimately I would think my theory you have to be good about how you take care of yourself your best line of defense. Is it not your own immune system? Germs pathogens are ubiquitous. You can't become Howard. Hughes locked in an airtight room pissing into jars. That's the only other alternative I mean people put hand sanitizer all over their hands all day. I've had more than one. Very smart doctor told me that destroys. The skin makes it more permeable. You have to have a good immune system. Stop eating sugar. Wouldn't that be a great start? There are so many things that you can be doing in sugar can cause inflammation like so many other things. The worst thing for your immune system is sugar. There's so many things that are bad for your sugar. Be Number One. Sugar is in the in on the list of the top things that you should probably decrease but you know they're they're you know. Smoking is also bad and people should exercise more than they should eat well in run role and I think that that's really important and so I agree with you being healthy and doing everything you can to make a healthy including me. Writing less sugar would be a good thing to do. No sugar but Finally whatever it is they always end. Don't they do? Maybe whatever it is. We'll it runs. Its course and then it ends. Well I mean most of these viruses will disappear. Although there are some instances where they become endemic. Thank you Dr. I am bowing into you. Pretended always come on. All right is the New York Times bestselling author of the New Book Code Red. How how? Progressives and moderates unite to save our country E. J. Dion great to see you back there all right. Here's the Chairman Nebraska Democratic Party and author of harvest the vote how Democrats can win again in rural America. Jane Club Jane how you doing and he is a former CIA officer and is now the nationally syndicated host of the buck sexton show buck sexton back with running. So Donald Trump had a rally a few hours ago. He is calling the corona virus their new hoax. So I'm GonNa look on the bright side of this and say that I think the corona virus is going to change people's views of Donald Trump. Finally not for the better so there I think two simultaneous conversations that are happening from the president side and really cross country. One of them is. This is one of the very few issues out there. Up there with foreign military invasion right where everybody goes. This is something we have to deal with. I was Long Island Railroad. Jfk S rape. People got the masks on everyone's freaked out. Markets are tanking and nobody wants to be a pandemic the administration doesn't want to be a pandemic so all of our interests are aligned. That said there are people who even at this stage. We have had a single fatality on. Us soil don't know the extent of the problem. There are people who are trying to score political points and say things like Chuck Schumer said the administration has no plan for this. And that's just not true any administration. Okay but he is lying his ass off about it do you. Do you really not have. Donald Trump has like one goto which is deny which works. You know someone accused of sexual assault. You can say they're not my type if somebody says Accused I didn't know him. And then the thousand pictures second. Wait a second. He would admit he lies his ass off. And that's part of the charm. I get it because government is for trolling and making liberals cry. They're liberal tears. But that's not so funny now is it? Do you really have no buyer's remorse with a guy who is lying? Who says we're going to have a vaccine soon? And when there isn't a wait he said there's going to be a vaccine but there isn't there will not exceed twelve twelve to eight. That's what he said but first of all our government is supposed to keep us healthy and safe right and so for me. This is an exclamation point about how donald trump has not been running a government that is keeping US healthy and save. Whether it's the meat packing plants where they have increased the production line so you can essentially slaughter as many animals as you want. And there's no risk to the workers health on the line or it means that the plant workers are now the one inspecting our meet Robert Government inspecting the meat this is all happening under president trump and the exclamation point. That was going on before you know not the increase of I mean the reason. I think your theory might be right is in the time like this. You want a president who when he talks to you. You have some confidence that he's telling the truth about how often he plays golf or his crowd size when the pictures are right there. How can you trust what he says about this? And you need trust in the White House but the other is you wanted administration. That actually believes that sometimes experts are to be called. Ss halvard problem and Bill Cohen. The Bill Cohen. The former Republican senator and secretary defense once said government is the enemy until you need a friend and experts are nasty elitist until you need. Somebody knows what they're talking about. Help you solve problem in this administration. I show you like excellent a clip. This is John Kennedy. He is not that John Kennedy. Here's the Republican senator from Louisiana. He's a Republican and he's been a big defender of Donald Trump here. He is talking to are acting head of Homeland Security. I named now the guy's name because these temps come through the permanently surprised. It wasn't a bunk as wedding planner. Quite frankly but this is a Republican Senator. Talking to this man. Watch this about the virus jobs to keep us safe. And you can't tell us how many your models are anticipating. No senator again I I would defer to the health and human services for that so check on that we will as they had a bone land security without is it transmitted a variety of different ways center again. Human-to-human is what we've obviously you're asking me a number of medical questions asked question. Hhs Secretary of Homeland Security. And you're supposed to keep the safe. That's a Republicans that guy make you feel safe book well? There's a lot of information that you heard from expert before that they're still figuring out about how transmissible is it. What the fatality. You can't really know the mortality care on Kennedy's feelings on that and I'm saying is that everyone has the same feeling which is that. They want the best response possible from the government. The only people that seem to be rooting for failure are rooting rooting. For Hell's waiting for competence disagrees saying. Oh my God. This is such a crisis were melting. You guys keep on saying that. We're saying that but none of us had instead. We have president trump who slash and burn our government to carry the mantra of the Republicans. Have this is. Trump is terrible. Therefore he's bad at this and that's actually not talking about no because we don't even police this versus looking into your eyes. This is a crisis in serious crisis and the guy is a liar who is putting into place people who were not competent to Angela. Something like zero jets from this. Do you think he wants zero days. Water soil everything. What I would really wants is he. Would he cares about is the stock market. That's that's what he said. I mean at some point like there's just a derangement where the president's interests are aligned here if he wants to get reelected he's going to do the best job he can just how terrible anybody here thinks he hears almost admire you because somebody who tries to do. The impossible should be admired but trying to do this. President is dealing with this in any other way but to protect himself not protect the country. Why did he tells the Chinese say the Chinese are doing a great job here? Why didn't he intervene their flights from China when some experts initially said that that was a bad idea? And other actually. Why don't we have more testing kits all across our country especially in our real more masks? It's so interesting in World War Two as soon as the war started. They closed down all the car factories and in weeks they were making bomber planes and tanks. We can't in this country make masks. Nobody can get a mask because they're sold out on Amazon and everywhere else. We'll say that the masks aren't as effective at preventing the spread for some people healthcare workers. Yes actually rather than have to go through the CDC TESTING. The money's gone out near actually trying to come up with their own. Okay I'm GonNa tell you what's going to happen because it is going to get worse and then instead of fixing the problem. Your president is going to Sulk. Blame and further divide. I mean I. I'm shocked that we can't even come together on this. I thought tribalism would end at a thing like this. I think if we were attacked by Martians there was a part of his response. That is wrong though what he done. So far in terms of action of missed the first twenty minutes of the show. He told lies he'd lied to us. He said lives. He said the back. The disease is going away and it's not going away. He said the vaccine is coming soon. And it's not. He told only his a record for the vaccine progression. It's actually everyone record your question I'm not going to pursue this anymore. There's there's there's going to be layoffs. Lots of them thirteen percent of the people today. It was reported. This is early on in. This crisis are not flying anymore. They've closed schools overseas. I mean it's just going to people are not going to go to restaurants not I mean I'm afraid of who they're going to put their hands in my salad now I've had food poisoning. It's no okay what's going to happen. They're not going to go to restaurants then knows people that get laid off and we know half. This country does not have any savings or healthcare. So if somebody if they don't have healthcare then what are they supposed to do what happens then when there's massive layoffs and people have no money and there's not enough health care what happens then toss come? I'm saying you don't that's going to happen layoffs. They lost six trillion dollars in a week. Deathly fear of a recession right. Now for sure. There's no question about that. People are really concerned. But that's all that also goes to the government. You know the feds not talking to taking action. No one's a slow asleep at the wheel on this. I think they understand I. I know that that's so funny but I also did. It is because it's ridiculous ridiculous. I mean we don't even know how bad the cases are going to be in this. We don't know if the market's GonNa Australia a worst case scenario plant out there that the public now read. Where's our worst case scenario? They faced the worst case. Scenario was the facts on the cuts. He's cut the trump cut the defense fighting budgets four agencies. Cdc National Security Council. He cut their entire global security health unit. Where the Second Homeland Security? That's that more on. We just saw health and human services the CDC used to operate in forty nine countries to shut down this ship before it started. China was one of them. You have a traffic. Congress sets budgets. Not THE PRESIDENT'S. The president has a government. Works does not congresses. The one that's in charge of this not the president and the president is in many cases. Congress rescinded thank God Great. But he's cuts are speak to a whole added and toward government itself as if all these things government does are useless. I hope in this course of this crisis we go back and play clips of what Donald Trump said about President Obama's handling of Ebola. And when you go back to look at an administration again that took science seriously. That took what government could do seriously. They actually did an exceptional job on a bowl and not only here but overseas. Because if you don't help people overseas to contain this doctor. He's talking about the lack of expertise. I mean Dr Anthony Fauci and I aged people running the CDC careerists. Who was told he couldn't tolerate this again. This is not accurate vice president pence. No vice president pence was like we just want to have a coordinated message. That's actually talked before we talk. That's all that he said he found. She says something that might be true. The contradicts what the administrative verdy seen that. Yes but one of the states that they're actually bringing some of these folks do right because we have an expert university with Brass Gun Medical Center. And they were saying that they didn't have any funding. They weren't even being asked to prepare things. So that's a problem just until a couple of days ago. They were the ones that were leading on the Bulla. So there's a problem when you don't have a leader leading to bring in two seconds. I just want to quote two things The mayor from Jaws said it's a beautiful day the beaches are open and people are having a wonderful time. How many is a summer town? We need summer dollars. And trump said the corona virus is very much under control stock market. Starting to look very good to me just saying he's the Pulitzer Prize. Winning columnist for the New York Times with his wife Cheryl Wudunn Co authored the book tightrope Americans reaching for Hope Nicholas Kristof overhead. Dr Going to how are you? You don't miss the handshake. No Okay thank you. Okay so listen. Let's first we'll get back to this subject but I WanNa talk about your book. I because it's fantastic book again. Ever get past this crisis and we will. We will have to contend with the fact that the same old things that have been making people die. We'll still be making people die in US zero in on what you call. I think deaths of despair in this country What what are we talking about when you say deaths of despair so we're talking about deaths from drugs alcohol and suicide which every two weeks kill more Americans than died in the entire Afghan and Iraq wars and? It's the story of my hometown. A quarter of the kids on my old school bus whereas it's Gone Hill Oregon right where valley goes into the coastal range. Of course I know it will be many visits. Summers okay. So that's and this is seeing typical of rural America. This very rural area. It's it's it's kind of a great depression that has struck parts of America but not geographically but demographically. It is a crisis that has hit working class America so these people would seem to be the ideal Bernie Sanders voters. They would seem to be more ripe for a political revolution than anybody. But when you look at the political map those areas were always read. Why why do you think? The white working class is Socially very conservative economically though they tend to be actually much more liberal and so look if they go in the voting and they were thinking about abortion guns then they will vote for Republican but Democrats have to fight for those votes and if they were thinking about raising the minimum wage if they were thinking about parental leave increasingly if they were thinking about healthcare about expanding Medicaid then there is a fighting chance to have them vote democratic so what are drug war was has been a massive failure for. It's one of the worst policy failures in a bipartisan. Absolutely an-and for Bloomberg hates pot. I mean it goes way back earlier but really I mean a guy is supposed to be so smart about so many things you know. Okay so what does good drug policy look like so a good drug policy? We actually have a good comparison. The nineteen ninety s the. Us in Portugal. We were both wrestling with a heroin problem right. They both looked at what you do the. Us double down on a law enforcement toolbox and Portugal meanwhile conveyed panel and decriminalized drug possession. Even heroin cocaine but above all what they used was the public health toolbox encouraging people to providing treatment and the upshot is that the number of heroin users in Portugal has dropped by two-thirds Portugal now has the lowest drug overdose rate in western Europe and. Meanwhile we lost sixty eight thousand. Americans last year and I know I'm always the bad guy when I bring this up but I saw it in the paper yesterday. Obesity The School of one is at the Harvard Chan. School of Public Health at Harvard says in two thousand ten years not that it's not bad now half the country in twenty thirty. We'll be obese. A quarter will be severely obese. Forty thousand deaths a month a month from obesity and that is a big problem absolutely about in the areas. You're talking about Absolutely it's enormous but it's you can't just look at the moment that somebody is reaching and potato chips it's very much. A reflection of this miasma of depression that has struck much of the country. And when people lose jobs lose good well-paying jobs then they self medicate with methamphetamine self medicate with alcohol the also with soda and chips. And so there's no. There's no silver bullet but there are silver buckshot. And you can address that in part by providing better paying jobs and Supporting Education in these areas. And you know I they that helps to address many of these problems together. I heard a lot about how the farmers were. GonNa turn on trump. You must know a lot about this. Okay because of the trade war and of course we know that he wrote a lot of checks to them to cover which is thirty five billion dollars but eighty-three percent. Wow that is a lot of voters Farmers who are that they serve it pro-trump. That's a huge number. Why can't the Democrats do a little better? I'm not asking for the world but eighty three percent. You can't win more than seventy percent. Well they can if they actually started to go to these rural communities once again so rural rural voters used to be with Democrats. We used to have Democrats elected in South Dakota North Dakota Iowa Kansas etc because we used to stand with them when they were hurting so when the farm crisis happened Democrats were there. On the tractors Jesse Jackson included saying that we need to unite the features. We're going to have real economic inland justice in our country in Democrats. When was the last time you saw a democrat? We had historic flooding in Nebraska. Not a single. Democratic presidential candidate came to Nebraska or Iowa when they had flooding as well so there is real problems that us as a party completely abandoned these communities and so why should they they just. Don't show up the air in Kansas. Now has a democratic governor and it's fifty years fifty years. Basically America was engaged in this project of lowering taxes and lowering investment in human capital and finally Kansas Republicans rebelled and said raise our taxes. Because you've heard our schools tumorous. I wonder if that isn't won't be remembered to some kind of a turning point in this long era that may lead to renewed investment in American human capital in ways that would help address the problems in the M Hill and Kansas and Nebraska. And so many other places and I think that I think that's completely right and I think it goes to one of the things I write about in the book is Kansas and as an example of the radicalization of the Republican Party. Over the last twenty years where the governor said if we slash these taxes cut this spending cut the schools. The economy will boom. The economy didn't boom and a lot a middle class. Republicans who actually wanted their kids to go to good public schools. Have wait a minute. This program is terrible and so it was actually repealed in the state legislature by with by votes from all the Democrats and a bunch of Republicans. Who said we can't do this anymore. And when the Democrat won was those moderate Republicans who actually supported the many moderate but we can supported the Democrat. And you do see. Whisker is a Democrats emerging other states. Utah Idaho Past Medicaid expansion. The debates are wrong about the debates like the one. We had Tuesday or not helping no the Democrats who want to help. It's helped me with that up the ladder the end by May please. I'm just going to say in response to the Republican Party getting more radical for twenty years in the Democratic Party. I JUST RUN THE NEW YORK. Times two days ago that effectively the DNC establishment is like all right burnings actually crazy. We can't really do this. Excuse me I'm just report. What was reported the time you're right opinion? It's an interesting socialist and it's interesting the hypocrisy here I it was. Hey you Bernie Bros. You GotTa get on board this time. Whoever the nominee is now that the nominee is burning we gotta stop him. Wait wait I thought you said whoever the nominee class and there's all these people that are still kind of hoping hillary she got podcast coming out that she says it is true that some parts of the democratic establishment don't like Bernie Sanders and. He makes him they. He makes them very uncomfortable. If that's true and I think it's okay that the Democratic Party is uncomfortable right now. We have a transformation that we need to do within our party. We have two wings right and you need both wings to fly. You need the progressive in the moderates. I always say you need all shades of blue and so it is clear it is clear that is Democrats for the past ten years. We've been talking about this. Rising American electorate that. It's younger that it's going to be more diverse than women are going to be more progressive. Guess what they're here and guess what they want Bernie Sanders were this. This is the first line in my book. Bless you for that. Many shades of blue is will progressives moderates feud while America Burns. And if you take the earlier part of the conversation do they really want to say that these differences between Medicare for all or a public option when they all want to cover all Americans? They get decent healthcare. Are Those so important that you're going to have a debate like that in the country sort of turns around and reelect this president. Who for all the reasons you said in the first part of the show presents a real crisis? Oh and I think there's a point related to that and I bet this will resonate in Nebraska that right now politics so polarized that there are an awful lot of Democrats. Uc every trump voter in two thousand sixteen as a racist and a Bigot. And that is not clarifying and not helpful winning those voters. This is a true by one of the reasons why they were Democrat candidates that actually started resonating early some with some Republicans people have on the right of a fondness for Tulsi Gabbard there like Andrew. Young like people that are at least willing to go. Some of the Democrats are such wins. You can't even get them to go on Fox News. President of the United States is the latest sexiest poll has Bernie losing to trump but bet closer than all the other. Democrats forty-seven Fifty Nationally. He beats him in Pennsylvania by four. Look all these pundits so I hear say things like well. Bernie will lose forty-five states shut up. I don't know what the fuck talking about. Have you never know? We never know the same people who said trump wouldn't even met. You don't know what we don't know is Bernie needs a revolution Shaw. He needs people who've never voted before. Now they're not showing up in those numbers in the primary but we don't know but now since trump I think is not going to leave anyway whereas well run Bernie not. He's not and by the way when the virus get mad. He's going to declare martial law. What's God that could happen? Would Act totally. Have your point about people being dismissive about Bernie? I even tell people on on my side on the right this do we forget two thousand sixteen. You had this fractured establishment field on the right in Marco. Rubio Ted Cruz. Amer kept saying can't be Donald Trump can't donald trump and then all of a sudden it was donald trump the establishment by the way did kind of reject him for a long time up to the convention and now obviously we went from there. There are parallels with Bernie Sanders rise now and Donald Trump's rise reminds you that Republicans are saying Oh we really want to defend Bernie Sanders against this democratic establishment. And the day. After he's nominated. He is a horrible socialist who will endanger the country. They either believe one thing or the other. But I don't know if you're trying to progress. Why don't you vote for this? Something called the Damn I lost it now. the duty to report act. This is Require candidates for federal office and their campaigns to report any context with foreign governments to the FBI seems simple enough even seventy five percent of Republicans are for it Mitch. Mcconnell won't let it come to the floor why not duty to report ex campaign. Campaigns have contact with foreign governments. I mean Ford officials all the time that conversations that constantly well first of all join just says were you got to report it to the FBI. Why fight that will again. It's because there's all these contacts and we'll be a discussion about whether or not. It's an various. Campaigns talked to foreigners or the fact that trump still doesn't really admit that Russia has medaled in our elections and that they're still meddling in Russian collusion to just clarify one. First of all yes talk. Born many of what's wrong with saying they should were point that I don't see what that doesn't answer the problem. Well that doesn't talk to foreign sure but tell the FBI especially if that foreigners offering you help in your electric will mean Mitch. Mcconnell would also say that just passing this it's all meant to be from Democrat to slap in the face of trump. It's ridiculous of course anybody who is a Patriot would say hold on a second. If you're trying to get me to do something illegal election and you're a foreigner we will not do so why didn't trump or poured it never muller for. Never Mother report did happen but he shit the bed muller did a horrible job someday liberals will understand that he did a horrible job. Horrible Really Muller was mostly a figure okay off from the interview that he did okay this week. Abc News suspended David Wright. You'll like this Actually surprise you on this one. Why okay okay. I won't tell the story I remember him on the news. He's a very good reporter. Somebody came up. It was actually that guy from project. Veritas those people who dresses pimps and you know. Get the receptionist to admit you. The Democrat planned parenthood older so clever anyway so he didn't know he was too who's talking to and they got him on tape and he admitted that the network news shit basically And he said trump. We're interested in three things the outrage of the day the investigation and the palace intrigue. But we don't really cover the guy we don't hold them to account and we also don't give them credit for what things he does do. That's a guy off the record when the cameras weren't rolling talking about the media. I don't like discuss. I don't like people doing this to people. Especially it's happened disagree for you. Finally there's I think when someone's off the clock and they're talking about the boss and put them on camera and somebody very high on the ABC side of it and why is ABC taking this action against him for just the pro. Here's the credibility. To Project Veritas. Right though they go around the country and we knew that they were in the bar. I was telling I was in the same bar that this all happened so I was talking to other party. Yes because these guys with beards and hats were like of course not but you know how to start to identify these people when you're in the business for awhile and so they had all caps on and they're all bearded and I said so you know they started asking me all these weird questions about Bernie etc and so I said so. Are you with the media because it was all media and stay party people in the room and they said no We're just here because we think it's really fun to take a guys trip to observe the New Hampshire political process and I was like cover. It is easy to make fun of the they deserved. I mean that debate the fact that we're in the middle of this corona virus problem to say the least plus the stock market. They didn't ask a question about that. But the first one was about a saucy joke that Bloomberg told a nineteen eighty lays anyway. Everyone pretty much agreed that debate. Yoting immediate all right. Thank you panel is time for new rules now role fair time of the plague. Okay Nurul. They've your trial involves long disgusting descriptions of you showing women your deformed Genitalia. Don't use a walker with green fuzzy balls. Don't be an asshole. This little girl thinks she just met Barney. The dinosaur letter thinks she just met Barney. The dinosaur the planet earth has to give us a little credit. We Tried Yeah. We still burn coal and ate meat and drive. Suv's and by Shit we don't need but at least we don't just throw out plastic shopping bags anymore. We show them under the sink for a year and then we throw them out new rule now that I have to hung my horn every time. A red light turns green because drivers are looking at their phones. Someone must invent a traffic light. That has a honk built into it when it turns green. I know this is L. A. And by law people must check their phones in every light. But let me save us some time. Yes that is a text from your agent and no. You didn't get the part. Now go they're all to the people who engage in the fat of foraging where you go out and gather weeds and other wild plants and eat them You go ahead. I'll catch up. No no it looks delicious. You enjoy is it's just that. I just saw my dog p there and finally Nurul Americans need to find a better way to say. I disagree with your position than I'm going to kill you. One of the few things the left and the right have in common now. Adam Schiff and Chuck Schumer received death. Threats for impeaching trump and Susan Collins. Got Death Threats not impeaching him a guy named Salvator Lipa was arrested last week for calling ships office. And saying I dare you to come to New York. I will put a bullet in your fucking forehead. And then he went back to the bar and started screaming. How come women don't like Nice guys last week? Some Bernie Bros. Got Very angry at the culinary union in Nevada for preferring their own current health. Care Plan to Bernie's Medicare for all and as we know. The price for advocating for an alternative health care plan is death accepted. These are people on your own team. Fellow Workers Fellow Democrats slightly. Different idea who you want to kill. This is what was so frightening to Kerama Brown one of the stars on Queer Eye who got death threats after saying. He planned to be nice to Republican John. Spencer on dancing with the stars. Mr Brown said the minute that my son started getting death. Threats was the worst moment for me because a lot of it wasn't coming from the other side it was coming from my own side. His own side death threats from liberals to children over this. Why don't they just make an APP for death threats? You could call it ender. Look I'm not saying there's no place for blind bloodlust like in the Bible or when they run out of the chicken Sandwich Popeye's but everything a singer who wore her support for trump proudly to the grammys got death. Threats Gayle King Got Death Threats for asking a question about Kobe. Bryant Illinois Omar Gets Death Threats for being an immigrant and death. Threats went out to a woman who wrote a pro immigrant book because she wasn't actually an immigrant the Ukraine whistle blower got death threats. And nobody even knew who it was. They just sent open letters to whom it may concern on going to kill this. This is what happens when you let cancel culture spin out of control. It's the same attitude just taking a little further. We take your livelihood. It's just go ahead and take your life because all the geniuses in this country are so one million percent. Sure they're right about everything that's always just my way or the die way you know. Trump may want to be a dictator but he is hardly alone a lot of people in this country. Love to say off with their head. Don't like that thing you purchased threaten to burn down. The factory. Don't agree with someone. Who won the Oscar? Tell them you're gonna find where they live and slit their throat. Don't like to call the REF made at your kid's soccer game. Send them a picture of you brandishing. An axe when did Americans become the fatwa people every every minor dispute us to go from zero to Mel Gibson in three seconds? Did you know that the new pop sensation? Billy eyeless spent her big night at the grammys apologizing for winning. Because her overriding emotion wasn't pride. It was fear. That's super fans of rival. Popstars would attack her. Oh if only we had this kind of passion for something that mattered in this country. Billy Bush kept winning all night and she kept saying things like no. Please don't let it be me and all the other artist in this category. I know your fans are GonNa Talk Shit about me for years because of this. Imagine being eighteen winning five grammies and all you can think of is how shit they know where. I live. You know. Things are out of control when even potheads or issuing death threats yeah reporter Alex. Berenson recently cited a link between we'd legalization and a rise. In violent crime and pro cannabis activists wanted his head on a pike. Let me tell you. If you're a store owner and you WANNA kill someone you might consider switching from Sativa Indica around the Lodge Bank and smart start taking fourteen parks. Ej Dream Buck Sexton Nicholas Kristof and Dr Dre. Noreen stay tuned for over EPISODES OF REAL TIME WITH BILL. Maher every Friday night at ten or watch him anytime on. Hbo ON DEMAND FOR MORE INFORMATION LOG ON HBO DOT Com.

Donald Trump president Democrats United States Bernie Bernie Bernie Sanders President flu CDC Mike Pence Nebraska Bloomberg Nicholas Kristof New York Times John Kennedy Bernie Bros school of Public Health buck sexton
215: Radio replay: Do this with your LinkedIn profile to find a job

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

05:29 min | 3 months ago

215: Radio replay: Do this with your LinkedIn profile to find a job

"This is the business storytelling podcast with Christopher tra- available on Google spotify, apple and Dora and other podcast channels want to play it on your iphone just ask Siri to play the KRISTOF trap business storytelling podcast also available on Alexa. Here's Kristoff today's episode. Mt Fifty four degrees at seven fifty five. Happy Monday October Twelfth of Twenty twenty join me on the newsmaker line is as authentic storytelling dot net's Christoph traff Kristof. He's a fine man what a good. Anyway we're not going to go there brandies is in the background that's why it's on my mind. Hey, Kristoff good morning. Welcome back to the W MT morning show. How are you today? Here, in great, how about your thanks for having me? I am glad to have you back and I'm doing. Awesome. Thank you very much. A lot of people may be looking for their next job. Now maybe they're a little bit uncomfortable where they are in their position, maybe they're looking to exploit some talents they have. If they're looking for a new position, you say you can use linked in just as well as anything else can't you Faithfully US linked in Doug I hear people say it all the time. Oh. My goodness I'm just. Networking right face to face or zoom zoom meeting that kind of thing. But don't forget about linked and people search on there for employees you can really brand yourself well but you have to updated right to have the right keywords in there. So when somebody searches for context marketing. Cedar rapids I show up So but but there are some very simple tips and tricks to update your profile. Have a good profile picture not selfie not a partying picture not anything like that have a professional picture and you know somebody could take it with an iphone but then think about who you're trying to reach what the services do you WanNa be hired for and use those keywords. So if you want to be hired in customer service, talk about your customer service experience and then of course lists all your all your employers, your skills, and now the other thing that I've noticed the days linked in now offers assessment so you can take a fifteen. question assessment and if you pass it, they posted on your link thin and if you don't pass it, it just goes away. And the reason this is nice. It's because when you apply at a place drooling thin, that's on the top of the e mail to the recruiter. It says, the applicant has passed three assessments that are relevant to this job. So that's not very obvious but all those things help. That's amazing. I. Didn't realize that I know that one of the things it's been very helpful for people in the past is the endorsement portion of linked in. Absolutely and ask people for recommendations. Especially, if he were let go I know there's been a lot of layoffs all over the place because Cova. Ask People for recommendations and it's so it's so easy to do. You just go to their profile you click on after to be recommended and you know if they do it great and if they don't do it, I, mean it it took you a couple of seconds. The other thing is considering giving other people recommendations you know and sometimes pay it forward but recommendation certainly help I always do an after a project where if I changed jobs I, go through my context and I see who I should ask you know over the years yes you like to remind people I'm old there there's there's like a hundred recommendations, but that's over you know we don't WanNa talk about how many years but number years but every time I have a project completed or something like that I ask for it, and then you know it really does help while if you're if Herbert Hoover is the one that's recommending then you know you got a little age by. Seasoning Kristof trap join me authentic storytelling. Dot Net is his main website, but he's got a lot of offshoots where else can people find you all over the interwebs? Yeah certainly, travel review that online where I talk about everything travel related the latest tips and tricks file a couple of things We had a trip during covert here and please feel free to connect with me. Lincoln. Happy to give tips. You can look at mine. I practice what I tweet. Just, kristoff traffic on link Dan happy to connect there. That is so awesome. Hey. I. Appreciate it and I'll bet you cannot wait for I will Hawkeye Football Saturdays to back either can't you? You. Pat. Go Hawk exact I'm excited to KRISTOF. Thanks for joining me here in the newsmaker line heavy wonderful Monday sir. You Bet you to take care of fifty four degrees. Now, eight am Fox News headed your way local and regional news following that I've got six more things you need to know in order to get your day started we'll talk with political from Casey Gt night about the latest forecast as wells Monica. Vernon. Everyone wants to move their content from happening to performance and it's possible check out my latest book with the latest tips and tricks and advice on how to establish that content performance culture. It's possible. The book is available at content performance that online.

Christoph traff Kristof Mt Fifty Herbert Hoover Kristoff Twenty twenty drooling Alexa Christopher tra Google Siri Dora Cova Dot Net apple Vernon Casey Gt Fox News Lincoln Dan
250: How to use social media polls to nurture leads

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

09:07 min | 2 months ago

250: How to use social media polls to nurture leads

"This is the business storytelling podcast with christopher tra- available on google spotify apple and dora and other podcast channels. Want to play it on your iphone. Just ask siri to play the kristof trap. Business storytelling podcast. Also available on alexa. Here's kristoff today's episode. Storytellers christoph traff episode. To fifty on deck here sunday november twenty second. Thanks for tuning in really really appreciate everyone making the time to learn together to grow together to be better together. Really looking forward to this episode today. So here's what i found on instagram specifically but you can also implement this on linked in but i ran across it on instagram. Because here's what happened. I was responding to somebody's instagram stories. Poll and they responded back to me by message. They said what's the biggest problem. So the question was something about Do you struggle more with going to the gym or nutrition and quite frankly for me. It's nutrition so. I answered that question and then this influence our immediately email message me on instagram. Right saying something like what's the biggest barrier. What's the biggest hurdle so this is actually very good strategy that you can use Or at least try willett bring in millions on day one probably not but it is a way to connect with audiences and just a quick reminder last week we had the livestream It's still over on periscope dot tv ford slash c. Trap with kate bradley tournus The ceo of lately and she talked about how cold calls need to stop there knowing there. Yeah they're annoying right and it's a lot of work because you've got to call a lot of people to convert anybody so she said when people engage with us on social media we consider them a warm lead and i agree with that so somebody responds to you in a poll to a question. That's relevant to business. That's relevant to your product that's relevant to whatever it is you do. They are a warm lead. They may not have known it. But if i'm telling you that my problem is not the gym. But it's the nutrition could benefit from a nutritional virtual coach. Yes i could now. Could there be other problems. I have some genetic disease that causes me to gain weight. Could it be who knows like a hundred different reasons right that come to mind sure but at the end of the day if my problem is i need to better nutrition. Guess what. I might hire that virtual trainer. Same thing when it comes to your business whether you're a marketer whether you're selling a product whether you're offering professional services doesn't make any difference right just find a question to ask that addresses something that your audience cares about that your target audience your prospects that your prospects care about so. It's not just about asking questions to keep people engaged to keep people busy but it's about there's a business reason to do it so just keep that in mind right and sometimes what i've seen as well ask questions. Both of them gave you an in so as long as people answer. You can reply. So for example. The casey i put on instagram just to kind of play around with it gone viral focus on long-term relevance instead. That's the instagram stories. Instagram real agreed question. Mark and then the answers are yes but how second answer is i need results. So no matter what they say. I can't respond with an offer for help with a question with something to move the conversation forward so just kind of keep that in mind. So what do you say when somebody does that. You know your message them on the back end. You can actually see who who voted right on instagram. You can't on linked in you. Can you can do that on all those different networks so that should not be a problem but you know you can say something like what are you struggling with when it comes to results. What are the barriers currently to get results. And then go from there. They might not respond if they don't respond. They wanna talk to you. Don't send them a snotty little message right being nice. Let's be real. Let's be human lincoln very very similar Different interphase of course. But you can do that as well. There's also different types of follow up messages that you can use one is. You can do a short video on instagram. You have to record that on your camera roll first and then you upload it to the message that's a really good strategy in my opinion episode one ninety five that's fifty five episodes ago. We had joel app on matt burnett talk about integrated personal visit video messages outreach So listen to that show gives you some ideas how to do a good message quickly to the point human be real and so then. You can also written messages on instagram. You do voice messages. So voice message is also something you can do on linked in and i wrote about that before on how they can actually help you stand out because not that. Many people sent voice messages so i sent voice messages all the time and the other thing is especially when i'm on my ipad. The voice messages. Sound much better than me. Voice dictating than i have to fix it anyway. Right so it's actually a little bit of a workflow hack as well. So is it a good idea to do this. Absolutely try some polls linked in an instagram stories. Especially if you have a good audience on twitter know by the way you can't see who is responding to your poll so you can't use the same strategy there but the one thing you could do on twitter as you can see who is responding who is not not responding but who is looking at your Fleets so fleets. Of course our new thing so do that you can do that and then you can consider messaging them. Probably not as far down the pump funnel. Because they're not saying anything they're just looking at your stuff and there's some of the fleet's recently ahead like hundreds of viewers. I mean that would take some time if i message the mall. Especially if until we get some automation here but at the end of the day you know. Human to human marketing. Its outreach. it's connecting. It's nurturing those leads and that's another way to do it If you had any success with it if you've tried it let me know You know see trap at gmail.com. I'd be. I'd be interested to hear how things are going. How things are looking has worked for you and again remember. It's a numbers game. So if you just started you. Instagram brand account and you got followers. It's not gonna work ride. You gotta built that following. I consider promoting. I think you can't promote it. So we have stories that i think you can not sure if you can do it with a poll or not But you gotta build your audience to get that to work. I'm christopher trap. Thanks for listening. Today's episode tomorrow episode. So two fifty one we talk about the of and how to follow. Better internal communication strategies with trend. Anderson of playwright dot com. So take a listen tomorrow. We'll be back In just twenty hours or so roughly. Thanks again for tuning in until next time. I'm currently accepting requests for future virtual and onsite keynotes and workshops in twenty twenty alone. I've spoken in singapore. And you'll virtually of course thanks cove it. I can't wait to get back on the road. And if we still can't get on the road in twenty twenty one. I would be happy to speak at virtually please reach out to me see trap at gmail.com war authentic storytelling dot net digital marketing. Your small to medium sized reach out now and drop us a message at c. trap dot com.

Instagram christopher tra kristoff Storytellers christoph kate bradley twenty second kristof siri willett alexa matt burnett apple ford google casey lincoln twitter joel Mark christopher trap
190: How to build instant credibility online

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

35:17 min | 4 months ago

190: How to build instant credibility online

"This. Is the business storytelling podcast with Christopher. Tra- available on Google spotify, Apple Pandora and other podcast channels want to play it on your iphone. Just ask Siri to play the KRISTOF trap business storytelling podcast also available on Alexa. Here's Kristoff today's episode. A business storytellers, Kristof trap, your host and author of content performance culture. How's everyone doing a? We are nearing episode two hundred. Ten episodes away roughly super exciting that everybody is still paying attention. Everyone still wants to hear more of our awesome guests and learn how to be successful with your digital marketing. So today's topic fits into that category. Really well, of course, how do you build credibility online and that's that seems to get harder and harder and harder And so I invited the author of instant credibility online. You can get that book on Amazon see trap don't online forward slash credibility Sends you straight to that page much easier than Amazon dot com forward slash eighty nine. Letters and numbers. The author is John was and John is based in Bangkok and he wrote instant credibility online John Welcome to the show. Chris, thanks for having me. Yeah you bet. So let's talk about First of all, what are we talking about when we were saying credibility online and how how do you get started and why does it matter? So there you go. There's A. Credibility Online I think that. There's there's a lot of ways to build credibility online. In the book that I have like I think there's different degrees of credibility You know if you're just starting out. There's one level of credibility if you're like. If you're then there's like an expert level of credibility and then what I like to call like an influence, her level of credibility. So. I think a lot of businesses. You know they. A lot of businesses are actually already experts. Or. Even if you're just starting out as a business owner, you are an expert. But a lot of them don't know how to communicate that and basically that's That's a lot of what I help. Bob My clients do and what I've been doing for years as a copywriter. Sorry for the interruption, you need help digital marketing for your small to medium sized business reach out. Now, drop us a message at sea trapped G MAIL DOT COM. In in your book, of course, again, at the mentioned see trap that online for its Thatch credibility you talk about twenty five tactics to win website visitors stress go from nobody influence in six months or less. Interesting is you know people everybody always wants specific right? How long? How much? What are we do Blah Blah Blah? I I I mean you kind hitting. They'll stinks twenty-five tactics. That, you can use in six months or less. So basically, the three levels of credibility you mentioned for businesses do they have to get to that top level or working they working they comfortably live? I. You don't have to get to the top level I mean. I think. I think all businesses should should just kind of aim for at least the experts status I mean if if If you WANNA. Go for influence. Assure you can do it but but you also have to remember that You know th the higher status you, WanNa go with your credibility the the more effort it's GonNa cost the more money. It's probably GONNA cost You know I mean there's there's things in my book there's that I have done. You know, but I know of them because. I've learned about them and then some of them have done for for clients. So. Yeah. It does that answer the question. Absolutely. So okay. So give me some of the I mean we don't have to run through twenty five tactics, but what are some tactics that companies can Can do out of the gate I mean certainly you know I'm a content marketing fan and help companies tell their story better and that's that's of course one right? How do you tell better stories? How are you when I was in healthcare John everybody wanted to write another story on the four science of a heart attack in the world does not need any more articles. Notting, me the four of a heart attack I think that's been covered. But, you know what? Else? What other tactics can people use can? You know I think as as a copywriter two, the two ones that often go like. Overlooked very often. And are actually very easy to do, which can can immediately give credibility I. Mean. To the listeners out there right now like the tips I'm GonNa, give you. You can do them literally today you could just put these things on your website today and all of a sudden you'll. You'll have more of an expert status to you, but the first one is. Just naming your years in business in in putting that very big on your website So basically like you want that on your home page. That is as long as you have been in business for a while. And if you haven't been in business for a while, there's also a way around it I talk about this in the book I think on my website I. It's I met ten years ten years writing you know. For clients and not not clients by also was TV and writing a TV and stuff but. I basically did not actually open might start my own business until two thousand thirteen but I was writing professionally since I was two thousand. Nine I believe. So so if you were if you word it correctly which is what I do is just to say, Hey, I've been a professional rider providing clients. Writing. Services for ten plus years. So that's that's the first tip the second and this is something that Pretty much. All businesses overlook but it's just. It's just about using numbers to to show your expertise. So for example, my own website I have like I've written a half million words for for my clients. It's actually more than that. I think is probably around seven hundred thousand or something this time, but but but the point is. That big number will get people's attention and be like Oh. This person has experienced. So if business owners out there listening if they to You just need to kind of think of what is my product in the smallest form and then you just quantify that and then you should put it on your website and definitely that's that's a big one you want to put that. On your homepage and probably even possibly put it in like a headline. As well so. I. Hope that's helpful and makes so so very few things camera. Very interesting. So I also, I love the whole knowing how many words published. And especially, on your website that's easier and easier right because I use wordpress on authentic storytelling at net and I used the the word counter W. P. Word Count actually official name Sophie wanted search for that plug. And I I'm just pulling it up. I think it's so cool because so I've published. Eight hundred thousand words. which would take you sixty seven men sixty seven hours to read. And and it tells me that right and then tells me the average and then it tells me the average how much published this year which I guess in this view, it doesn't tell me but this year, I've published one hundred, twenty, thousand words on which about an average of twelve hundred. So the reason I, bring that up. Because kind of what you're doing is. To establish yourself as an expert, you have to know what you're talking about and exactly right and maybe more importantly you have to sound like you know what you're talking about, and so for example, what I do with what I said I still got this many words this year, my average twelve hundred, thirteen, hundred words. So when I talk with clients when I talked with. Executives I say look. We WanNa hit a thousand to fifteen hundred words for Google and it just looks better right because you look at. Word. Article you can skim it so one hundred percent. That's awesome. But would you recommend I put that number somewhere I mean why would people my what I mean I use it in conversation. What people care in writing on the website or how like how do I tie that in there? So what what is how how big is the number? Eight hundred thousand published were who? I think. Yeah I would. I would I I don't think you have to because I think for for for yourself. There's other ways that you can establish your credibility but I think it's. Putting that on the website would be good. But but I know at the beginning of this podcast you said you were approaching two hundred, two hundred episodes. That's right there. That's like a great way to also establish your credibility but anyways I'm getting a bit sidetracked though to to answer your question So. So Chris with. With your clients are you you're actually doing writing for them as well then yes. Yeah. For example Okay then yeah. I mean you could just put it So. With, websites I the homepage I, always kind like break it down into sections, and you have typically a banner at the top with a picture and then headline there, and then under that it's what I like to call the intro section of your homepage. So for me I, put my path million plus words right in the intro section when like talking about myself it's Basically how I've done it is just say like you can. I don't remember exactly what I say, but it's something like. You know you can trust me with my writing because I've been doing this this and I've I've written over a half million words Another way actually to to do something like that, as well as one of my former employers He has put He's he's a marketing agency and he is. He's basically put at the top of his website like right under the the banner it's like. Basically he basically just lists the number of words the the the the company has written in total. So he he lists that he lists the number of impressions like Or that the number of reach that the company has had for their clients, which is like millions and millions you know and then. There's something else which can't remember off the top of my head, but but he basically just has it like a bar that's under the. The the the main banner image, and it actually moves like like if you stay on the website, you'll see that. The numbers are going up. When you're on the website in real time. So I don't think it's. It's like actually like connected to the writers work but is just like making like an estimate you know. So but so if you go to authentic storytelling dot net I, mean it says. So the headline in the banner is content in digital marketing tips and then the little sub head or whatever like Kristof trap could very easily change that to something like. You know. Eight hundred thousand words of tips for one point, five, million visitors or that. That that's that's that's actually great. I've really liked that. because. It's you know one of the things with with establishing your expertise in with like copywriting it's it's it's being specific. So if you can. Have those kind of specific and big numbers then. That's really great for for credibility. Already see this guy is this is why these podcast right and I know sometimes guess cringe when I bring this up but people listen to these so nothing to worry about John but I always learn so much to in again in content performance culture content performance that online we talk about the collaboration and so guys what you're seeing here is like we're doing life collaboration I'm not defensive about John Giving me an idea from my website right I'm not sitting here. But it's my name. It's my most important thing and so when you're collaborating team, you have to, you know put you eagle aside think about what you're GonNa do think about what you gotta try and I. It's interesting how often I take ideas back from the shows and album I'll see how that looks. I don't know how it's GonNa look on mobile I don't know anything other than that. That's seems to be a good idea on the surface. Years in service years in Business John. I always see companies. They have ninety nine years or eight, thousand, two, hundred, forty, nine years of. Experience and that's because. They got a mix of older people, younger people and when you add up twenty five business. I mean firstly lying between being just Kinda shady about it and being helpful. While? This is a this is a really good question. Because I feel like there is a thin line. I mean you got to tell the truth for one thing you know. So you shouldn't. You shouldn't should always say say the real thing or I mean if if you don't know what the exact number just. Give your best estimate like a I've had I had this one insurance client who I've been using this technique with to to say how many? How many claims they paid out for their clients and like I was thrown out numbers and they were like, no, no, no, no. No that's too big. So they would just bring me back. Because I always want to as a copywriter. Marketer you want sell, sell, sell it as much as possible but but really you know you just got A. I I think. Using using these kind of tools that I talk about in my book you know. You just got a for me. It's like I just hope that the the right people are getting it because there are certainly. Certainly I mean, I'll be honest there. There are people who are going to get my book and they're going to abuse the the kind of kind of tools that I I've given because. Because not everyone wants to have a genuine business you know So to answer your question though to me it, it really all just comes down to intention and I know. I've heard some people say that Oh they don't like that kind of idea. But if I think if your you know your heart is in the right place said you have a genuine product and your genuinely trying to help people then that that's really what matters and then and then also just sticking like telling the truth you know. I, think that's really important too so So. Yeah. I wish I wish I had a really clear cut answer answer but that's like a super like ethical questions. You know it's tough. It's a tough one to give the copywriting credibility world. Think. But you can be. You can be. Honest by just picking the best way to share it right I mean. But but if you're saying you have eight thousand years experience, technically that might be correct if you add up all employees but. Only I. I totally understand what you're saying I've been in. I've been in situations like what you're talking about before and I'm trying to think of an example I have thought of an example with another business but I don't Wanna say their name because it would it would the bad publicity. Think about think about these, maybe if you can give an example without giving the name, but the one that comes to my mind is so every time I work in. Every time I work in a project where they have online and print. So publishing, for example. They all. So used to be when I grew up in publishing, it would be like, oh I, have we have eighty, three, thousand subscribers forty, seven, thousand, one, hundred, twenty, five, thousand print, right And that was the number. And then when digital cameras and went, let's be honest about it and so I talk about this in the book as well. Accidental Seo Strategy. If you know nothing about Seo, but you're a good storyteller, you will have some home runs promised. I'm not saying you should do that but I'm just saying if you tell good stories and you publish them at some point, something will take off I've seen it happen literally every project over the years. And so my my point is so in publishing companies do that at some point they readers online, right? And a Lotta. Times. There's way more readers than they haven't print. So that say I got forty seven thousand people reading my print magazine newspaper whatever. But I got one point five million or whatever. You'd have to save all ready mentioned. One point eight, million readers online. I can't say we have an audience of close to two million or we have an audience of one point eight, million I don't have to stick with only print product. Would you agree? I would agree I would agree you know you just you just would not be. Specify you know you. The I I would actually agree with that that you could say that. Yeah. So you have to just figure out what's the? What's the right number? But I would say a lot of traditional publishers disagree with us on this job they would say, oh no no, we need to say whatever the print numbers because we know who they are. We don't know whoever like the one point five, million readers on authentic storytelling. I don't know who most of them are right like every person signs up for my my newsletter. Even, the people that buy my book, I don't always know. you know I I don't always know. Who they are, but if they buy it through Amazon. Interesting. Six months. Let's talk about that. Why I was a possible in six months so I think that it is possible but you would need to it would require very focused effort. A very focused effort or a lot of money one of others. And actually I think you could do it even sooner but again, it would take a very focused effort but you'd have to be implementing the the influencer. Influence or tactics in the book and I think one of the easiest ones to do is actually probably just being like an author and in all honesty because it's just very easy the it's it's easier than ever to be an author right now because you know there's no there's no gatekeepers essentially and also to make yourself a bestselling author which is actually not as hard as it sounds but you know you could easily write a book in a couple months and get it published in. To bestseller end that would be one step but there's there would be more that the I would say he would need to do is while Starting like. Probably starting like a regular blog probably trying to do guest posting. Danny, have you heard of Danny any Christoph? No so Danny. He's not as popular now as he was but he I would say he's an influence Sir He he he exploded on the scene like this was maybe like six or seven years ago and he wrote I think it was like eighty something guest posts and like. I don't know like a month or two like incredibly quickly and all the sudden this guy just like launched he he would just went from like nobody to influence her like. Like like that you know But. so I I, really think it would take a very focused effort of doing things like publishing a book getting on podcasts. Is away a guest posting. There's a, there's a really good tool called Have you ever heard of Harrow? Opera. Herro. Help a reporter out I think is a really good. Way, to kind of get to get some publicity for your business You know if you're. If you want. I talk a bit about in the book about becoming an influence in your city and I a former my former boss was able to do that and he just. Got Onto one of the boards of the biggest chamber in Bangkok and He just started going to networking events all the time, and he's he's influence or in the city now like. Everyone. Knows it so So you know that's another tactic because influence there doesn't have to mean just. Online influence or can mean local influence there as well. So Yeah, the. So. thinks impacter good information as as as a always. So first of all The reason. So there's a couple different reasons why guests posting can be helpful right and same with being influenced or locally What is people just see you as an influence, right? So if I'm in the the media in the newspaper whether they linked to me or not at the end of the day I'm that's right right like if I. Go on the I go on the radio every once in a while and they link to me from their website. But at the end of the day, people listen to it and then they put it online as well But another reason why those things are important is still the link back and I still remember Greg Gifford he was on the show. Talking about local Seo and he is coming back on the show to talk about a reviews why you don't want five a five star rating on. Sale. And So we'll dive into that in a in a few episodes here but but anyway so he said if you are on boards if you're sponsoring local teams etcetera etcetera and your local business. Make. Sure those companies link back to you. Even if they have little traffic, it doesn't make a difference, but it does help you for local Seo when I think about guest posting. So I I got a I have an article that has just come out on content marketing institute, and certainly there is cash a and be an on. but there's also the there's also the link back Yup right. So is there value? So how important is the link back on all those like how how much people focus on that? From a credit credibility standpoint like the link. From credit credibility standpoint, the link doesn't doesn't really matter. Because because, you're from a credibility standpoint you want to be on the publication that said, you do want the link I would say because you know you get back link which will help with Seo especially, if they're like like I, think you said what content marketing institute that they gotta be a Pretty A. Pretty High. what's it called the domain authority I'm imagining So, and then the other thing with a link to is is you control that link so you can send them wherever you want to go. So if you're if you have a new book out or if you have a new course out or any kind of new product out and you WanNa, have that link send them to the landing page than Bam you're all of a sudden going to get a bunch of traffic to that landing page. So so I think the links important but but from a credibility standpoint I don't think it's it's it's a necessary thing, but you should you should get it regardless if you can. and. So you talk about. A guest on talk show on podcast. How about starting talk yet so I think that's a good idea I mean, yeah. I totally think starting starting your own podcast would be a great way to to. To to not only gain like an influencers status, but also to make other connections with with influencers because on. The book something called Credibility by Association. So if you of this network of influencers The you can work together like you're you're going to be getting some of their credibility by By even just hosting them on your show, you know some of their crab credibility like rubs off on you so. I think it's a great idea. Again I'm sure I'm sure it's a lot of work. Am Am I right Christoph. I mean, nothing is as easy. As it sounds I mean I was just looking at the dilbert cartoon. The day we were recording than they said, can you get this software project on Monday and the guy goes will take longer than a half a day so everything takes. You know really quickly on on the book I. Mean, I Know You have a chapter in here on self publishing self publishing golden. Golden. Age and It. Does help you become more established when you can say author and then the other thing we do have an entire episode I don't remember if there's an article on the blog, but there's an entire episode if you go back to. Wherever you listen to podcasts on. Why they're so many number one authors. And and you can listen to the whole thing. I don't know you should try saying hey siri play that episode I. Don't know if that works or not. But anyway. So the in a nutshell, the reason there's so many First of all, you still have to sell your book to become number one the end if nobody buys it, you can't get there but Amazon in a nutshell. UPDATES every hour. So you could you could be a best seller for an hour and as long as you get the screen shot, you are now number one. for very long but you know so there you go. But it does definitely help one hundred percent. Does help you how. How about grammar. White the Matt Grammar. Man When I wrote that that. Chapter. Via, one of my, my one of my editors because I actually use editors as well and he he did not like that after. He didn't like it because he's I know he's I'm pretty sure he's a stickler for grammar and You know I don't have a whole lot of like data backup my point in that Chapter I did the. Best that I can, but it's just For for me. I think I guess grammar I think is important in people should always. You should you should check your work. You should double, check your work I think but I do think. You know I think I think that sometimes people do. Maybe, it's just me because I know a lot of writers and maybe the ordinary person won't think that think the same way as me but I think a lot of people. On the importance of Grammar having to be like one hundred percent flawless you definitely want to get one hundred percent flawless if you can but you know we're all human beings mistakes happen I think there's a difference in seeing a page like a blog post that's loaded with grammar errors that one with just a single light typo or something you know. It happens and I've I've ridden tons of. One of the former marking marketing agencies I worked at you. Know I. Do Tons of websites for them and I. Sometimes Catch Grammar errors on some of the websites that I didn't write and I'm sure some people caught grammar grammars on my website I wrote to every once in a while so. But but I guess my point is it happens and I think people are. I think people are more forgiving than than than some people think but yeah, I. Just. Say Grammar is important definitely Definitely double, check your work but just don't be like neurotic by that. That's that's how I. That's my philosophy grammar. Ya and so first of all I mean agreed, we do need to have sentences. That's. Correct. But sometimes it's debatable. It's not a grammar for it's. potentially styles for point yeah. Yeah. the I was just writing a piece of copy today actually that some people would consider a grammar error, but it was a conscious choice I started a sentence with which the word witch W. H. H and I know some people would probably say this is not correct grammar but you know it's copywriting and I think You know. With copywriting, specifically, the the choices you're making are lot. It's a lot about. Ways to get people's attention and to keep their attention. So if you do unusual things like with your grammar sometimes it's going to to keep the reader reading. So so so yeah I. Mean I think it's okay to to do that and I always kind of make these highly stylized choices that some people I'm sure it hate. Right so. and. The other thing I did write about that Cafe Pacific Put their name on a new plane in I'm sure they're they're probably fly in and out of Bangkok I assume but. They Miss Baugh and that that's actually a pretty bad on the plane. On August fame and so I've been using this as an example with every writer I sit. So you don't WanNa make mistakes I get it But if an international airline can misspell their name and laugh about it and move forward, you can too. So all they did is they they tweeted a picture. And said, whoops this one this needs to go back Philippine shop which it does because it's misspelled. So keep that in mind I mean certainly something's things will. Yeah that's great. That's really great and that's actually really great for branding I've I'm sure I'm sure the customers actually like the more for that that they can make a joke about it feels like so that's a really good example definitely. I I will still be Flying Cafe Pacific they're actually my favorite airline so. I'll definitely be flying them regardless of their big spelling error. I. I also think some people just always look for something to pick on highway frankly my. My. My opinion on Grammar is unless you pay me to criticize grammar I'm not. for for the most part guys, John's book can be found at sea trapped out online forward slash credibility that's working and You can check it out there instant credibility twenty-five tips in A. Start implementing in six months John where else can people find you connect with? Let's see I would say a Lincoln is good. Find me on Lincoln just John Wiler you should be able to find me otherwise I do have. A business called the ordinary dude meditation because I may longtime editor but you can connect me at with you can sign up for my newsletter, their ordinary meditation, dot com or you can. Follow me on facebook but I would say that's that's where you can find. Fantastic and wiler everyone is spelled w. L are so connect whisker saw John Thanks for joining us also I'm just looking at the book I mean it's. A number four NPR. So it's it's definitely people are reading it. Hopefully, it helps people tell better stories and be morial while they're sharing their their expertise John. Thanks for joining. Thank you so much for having me Christopher. It's been a it's been a pleasure I. really enjoyed it. You Bet. Thanks everyone for listening until next time.

John Wiler Amazon Bangkok writer business owner Google Kristof Chris Christopher editor Bob My Alexa Kristoff Siri Thatch Christoph facebook Danny
232: Does your brand draw as much emotion from people as the U.S. election in 2020?

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

17:42 min | 2 months ago

232: Does your brand draw as much emotion from people as the U.S. election in 2020?

"This is the business storytelling podcast with christopher tra- available on google spotify apple pandora and other podcast channels. Want to play it on your iphone. Just ask siri to play the kristof trap business storytelling podcast also available on alexa. Here's kristoff today's episode. Hey business storytellers. It's christoph trap episode to thirty two hopefully enjoyed the last few days we got some great guests on crew. Saunders talking about content intelligence and seth godin book came out episodes to thirty and two thirty one. If you wanna go back and take a listen to mars episode to thirty three. We'll be diversity in marketing a chat with michelle ago me very insightful. Certainly something many of us can think about today. What many of us are thinking about. Though is the u. s election. Oh my goodness people. What a story. What i mean. How about the content of follow on the different channels. It's just gripping At the time of this recording which is seven ten. Am chicago timezone. The day after the election cnn has biden at two hundred twenty four electoral votes in trump at two hundred thirteen. So whoever's gonna win they need two hundred seventy at a minimum That's the winning number. But what's interesting about the election. I don't necessarily want to get into all these politics. But the one thing i want to get you to think about. And to consider is how gripped set the right term gripped. The nation was were still is and even the world by the election. Now certainly not. Many brands can demand that kind of Attention or that kind of You know line even think about it. It's been going on forever. It feels like months and months and months. I got flyers every day from the different candidates. In fact my six year old said to me. Yesterday i was looking at somebody on linked into my office and she walked in and said that teresa greenfield as if no one to somebody else's pay is at I'm like i don't even know where this cutting but certainly all these candidates have been in front of us. Non stop flyers tv commercials ads on the web social ads. You name it. You've probably seen him. And then of course it. All you know culminated. I guess with the election night coverage and it was. I mean it was gripping like it was really. It was hard to turn it off. Somebody tweeted this is like the longest seattle seahawks game ever and it does kind of feel like Watching a sporting event to an extent. But the reason. I'm bringing these up. These things up guys is we have so many companies that want to create success overnight without putting in the dollars without putting in the work. I'm not a fan of everybody saying you have to work more. I'm also not a fan of cliches. Work smarter not harder whatever. What does that even mean but working more doesn't necessarily mean more success does something to keep in mind. I'm actually working on an article. That should be up shortly here on authentic storytelling that net. And i'm talking about work. Life in the gration and carlos had alga called work life balance on a livestream. That episode has not run yet It's coming coming up here Down the road could probably tell you when it's currently scheduled to be that's carlos Episode two forty five. that's november seventeenth. Why marketers need to set work life. Boundaries that's what carlos hidalgo talked about So it's not just about working more but it's about doing the right things and when you look at the election certainly that's a different level. They're not selling a product. They're not selling service like most of us but they are selling themselves right. Because at the end of the day you voting for somebody based on how they sold themselves based on how they marketed themselves and also based on how other people market at them right. I mean there is all kinds of ads running that the candidates didn't even come up with some kind of outside organization that has some stake of some kind in the race. That runs these ads. But my point is certainly there is a level of repetition. You have to get people to feel passionate about things I don't think in my lifetime. I've i've heard anybody ever bs passionate about an election as this one now. Maybe that's just because you know. I'm in my forties. Maybe there's been others And i don't remember them but It seemed like everybody had opinions. People unfriendly on social media. People left groups. People blackley each other over political opinions right So hopefully we can have better conversations again on social media moving forward but my point is in your next marketing strategy. Think about how you felt when you watch the election. Think about how you felt when you were watching the results and that's how you want your customers to feel right so if you if if your candidate lost certainly don't want them to feel upset pissed etc but we want them to to be at that level of emotion just the positive version of course so if you candidate one and you're delighted today and i know still some races here especially the presidential one that at the time of this courting has not been called anybody and just very quickly about calling elections. I if you if you followed a on twitter they called alexei called racists in no time and i mean it was amazing to see It was the hatchback ap race call ap ap underscore politics and it was live. It was quickly in day. Use at see. If i can tell you hear a race call spot so what i assume they did is as people were feeding in the results or they were getting enough results. They were calling it and then automatically. They've pushed out these tweets. Every tweet basically was the same thing. For example democrat case wins reelection to your house in hawaii's first congressional district api rates at twelve thirty am hawaii hawaiian standard time election in two thousand twenty h. i. election as the hashtags. So but my point is like so that hawaiian election. Let's stay with that for. I don't know mr case. I don't really care necessarily I guess i might care. If i'm following the whole race whether or not democrats or republicans have the majority in the house so that could be why i might care about that and i think the last i looked at currently tied digital marketing for small to medium sized retail out now and drop us a message at c. n. g. mail dot com. Certainly i care about that but as you heard from my reaction very little emotional reaction right to mr case winning i really the the immediate impact wasn't necessarily top on my mind in other races. I got strong opinions bright. We had local races to To federal offices were on the ballot. one in congress one in the in the senate and you know so. My reaction was much different when i saw them. But that's what you want to get people to do so the next time you have a meeting next time. You have a committee meeting. And you talk about branding and should this font be point. Two sizes bigger. Should you know. Should we do have certain things so we do this and that at this yes you gotta do them all. Stop arguing over little stupid stuff. That doesn't matter stop bickering over. Little things You get to spend money to make money quite. Frankly look at these elections. I mean i don't know how much money spent millions. Maybe maybe more probably billions honestly. But i don't. I don't have that in front of me. But they were in front of me all the time. So you wanna do that with your audience. In of course keep in mind. Your audience might be much more niche than every voter in the united states but voting voter turnout was at a record high in many many places and that was because they had great calls to action. Right i mean people wanted to make a difference. People felt emotional about what's going on. And they they voted one way or another and you know coverage is just non. Stop talking about coverage really quickly seriously. Shout out to john king over at cnn and he he had the map up all night he was going on counties talking about different states. What would happen if biden flips ohio. For example what counties have the biggest impact all different things. It was just fantastic and the reason. I'm bringing this up is because the power of visual and the power of data so the more you can tell a story in a way that's visual but that's also full right so he's just showing me the map. I get it right. I understand what's going on. But the context that he added to it and at one point he said. Here's why we're focusing on ohio. So much and the reason is because if biden flips ohio trump had no way to the reelection. I don't know how currently looks But the so high is currently for trump or has been called trump. Sell off the table but my point is the visual but context the storytelling brands need to do a better job. And and i did have an article on authentic storytelling dot net talking about Journalistic storytelling techniques. Brands can really try some of those into a better job. Connecting with your audience trying to draw that emotion a meaningful way. Right so certainly. Some people may have set some of the emotion that was drawn out was manufactured a little bit over things that ultimately you know they might that affect you or or what not so. It's something to keep in mind. be real. be authentic. Share your story but you have to be in front of your audience wherever they are and that might include not might but that very likely will include some pay campaigns whether that's at campaigns on google where people are searching Seo organic seo social Social promotions All those different things you know email marketing maybe do a maybe mail campaign lineup so something to keep in mind certainly. The election has been interesting to follow really was hard to go to bed last night. And i you know we have a little bit of a cold vid issue here at the house and so not necessarily feeling as hot as i could either but but it was like a really good game like a really close game without commercials. I mean they were hardly any commercials. I mean john king which is going and going and going and at some point you would think. He needs a bathroom break but It felt like he was just going and going and going an offering insights and what was going on in the different parts of the country. So hopefully that gave you some inspiration to the feeling is probably still top of mind for both of us. I know i'm still kind of in the election mode. I'm still watching But maybe we can connect with our prospects and our audiences in a similar way. And maybe we can't be as relevant as politics currently seemed to be in the in the united states record number turnouts. That's that's fantastic to see a really really is You know absentee ballots. People have sending in their their votes. So early i voted weeks ago and You know so. Think about the feeling how we're all feeling and then of course. How do we get our prospects. Our customers people our target audience to feel like that in a positive way about our brand. And i can tell you this. It's not going to happen through. Vache hyperbolic marketing so all this. We are the leader. Were the state of the art. Bla-bla-bla that's not going to do it. It's not going to do it. Promise so something to keep in mind. I'm christopher trap your host and author of content performance culture. You don't hear me talk about elections and politics too often. But i thought this one was a special episode so wanted to jump in here We are still scheduled through the end of the month. There's a lot of shows coming up really really appreciate all. The guests really appreciate everyone. Listening appreciate everyone You know letting us know what you like what you don't like if you liked the show. Please consider leaving a review on apple podcast and anywhere. You can listen anywhere. You listen is fine by me. It's kind of funny to me quite frankly that there's one thousand nine hundred guests thousand. The only two that allow reviews are apple. Podcasts and pot chaser so very very strange. But i'm not in charge of all those channels. I'm barely in charge of my own show here at my friends. Have a good rest of the week. hope to see you again tomorrow with the show on diversity marketing. Very interesting Topic i think we all need to do a better job and be aware of what we need to think about so for now. That's it all having the topic Hopefully the elections are wrapped up here in the near future but we will see might be days. I'm christoph trap your host. Thanks for listening to another episode of the business storytelling podcasts.

christopher tra kristoff six year teresa greenfield gration biden carlos hidalgo blackley carlos kristof christoph cnn siri seth godin Saunders seattle seahawks pandora hawaii michelle google
307: Saying no can help you become a better leader - a chat with Jo Miller

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

35:01 min | 2 d ago

307: Saying no can help you become a better leader - a chat with Jo Miller

"This is the business storytelling podcast with christopher tra- available on google spotify apple and dora and other podcast channels. Want to play it on your iphone. Just ask siri to play the kristof trap business storytelling podcast also available on alexa. Here's kristoff today's episode. Business storytellers christoph trap. Thanks for joining me. Another livestream episode of the business storytelling podcast and interestingly today we are live. I think it's working on all the different channels. Looks like people are tuning in amazon. Live check out the books at the bottom there. Women of influence is the one that is featured today. So i have to click over here now. It's featured a woman of influence. I have that author on the show today joe miller. Hopefully you guys connect with her at checkout her book almost a thousand nine thousand ten thousand ten thousand copies sold. I might get there one of these days. We will see fingers crossed so we'll get some opinions from her on how i can do that but today we're live streaming. I am paying attention to you guys. Twitter facebook the official christoph trap on facebook as well. As my personal account periscope twitter youtube linked in an amazon life. If you're listening on the podcast feel free to connect with me on all those channels so you can hear these shows down the road as we are live streaming them. I'm telling you the live streaming could not be possible. Got to change some things here without the friendly people over at re stream. I gotta move out of the way. This way we stream dot. Io votes last join forward slash c. Trap take a look. That's how we'd livestream to all these different channels at once. Not sure how that would be possible without them but check them out. Therese team that. I'll full what slash c. Trap still a mouthful even with the trap at the end let's get her out of the comfy green room here and talk about first of all. We'll talk about her book but then we'll also talk about. When do you say no. And this is what prompted today's discussion. You may remember. Joe was on the show when we first started this podcast and the audio not her fault. My fault the audio was not quite there. I mean production was not necessarily what it is today. We're doing all this live streaming where we're doing all these different things so i'm glad you came back despite those technical difficulties back in the day. Here she is joe miller. How's it going today. Doing really really well and look Folders asia this is my first time doing a livestream sire. Thank you christoph. For getting me out of my comfort zone into the game. Yeah you bet. This is kind of worded. It seems people are tuning in and watching and seeing what's happening so let's start with what actually prompted the conversation and as you guys heard me talk. Say before i do take pitches but i love finding my guests when they say something smart on social media and then i asked him to come on the show because it makes me feel like i'm doing something i'm not just here evaluating ten page pitches and you said something about you gotta stop or not stop. You gotta start saying no. So what's that all about joe. Yeah look at comes from my deep belief and lack experience. That's pointed me in the direction of understanding that being a leader and leadership is not about doing more Rather it's about shifting from leading because sometimes in korea's it's the things that we say no to or a deflect off played or push back on that can be more defining of as does and 'success now career and more defining us as than the things that we say yes to and the things that we hold onto and look kristoff this is the business storytelling podcast. Can i tell a quick story about how. I came to that realization please. We love stories are especially the good ones. Hopefully it's a good one. It's not it's not mine but it's from a remarkable late up very season very successful late night. Alice khatlon Who was really part of the inspiration for the spark of an idea and Today she is the senior vice president in charge of north. America's sales really huge global software company. But back in the day about a decade ago She got her first big promotion into a Level role and that's when her life became a whole lot more chaotic and unpredictable and unmanageable than it had ever been before. And by the way this is what a lot of us are going through right now with colorado with work and life no longer being distinguished being smushed together. Life is so chaotic and unpredictable. Anyhow a decade ago. Alice found that trying to do it. All as a as a new leader and a road warrior and working mom. Three young boys literally made her sick trying to do it albeit all landed her in a hospital bed with an iv in her And adopted came in and looked alice right in the eye. And said you need to dan and you need to do less or you might not be here with your family to enjoy all of your success. And that's the moment when hit. Harmful alice that being later doesn't mean doing more and enlisting support to be crucial her success because of course the best laid is notable letter. Even try they enlist support from They learned to say no that push back on the stuff that doesn't keep them very firmly in line And sire indeed. It's this idea that from this moment. Forward the tasks that you let go of encino twin push back on can be the ones that define you even more sharply than the things that you continue to hold onto and say yes to. I'm currently accepting requests for future virtual and onsite keynotes and workshops in twenty twenty alone. I've spoken in singapore. And you'll virtually of course thanks covert. I can't wait to get back on the road. And if we still can't get on the road and twenty twenty one. i would be happy to speak at event. Virtually feast reach out to me. See trap edgy. Mouth dot com authentic storytelling dot net. Wanna do things right. That's why it's so hard to say. No and i even learned this. I mean i kind of have my rules on. I know some people have their own rules. Somebody we had. Seth godin on the show a little bit ago here and talking about his latest book which is also. If you're watching on amazon life it's in the bottom. Just scrolling over. We're not gonna take jobs book off the featured spots or you're gonna have to scroll there is like forty total books in the bottom there of people who have been on the show so we'll keep that going when we go live on amazon so people can check out the books from previous guests as well. But seth apparently has a rule. He comes on podcasts. Have had at one hundred episodes now. He didn't say that to me. And we're at episode to sixty or something to ninety or already scheduled to eighty nine. And so i have my own rules as well right like i do this for free. I don't do this. I always go on podcast. I don't even look whether there is successful. Whether they've done it for five years. Somebody asked me to come on a podcast. I always say. Guess if it's a thirty minute thing right if it's a sixty minute thing if it's five prep calls probably not right if they want to pick apart graphics pick apart my powerpoint probably not interested i take feedback usually mostly from clients. Thank you very much. So i got those rules in my head right but but i didn't have them in my head twenty years ago right twenty years ago have been like. Oh yeah you want me to work for free for exposure. You bet happy to do it but today. That's that's hard no right. So how do we get. There is a just a maturity thing. We have to kind of get a little grumpier. That's i'm just talking for myself here. But how do we. How do we get there joe. Yeah i'll call it being strategically grumpy right sitting around move curia like new and it might be as we get on a little in the decades. I get a little more strategically grumpy about the things. all say yes to I think back to your comment about seth godin As late as always wanting to gst get stuff done right but we wanna be super strategic about what that is so that we're able to make out greatest possible impact and in our previous podcast episode One where the stand was perhaps. Just a little bit dodgy. We talked about undestanding out personal brand like who am i. And what's that unique value proposition. That i bring to the well. What's what is it. That i can do that is truly unique valuable And for me. It's the coming together of three elements. What my strengths. What am i passionate about. And then what is it that the world or my company or my customer base will community really need and values if you can picture that ven diagram strengths passion value. Your personal brand is when you hit the target right in the middle at that point of hominy between all three elements and so i think the idea is to do the self reflection to get a deep understanding of what it is uniquely have to offer the world and then try as much as you can to stay in your lane and the more you know what that brand or value proposition is easier. It is to raise your hand and Enthusiastically unapologetically go after the stuff. That is in your land that does help build that brand professional presence that you're wanting to build up and it makes it so much easier to say no not the stuff that's not in that that sweet spot And i will also say it also makes it a whole lot easier to do co. copetition right if we're not clear on what our unique value proposition is. When i see say my friend kristof getting invited to speak around the world. If i'm not clear on who. I am as a speaker. I get a little envious of that and i start to maybe go after opportunities. That aren't the ones that are right for me. Defined what i bring to the will. That's my unique strengths. Passion my value. I can say you know awesome kristof good for you. You're speaking conferencing iceland and then you know when net conference invites made to speak next year. But it's an online digital marketing content. Creator conference it makes it so much easier to cite. Nor thank you. And pats refer someone like my friend kristoff. Who would be a great fit so the better. We know and understand who we are. We don't have to compete with as we can cooperate or collaborate so we get to that point of copetition. I didn't. I didn't mean to make envious joe at all and just for the record all of my keynotes right now. I've even a couple of weeks ago. I don't no longer was who knows what day it even as a couple of weeks ago. In singapore istanbul and standing right here in the same spot was at ten thirty. Pm at night and the other one was actually recorded so no travel happening here. I'm not going anywhere. I've been here and this is why i go. You know it's it's the new world we're in unfortunately but those are good tips. You know what you are know who you are. No what you're trying to do and go from there. Now you previously talked about not to do list and what's interesting about this. I like to hear about that. How do you make one. And i'm this guy. I really am. I put stuff on my calendar. Do this today to this to this and sometimes totally sneaky. I go into tomorrow's to do list right. And i'm like i feel like i'm head because i got that off my list for tomorrow. I wasn't even supposed to do this today. But i did. What's interesting about hearing about not to do list. I tell people this all the time and marketing projects. We talk about what we're not gonna talk about. What are we. What's absolutely off limits. Especially when people try to bring new markets to the two products new products to the market right. What are we not going to talk about. What is totally of limit so once you know that you can before. It's kind of a very similar concept. But tell us about the not to do list i will i will and and i love what you're saying it's about putting god rails around know what you'll enthusiastically go after and then what's off limits for you. In fact i have. I have two quick tools to share that. It kind of comes under the heading of daren't become indispensable for doing work that downplays your potential that under sales all that you're truly capable of inside. I really encourage people once. They know they brand that. I start looking for those opportunities even on their to do list the day-to-day basis to to shift their behavior and mindset from doing to lading to step in and more fully express express that that brandon leadership potential inside one of the one of the latest that i interviewed for my book. Donna munch who was at the time vice president of cloud operations with net app. Taught me this. Great little trick. Which is she calls it. Your your time portfolio and so you wanna just look back to a prior month on your calendar. Pick any mounts. It doesn't really matter one month in the past and go through calico your activities using one kayla for when you were doing the tactical to dues the doing and then use a different color for when you were leading the more strategic Being more forward thinking plan full maybe motivating inspiring enlisting others in so go through that month of your calendar calico the activities one telephone doing one calculating just kind of take a step back and ask yourself. What are the trends. What are the things here. And what might be some of the more tactical dues that you could go off and step away from and what would be some of the more big picture strategic leadership things you could do instead. So i think i you want just understand. What are the opportunities. Yeah because i think no matter what moment or level career phase. Alice might the add. There's always an opportunity to to step away from the doing toward the lake so once you kind of got that that list going on. That's i think where the not to do. This comes in and some ministry. If i can page ninety six in the book we can see my diagram it. This is not to do list Let's start with a concept of shoots so shorts at tasks that we add to the back of our mind or app to do list that really gives us no joy and so we procrastinate on them we put them off and when we think about having to do this thing this should we get this sense of dread or guilt and generally feel bad about ourselves and sire. The shorts are those niggly things on our calendar on to-do list that really don't give us any joy and nonetheless. We fell to check them off the list. So a good friend of mine wants to aside and said joe stop shooting all over yourself right so What i recommend doing instead is to create a not to do list which is where you create a list of all these shows that you give yourself permission not to have to right now. Like to put him on the list. And i'm proud to say that yoga has been on my to do list for about fifteen years now. And it's okay to reassess i would say after today livestreams the to do list and onto that may be more of these lists some examples from my book One is invite neighbors. Didn't you can tell this is a pre code publication. But i went out and built a twelve. Sita dining table. So that i could do potties for a dozen people and quickly figured out the edmonds cleaning the house cooking all day cleaning the house again after your guest slave and so inviting people for dinner is now on the not to list and is gonna remain there post One of the executives. That i interviewed said she will not run or jog unless being chased and i love that example and i think for a lot of people clean out. The garage is one of those sure that i can go on your not to do list. Sire make a list. What what are the things that you grant. you'll still permission to not have today Kristof any come to mind for you. Well that's a good question. I don't like to do any work for free. Honestly there's some things as i mentioned earlier. You know that. I do like somebody wants me to do. Give the same keno for thirty minutes or podcast and it's remote depending on when it is who it is you know what else i can get out of it but but not always. I definitely don't do any strategy or writing for anybody for free. Drives me crazy when people come to me and they say oh you want to write this thousand word article and here i am. You know. I got this article open in fact on the screen here and i'm going to get to about fifteen hundred words. I'm about four hundred and it's been kind of like interrupted by the six year old. Who wants me to tell her away. Zoom working you know or whatever on new zoo the twelve year old one something else so i really don't do any of those things for free to people because i i don't i know there's some value for some companies but it's just it's not the model i'm going after What else yoga. Probably it's been on my not to do this for forty forty one years forty two years. Whatever it's been You know i. I don't know what else. I've never even thought about what what should be on my not to do list. Because i'm so busy trying to get all this stuff done. That's on my to do list. You know so. I guess that's probably part of the problem. Yeah you know. Maybe there's going to be value in writing that down and also checking in on it on a frequent basis making. I thought it was alley. Will i created a not. Do my personal more than a decade ago and just happen for fun to share it with a friend and she still checks in with me at kind of his an accountability partner on that list. The yoga especially almost fifteen years later so do think it's a really valuable exercise to write it down. And then you can reassess it loose stuff on a digital marketing for small to medium sized retail now and drop us a message at c. Trap edgy mail dot com thing. I just thought about. I can't stand when people want to meet with me to pick my brains and it's like seriously. I charge people for this right to pick my brains and probably when it really hit me to stop to really put this on. My not to do list was back when an somebody invited me out for dinner to pick my brain whatever. Sure i'm hungry. And then we didn't even have dinner or appetizers and a beer. Unlike won a bunch of crap like this is like a. You know two hundred dollar meeting and you didn't even dinner so i don't do those anymore. It's definitely on my list you you don't get to pick my brain. It's a little bit different when people ask me on podcast and i don't know what your opinion is about what we're doing here but first of all when you're on podcast. Right now right. We're on all these different channels and the chances are joe. If we make any money of this podcast you will make more than i will. Because chances are people will click the link to your book so i get the affiliate money which is not very much and you will get whatever you normally get which is more than the affiliate pennies. So the point is you know but i got a podcast daily livestream. Somebody has to come on. So i try to find good guests ride. You want to obviously want to get out there as well. Right try new things. Try a livestream. And how do you feel about livestreams is that that has moved off. Do not list do not do list. It's heading in that direction and if possibly depends on who asks you and i have collaborated and it's always being fun. It's always been interesting. I've always been proud to share the cost the with created. And i know you kind of a master at this really at the cutting edge and sire. I guess what i thought about is. Is this going to be some valuable content. I can share with my audience and gonna learn something from someone who is truly masterful at it so definitely this time. Moving across into the other column and i. I'm probably gonna continue so so far. So good yeah awesome. Thank you so much. that's a master. I'm i'm far from a master. But i'm learning. It is a lot of work to do to pull off all these different channels but it is getting easier and easier. Let's talk about your book. I got up here. Women of influence nine steps to build your brain. Establish your legacy and thrive ten thousand copies. Sold that's unbelievable. You have a copyright. They're well prepared. Love it and so tell me. I mean i let me tell you my story. Why started writing books and it was joe policy. I two thousand six twenty sixteen. And i said why do i have to write a book. Joe stupid like people can read my blog and he said it's different books have more people take them. People read them. which is an interesting comment. Because my latest book the majority has been sold as kindles. My first book the majority by far have had been sold as As paperback or whatever you know the hard copy so that's been an interesting shift in those four years. I don't know why that is and then we had about a thousand downloads of the audio version. So that's been interesting too. Because i didn't even have an audio version. The last time. So why towns about and i agree with joe. It helped with authority. It help with giving people something right. Here's my book. Thanks for visiting with me. Or sometimes i take it to projects to on sales call sometimes when i interviewed for a job or something i take it and there's not many other people who can hand over a book right so tell us about. I mean why. Why the book. Why now out of the go. Yeah thanks thanks for asking. So i think i'm one of those people who took two decades to become an overnight success and you know i. I started out as a speaker. Just because i got invited to speak at women's leadership conferences and i enjoyed doing it in that refer me to others and so i got by for more than a decade Pretty much doing it backwards. Typically what someone does is they become a published author. Then they go out and speak and and so the boat leveraged the book to make nine for themselves. And i guess i just got so busy and Passionate about going into companies and guida women's professional conferences working with women helping them advance their careers. Cummings powerhouse leaders that they were always meant bay and then Something funny started happening People started coming up to me and saying this wonderful very inspirational practical. Is there a book about this and kristof a handful of people in particular just kept on and on it me over the years shout livia. Shane green who was one and it just became this ongoing conversation that i couldn't avoid so eventually i just had to go out and the dodd book already and get it done But i also think that offered me for many many years. Is there as you know. There are a ton of business. Books leadership books and professional development books. But one of the things i noticed was that Physically very few are written by women and very few feature the stories of women and this think happening to me where i pick up a book For example my my mother in law has tastic leadership library in are picking up a book one day in her living room and was reading all these great latest stories and principles that the stories and examples were all about men and i counted up to about eleven examples and then finally those this cautionary tale of what not to do and you guessed it. It was a woman. And i remember. Just picking the book up throwing it across the rink then. I remembered where i was whose room i was in whose book it was quickly apologized but i started really looking out for you know whether there are enough books that featured the stories and examples of women and so for me that was a real driving inspiration just to get a women's stories into a book on leadership and of course we're getting more and more stories out there with the vice president elect of course and then i don't know if you saw the news also with the communications team is every leader on. That team is a woman. Yeah it's remarkable to say really really exciting to see really exciting to see the what's happening so there's so many leaders of books out there already. Right what house houses different did you think about that ahead of time. What's you know. There's so many topics so many books already on that topic. How did you find a way to differentiate other than what you already mentioned with the examples of women leaders and that story that throwing the book across the room was a defining moment for me in deciding to go forward. And i'd also amassed more than a hundred interviews in various webinars that i delivered with some really inspiring very season very successful women ladies and just had been blogging and sharing quite since stories and examples of them through the inside. I of course wanted to bring a lot of their knowledge to a wider audience in showcase all of the principals and tits that. I've learned from them like some of the ones that i've shared earlier. But i also night to an initial just kind of evolved. As i started writing the book is that a lot of books will give you like five things to do And and so what's different for me is. It's not so much about changing who you are by doing a prescribed method of leadership but rather understanding who you are because of course we all already latest but sometimes we just need to figure out what Only and strengths are sorry for me. This idea is that leadership is not about changing yourself. It's about becoming yourself at standing relationships kind of show up you wa embraced Strikes and grow from there rather than follow like a checklist of five six seven or eight things to do. That will make you a later. I think the whole thing of understanding yourself is something that has really hit home for me over the years you know back back in the day somebody would say oh you this is how you are or whatever well okay well i got to work on it and now i'm like yeah whatever. That is how i am. You know if it's a bad thing where for doesn't fit in that situation. I might i try to manage it right for example but i don't necessarily try to change who i am just because i am sorry. That's kind of that's kind of how it works right when you when people wait the book. What do you want them to take away at the end. Like what's the key takeaway. How do you move forward and become a better leader. Well to build on some of the things that we've spoken about so far eighty one is understanding your own in night leadership style and strength and then build a professional presence or postal brown Around that shift from doing to leading star dude less laid more. But i think the you know the really big thing. I want people to take away. Is that you know you don't need to become indispensable for doing work that downplays yo potential and under sales all that you're capable of a in the words of one of the women whose stories inspired the book. She said i feel like. I'm the best Secret in the organization And i feel like i've become indispensable for doing work that under sells might might potential at an sorry my wish for anyone that reads the book is that they no longer that s kit secret that they can step up and let authentic leadership strengths shine become met later that they were meant to be know the whole thing about being the best kept secret. Sometimes i'd also comes back to people need to just share their stories right. Don't think of it as bragging. You're just sharing just tweet about it. Just share it somewhere. And if you can't do it have somebody else shared right. Make sure they they do it. I'm still a big fan of the fridays in a company on a friday. send out. here's what has happened. Here's what's been going well and then have other people share them because you can't know everything right it's impossible but why is it so hard for people to just share their successes. I know this is not the first time we've talked about this topic. But i hear it all the time. Oh i don't want to brag but then you can't complain that you're the best kept secret. Yeah and and. I think it's because so many of us have worked with that. That one person who did it to the extreme and they will always like told me about themselves and how awesome they are and kind of beating their chest bragging in south promoting and it just gets really really quickly so many of us go. Oh i never wanna be like that person but we step a little too far to the other extreme and takeaway high to promote our awesomeness and our brand value in our accomplishments. So we got to fire in the other direction right but you know one of the fascinating pieces of research that i dug up while i was researching. The book is This great little e put out by hinge marketing. That's usable experts. And they found that one of the most effective ways of of self promoting. If you wanna call it that. I call it amplifying your accomplishments but one of the most effective ways is just to share your knowledge if you can educate people even as you're sharing what you know what you've done people get right value from I love to learn from your and so when we talk about amplifying accomplishments i'd say Promote every little thing you do but bi-strategic think back your longer term career or ladyship goal or the brand jo building and then amplify the accomplishments that align with those aspirations right a Amplified the accomplishments that line with your aspirations. So do it in a thoughtful and strategic way. And i think that's one of the reasons your successful. You're successful in what you do you love to share knowledge. People love to learn from what you know and teach people as as you do and i think that's one of the best ways to to showcase your interested in. Thank you for the comment joe. What's interesting about that too. Is sometimes people think their knowledge what they know gets diminished because they share it and i can tell you there is not. The case doesn't happen unless it's some patent or some supersecret. Something you know all this stuff. I do like somebody said to me. One time all we need. is this. Copy this patented or whatever. There's nothing to patent like. This is what journalists do around the country like we're just literally doing what journalists do right except we do it in a business environment so you can't patent that you can't copyright that it's like saying copywriting writing so i'm the only one that can write anymore going forward very interesting discussion. It was great to have you on the livestream joe's book. It is in the bottom there on amazon life. And it's also and all the other channels if you don't see the link just drop us a note know we'll be sure you can get it. Of course michael content performance culture. It's still on cyber monday. Deal just today. Can i say that with a straight face. No it's all week. The united states and uk ninety nine cents in the us and joe. What's the uk. I know you're not from. There is nine. it's pennies. I think ninety nine pennies. What does it pennies in pounds societies. And they're not euros so ninety nine pennies if if you're in the us and you wanna in the uk and you wanna buy their ninety nine pennies Let's see i was gonna ask you something else. Forgot my train of thought either way it was great to have you on the show. Thanks again for sharing your knowledge and your insights and congratulations on ten thousand copies. That's awesome awesome to hear thank you. It's been good talking with you today. Kristoff always something awesome. Thanks everyone for watching and listening until next time.

kristoff joe amazon joe miller christopher tra christoph trap Alice khatlon seth godin Donna munch Twitter facebook kristof Alice singapore siri Therese christoph encino Joe
254: Social media comments that won't help you build YOUR brand - unveiled!

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

15:48 min | Last month

254: Social media comments that won't help you build YOUR brand - unveiled!

"This is the business storytelling podcast with christopher tra- available on google spotify apple pandora and other podcast channels. Want to play it on your iphone. Just ask siri to play the kristof trap. Business storytelling podcast. Also available on alexa. Here's kristoff today's episode comes to social comments. There's a real danger that you want to be aware of what i mean by that. Is people post things on social media that they want you to respond to and those are topics that are typically controversial those topics that a lot of times draw on emotion right like the other day. I saw somebody post something about if marketing doesn't do this. Then they're not aligned with the organization of course. Of course everybody has an opinion about it or somebody will say something about a hot button. Issue and of course many of us think of social media as a platform where we can collaborate where. We can't have a conversation where we can have a discussion but the reality is real good conversation and real good. Discussions are very very rare on social media. And here's the truth that most people that post thinks that are somewhat close to what their company does. They don't do it because they want to have a great discussion. It's a marketing purpose. It's a marketing reason. So the more outrages my opinion can be the more likely people are to listen to it and right or wrong. that's life right. Emotions draw us out and emotion. Skip us to do certain things i mean. You certainly have heard Ashley pointer on the podcast. Previously we talked about You know how do you bring more emotion into b. Two b. marketing. And certainly that's something to keep in mind so when you see anywhere people posting strong opinions that draw your emotion and you really want to comment on that post. Think about it. What will it do for them when you're commenting of course on the flip side from a marketing perspective if you can share opinions that are in line with what you're doing a business and they're drawing on people's emotion. Why wouldn't you post it. Why wouldn't you share it. Why wouldn't you talk about it. Why wouldn't you leave that social media account. But here's what happens every time you leave a social media comment. You share that person's content whether it's on facebook lincoln even twitter. I don't know about instagram. And all those other major networks you comment on. Somebody's post and that post now gets shared to your timeline. It's free advertising my friends. So just be aware of that reality that i'm not saying i'm totally against having good discussions online and i know many many people have traded but most discussions online are truly crap. I mean we have the episode coming up here or we have the episode already. Listening to the livestream is still coming. Up with eddie camera. Last name now garrison. Think social media expert. We talked about facebook groups and Eddie talks about and talked about in this episode. If you're listening on the podcast version of life recording the value of facebook groups and how to do them in a manner that's actually constructive. I found that most facebook groups are the biggest waste of time. Rules are enforced. Never people are just posting the same crap over and over and even though when people say oh we're so welcoming of different opinions. They're not and they'll find a way to you. Know pull either truly aggressive or the passive aggressive thing. We're seeing more and more on social media so when somebody posts something and you comment on it. It shares their content so way the potential outcome is there anything good in it for you to share their content. Is there a real reason for you to comment. is there. something you can add to the discussion. I saw somebody on twitter. They were talking about you. Know you don't have to post every little thing you're thinking about it and it's true you don't and neither do. I and i have started to let a lot of things. Go for the most part but you know what kind of prompted this podcast. I saw this post. And i commented like three times likely. It must be really good post so all these social networks think that they're highly engaging posts and of course they give them more reach. More people are liking it. More people commenting and people have tried to have a discussion. There was actually There was like a journalist. Never heard of the dude and we had the iowa inland hurricane here right. That's what it's called. But that's what i call it because it's that's the best description of it super terrible storm. Ninety percent of buildings destroyed or damaged. I guess and some guy posted a controversial tweet saying something about how there's no local media coverage iowa etc etc and it was wrong. He was not correct. You know but do you know what everybody did everybody. We tweet tweeted the guy and everybody commented on the guys post and everybody re tweeted with a comment and really what you guys are doing or what we're doing is we're giving them more exposure so sometimes quite frankly the best strategy is to only comment when you actually wanna share their content and that happens all the time you know. There's some there's always new people in my post on linked and other people like their polls other people comment and the other thing is too sometimes. Their responses is like their responses. Are i agree. Couldn't have said it better. What's the point of even saying that. What's the point of even going. Oh that's so great the best post ever. In blogging ten years ago we used to call those spam comments. Right wonderfully written post great insights. Thank you so much. Thank you so much for what you know. If you're going to post something add to the conversation but be aware that the post gets shared wider and wider and wider. And if you don't want it to get shared wider and wider and wider don't comment. It is okay to squirrel and read. I know some people tell you they want people to engage in blah blah blah. I want that too but from a marketing perspective. You know it is important to keep that top of mind. Now if you're the one writing some of those posts there is a value in doing that. There really truly honestly is. But i still wonder if some of the post we see are truly authentic. Are they really. Did they happen or are people just making it up as they go. We don't know right because how would we but it just something to think about. You know if it's a really good story don't believe everything you read and don't mistrust everything you read and there was. Actually it was arnold schwarzenegger somebody read. I guess and somebody made a pipe. Of the terminator. And they send it to him. Schwarzenegger apparently replied and says how can i buy this from you. And the guy said or the gal. I don't know the gender. The person said why. Send it to you. And just send me autographed picture and so schwarzenegger dead immediately. Somebody goes this fake and schwarzenegger again responded and said if you don't have any proof that it's fake why even open your mouth and it's not fake. It's picture of me with the pipe very unique pipe. Plus it is schwarzenegger looks just like him except a little bit older than when he was a terminator but we all get older and he said the people that mistrust everything or just as bad as the people that trust everything so sometimes you can just take it a faith value face value. Not faith move on and there you go but if you have a good story to tell especially if you can display it in a way that's interesting and draws on people's emotion and sometimes what i've seen is especially on linked in you have to click pretty quickly so that first sentence think of it almost like a headline. You really have to pull people in you how to draw them in and it has to be Has to be a good good first sentence to dry in people's attention that they click and read the rest And of course that helps with the lincoln algorithm as well Twitter of course. I would still recommend paragraphs are your friend just because you have two hundred. Eighty characters doesn't mean you don't need white space. Facebook is similar to linked in. You have to click the button when a post gets really long So in of course on instagram similar as well. But you know some people they put all this stuff in the caption. I don't ever look at captions. Ever like i read the washington post headlines on there sometimes in the new york times and i never read the captions. I mean once in a blue moon. I mean it really really does not happen all that often so something to think about Sometimes if you are the marketer at the end of the post you can ask a question. Do you disagree. Tell me why i'm wrong. Why wouldn't it be this way. Do you already said that. Do disagree so ask a question. And you know i still remember. I worked with a fellow. One time in very challenging emails. We'll put it that way and always like you know this is the point. Beloit a debate over email but You know you've probably heard my opinion on that. I don't think email is the best tool to have a debate for anything right. Let's get on a zoom call. Phone call in person if we ever do that again. when covert ever goes away but at the end of the email it always said what do you think or what should the next step be. Or what do we do now. Or how do we fix it or something like that something that would put your mind in in the mindset of new all the next step the ball's in your court so she can figure out how to do that with your with your social posts. I you got to get people to read that far quite honestly but you know. Put the ball in their court. Ask them to respond. Now depend on the network. Never met anybody who knows you know. That's that's life of a marketer. Sometimes it works sometimes. It doesn't maximize your channels. It's okay to try the same content different channels. I mean think about this livestream for some reason. The music at the beginning played twice. I don't know why. But i'm still streaming to you. To linked in twitter and periscope and then we'll put it on the podcast channels and a in when we're done here if you're listening to the podcast channels connect with me lincoln to get notification for the next one see trap dot online forward slash linked in and on twitter c trap twitter dot com forward slash c. trap turn on the life video notifications and happy to have you on the next show but you know trade poll something that people might want to respond to the problem that you might want to think about though is i know we won all post and post and post the post but if we post to match people might mutis and people might you know peop- people might not even see the next post so there is that danger so just something to think about. It is what it is. That's kind of our girls but at the end the day. I wanted to bring this up because i see a lot of people posting and commenting on social media like you know. They're they think they're having a good discussion but really what they're doing is they're sharing what they're sharing the other person's message and they're helping them get their brains out in front of people so just something to think about. Not saying. you shouldn't do it but at the very least it is good to be aware of. I'm christopher trap. Your host and author of content performance culture. Thanks for listening until next time. Content from happening to performing. That's what everybody wants. Nowadays and content and content marketing and marketing. All those related feels. Check out my new book. Can't performance culture. The number one new release in the public relations category on amazon dot com. When it came out. I hope you take a look. It's available as paperback and kindle worldwide.

facebook christopher tra kristoff Ashley pointer twitter schwarzenegger kristof siri lincoln iowa alexa pandora Ninety percent eddie Eddie apple google arnold schwarzenegger Schwarzenegger ten years
251: The curse of knowledge and how to follow better internal communications tactics

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

35:08 min | 2 months ago

251: The curse of knowledge and how to follow better internal communications tactics

"This is the business storytelling podcast with christopher tra- available on google spotify apple pandora and other podcast channels. Want to play it on your iphone. Just ask siri to play the kristof trap business storytelling podcast also available on alexa. Here's kristoff today's episode. A day we wanna talk about internal communication strategies and tactics. So it's interesting to me. Is that we focused so much externally. How do we get more leads. How do we build the brand. How do we get out there. How do we schedule things. How do we automate. Oh my goodness i mean you can just. That's that's all we Spend time focusing on it. Seems like sometimes but internal communications matters as well whether you're small company. Big company whatnot And today's guest trend. Anderson is the chief operating officer pre right dot com and he focuses on growth through storytelling. So he had me right. Right there with that tagline and you may have assumed but what's great about. Trent is i ran across him again on social media. He was sharing something about internal communications. And i thought. I should ask him to come on the show and share his wisdom's with you guys trent. How's it going today. It's going very well christoph. Thanks for having me on today. Awesome Always glad to have experts like you on the show. So let's talk about internal communications. It can't be hard right. Focus on that especially when when we're also gotten hole in the medium sized companies of external communication wide. Why does internal. Why does it matter than what are some tactics. Yeah i think internal communication often gets overlooked like you said because of prioritization is on on external right. How do we get more leads. How do we get more clients. How do we continue to grow. Well it's all fine and well and those are all kind of like leading metrics to look at but the lagging metrics i think is internal comms in the the effects of vision or lack of vision or clarity or lack of clarity with where organization is going. And if you're like me you've probably been in an organization before that was doing everything right externally but internally there were huge huge issues and usually started from top down or Or from a leadership position in wasn't able to communicate internally why we were doing the things that we were doing why we were up. Prioritizing certain Initiatives and all that good stuff so i think a lot of internal communications Really manifest itself through the curse of knowledge and typically when we talk about internal communications. It is driven by leaders. It is usually a top down. Approach and as these leaders are sitting in their war rooms and deliberating strategy in tactics. Really fun corporate buzzwords They usually have the curse of knowledge. And for those that don't know what the curse of knowledge is is Basically they have such intimate knowledge of a given Piece of information that they assume the rest of the organization also understands that and really. It isn't the case so You've probably seen the clip from the office. Where oscar is telling michael what his options are afford utilizing the surplus budget for the year and comes back and says explain it to me. Like i'm eight and oscar tried to do that and then michael comes. Back does now extent like five while the oscars way of explaining what a surplus bunch it was Was the curse of knowledge right. So oscar is an accountant for anybody who doesn't know the office by by the way. Go see that net flex. Because i think there's a lot of business lessons learned their case. Oscar has the curse of knowledge because he is crunching numbers. All day understands how to read a financial report. Michael clearly does not right. So oscar had to simplify his message so much more to get it across and ineffective communication with michael. So i think again drawing this back to the curse of knowledge it really comes down to assumptions that are made about what everybody else understands about the business versus the actual reality. I'm currently accepting requests for future virtual and onsite keynotes and workshops in two thousand twenty alone. I've spoken in singapore and istanbul. Virtually of course thanks cove it. I can't wait to get back on the road and we still can't get on the road. Twenty twenty one. I would be happy to speak event. Virtually feast reach out to me see trap at gmail.com war authentic storytelling dot net in the cursor knowledge. Certainly but i can see how it happens right because as leaders i mean especially as leaders i mean think about an idea i think think at some point i roll it out right. Start Percolating the idea right and we build on the idea and so now already time has passed and then do you think it has. Sometimes the problem. Is that liters. They've been involved for so long and they just don't even think about it or waiting for the perfect time to communicate something and i'm not so sure. There is a perfect time for anything anymore. Yeah i think so. Much of that is is accurate again. I'll just draw my own experiences right. So at one point i was One of the first hires in an organization and it was the same kind of core group of people that started the organization than really built it up over the course of a couple years and as the company continued to scale and grow will the need to bring on new hires increased and it was almost like an us versus them. Kind of mentality right like we been on the front lines. We'd seen off the pain points all of the You know work work. That was happening on weekends and nights and that sort of thing all of a sudden. These new hires come in and they don't they don't remember what it was like to be in a two hundred fifty square foot office There in twenty five hundred square foot office for twenty five thousand square foot office. So i think organizationally happens so often for leaders to almost create this In an unintentionally usually us versus than type thing. I think a lot of that comes down to the curse of knowledge. And one way to supplement. Or orig- yourself of that curse is to document all of your processes right. I think that's one thing who Tactical perspective did wonders for us. was was creating internal wiki. He's We use the tool called guru to help document all of our processes that were that was then integrated with our slack. Channels anytime New hire came through the on boarding process and they still have any questions or issues. That could just log into guru and in type in their question and all of a sudden boom the guy who started the marketing department Gave his two cents on on how to ask ago about a portion that task so again. I think you're absolutely right in that This starts and ends with the leadership team and of course i mean once you bring on new people. That's that's important to have those things written down. What one of the strategies. I like myself is. I'm a talk to thing kinda guy. Dread right and some people have held that against me and they say well you have to say crappy idea before you can have any good ones. Which is which is true. Like i really. You know. I have some doozy's over the years usually it's the first one But then basically i fall into the category of talking to think that thinking to talk. I guess And that seems to be a decent strategy to keep your team informed. What's going on right because you kind of. You're looking to communicate with them. You're looking to collaborate with them. And they they kind of staying the no but that's of course. It's not scalable leg. If i have you know five people on team that works or even maybe ten potentially but if there's four teams of ten people in division i that's that doesn't work What are some internal communications tactics that you've seen work other than A wicky. I think that's a good idea. I've done that as well but actually before it before you answer the question about other tax when it comes to wiki. I've done those before. And it was really very heavy on digital strategies. And i'm saying i spent so much time. Updating because yes the high level things they never changed or they did change sometimes but very rarely but like the how to do. It changed all the time i mean. I'm just looking at anchor. Which is what we use to record an anchor. Just change something while we're recording. And so how do you. How do you kinda mix those two in In any kind of the wiki you show. Yeah i think this brings up a really good distinction here and whiskies are very very powerful in terms of sharing facts in data in a perhaps like processes but as things change. They require additional hands on and and effort as you just mentioned christoph. So i think if you were to go up one level from The data asset-backed right the facts. In the data's i think one thing that you can do to kind of cement the overall sentiment around those facts is is really developing a story around it and think that is where the need to to really understand. What why are you doing this like. Why are you documenting this process. It's it's typically because it's lead to some sort of result and ethics stories are really really good way to cement a lot of the fact telling in in data a knowledge transfer in ways that are the kinda transcend the wikki itself right. So i think if there's a way for organizations to Not just collect data not just a share data but also Piece of information into a Overarching story that makes the new hire on boarding process. Much easier that makes the customer success strategies. Much easier I think really building around That that whole tactical part of communication especially internal comms if everyone's telling the same story Everyone understands why. Why and everyone. I under- understand You know what you're trying to achieve so Think that was where. I would differentiate between the wikki and then developing internal stories that help guide the organization forward as well for your small to medium sized retail and drop us a message at trap and g mail dot com About as you were talking the internal a dna. I guess for lack of a better term is how you talk to each other. And i still remember one of the best best employee handbooks and most of them are just horrible honestly many of them not most but many and It was meta dj. Paul griffiths road routed believe he was the cto and that company has since been sold to proficient and it was just. The tone was very different from like you know soul formal. It looks like it immediately. Set the tone on how we talk to each other how we collaborate how we work together and i mean even like the way he talked about the company We we don't say we were met touch from because that just sounds and Just like the term iki in an employee aimed right kenneth cetera tone. And then the other thing that kind of set the tone. There was a page about travel rules and regulations and i've seen employee handbooks that that set the processes for travel. And they're just crazy you know. They're like we book this and we looked at and here the rules and some of the rules are just totally dumb. In fact some of them are like we always spoke academy. And i like but what if business classes cheaper which does happen especially day so you know and so it's just crazy stuff but the matach employee handbook at one line. Do ones right. it's always said So it kinda set the tone but what other tactics can can companies use to keep him. -ployees You know up to date in the no at the right time. Yeah definitely. I think one thing that i'm seeing more and more is having a dedicated channel for internal communication and There's an organization called casted in. They're based out of indianapolis and lindsay is the ceo over there and her work with jay. Gonzo who is a A very well known podcast or They've really kind of spearheaded. This initiative to create internal podcasts. That are relevant are timely that keep distributed organizations up to speed with what's happening in the organization and the they leverage a lot of storytelling. And how they do that and in this is obviously more important now than ever as work from home. Policies distributed work are becoming more and more pervasive. They're good reason the ability to communicate Effectively becomes a lot harder and for a lot of organizations. I think about my mom who works at a fortune. One hundred pharmaceutical companies. This is the first time ever had to work from home and the story in tation for a lot of these employees that have been there ten fifteen years Who are very accustomed going to their cubicles and having little barked water cooler talks now all that all of a sudden is happening via microsoft teams in slack and all these other instant messaging tools. And there's not that same sort of feeling of rallying around the corporate logo. So i think what lindsay in casted doing in leveraging the podcast space which again i think fits so well in this distributed workforce era I think that's a really interesting opportunity. to build additional Community in affinity and in communication around. What's happening in an organization especially given some of the challenges of an in person communication. This is interesting about that topic episode. Twenty five guys which is twenty five episodes ago already just published in late october. We had tat corcoran on the show with blueberry that's b. l. u. b. r. r. y. dot com on the show in beijing. The an episode. We talked about at length. Just kinda hinted is why executive should consider private podcasting casting to communicate with employees. And it's so interesting to me because once again like why does it have to be private. Why can't it be public. Well i think i mean. Tell me what your thoughts are. But i think part of it is because not everything. Ceo's or whoever see exiles your name the sea level they want public necessarily but they wanna share it with their employees as part of their strategy. Sure yeah i mean. I think there are some things that you don't want to necessarily reveal a not not for nefarious reasons but just because it's kind of the essence for the magic of the brand of the internal community itself right so You know in sports. We have this analogy where whatever happens in the locker room kind of stays in the locker room and in i don't want people to misinterpret what that means that. I think it really is a space where the teammates can hold each other accountable The only other responsible and they can air out any sort of a challenge in a very non judgmental way. And i think if we're draw that analogy into the business world again Hopefully devoid of misinterpretations of that Ecosystem could look like. I think a lot of that happens as well so so in any case i think it's a great strategy in the one thing that i will say. I think this is probably the explanation. Put on the conversation is communications very simply communications. Creates confidence right. So if you're a leader a c. Suite leader in. You're not constantly communicating the good the bad and the ugly of what's going on internally externally zone so forth how are you supposed to lead your teams in a again if you create confidence through communication i think you create rallying cry around your brand Around what you're doing around your mission and that can really lead you through tough times as a lot of organizations are facing right now so Again i think it makes so much sense for for sweets to take a proactive approach to communication in. There's a lot of long tail off And what are your tips. I mean certainly written memos for ceo's that then went out under our name right and But it's not them. And that's i guess it's fine to an extent when their their thoughts their strategies and just Make it make it move faster. But what what are some good ways What's a good Interval to get in front of people. I mean i remember Not remember but you know you have a slack. Channel for t. I mean it's it's all the time right and you have to figure out what you say what you do on their. When do you schedule a meeting. I also like to do you know so we friday send out a thing saying hey. Here's some of the good things i noticed. What did i miss Added so if you you know so people can added if it's like basecamp or another tool like that and funny story here. Trend i actually. I did a podcast version of affray. Before and people said oh. We don't like that. We rather have it written and i think that was because they didn't listen to the whole thing. I just skim it You know but what's the right interval often. i mean when i hear. Ceo's say hey we need to do quarterly. Update i'm thinking quarterly update. I mean that's like that's a long to definitely. Well i think the cadence. They're really kind of comes down to organizational size right so it's less about c. suite verse like division. It's it's more so like if you have the ability as the c. Suite member to get in front of your your team's often enough. You should do that. And honestly given like internal communications. Everyone should should probably know what's going on. If you have a team of call it five up to two fifty right. The organizations big enough to not have that level of inside to what's happening day in and day out now if we're talking again like fortune fortune one thousand fortune five hundred fortune one hundred. I think so much of that Communication that happens from the c. suite can kind of religious be turned off by most of the You know the the the leader's not even leaders but like the individual contributors teams like Again my mom my mother. She is in the customer service in finance division of a large pharmaceutical company. With the ceo says about the company really doesn't hold a lot of weight with her necessarily because You know it's a lot more raw. Ron here's the organization in all the great things that we did but if she were to get that same level of communication from her division. Head or Her bosses boss. it might be more relevant so Ideally i think the the cadence kind of comes down to organizational size and whatever that expectation is in terms of of winning. Now i will say that A lot of the c. Suite regardless of size they only want to accentuate the positive of of what's happening in in organizations and that could be external or internal but i would really encourage any leader To to also talk about like we said that the bad and the ugly in i think to borrow from from jaakko willing if anybody smiliar with a former navy seal Some of what. He says When bad things happen you wanna say good right so but lost a client. Good now we have a chance to review our customer service and customer success practices to to create. Stick your relationships so we don't lose the next client or we lost out on this proposal. Okay normal people would say oh crap but we're going to say good and we're going to reevaluate our process or we're going to say Good they probably weren't going to be the best fit for us anyway because they're a little bit outside of our ict or you know Profits are down in. Costs are up good. This gives us a chance to refocus on what's core to our business and in on the other end You know better than we were before Again i think that's a very broad sweeping answer to your question christoph but But again. I do think it's it's incumbent upon the leaders to take communication Very seriously and it's not that hard It just has to come down to commitment i. I think it's comes natural to many of us especially when we grew up in marketing right to To talk about the positive. And i i was just thinking about of course. Were currently in the kobe. Pan-demic still think right Like So i can't even visit chicago without quarantining for two weeks. And now they know in iowa. Iowa governor had a press conference it started relatively positive or not positive but just kind of like her talking and i looked at my wife and i said oh the hammer is gonna drop here in a minute and i'm like this. Get to the point. Tell us what the tell us what the thing is. And this is not a political statement. It's not about kim reynolds. That's very common right. I mean. I've seen the emails when. Ceo of sound email announcing a crapload of layoffs. And the first half of the email is a bad wonderful. Everybody is and it's in journalism and of course we call that buried elite how Oh and then the other example. It was actually guys. This was episode two forty seven published on thursday amazon star ratings. How amazon calculates them for different countries. And so i was looking at different countries and my book. My book star rating was lower than in the us. And i was like why how. They don't like me there. Well it's because how amazon calculates them right so basically in a nutshell if you don't have any local reviews in that country it only takes the verified purchases so if you have a lot of negative reviews. It's the lower in the verified purchases. If you have a lot of higher wants it's a it's a little higher so all the other ones where people by the aren't counted. So i wrote about this right. Because i thought it was interesting but why do i wanna tell people that. In germany my book is related. Is tweet stars you know. It's not that good. But i thought it was more valuable to share. How amazon calculates the star ratings. Because as i was kinda interesting. And i mean there is actually some thinking behind. So how do we get people to embrace the negative that it's okay to share things that are not working or that. We need to work on. Well i think the understanding that everybody's human right I think goes a really long way. you've probably hear a lot of a lot of pundits talking heads in quote unquote thought leaders. Talking about empathy right and i think One of the big misconceptions is that like empathy can be developed overnight. I'm of the opinion that some people are born a little bit more empathetic than others That doesn't mean you can't increase your level of empathy. But it takes time. It's it's a. It's a intentional practice. You have to truly try Over the course of the long haul to become more empathetic. And i think that's that's an issue that a lot of people face so absent the ability to snap your fingers and all of a sudden. Hey i'm mr empathetic now hub. I think some of the things that you can do is agana. i'm going to go back to storytelling which really is probably the most Utility laden tactic that we have in our quiver yet. It's it's very seldom used Other than people thinking about movies and television shows But story. I think shows how you know. You're in this point of stasis and All of a sudden something happens and it has a negative impact then really the character has a choice do they let that negative impact You know crush them. Defeat them or do they figure out a way through the help of internal self realization or external guidance. Really rebound from that that level of of loss or negatively in in continue on that journey. And i think if people just just really basically studied some of the the first principles of storytelling. I think they would see that It's okay to have a negative thing happened because it doesn't mean that its final right. It just means that. That's a bump in the road and it's up to that individual then to pick oneself up from food straps in continue on and So yeah that would be be. My answer is yes. You should say that you're you know you had something wrong happen. That's not necessarily important thing. Tight rebound from that in how you continue on your quest for whatever it is. You're seeking. yeah no disagreement here. I do think it is hard for some people to do that. Think about that. I mean. I have plenty of of people have worked with over the years and and i you know i work with them and i started a project and i hear oh. Just make me sound good okay. But but what's your opinion about the time. I don't know just make me sound good so certainly Certainly that's something so try and of course you are the chief operating officer. Pre right dot com. What's you know you talk about storytelling. There tell us about the platform. What is it. How do people use it. Yes it originally started screenwriting tool and our product of you'd rogers was actually a film student. Turn story board artists and when he fled to new york city to have his first job as a story about artists the also is working on his screen screenplay simultaneously and being more visual learner as he sat down to write his own first screenplay man i really wish i could take those elements of the visual aspect storyboarding apply to a screenplay and that's when right version one point oh actually started in for those. That aren't familiar. I mean there's there's many ways that we learn but one of the more Impactful in stick your ways. We leonard is through visual orientation And if you remember you know sitting through cherry boring classes sometimes if there was a depiction on a chalkboard might have helped you You know understand her realize the concept better than just having a teacher drone on about it but any case that was kind of the first foray into stories now when i joined pre right. I knew that there was an application outside of screenwriting and i've always used story personally in my Sales and marketing career to have greater impact In in more meaningful conversations. So that is where we started to adopt the Adapt the system to fit Different elements of of business of content creation Always story Around the the central thesis there In the funny thing about story is we've been telling stories. You know literally since Cave paintings and the three act structure which some people might have heard of extra started with aristotle and the funny thing is we've been talking the same stories literally forever. We're doing this changing the characters in the environments that these stories are living in so i encourage challenge listeners Take a look at the movie die hard. Take a look at the movie. Tommy boy and take a look at A couple of other movies in tell me are those stories. Any different in the answer's no Tears there's an individual there's a love interest something bad happens to the hero the hero sidekick sidekick helps the individual conqueror challenge All all's well at the end. And i think again looking at story tongue to the frame of movies we've all we've all seen that but that same amount of storytelling can be applied to individual sales conversations that we have with prospects can be applied to Are twenty twenty one content planning Storytelling cheonan should be utilized more often by by by business folks internally and externally because it creates a motion and now more than ever i mean the the tried and true efforts that we had In call it the sales and marketing automation era. Which i think. I'm ready to to proclaim as dead. I don't know about you christoph. But like the the efficacy of a lot of these Automation things just isn't there anymore. So absent the ability to load in five hundred contacts Felon hitting you know. Go on an outreach campaign what are you gonna do. I think it comes down to Identifying again here's this. Ugly word empathy You know what makes people tick. And what's made people tick. The last five years is the same. As last five hundred years it really comes down to story are emotionally charged insight driven methods of communication. That help us feel something that Really actually does have a physiological effect on our brains so in any case That's that's the big picture with pre right But what people can use it for video. Sales letters podcasts. Youtube videos Short form video content were working on partnerships with number of of leading video Marketing providers As well as sales intelligence platforms. So you can pipe in data from your sales intelligence platform and build a better story around that data says so any case we think storytelling greats the outside a positive outcome regardless of who you are in your level of familiarity with the the ability to tell stories. I don't know we'll we'll see how that turns out. I mean there's certainly a lot of automation happening but but a lot of it. I mean you still need to supervise it you know. They still need to set it up correctly. But i certainly agree with the whole thing. You mentioned you just load up six hundred context and send everybody that same crap and of course as we know that stands for content. Really annoying people in you don't want to do that. what's interesting too is i mean storytelling hasn't changed that much And we actually put lincoln the show notes when we had. Jj peterson on the show. How to make your marketing more effective by using a storytelling formula. So simple in theory right. But it's also getting harder and harder because everybody is just getting overwhelmed with the content that's being thrown at them. I mean before we came on the air. Today's we talked about when this episode will publish. Of course as you know today is a sunday. Why would i published on sunday. Well because hardly. Anybody else publishes on this sunday plus publish every currently but on the weekends. There's no drop off right people. Same people listen sometimes. There's more people listening. Just because i don't know if it's because i'm the only podcast publishing or not Okay so pre right. Dot com is the any definitely on in didn't dot com slash slash growth. Trent the and i try to publish something useful for for my audience. Daily we also have a podcast Sponsored by pre right dot com and. It's called creator stories and that's where we interview Individuals and teams about their penetration journey in their storytelling journey than we've had some awesome guests thrown from marketing agency owners to barstools sports bloggers to everybody in between so yeah crater stories available on all your major podcast outlets as well as on youtube So yeah i loved to hear stories. I love to talk with individuals about how they're facing the quote unquote normal and i always do through storytelling lens. So a lot of places. You can find a awesome. Thanks again for joining us tomorrow. We have sam orrin on the show how to make stories repeatable in retreat re tweakable and sam talks about how to do that in a way i could never do. I mean i don't. I can't talk like that and explain at the way she. It's a fantastic episode. Thirty five minutes of wisdom's from sam. Thanks again for listening until next time.

oscar christoph christopher tra kristoff michael Paul griffiths kenneth cetera ten fifteen years kristof siri lindsay amazon Trent pandora oscars trent jaakko istanbul Anderson Oscar
Meet The #1 Video Influencer In North America (with Christophe Choo)

Scale The Podcast

1:02:24 hr | 1 year ago

Meet The #1 Video Influencer In North America (with Christophe Choo)

"The old hi everyone daniel ramsay here the c._e._o. Of my out and the host of scale the podcast this podcast is dedicated to having conversations to unlock the exact formula and strategies these multimillion and billion dollar companies use to scale their business. You can visit me on our website at scale the podcast dot com or listen to this podcast broadcast on itunes or google play. Hey everybody daniel ramsay here with my out desk and and all my goodness. I've got a story for you. Real quick before we get started with our special guests so i'm i'm doing my morning routine and this morning and i'm texting with my broker and and i'm trying to buy a commercial property right now and it's at an intersection with a lot of traffic and it's just this ideal little piece of property that is like can l-shaped on one of the best neighborhoods in town and so tex my broker. I'm like man. Why haven't you gotten back to me. We submitted an offer like seven days ago and you know what he says he goes. Oh i don't know i haven't heard from the sellers the sellers agent and here's the thing guys i have twelve hundred realestate the state virtual assistance right here and right now and i'm telling the guy you need an assistant. We are getting into the busy time we are getting eating into where seventy percent of all release date transactions are happening in the next three to four months like seventy percent of the five million transactions are going to happen in the next three rita for months and if you don't have an assistant than you aren't assistant and if you're listening tony my broker my commercial broker you need better assistance man to help you keep organize again is and to take things off. Your plate. Shoe can drive revenue so anyways. That's my rant <hes> but if you're listening right now we've got a special guest. I <hes> first of all what we liked to do is bring people who are crushing in a particular area so you can model that you know that back in your own business regardless of where you are in the country so today we have a special guest kristof show. He's he's the owner of kristof show real estate group. He's in l. a. In basically one of the highest end property areas of california and here's what he's known for what and why we brought them on <hes> bom bom who is a real estate email video platform listed him as the number one influencer in video marketing for the two thousand eighteen year and what's cool about this is christoph- today is going to share with us the down and dirty the details exactly what he does in social social media and video to drive huge listing volume and really make a difference for his client so kristof thanks for being here man appreciated adam excited to be here with you and your company and doing this video cast and helping share my knowledge to help other agents brokers all around the world in the country so it's raping you're doing yeah. That's what we do and what's cool. Is we serve the top one thousand agents across the country. We've been blessed to be in business. Twelve of years in the real estate virtual assistant game and all we wanna do is make the industry better so we have people like you christoph. Come in and knock it out outta the park so kristof talked to us about your story like i always like to start these things off with a couple of questions like how did you get into real estate you know oh and why did you decide to do the social media video influence or kind of marketing good question stories are always good. People can relate to store so <hes> it goes way doc exhibits selling real estate now for thirty. Two years argued believed that more than half my life. I've been selling real estate so i was a regular student in a highly gifted classes assist when i was very young i didn't like to study didn't like school. School was boring and a little bit too slow for me. I wasn't a good student. <unk> top grades yeah in a specially in high school. I ditched a lot of high school at barely graduated. <hes> lost my scholarship because i did so much might was i remember two weeks before for high school was over <unk> to europe and the counselor that afternoon when they got home and said your son's not graduating feeling all of his classes so that was the end of that abided graduate like a cranford the finals in past and but it was also fashion model at the time so i didn't really care. I thought it would be a model photographer. Optus cares about schools school wasn't helping and so i started dating my wife now of twenty six years and she said to me. I was traveling quite a bit to europe and asia <unk> lynch lint. I'd be gone three weeks three months at a time and she said how about getting more stable jump up and i was eighteen years old and a known anything should have a real estate state and as a young eighteen year old. I honestly thought i can drive fancy car. Be my own boss shoukri houses and make a lot of money. That's what i thought i had no idea that there was such thing escrow title and inspections in loans and appraisals and all that stuff. I just thought you just show houses and you make money no chlorine. Though i was muddling that summer summer to my came back to my real estate exam i went to interview i was living in los angeles area at the time which is part of interest with my family still. It was eighteen and a good at the local jaundice office because that was the number. One company in l._a. Was luxury and that's what i wanted to do. It wouldn't hire me. The manager asked me what my goals and i said well. I'm going to make a million dollars a year in nineteen eighty eight eighty seven. I think i'm gonna make a million dollars a year driver all sorts while she thought doug sprays so she didn't i went to the next closest john douglas office which was in hancock park about a five six mile drive in their yard me first year i was doing to open houses a week up desk floor desk as you call it hitting those incoming calls nothing was happening. I think the first year i got a listing for forty three thousand. I sold hold it but it was a seventeen hundred thirty dollars commission. I remember that very well my first mission to me perspective for over a year. We've only done when sale you gotta. Ah yes and business going in the next ninety days or even to be kicked out of the office. Why don't want better the office so i went to a roger butcher seminar if you know that name and he taught me how to call expired listings and for sale by owners say that started sending letters to every expired calling them nor not condemning. I started building my business so that's how that started in a subject really well. <hes> went from seventeen hundred thirty thousand is sixty thousand one twenty two to fifty like doubling every year. It was point. Maybe eight years into that was one of the second her first agent talk agent in an office. Hold on kristof. There's so much good and good evening what you just said so when impact so yeah yeah so win win clients come to us. We always we do something called a double all my business strategy call and you just confirmed the possibilities like i've i've seen really big teams who are doing two or three hundred hundred transactions doubled six hundred. I've seen five hundred transaction teams go to one thousand and i've seen brand new agents who did five deals. Louis do ten the next year then twenty that in forty. Let's break down your early christoph. Let's call it baby christopher doc baby real estate kristoff. What is it possible when you're you're. You're building team building a business to double on a consistent basis this what's required if it is will back in those days that made it was resolved by sorted out there was no it was barely the internet computers. Were just starting out fax. Machines or just coming out was a very different era so so no i mean i literally went from nothing for the first eight to ten years and i built my business solely the on prospecting meeting look. I was eighteen nineteen years old. I didn't know anybody. I was buying selling right. People couldn't sell their house. They want to sell the else so why not go to the audience. It's looking and i just i was in coaching. I learned about scripts and dialogues and all that trains and so it was very komo when i started coaching was a thousand dollars a month way back in like nineteen ninety two and i did not like could afford it but i in my mind that okay it's one hundred twenty twelve thousand for the twelve the coaching but in my mind i knew i would get a ten time return on that investment and ever since continuously for twenty eight years. Okay okay so so what you see what you're saying and i want to clear this. You're you're fanatically focused on prospecting and then you hugh invested in yourself having coach. Absolutely how many doubles did you get from. Just those two things mean w my business seven or eight years pretty much. I think you just doubled every year for seven hundred year with those two strategies. That's pretty much there was nothing else other than prospecting those days past clients and sphere and all the next down the road owed <unk> but that's how it started in the beginning was all in my left hancock park beverly hills which is now for the last twenty years between my average price in hancock park was the he two hundred eighty two thousand at that time right and i was doing maybe fifty to sixty five transactions year now beverly hills he can average five million nine million sometimes twelve million depending on the deals. I do that year so so that was kinda transition interesting. You talked about assistance. I had an assistant. I think my second or third year in real estate. I've had my entire. You know probably twenty twenty eight twenty nine years of my thirty. Two year. I knew early on having an assistant was critical. We didn't have virtuous systems and things like that in those days physical assisted in my office. You know five days a week so that's very important because <hes> we studied things like how much your time is worth for our. You're in my town is in the thousands of dollars so it's more than an attorney gets so i thought why would i be doing twenty dollars. An hour work when i making thousands of dollars on our so <hes> today was thousands of our it was hundreds an hour but still it was more than i was paying system right and that math is what we do for our clients your your i love interviewing you man. You're you're. You're like our poster child for helping real estate people grow because so you're coaching prospecting prospecting fanatically focused on that once you've got those two things down. You're ready to start building team and when you start building a team the doubles become become faster meaning. There's leverage in it so it's like a snowball and the and the snowball has gotten really really big how having an assistant and building a team what has that done to your volume and you're increases and the the speed at which you've been able to double would certainly helps a lot. I having an assistant martin director and people to support you. I mean i basically have four jobs. One is to up to people. I don't know people i know negotiates cracks rex and find more clients and get the deals done. It's pretty simple so i should not be involved in other things now of course planning brainstorming harming setting goals and plans for what you're gonna do that's also important because but then you have to have the infrastructure and the people in place to forward your ideals awesome class right okay so i love what you're saying as the leader your job as strategy talking to clients getting clients and negotiating gating deals in your world everything else should be given away to an assist an is that is that kind of how you're you're much i will say though certain things i do i i don't do myself but i do oversee myself such as a photo shoots and video shoots. I think those are very critical aspects and i've tried to let go those those things meaning. Just you know my sister marketing director have told him to go with him to the house did pictures of and show them the angles. I want certain rooms. Make sure they know to make sure everything symmetric. Only pillows are properly all that stuff but yes no one seems to be as detailed or thorough as i am so i've learned that i kind of have to be there which is a little bit time consuming assuming and then we videos i have to be there because i'm often in the videos during introductions and walking tours and that kind of thing so so i do try outsource or breath people do a lot of the worker the servings i still have to be even though not supposed to but i know if i if i leave certain things like photos and videos to their own. I'm usually not happy happy with the results i detail and when i'm there they'll take a picture. I wait a minute. That land is off. Kilter the corden showing you know those kinds of things which doesn't immune much for the i guess it does to me. Hey everybody daniel ramsay here and i wanna tell you about an extraordinary offer to take action and start scaling your business right now. You know i own bata questions about how to grow your business generate more revenue and reduce expenses expenses and the answer is simple. It's my out desk. Virtual assistance miami desk offers five star virtual assistant services to thousands of a business professionals across the united states and making our clients over one hundred million dollars in net revenue every year our customers absolutely love love our virtual assistance and i wanna give you the opportunity to learn exactly why simply text the word 'em o._d. Mod two three one nine nine six and we're going to give you a free double my business strategy call where you work one on one with one of our business business growth specialists to design an action strategy for growth and cost savings in your business. We're going to give you over twenty growth growth and strategy guides a market force personality indicator an important business checklist and hiring guides my out desk admins can help help manage your office your sales. You're marketing pipeline and even help you lead generation and follow up and during this call your learn exactly how you can put them into your business right now so again techs 'em o._d. Two three one nine nine six and get a free double my business strategy call right now and learn how my out desk can transform your business today. Uh well. You know what i love about. What you're saying is you don't have to be the the video you don't have to be the the video producer but you do have have to be the director absolutely or videos and in your online presence kind of you know brand is that is that how you would put. I've never edited edited video in my life. I don't do that. It's it's beyond my coverage but i do very much produce it. I'm definitely produces takes a while to think of the plan for the video especially for a house you know depending on the position of the house yet morning light in the front afternoon light and the backs of scientists to shoot it to retreat types. You have cloudy mornings you know in l._a. Have cloudy mornings so you gotta shoot the inside one day and shoot outside another day when it's sunny so there's a lot of involvement lead and then i have to in my mind put together the storyline of the video else say house and then what i sometimes. They don't do it as much now. I have the city offered. Send me all the raw footage when i look through it particularly providence forty or fifty or sixty million dollars. I take a lot of extra time and care and that because it's a very special property as a lot of special unique features so i have to really planet out look at all the footage the may have thirty minutes of living room footage in all look through all because even willing to have a one minute video four minute video. I need an out of those ten clips clip number four fifteen seconds instant twenty seconds. That's the shot. I want in particular part so i will story on it. I will send the videographer kind of an outline of the videos i want in. We maximize. It's it's all google drive. I can make notes on the video itself on google drive so they just have access to it and then that way they can create the first second or third edit. It's based on my my thoughts but producing things is very important but it's important have the right people behind you to implement those things and they've burner field. This is awesome. I love what you're saying. I think it's so the case as leaders and owners we have to rely on others to execute for us because they have specific skills that like you and i just don't have i hated school and i can't sit at a computer and i am not detail oriented and i think that's the norm for us real estate people. Is we just we aren't. We need to rely on others to execute for us but to keep the vision you know there. We've got a ton of panelist and a lot of people who are here attending. I saw matt wagner. N what's up buddy a. I'm and i just want to let everybody know it's really hot here in california christof and i are like it's eighty two degrees at seven a._m. A._m. in sacramento california is going to be a hot one but if you're listening right now i'd love you to just kind of say yo what's up and where you're from uh-huh and what how hot it is where you're at plus. I want you to know that christof and i are going to answer questions because we're here here to work here. I mean we're here to give love and value to the folks that are on this call and listening in our audience and this is going to go out to everybody chris. Let's let's breakdown. Let's talk a little bit about your story because you you you. We reached out out to you for a really specific reason. You've been doing social media and video on property before it was cool. It's cool now ten years ago. When you were heavy in it nobody else was doing that and so i just want to break down that story and if you're in the audience stay with us because chris offs going to give us his exact approach to how does social media and how he uses it directs brexit video for his listings and we're talking about multimillion dollar listings so it's a good question and <hes> so let's go back in. It's it's all related back to coaching and having the right people behind so tom terry was my coach at the time when i spoke with him and his company as number one option world as far as of real state and i was at his talk retreat in palm desert it was <hes> it was one hundred and eighteen degrees not quite like today but it is hot in usa. I forgive me but i'm in the sunlight. The window and it's air conditioned office still up so the conference in gary v irina chuck was there ever heard it ever heard of before ford no he was so we had met in person and then after lunch yet <hes> conference on i'm sitting in the front row and google had just purchased you too and in those days this is going back ten eleven years ago and as the websites in the blog or king meeting websites came you had have a blog logging in a transition from the lower end market for so the beverly hills ten years before physically i started a my social world to to build personal referral network of high end sellers and buyers because after live it read it and live there in order to attract those clients so but you know light let the world was changing and it's changing more quickly today so ari said hold hold on hold on hold on you. You are so fast and i'm gonna slow you down because i i wanna say what's up hector. He's in san gabriel valley. It's only seventy eight degrees there. You said something that is so valuable. If you're listening and you wanna make transition from regular real estate where you're you're three hundred four hundred the national average and if you want to start selling multi million dollar homes kristof says you have to live it breathe it be it and talk a little bit about that transition because i think it's an important point. You've transitioned from a regular real estate person in l._a. To the point where you've sold a fifty million dollar property <hes> pity and that's a big deal most people don't do that transition so talk to us about that. Let's <unk> another long so basically most people contact me wanna learn about how to get into lecture selling real estate but they want to be a little quote unquote luxury luxury right or really has to be intrinsically who you are in order to sell it number one. It was always internally. I was even though my parents did not come from a wealthy family by any means. My mom was a hairdresser own beauty shop. I stepfather worked for rare art. Book company was exposed opposed to traveling to europe exposed to agriculture young age they get exposure and i had a young age starting junior high school the sauce some sparking something something different and saw that i wanted something different and is to the world of wealth among sri was a particular teacher in junior high school. That was my yearbook teacher. My <hes> <hes> art teacher and she said showing me all these luxury magazines which i had never been exposed to about the luxury world of luxury people properties so enamored by this and i just started falling a so the question was how get intellectual oh yeah so so back a little bit further so first year seventeen hundred than income going up the fifth year in the business. I think i'd earned two hundred fifty thousand nineteen ninety-three because that's the i got married so you're getting married and decided to go on a trip to europe trip to asia off for our honeymoon a member the trip that time cost about sixty thousand dollars for this whole vacation which was about a quarter of might gross income for the year lines mindset again is so important in my mind. I worked so hard every day of the year. I was okay to spend quartermaine. Come to travel for six weeks in live really the life that i thought was the real life the life of luxury and always if i don't go the best i'm not going to go so we went first class but on the best crew should at how sweets the best hotels everything i mean six star five-star all the way and magic thing and i believe in miracles i believe in magic and everything matt formations. I stayed that expect miracles canary day and they do happen and we were on his cruise with a thousand people in the middle training for two weeks and <hes> little roster of of all the names of the people on the ship doc and there was a couple from beverly hills and not yet moved to beverly hills but by chance laying on day sitting at just happen to be then he said adding he became friends. Somehow the universe put us together on the on the deck yet the one couple that i really wanted to be from l._a. Or beverly hills we met some channing became friends so maybe six months a year later we kept in touch became friends with them. They sent me a referral and from that referral it was a twenty four unit condo building in beverley hills that actually own decided to lisa <unk> lisa's back in nineteen ninety four we releasing those units yes from five thousand to twelve thousand a month and i was lisa's for the whole building out and so from that from that cruise met so many clients from that building that i think today from that one crews believe if i've calculated my time i think ever number two point two million dollars and twenty seven years i from the roots so that sixty thousand dollar expense as monetize itself many many times over but i've always said do what you love be athetic about which you love and and be do the right thing. He kinda people give them appreciation affection attention and universal provide you blessings from that so that's how that started but then physically i moved to beverly hills instead of workings physically in this area by movement officer their heels at what is that. I moved my home a few years later here because i was commuting an hour an hour and a half each way to come to work to beverley. I mean that's i wanted to be here so we started building the so we had some connections in beverly hills we start building that social network one of the party's going to advance physically move my office office that i'm more involved visit moved our home more involved so now i don't really get outside of a two mile bubble of beverly hills too often but it was a a gentle transition on different levels but it starts from having the dream the intention of the desire of and back in nineteen ninety two my previous coach said you have to have an intention for your perfect client. He says he if you don't know who your perfect client is. You're not gonna track them and back in so rain and my brain. I won't clients to love me. Trust trust me respect me will follow my advice are rich in front of that can be friends with that's mike light so out somewhere. That's what i'm looking for and that's what attract so. It's the law attraction so that's kinda. How it went from bleeding yourself spending the money you gotta spend money to make money and then putting yourself physically and environment arment and then really training yourself training than my whole three. I still train all the time constantly getting better so going back with the social media marketing that gary chuck said google bought youtube <hes> he says you're mr lifestyles of the rich and famous your beverly hills. He said we need to to be a d._j. For content community as exact worse and he said licenses lifestyles of the rich and famous i remember that was one of my favorite shows in as i love that shaw and so that afternoon at five thirty when the day was over i went to best buy i bought my first flip cam video camera. My sister was with me at the conference about a tripod. One of the balcony of my hotel beautiful view of the mountains in the lake at the hotel and i did a quick two minute video my first video ever. It's still on youtube anisette. What the heck am i doing. In palm desert the middle of august two hundred and eighteen degrees. I talked about the conference had learning drawing trinite l. built my business help serve my clients better make more streamlined and all that stuff and that was my first video and also exa during that during the break during the the conference i was on my phone when go daddy was the break and when i go down and head butts all the life south of richard's amos domains which were actually available so i puff so that's how it started and then gary said another thing said from eight o'clock in the morning till eight o'clock at night. You're working in your business meeting. You're out there. You're you're showing. You're doing day to day stuff. He says from eight o'clock at night till midnight. He'd were on your list. That was either. She pointed helped catapult. My visits so so at that point in time i was not on any social media platform nothing no nothing so basically said every day just start new platform log in set up an now. That's what i did so i started. I think lincoln was my first and facebook and i spent i think six or nine months really immersing myself in that whole world every every social media platform learning about what they doing testing and try and testing try and tom very osas always a._b._c. always eat so i'm always assisting testing and try so with all the new technology <hes> and now the video influence many companies send me their cameras and send me their their things to us and test out. How is he want me to influence to get people to buy their products so singing trying things <hes> it doesn't work but i try and that's why i would like videos. I do the hike reduction expensive issues but also i will tell you my walking tour videos with my phone in a house or more popular to the consumer than fancy. I production videos. I'll do very expensive production video and i'll do walking tall typically get four to five times more views on my hand held phone walking tour of the house so i just do everything i tested troy. I have fun with it. Make it interesting and funding and try to just do things. Just try it out and you never know what's it's gonna work. That's awesome. That's awesome okay. Hey we have mary from indianapolis but you did tell us how hot it was mary and guys we're we're ready for the question portion of of the call we are going to definitely ask kristoff to outline how how he produces his videos. That's the one that's the secret sauce and then when once you have the videos where do you put them to generate arrate real estate commissions because i hate all of the influencers out there that post videos but they don't equate it to how they made commission right all right so we're going to be very very specific seventy five degrees in indianapolis. That's not bad. That's nice. That's good but kristoff first off. Let's let's let's do this. Walk us through your process for being a producer or a director on on your listing properties with video on a production video just self video. Let's let's i mean. It sounds like you do the production video but that's it's for the seller because they want a fancy video right with a seller and it's also for me. It's a brandon tool. I watch you high production video and i learn how to deploy production because a lot of t._v. Shows both as member on h._d._t._v. and a lot of other been. I know maybe twenty different t._v. Shows right show a mansion tensions in beverly hills and all that so i kind of follow the formats whenever production for a t._v. Show i really pay attention to produce wreck attention to the cinematographer. I talked to them. I see would they do. I really really studied them that i take the best of all the people i meet incorporate that into my own videos all right. Let's go. Let's go through the high production video of value of a property like you know. Walk us through that <hes> how it looks what you do like give us step by step and in listening <unk> that was fifty eight million and credible property one of the largest properties in certain parts of beverly hills twenty seven thousand square foot house with two guests all sorts of it's a very big property physically shoot right and it's on their unique in it's the only house in existence in los angeles or beverly hills. It has too many trains on the property. It's such a big property like land. Franks is the owner new. <hes> yeah rolled headed traded his house home. Oh meals which is right nearby and so he saw the trains and he loves the owner lead train so he headed walls people at the disney studios make two trains from at the house so it was very special and unique alicea tennis courts in every amenity even and it was a really beautiful very opulent european style manner manner of color so i get the listing sign. It's exciting it can sometimes take me a little time to come up with kind of the concepts so so <hes> unusually that happens during the quiet time meaning i do get. I do meditations every day. I get massaged her so when i'm particularly i'm getting my massage on my mind is quite that's gonna win the the magic thoughts. Come to me like all do this and do that. So how am i gonna shoot. What am i going to do. <hes> that's number one number two. It's very thought intensive and time intensive for example that house we gotta shoot over five different days. Each shoot shoot day was between five to seven hours <hes> and per day to shoot because you know this particular house was situated the french-based east west the back faced east so obviously the garden you know you need the sunlight in the middle of the day so there's no shadows from the trees and things like right right to be shot the earlier morning because unlike was in the back from the sunrise in east the french out of the house had to be shot in the late afternoon because his son was in the front so that's pursuance timing and coordination owners have to be willing to allow you to do that. Then we have weather issues some knicks rain gonna cancel <hes> and you still have to book the photographers offers offers and stuff to pay them so that's a little bit of an issue but you have to really find out that whole part of it and this is what i'm hearing you i i wanna i'm again. I'm gonna slow you down. What i'm hearing is you have to pay attention to the sun to the shadows of the in and also how the house is facing to optimize the video right. Why why is that so important and and ask okay so. I'm a real estate broker. I love i have a guy called me one day and he says hey i need help on my house. I said no problem what's the house and he had he heard me on radio. So <hes> i was on a radio with rate and and matt wagner show he calls because he's listening to the morning drive. He says daniel. I need help i. I hear you're the best in town. At that time. I was number fourteen out of nine nine thousand realtors. He calls me. I look at his property and m._l._s. and the second photo was a photo of a bathroom the toilet and the hairbrush the ad hair on it. It's like i was like dude. You don't need me. You need a better agent. You just need somebody to take real pictures and highlight your property and and <hes> anyways we ended up getting the listing selling it helping them out but i think the average agent doesn't understand what you so simply understand right so talk to us a little bit more talk about like the positioning and like you know how break that down for us. It's a science and it goes even back but it just came to my mind. It goes even back to before you even get to the point of hong into a thing of who is the buyer. Yes i mean. What's the age demographic are they. A local buyer. Potentially are the international buyer who was the bio so that's very yet to create the video and target video to that kind of audience so this particular boss i i figured is not going to be. It's a real mansion style property very opulent very old <unk>. We walk in the entry. It was like walking into a beautiful house in paris. I mean it was very very french. European filled with incredible antiques are very very very extremely high. I mean like walking so your typical pickle young millennials or young twenty year old isn't going to be interested in that kind of house so so obviously it wouldn't be a funky cool. Video wouldn't be a hip music. It's it's a whole different thing so that's the demographics i think of that process and how to make it feel old school opulent but yet since it's a it's a very heavy house. It's very formal how to make it a little bit more lights six more appealing and not so <unk>. You might think it's oh it's too heavy into too fancy nc from maybe right so your job is to kind of take the video and whatever the property is trying to make it appeal to the broadest market possible. We've got a question from angela angela. I love your question. I'm gonna let kristof finished this kind of <hes> list and then we'll get right right to it. <hes> chris you answer the question first or yeah man let's do it. Angela is curious about your opinion on followers like sh she asked is smart to hire a company to buy followers which is thing you can do nowadays or or de build your followers organically from people who know you trust you and may want to do business with you so good question. I think it's sex aggression. I would never ever ever by any followers. I never have never will <hes> every social media expert. I talked to says it's not a good idea. You're better having hugh followers hours. That are really good followers. It's more important who follows you than how many volumes so definitely by by followers all gonna be organic <hes> all my social social media followers <unk> in the hundreds of thousands on all the platforms they're all organic and for example like my pursuance surprised page so even though it's private i still have a lot of organic followers. I don't know how find me if i had never ever ever by followers so getting an angela i want. There's there's no cheap or easy ways to to be a real like influence or in the world. I mean i just people always want wanna buy their way to success and we find it all the time when somebody is like can can. I hire an assistant who knows how to do. My facebook knows how to do. My media knows is everything and i'm like christoph. You have to be the director of your own movie and you can have assistance who help you with all the details of it and that's what we provide but i just think you can't hitchhike in somebody else's car. You know that's a good <unk>. All of my social media posts are my own being an talk to me. A social media post has to be kind of time specific morning. I'd try to forty five a day first thing in morning. When i wake up at something inspirational flower or replant something that is meaningful to me and again i post what's meaningful to me and when you do that you attract those black your kind of things that you like him wanted to pacific so host all my own it's okay to create the single post in the content and the words and then give it to your social media personnel. Your system have them posted in all the other platforms. That's fine. Yes <unk> tweak it for big. You'd better come up with the content yourself. It's gotta be from your heart is what i have market record. I've had i tried to have them. You know i said here's a photo. Come up with some content priebus. I never liked what they say. I take more time trying to fix it and change it than if i just take thirty seconds in the voice in my phone in the not to say i wanna say at them implement so so don't don't buy followers <unk> treat your own in try to soundings amies relative to what's going on in your local world or the world itself again report factor. I think that's great that you're you're helping people understand how how to use an assistant. I'll give an example one of our p._r. And media people reached out to christoph you talk to l. who who kind of set this all up and we have alvin who's on the call right now and he set up the video and he set up the the post about what we're going to talk doc about. He sent out the e mail he posted across you know our our team posted across all the social media but i'm doing this interview because christof and i are going to be buds man man and and if you're listening right now like it's it's it's it's because we're the experts and people don't want to hear from our assistance so i think that's a real but there's a lot seventy. Eighty percent of the work can be done by your assistant but the content has to come from you and i think i don't know exactly was when i look at my platform show you how many post you had or how many tweets you've done and i think i'm running in the range of forty to sixty thousand thousands hosts since i started ten eleven years ago so i do put a lot of content out. There is no question there's a lot of it but you know social media's an opportunity today. It's it's basically free where have opportunity to brand yourself and all i care about on social media four things my name beverly hills luxury in real estate. That's all it's gotta come across and it could be a luxury lifestyle of a great restaurant would be luxury of a beautiful home luxury of enjoying a beautiful garden collapsing and meditating those are all luxuries in different ways so but that's that's <unk> quarter to second split second to capture someone's attention be meaningful useful fun and interesting for them to pay attention so if you create content he bobo volume automatically so name the area three retreat for me in real estate <hes> okay all they really need to think about so as an example lob linked to have made it fourteen thousand followers lincoln and it's particularly <hes> interactive platform in a way we should be friends timothy <unk> later on so but i don't about lately linked in you get friend requests or or following whatever the connection unaccept- everyone and a eh then immediately especially the last few months you start getting those spannis like a cut and paste private message ovalles mostly selling elite systems six forty five a day oh by leads by leagues by i just don't even look at those and the other ones are mortgage brokers said oh we'll help you get refinanced. It isn't that awesome awesome ideals or cash. I don't need a broker and if i do i've got used for twenty three years. I don't need you don't even know to do business with or so. I drank illicit. It frustrated me on monday. I just i want my lincoln and they're like you know. Thirty new requests accepted them in right away like ten spam oh by his five after after this to that and i like it just said forget it. I did a quick two minute videos but my camera. I talked about the etiquette. I said this is not how you do business you. The need to know you like you trust before. They'll do business with you so don't directly in the navy tried to sell me something. It's not gonna work and linda doesn't usually get a lot of interaction that particular coast video said quite a few thousand us one hundred thirty comments and his i realize no twenty-seven shares which is very not unusual for atlanta platform but obviously particular content was very precise to that platform and everyone else it was coming said the all thought the same thing but i took the time in took me two minutes but at the camera recorded video editing posted video and in cincinnati cincinnati. I've got another two hundred layton connections since monday because people saw video people share that video and people like who's this guy. I wanna get to know so so sharon. Karen knowledgeable things to people lincoln is one thing facebook's another twitter and instagram rather than so share what you think is valuable and hopefully it'll work and to get back to the questions monetize videos from at right at <unk> backer because i started with videos that summer remember with tom ferrier two thousand seven or eight. Whatever the year was yeah. I started doing it goes very consistently and look and i think it was either three three or four years into doing videos consistently maybe not as consistently today is now a see more of the value but it was four hundred and some videos into you mean on my youtube channel now. I have twenty eight hundred videos on my youtube channel. That's just a couple just a couple at ford some videos. Maybe four five hundred subscribers at at time and remember. It was on the phone thomas tom this. I don't wanna take on an endeavour unless could monetize it r._o._i. It's x. Amount lenovo marketing led former tool. I wanna find a ten time. Return on investment so video after video nothing was happening. I track these whenever someone calls. How'd you you find out about me was over for whatever so nothing and thompson chief doing what you're doing. It's gonna work keep doing it. Just keeps consistent with it so yeah. I think within thirty days thereafter get a random phone. Call a being prepared to support. I get around in foam ball at the office. My sister says this ladies want to talk to you about buying a house. Pick up the phone and talking to her. She just daughter school should a thirty minute commute back home. They looking for house for a year and a half. Ask you weren't happy with their rover buyer's agent and find someone new and this is what you're looking for. We went by house for ten to twelve million or than sell our the house after that. It's worth around five buy rate and i said how did you find out about me. Oocyte couple of your videos said really which videos should i saw your driving driving tour of stone canyon road simulate and she and she said i saw your helicopter tour video. I said well what made you decide to call me from those videos. He says one. You're really honest. Syrian house so was honest he says on your driving tourists on candid in some cases of belair which is very very expensive neighborhood but it's five six minute drive from beverly hills and i said it's five six minutes from beverly hills. Start to sunset is called stone canyon. A canyon is a main street in offshoot shoot streets but you're in a canyon and if your son lover is may not be for you because the sun will rise a couple hours later in the morning and will set a couple hours i earlier in the afternoon as i sold houses in that location and you could be there at ten o'clock in the morning on in summertime and you still have shade in your backyard is is a mountain is still blocking the sun. We were about to buy a house on xtra <unk> twelve million dollars in a game in the afternoon and there was no senate so she liking honesty and i was very often my driving to talking about the pros and cons of the neighborhood in the helicopter. What made you talk about that well. She said if you spend that much money on a helicopter tour of the most expensive homes in l._a. The spend money to market my home so rate so interesting. She said my husband's a lawyer. He's apartment very big real estate law firm real estate law firm ball teams and <hes> he wants to interview to bars agents said okay in what is wanted me monday eight thirty eight thirty at night so <hes>. I went there monday through the night. He's an attorney pinstripe suit with a tie and the best the whole thing yellow note in our first conversation was with the wife thirty minutes or so on the phone like it to the house thirty husbands their opening. My illinois is he's an attorney. I am. I said mr next you mind. If i ask you some questions he said absolutely <unk> asking question question. After question is my concern. Was it been looking for a year and a half for a house in the broker. What's happening with that right rant about half an hour into my questions i could feel there. There was a comfort level. Put my foot down on the table and said i like you. I think you guys like me. Why don't we get started do some business and he says he's off. My wife decided to hire you the first time she spoke to you on the phone and i said great and what am i doing here for an interview. He said they just wanted meat. You that's it so. We took the without looking at some houses three weeks later. We open for over ten million on t._d. On t._v. show the time we did the whole okay show was showing them find a house by the house the whole thing and house for ten million. I sold her house from five billion. The friend bought a house meet for four point seven million than the secretary of solar condo for five hundred and she bought a car for one point three at all happen within ninety days of our first of all right so took four years to monetize what we did twenty four billion deals in ninety days from that first monetization videos and what i love is earlier earlier earlier. We talked about your initial doubles and the fact that you hired tom ferry. I think it's it's so valuable that he he said. Look stick with it and that's exactly what a coach is supposed to help you. Create the vision for your company. You make sure you stay true to who you are and what you want your future to be and i love tom. He's he's a great friend of my out desk refers. There's business to us all the time and we refer business to him and i love the power of that story for if you're listening right now i can tell you and you want to be in the luxury world. You want to double your business. One of the most powerful things you can do is hire a coach. Somebody just like christoph. Did tom ferry's for example of the value of coaching we all. There's not an agent. I number doesn't have ups and downs in their my career was two thousand six eighty two thousand seven before the crash <unk> gone. I think three or four months without a single close i had listings but they weren't selling andy's closing no living in beverly hills in this lifestyle. It's zor expensive and we got no cash flow coming in. It's it's very scary. You know you have more staffing. You know going to dinner. Beverly hills is five hundred dollars for three people in another story so anyways three four months in coaching you tom directly every week in we're on the phone and i was getting not depressed spaghetti. I felt like a honesty. My mind like i was being sucked down like a like a black coal spiral of negativity yeah who was happening and i was prospecting everything they can cause. Remember saying to my wife and thomas tom. I keep making the calls every single days. Nothing's happening before months. I might as well just take off for formats does not work. Nono keep doing what you're doing. Keep inconsistent doing says no. No no you can't do that. Gotta keep on a word what's going to happen and eber <unk> and i do work every single day the christmas morning in years. I live five minutes away from the office to come to the office even for a couple of hours as to do. I like to have my home long time to be my home time so i work and i go home. So is it the autism sunday morning at eight thirty and i get a phone call the office and it was a friend of ours and this is back to you and this friend <hes> we met our our social world as socializing and hit one of the beautiful homes in los angeles into many arts ad and we my wife and this is one of those beautiful homes in l._a. Restored we're going to talk to you about selling your house. You can meet us tomorrow on monday morning. I knew the house also worth teamed twenty five thirty million eleven years ago. Today double ended at that point. I think my high sale was like five and a half million so i i was mentally prepared. I was mentally prepared but i wasn't quite ready for that. Point cycled at my wife. I said look at me working all afternoon. I got to prepare for this appointment. I spent eight hours that afternoon preparing for this listing appointment. Which is the next morning at eight thirty minute the house <hes> walk through the house long enjoyed even within twenty minutes. I signed a listing contract for over here. I got you didn't want to pay me exit. He asked me to commission and i said at six percents is no. I'm only anyone million dollars to sell this house. I wrote in one million dollars. He says a waiting list it was it was it worth twenty two twenty three million. He says what unlisted for us in twenty six and a half million he says no. I want us to put thirty million. I said well if i sell the house the next thirty sixty days that okay he says no because it's it was october says we're not leaving the country till july so the kids go to finish school. Which is why did he wanted the higher price. You know the time frame yeah you wanna high prices have body long realistic right so anyways we listened it and we did sell it for twenty two and a half million exactly what you told him not ah but it was score months of nothing happening and cash flow was like almost non existent at that point types of his signed contract with potential million dollar commission thirty million how else we videos magazine covers. I don't know how quite a finagle all that but i did and we ended up selling but so don't get discouraged cheap. It keeps at it no matter of the worst days. Just keep doing what you're doing. What is your option. Go home sent me depressed and he comfort foods or whatever or keep going <music> after your dreams and goals does eventually will happen so i just wanted to bring that god. Don't get discouraged. Just keep moving forward. Keep your mindset positive as if you keep doing that the the magic will happen how long if an agent wants to transition and we're about to wrap up guys. If you have any questions chris often. I will be on facebook after this. You can ask questions if you're watching this in a replay mode or or you know later in the week or we get you <hes> via email email will answer questions as you go but we're about to end kristof. How long does it take to break into luxury number. One in a follow up question is how long should a expected to take to build a an influence or kind of marketing strategy using video and social media. Those are the two i think questions way on heavily to help our audience a really good question the way you ask them just brought to my thought three three different things so by initial reaction to that is three to four years minimum for all of us when i look back and think about when i transitioned shen to beverly hills it took about three or four years to go from selling tutoring eighty thousand dollar houses to really start getting some good traction in the luxury market place can you i <hes> i look at the video marketing. It took about four years from starting starting that to start monetize that with my website in us of marketing <music> tip about four years building the website for studying deals from the website yes social media. It took about four years doing social media consistently before i started getting referrals deals from that so pretty much across everything. The timeframe is about four years. Why why do you think that is. I mean that's pretty consistent. Yeah this consistent. I think it takes time for people. People need to know you like entrusted <unk> business. It's not even means an agent meaning. It doesn't agents that you need somewhere at a conference <hes> they on social media. They may not know you. The purview gator speak be they don't really know you but from that point that they meet you over time is see you consistently meaning. I do a lotta. I do consistent content. Fortified posts a day on all every platform on all of them. They should be able to see me somewhere. Somehow assume consistently and it's top of mind recognition and then this comfort and now more for more videos not just houses parties in the lifestyle that doing videos kind of heightened scenes of my day to day life experiences and the challenge your with on on helping clients would like literally talk about what whatever is pertinent that day in an escrow or negotiation. I'm trying to do videos every day about what's going on to help agents and people and less than we did by five six. I get like a quarter million and referral business agents and also what makes you what made do you think me remember me. The bet passing the conference so they heard speaking of conference if followed a social media seemed consistently but the agents say primarily the agents say they like my how to videos in the behind the scenes videos like i did know of of talking about sewer line inspections in l._a. Okay and how sometimes in this particular property it was in biller. It could not find a sewer cleanout <unk> then the camera outside the confined ended so we had to pull up the toilet in the bathroom and send a camera down soil in the last thing i wanted to show picture of removed toilet in a bathroom but they did not talked about the exact situation. I said most people today to inspections and the problem told the resolve and this is what's happening. She said she saw that video. She didn't know about that. God and that's why she called me for a referral and it was a property sold for eight million dollars so <hes> so again giving value with giving to agents to potential sellers fillers. Potential buyers are just anybody giving value to them. <hes> without expecting something return the simple common return anyways. I love it while we're going to end christoph <unk> stuff. You've been amazing today. This has been awesome. What's the one thing you want to live the audience with like how would they get a hold of you and then what's the one thing you'd you'd like to leave. The audience with today. Hold on me is really simple. Just google mining find me all over the place everywhere simple. I'm on every art form that i'm aware of and i bob you can find me on facebook but send you to my business majors. I've been full for like ten or nine years so but <unk> earns. You can follow me there opens. There's no limits. What am i want to leave you with believing yourself. Always keep your mindset positive despite the business. It's like a roller coaster all old law. I wake up with a good attitude. Sometimes i wake up signs wake up with a bad attitude refueling upset <unk> habits but i had to catch that and focus on. I'm hoping that contribute to my clients coming to the office of the bad attitude or being isn't gonna help. My clients is gonna help me get more deals is going to help close at escrow isn't gonna help that sellers sell their home. Nope <unk> self-focused key positive be consistent be happy. Do affirmations everyday meditated day. Be your best self. <hes> <hes> don't hold back. Don't afraid always be testing and try and he goes remind final words advice. I love it man <hes>. We're we just listed. Did your website and where to fall you on youtube. Chris think thanks so much for your time. Today it's been this has been really fun actually and i really appreciate everything we should do it in a love it about what you didn't get to the other points but it's okay next time yeah well. There's a lot there's a lot that we unpacked here today a and and we will have you back for a number just following me. I mean following all the platforms but in particular follow my youtube channel is any video. I want to get it on my youtube. You channel <hes> in that way. You can access all the interviews. I've done my speaking engagements which i've done many of them my t._v. Segments and you can just followed. Would i do in in amid. Don't do it my way. Do what i do. In a way that makes sense for you your personality your lifestyle and your immunity. If i were to malibu or in maui maui on the beach i wouldn't be wearing pinstripes suits and ties every day. We weren't flip flops shorts and a t-shirt right so i'll take that was one thing i'll just leave it with. A video reflects summit that we had a month ago. You're twenty four top. Did you influencers in north america. Speaking of i know most of them. We all basically say the same. Eh in different ways consumers today want authenticity real. Why is it the the number one tv. Shows are reality t._v. An intermit- personally i'm in beverly hills address. Maybe flashier bucci to some people but that's just me i am. I like to be dressed in a light. We're anti things things in beverly hills myself chrissy. That's purposely. Why edit my videos purposely. Why do the live or just a non edited walking torch because i'm a very down to earth down home. Kind of person people know that just seeing a picture of me or sing quick clip of mainly might be oh that stuck up. Beverly hillsdaie was born with silver spoons mouth but that's not who i am was never was so i try to be purposely really authentic and natural <hes> <hes> so that people will relate more to mate as opposed to what the i am. I love that man. I love that m._j. Says thank you for meeting when things are slow. Oh the night is very dark. So i think that is a a real situation for us. Real estate brokers and agents out there. You know <unk> our businesses challenging. There's a lot of competition and so having yourself stand out and being different like you have done is really the avenue that we all need to go down so again kristof. Thanks for being here appreciate you brother. We'll we'll have you back. This has been great. Thanks for watching guys. If you don't have an assistant then you you are an assistant and you're telling yourself. You're not worth more than ten bucks an hour because you can hire a a real estate virtual assistant from us for for i mean and for pennies of what you're actually worth most real estate people are worth thousands of dollars a day or an hour just prospecting just picking up the phone and talking talking to people. You should not do your own paperwork. You should not do your own marketing assistant work love you guys go on our website my out desk dot com. Get a consultation tation. It's free we will help you. Double your business kristof. Thanks for being here today. Appreciate your time. Thanks guys see later <music>.

beverly hills l._a christoph kristof daniel ramsay google los angeles thomas tom facebook europe director youtube united states california virtual assistant Optus ford
176: Radio interview replay - Are we just burned out with all these Zoom video meetings?

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

07:06 min | 6 months ago

176: Radio interview replay - Are we just burned out with all these Zoom video meetings?

"This is the business storytelling podcast with Christopher tra- available on Google, spotify apple, and Dora and other podcast channels want to play it on your iphone. Just ask Siri to play the KRISTOF trap business storytelling podcast also available on Alexa. Here's Kristoff today's episode. All Right Chris Trap, you've waited long enough. Let's bring on the program via the newsmakers line on newsradio six, hundred w emt a transplant from Germany and an offensive linemen back for the University of Iowa in. Right. Right around that time late night not saying you're old that your diploma had to be was they had to carve it in stone in no I'm kidding I graduated from college back in nineteen eighty nine. So I still got you by a few years. So as a university of Iowa graduate, I would imagine that once Hawkeye. Was There Hawkeye thing what was it like to hear Luca? Garza say I'm coming back I want to try for a national championship. Well now we gotta do it right I mean it was great news to hear. But of course, you gotta get on the court and and get down there certainly as a chance down. But. First of all, we gotta play we have to play basketball and. who knows what's going to happen? I mean, just look at Major League Baseball which is about the least contact. You know there's no contact between people and and they're they're struggling. So I can't imagine basketball and football I. Hope they both happen and hopefully the Hawkeyes have a good season exactly no, that's something that the right they're gonNA have to actually be able to get out onto the court and play the thing running across yesterday on twitter. After the Garza decision, who's they everybody and I will wear your damn mask. So we can get this basketball season going meanwhile some other things because of the coronavirus pandemic that have changed significantly Zoom Microsoft teams, all these different platforms that are coming up there as far as virtual work environments and I guess the big question that you may have an answer to kristoff trap. His are these virtual meetings working for people or is it just an absolute dud? Interruption. Do you need how digital marketing for your small to medium sized business reach out now and drop the message at sea trap and g mail DOT COM Well. They're working to an extent, right but but it is just like in an office, you can't have meetings for seven hours and you're going to get anything done. So you have to be really really cognizant of what's a meeting? What's an email? What's this slack message and not everything needs to be a meeting and you know even when you talk about conferences really briefly there is an overabundance of. Conferences, there's an overabundance of come on the Soom call video, and by the way I've worked for a while and the whole thing of being on video. It's a new thing like I never would go on video I'm on the phone you know call in, and now everybody is expected to be on video and then you know people walk in and what's the point in having ninety a little boxes and? You can't see him anyways. Yeah. It's smaller than postage stamps for for some them I. Think it's part of it's just proof of life so that they know that you're still alive be you're not being held hostage one of the things that I've noticed for people when they're doing these meetings is. You have a lot of people that are doing that and just walking away they just opened up and they just go away part of the things you look at the students out in the Los Angeles Community School district when the school systems shut down, there were forty percent of the students there that never even logged on. Do we have workers that are able to get away with just not logging on or if they do they just log on and walk away. They are trick to do that I'm not recommending. Off. To not, work today. Alex? But but on zoom you can do virtual backgrounds and I think they're Kinda cool because what I do and sometimes like with you know in a conference, I'll put my book the background. So it's like it's promotion rights almost like a press conference and there are zoom backgrounds where you can literally have a picture or video of yourself nodding. and. So you can't do that. The problem is when somebody actually calls a you. Or if there's Nothing not at just not like no matter what they say. There's there's too many political things that I can. Go to university career fairs, career fairs of mood move zoom as well. There are a lot of tunes for people to take advantage of these online tools because maybe could make these things before they've gone virtual. So you have access to them all really from wherever you are no matter where you are. And you know the one thing I do want to say the former journalist wants a journalist always journalists, right? Yeah. I you know I a lot of public bodies have done do meetings online and even like my my pool right in cedar rapids they have bought beatings on zoom and I would highly recommend to keep doing that the lindmark school board meeting the other day has like eight hundred people watching. Wow. When was the last time? When was the last time? You had eight hundred people at a board meeting like probably never right from public records perspective from that perspective they are working. Well, they were probably waiting for somebody to go off like happened in that New York City Board of Education meeting that just went viral somebody became an in general. You saw that one that was. I'll I'll send the link to it. It's something else I you know what I think. In in Joe Biden probably I think he needs to get a new background presume somebody else's basement other than where he? Could he go to your basement and and do a video there? Oh. I'm happy to send him an image but right now we're quarantined at home so nobody can visit. Just sending the image that okay send him the image. It's not a bad thing. Kristoff trap authentic storytelling dot net. You've got another website you WANNA promote as well. Yeah. If you. If you're thinking about traveling neck dear, travel reviews that online check it out the latest travel tips on how to do that and they gain. Yeah. Still trying to figure out if we're going to be able to go to Europe this fall, we may just end up doing a tour of national parks instead. So. Distance Way Hey kristof. Thanks for joining me. You're on the W.. Mt Morning Show have a magnificent Monday. Sir? Thank you to sixty degrees now seven, twenty, eight on newsradio.

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