29 Burst results for "Kristof"

"kristof" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

The Nicole Sandler Show

01:47 min | Last month

"kristof" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

"Too. Often we've in the country we thought of jobs as an income stream and there is now so much evidence that they are beyond that a source of identity, a source of purpose and meaning. To in many cases, social life to in many cases absolutely absolutely and they knit people into a community on and you know now you know then eleven million people lost their jobs since since February eleven million. and. We can't even come up with a you know a bipartisan. Rescue. To support them since the end of July. European countries did a very good job in trying to en- basically paying employers to keep people on the job, and that meant that unemployment didn't go sky high and people didn't self. Medicaid and of course, in countries outside the US they when they even if they do lose their job, they don't lose their health insurance as they do in the US in the US you know a million people because they lost their jobs also lost their health insurance in the middle of a plague and the. Democrats floated the idea of opening having an open enrollment period for the affordable care act for all those people who lost their health coverage with their jobs and the trump administration said no and not only that they're still going to court on November eleven to the Supreme Court to overturn what's left of it to take it away from the rest of us. Again, I mentioned to you I'm a lung cancer survivor. Hello I'm self employed. I Work Outta, my home studio I do this radio show. Without the affordable care act I'm I don't have insurance I. Don't have health insurance I'm wondering Nick Kristof with.

US self employed Nick Kristof Supreme Court cancer Medicaid
"kristof" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

The Nicole Sandler Show

07:31 min | Last month

"kristof" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

"It's the Nicole Sandler show. And we made to a Friday barely, but we made it. It looks like for whatever reason Oh, no youtube is not starting and I don't know why I'm having all kinds of. Tech problems. So what else is new? Oh my goodness. We just got back on Youtube and it looks like. It's not gonNA to let us stream their today. So you may just may have to come over to facebook I. Honestly don't know if we're on periscope twitch. Because I'm trying something new and it seems to to not be working so. I don't know. All I can say is. Come try to find US somewhere. It looks like nothing is going on except facebook live. So we are on facebook today in terms of video everything else seems to be kind of Fu bar. I'll try to I'll try to fix it but I'll put a note in the Youtube Chat. Room. But you know we're live at five. To Pacific so I'm at the mercy of the clock. Best laid plans. You know I had a stressful day today in that I had a doctor's appointment earlier. Today I had to go see the neurosurgeon to get an MRI on my brain because of a what we believe is a meningioma. Long story but. Yeah, let me just type Youtube not work I'm typing in the Youtube Chat Room You know it's times like this. I could use a producer not working comb to facebook. Sorry All right. So Anyway, I I was kept waiting for an hour and a half and I was already I was ready to leave and then the doctor came in and it turned out I really liked her. you know such as life today is also just a weird day. It's October twenty third. We are eleven days out from election. Day tensions are high. We made it through the last debate last night we'll get into that in a moment but it was. One years ago today. That my mother. died except she wasn't she she wasn't officially died until forty one years ago tomorrow because she suffered what what what happened is she had leukemia. Making a long story very long story short, but she had leukemia and. what kilter apparently wasn't the leukemia she had. Shannon aneurysm and. She went into the hospital I guess on the twenty second I was in school in away college in Tampa and I got a call from my dad who said you know I tried you said Mom's going to the hospital everything's okay don't worry. And then the next day she fell into a coma. They said she was brain dead. We had to wait twenty four hours of where there was no brain activity before. Turning off the life support it was. Horrible and now forty one years later when October, twenty third and twenty fourth come around you better. Believe I feel it and I'm feeling it extra hard this year because there's so much death around us. There's so much That that is is It's just horrible. An now with Cova know everywhere you go I was out at this doctor's appointment this morning and I'm waiting and waiting and waiting and getting more and more stressed as that hour and a half ticked. And somebody came out of the exam room, an older man wearing a mask, but it was down around his mouth and Chin and I said. It really needs to cover your nose I know. Well, if you know then do it I'm sorry this it's no more. We can't screw around anymore it. This is dangerous. People are dying now all these hospitals in the mid West in the. West in the in the in the as Donald Trump calls them red states are all. CATA- catastrophic. The ICU unit or fill to capacity and it's you know. I don't know why people are screwing around and Donald, trump had another event at the White House today in the Oval Office with very few masks and no social distancing. Unbelievable. And yes. I watched the debate last night and I have some observations in some highlights and lowlights to share with you and our guest today. I'm keeping my fingers crossed because I see him doesn't accept my invitation on skype yet, but he's supposed to join us at the bottom of the hour. He being Nicholas Kristof who has a two time Pulitzer Prize winning journalist who has a call them in in a twice a week column in The New York Times and he and his wife last year wrote a book called Tightrope. Let me get the subtitle for you because it's a very important part of it tight rope Americans reaching for hope. So they released the book last year and on Monday, the film adaptation of it debuts on the world channel, which I don't have but also world channel. Dot Org and PBS DOT ORG and it. It's a very personal. but difficult film because it's about this disconnect in America it's about poverty and hopelessness thus tight rope Americans reaching for hope and the income gap and the wealth gap and all the other inequities in our society. And I'll tell you you know and it was not an easy film to watch but it's something we should all watch because you notice during this campaign candidates talk about and this is not unique to this campaign. It's every presidential campaign and I've noticed this for A. Number of cycles. Going back they talk about the middle class. They never talk about the people living in poverty and I believe and I don't have facts to back it up I. Don't have statistics. So I'm just saying, I, believe that those living in poverty. Make up the fastest growing segment of our population. Sadly, and with the effects of this pandemic, it's only gonNA get worse. So we'll talk to Nick Christoph about all that but. I WANNA start today with a song that I found online this morning and I know that I'm risking another copyright strike. I know. But I think this is worth it. I really do and please you know the the thing is it's it's black eyed peas with Jennifer Hudson. A video produced by will I am, WHO's The guy? Who did the big? You know the Obama Song? Twelve years ago. Yes. We can remember how powerful that was. Well, this is one of those. And the black eyed peas tweeted out this morning and said Oh my God. This is just brilliant. Everyone needs to watch this and the black eyed peas.

Youtube facebook leukemia Donald Trump Nicole Sandler US Tampa Obama Nicholas Kristof Pulitzer Prize producer PBS Jennifer Hudson coma CATA Chin skype America
Blazers' Lillard out for Game 5 with a sprained right knee

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:07 sec | 3 months ago

Blazers' Lillard out for Game 5 with a sprained right knee

"Damian Lillard when they meet the Lakers tomorrow. Lillard has been ruled out for Game five due to a sprained right knee. The Jazz tried to finish off the Nuggets tonight, up three games to one. And the other game features the Clippers and Mavericks even a two with former Nick Kristof's Porzingis out for a second straight game due to a sore knee. WN BA the Liberty take on the Chicago

Damian Lillard Nick Kristof Lakers Clippers Nuggets Mavericks Chicago
"kristof" Discussed on Pwned: The Information Security Podcast

Pwned: The Information Security Podcast

03:44 min | 4 months ago

"kristof" Discussed on Pwned: The Information Security Podcast

"Now kind of hide. Your security postures not really something you can do anymore Yay under. Management as we all know is huge and so everyone starting to take a harder look at their vendors and getting confidence in them is is something that's really tough to do. On his kind of a big ass and I think just in general. I would imagine just having. I mean if you're dealing with any sort of. Information that you don't WanNa lose you know or or you know have released. You need something to measure your general security against anyway so as I so even just sort of say like. Tool to just sort of figure out where you stand, a good I mean is that does that make sense us I so as a tool for that purpose as well, it can certainly work for that and one of the benefits in that regard, or if you don't work. In a highly regulated industry for instance so like. Maybe you don't have credit card data or you don't have A. Pi or or tons of Pi and you're looking for something to do a security baseline. Is certainly works for that and actually I highly recommend it for that, because if you pick something like one of the nist standards, which you know, we all love the the nist eight hundred fifty three control framework with its hundreds and hundreds of controls, but those are written for the federal government right. So they can be adapted for industry. Obviously, we have a client to do that, but it's definitely not as intuitive as something like ice where it's going to be a lot easier to successfully implemented and adapted to to Your Business. What are some pieces of information that they can get to help guys out in who should who should from your team? You know kind of be contacted initially to help with us. You can reach out to me if you need assistance with. I'd say the biggest thing. Is You know any prospects who are looking war, a security framework, assessment or type of Third Party assurance I would ask them if it's driven by a contract or any sort of compliance or regulatory obligation. because. That's really gonNA drive what path we take them down and unless they have an explicit requirement to do Nist, XYZ or PTR HIPPO ISOS, Kinda the one-size-fits-all like everything else should go towards ice. Oh, because it's the most adaptable and then it's also a service where we're going to offer certification for it awesome. I think that's all I've got. Is there anything else you wanted to touch on now? I think that's a good. Start, all right? We'll Christoph thank you for your. Thoughts guidance on this and. Hopefully our folks that are listening in. If you have any questions, can go to you. Yeah, absolutely anytime work.

nist A. Pi Christoph
"kristof" Discussed on Pwned: The Information Security Podcast

Pwned: The Information Security Podcast

02:56 min | 4 months ago

"kristof" Discussed on Pwned: The Information Security Podcast

"All right, what's up, everybody? This is Zach again and today I am joined by Kristof Christoph Hello. And KRISTOF just because not everyone may know who you are what you do. do you WanNa? Give a little bit of background at what you do in new harbour. So I lead our Information Assurance assessments team. And so we do a wide range of. Risk and compliance, and security assessments. So we're you know we're kind of in that vertical with with some of the traditional quote, unquote audit type. Folks but obviously being new harbor. We Really Pride ourselves on. Having more of a security focused on some of those traditional audit type firm so. Yeah, that's that's what we do. And what kind of audits like what? What would be like an example of some of that stuff that you would do? Yeah so you guys may have heard of Eyeso- or nist or Or Hip all of those are really in our wheelhouse so. you know there's a couple of different flavors? Some are things that I would call compliance based, so that would be more of a hippo or API flavor, and so those compliance rigs have a lot of different requirements that our clients have to follow. That's like centers for Medicaid Medicare and then like credit cards stuff right? Yeah, so. Yeah exactly so the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare. CMS has a lot of. Security requirements, and so we do assessments against that and then the Pi Council. Publishes the P. C. Idea essence. Security requirements. It's a lot of fun, cool and today we're talking ice. Oh correct, yes, so ISOS Kinda like the goldilocks of in my opinion of the security framework, so it's kind of in between all the others and It's one that we're really working hard to Expand our service offerings for new Arbor. And what would be like I guess? I've I think we hear a lot from people that they think they need ice. Oh what are sort of like some examples of companies that you know why they would want to investigate that, and maybe even just sort of an overview of what I so actually is are the I obviously has standards for everything. But specifically for the area that you're specialized in. Yeah, so that's a really good point. Zach so when we talk about. eyeso- at New Harbor. We're talking about ice. Oh Twenty, seven, thousand, one, which is the information security management system standard for.

Kristof Christoph New Harbor Zach Medicare Information Assurance Medicaid Eyeso Pi Council
Does closing schools slow the spread of coronavirus? Past outbreaks provide clues

Short Wave

08:22 min | 9 months ago

Does closing schools slow the spread of coronavirus? Past outbreaks provide clues

"Okay let's start this conversation by talking about the number one thing on most kids minds and definitely the number one thing on most parents minds school closings so corey. Why take the kids out of school? Well Emily we've seen in the last few days a kind of tipping point where we went from schools closing. You know here there. On a case by case basis to honestly and just really forty eight hours last week schools starting to close statewide and in most of these places when the decision was made. The didn't actually have that many infections. So you know it. It may have struck people in the moment. Like kind of weird right. Why doing now. Why close if there aren't infections in our media rain so why do that well so I spoke to this guy? Nicholas Kristof. He's at Yale and actually does a lot of really interesting work studying. How ideas spread among other things And they happen to spread kind of like diseases and so when corona virus hit the scene given the interest in this topic and given the fact that you know I'm a physician also specialized in public health and Epidemiology. It was not a stretch for me to become interested in this topic. And so Chris Dacas said. Look yes you you can close the school when there's a case and probably everyone would agree that that is a sensible thing to do and it helps so there's a study. He pointed me to of H One n One. A Flu. Epidemic was about what years ago? Yeah so the study is of Japan's reaction and showed that closing the schools when there's a case made a difference and found that reactive school closures reduce the rate of infections in the community by nearly thirty percent. That is no small number percents so that makes a lot of sense to me but like you said schools in the. Us are closing all over the place even when there aren't a lot of infections. Yeah and I think part of that is because the science around covert nineteen at least in how it spreads is still kind of unsettled. You know. We're not totally clear on how kids can spread it We don't know if say a child you know doesn't seem sick. But is still carrying the corona virus. How will that child impact the people that here she comes into contact with right right like their parents or caretakers exactly so honestly out of an abundance of caution school closures? They limit contact. They limit the possibility of kids getting sick. And of passing along Corona virus to the people they love and Corey. You have an example from history of a time when school cancellations really helped out during a viral outbreak. What was that yeah? This was an enormous flu epidemic back in nineteen eighteen and there's actually a really good research on how U. S. cities responded including What happened to the city's the closed their schools early versus those that didn't so Nicholas Kristof ca says when you look at this research. The results really speak for themselves. If you compare a you know a Saint Louis which closed the schools in advance and kept them closed for longer. Their death rate was three hundred. Fifty eight people per one hundred thousand population but Pittsburgh which waited 'til later didn't keep the schools closed as much. Their death rate was almost three times as high eight hundred. Seven people dying per one hundred thousand population. Wow that is a lot of people. Yeah it's a lot of people And what about? How will that affect families in vulnerable populations? How how will that affect them? I imagined that all this comes with a cost. Oh absolutely and I think this is something. A lot of people aren't thinking about that. You know while keeping schools open has a public health cost so does closing them especially for vulnerable low income families. You know a lot of people don't realize that twenty million kids in this country more than twenty million depend on schools for free breakfast free lunch in some cases free dinner Many of them get medical care at school not to mention the fact that there are lots of parents out there who are working. You know low wage hourly jobs. They can't take off work. They can't work from home. So what happens with these kids? I spoke with Sonia. Santa Liza's she's the CEO of Baltimore City Public Schools which are now closed. And she really summed it up. Well for me are a large number of our students the safest place for them to be actually in school so if you think about this from her point of view in. Baltimore you know. The State of Maryland has closed schools for two weeks. That's a long time for some kids to be home alone. to be coming to distribution centres to pick up what are called. Grab and go meals. But honestly emily really really complicatedness is the fact that CDC released new guidance at the end of last week that said these short-term closures like two to four weeks. They're not even long enough to actually slow the spread of this disease. They might need to go much longer and I know there are a lot of school leaders around the country who are looking at guidance and scratching their heads. Like how much longer we talking about here? Well I mean the governor of Ohio Mike DeWine said on CNN. The Sunday you know. He's closed schools there for three weeks but he said it's perfectly imaginable that this is going to go on a lot longer and it would not surprise me at all if schools did not open again this year. Wow Mollica I want to bring you in on this. Because you've been looking at the ways this can really affect families. Yeah if schools are closed it can definitely put a lot of pressure on families I spoke to Joy Osowski. She's a clinical and developmental psychologist at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center. And here's what she said. One of the issues. Is You know a lot of parents need to work. And they cannot work remotely and even if they can work remotely. There are a lot of different kinds of things that need to be done for children. If they're not in school yet puts also much more pressure on parents because there isn't the routine of school so there are more meals at home. There's more care for children needed during the day and so they really have to establish what we would call a new normal anew routine and that way so how can parents create that routine and deal with that well You know she had a lot of different ideas but the one that struck me was that Older children can take some responsibility. I myself am the oldest of five siblings and I helped with my siblings growing up. She says that they could basically watch younger kids and help around the house doing chores and that kind of thing And she says it actually is helpful for the older children and can give them a sense of responsibility a sense that they're like actually contributing to the family in a time of crisis And I asked a soft ski weather. Older kids really do step up to the plate and she says that actually she's found after disasters like Hurricane Katrina for example. Older kids have been really helpful. They're helping younger kids out with schoolwork So parents can lean on them. This older kids do your part of the job description. When you're born you got a job description and it's look after sampling. Yeah and what about talking about the virus itself because I know a lot of families are really scared and there's a lot of anxiety around it and maybe they're not sure what to say? I mean a softy said is that parents need to be informed check the CDC website listen to NPR. And there's really really good news for families on the one end. Kids don't really seem to get very sick and emily. I JUST WANNA add a couple of things to from the episode. I just recorded with my colleague on your comments on parenting and current virus over life kit. When you're talking with kids make sure you're not making promises you can't keep so. Don't tell them. Oh no you won't get it because you don't know that and I always liked to channel Mister Rogers whenever I can which is look for the helpers trust in the helpers know that the helpers are out there our country is full of doctors and experts and professionals who are there to help take care of us when we need them and that will be a comfort to kids. This is the time for the helpers for

Emily Nicholas Kristof Corey FLU CDC Baltimore City Public Schools Corona Mister Rogers Epidemic Pittsburgh Baltimore Chris Dacas Japan Yale Maryland Louisiana State University Hea Saint Louis Ohio
"kristof" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

Real Time with Bill Maher

03:08 min | 9 months ago

"kristof" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

"Democrats forty-seven Fifty Nationally. He beats him in Pennsylvania by four. Look all these pundits so I hear say things like well. Bernie will lose forty-five states shut up. I don't know what the fuck talking about. Have you never know? We never know the same people who said trump wouldn't even met. You don't know what we don't know is Bernie needs a revolution Shaw. He needs people who've never voted before. Now they're not showing up in those numbers in the primary but we don't know but now since trump I think is not going to leave anyway whereas well run Bernie not. He's not and by the way when the virus get mad. He's going to declare martial law. What's God that could happen? Would Act totally. Have your point about people being dismissive about Bernie? I even tell people on on my side on the right this do we forget two thousand sixteen. You had this fractured establishment field on the right in Marco. Rubio Ted Cruz. Amer kept saying can't be Donald Trump can't donald trump and then all of a sudden it was donald trump the establishment by the way did kind of reject him for a long time up to the convention and now obviously we went from there. There are parallels with Bernie Sanders rise now and Donald Trump's rise reminds you that Republicans are saying Oh we really want to defend Bernie Sanders against this democratic establishment. And the day. After he's nominated. He is a horrible socialist who will endanger the country. They either believe one thing or the other. But I don't know if you're trying to progress. Why don't you vote for this? Something called the Damn I lost it now. the duty to report act. This is Require candidates for federal office and their campaigns to report any context with foreign governments to the FBI seems simple enough even seventy five percent of Republicans are for it Mitch. Mcconnell won't let it come to the floor why not duty to report ex campaign. Campaigns have contact with foreign governments. I mean Ford officials all the time that conversations that constantly well first of all join just says were you got to report it to the FBI. Why fight that will again. It's because there's all these contacts and we'll be a discussion about whether or not. It's an various. Campaigns talked to foreigners or the fact that trump still doesn't really admit that Russia has medaled in our elections and that they're still meddling in Russian collusion to just clarify one. First of all yes talk. Born many of what's wrong with saying they should were point that I don't see what that doesn't answer the problem. Well that doesn't talk to foreign sure but tell the FBI especially if that foreigners offering you help in your electric will mean Mitch. Mcconnell would also say that just passing this it's all meant to be from Democrat to slap in the face of trump. It's ridiculous of course anybody who is a Patriot would say hold on a second. If you're trying to get me to do something illegal election and you're a foreigner we will not do so why didn't trump or poured it never muller for. Never Mother report did happen but he shit the bed muller did a horrible job someday liberals will understand that he did a horrible.

Bernie Sanders Donald Trump FBI Mcconnell Democrats Mitch Rubio Ted Cruz Pennsylvania muller Marco Amer Ford Russia
"kristof" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

Real Time with Bill Maher

02:25 min | 9 months ago

"kristof" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

"We gotta stop him. Wait wait I thought you said whoever the nominee class and there's all these people that are still kind of hoping hillary she got podcast coming out that she says it is true that some parts of the democratic establishment don't like Bernie Sanders and. He makes him they. He makes them very uncomfortable. If that's true and I think it's okay that the Democratic Party is uncomfortable right now. We have a transformation that we need to do within our party. We have two wings right and you need both wings to fly. You need the progressive in the moderates. I always say you need all shades of blue and so it is clear it is clear that is Democrats for the past ten years. We've been talking about this. Rising American electorate that. It's younger that it's going to be more diverse than women are going to be more progressive. Guess what they're here and guess what they want Bernie Sanders were this. This is the first line in my book. Bless you for that. Many shades of blue is will progressives moderates feud while America Burns. And if you take the earlier part of the conversation do they really want to say that these differences between Medicare for all or a public option when they all want to cover all Americans? They get decent healthcare. Are Those so important that you're going to have a debate like that in the country sort of turns around and reelect this president. Who for all the reasons you said in the first part of the show presents a real crisis? Oh and I think there's a point related to that and I bet this will resonate in Nebraska that right now politics so polarized that there are an awful lot of Democrats. Uc every trump voter in two thousand sixteen as a racist and a Bigot. And that is not clarifying and not helpful winning those voters. This is a true by one of the reasons why they were Democrat candidates that actually started resonating early some with some Republicans people have on the right of a fondness for Tulsi Gabbard there like Andrew. Young like people that are at least willing to go. Some of the Democrats are such wins. You can't even get them to go on Fox News. President of the United States is the latest sexiest poll has Bernie losing to trump but bet closer than all the other. Democrats forty-seven Fifty Nationally. He beats him in Pennsylvania by four. Look all these pundits so I hear say things like well. Bernie will lose forty-five states shut up. I don't know what the fuck talking about. Have you never know? We never know the same people who said trump wouldn't even met. You don't know what we don't.

Bernie Sanders Democrats president Democratic Party trump hillary Tulsi Gabbard Fox News Nebraska America Burns Medicare United States Pennsylvania Andrew
"kristof" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

Real Time with Bill Maher

01:52 min | 9 months ago

"kristof" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

"The truth about how often he plays golf or his crowd size when the pictures are right there. How can you trust what he says about this? And you need trust in the White House but the other is you wanted administration. That actually believes that sometimes experts are to be called. Ss halvard problem and Bill Cohen. The Bill Cohen. The former Republican senator and secretary defense once said government is the enemy until you need a friend and experts are nasty elitist until you need. Somebody knows what they're talking about. Help you solve problem in this administration. I show you like excellent a clip. This is John Kennedy. He is not that John Kennedy. Here's the Republican senator from Louisiana. He's a Republican and he's been a big defender of Donald Trump here. He is talking to are acting head of Homeland Security. I named now the guy's name because these temps come through the permanently surprised. It wasn't a bunk as wedding planner. Quite frankly but this is a Republican Senator. Talking to this man. Watch this about the virus jobs to keep us safe. And you can't tell us how many your models are anticipating. No senator again I I would defer to the health and human services for that so check on that we will as they had a bone land security without is it transmitted a variety of different ways center again. Human-to-human is what we've obviously you're asking me a number of medical questions asked question. Hhs Secretary of Homeland Security. And you're supposed to keep the safe..

senator John Kennedy Bill Cohen Donald Trump Hhs golf White House secretary acting head Louisiana
"kristof" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

Real Time with Bill Maher

03:17 min | 9 months ago

"kristof" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

"Leslie seems like a perfect storm for him. Not well you know. The disease is definitely people don't have as as successful. They don't have successful outcomes In people that are older or who have co Morbidity Bernie. Don't touch him. Well your statue. Touch Bernie Bernie is doing what everybody else should be doing right now. Which is washing your hands. But I into the crowd and touch a million people thinking survive this or she said life will chain and that's yes and that's okay and it is yeah right yeah but ultimately I would think my theory you have to be good about how you take care of yourself your best line of defense. Is it not your own immune system? Germs pathogens are ubiquitous. You can't become Howard. Hughes locked in an airtight room pissing into jars. That's the only other alternative I mean people put hand sanitizer all over their hands all day. I've had more than one. Very smart doctor told me that destroys. The skin makes it more permeable. You have to have a good immune system. Stop eating sugar. Wouldn't that be a great start? There are so many things that you can be doing in sugar can cause inflammation like so many other things. The worst thing for your immune system is sugar. There's so many things that are bad for your sugar. Be Number One. Sugar is in the in on the list of the top things that you should probably decrease but you know they're they're you know. Smoking is also bad and people should exercise more than they should eat well in run role and I think that that's really important and so I agree with you being healthy and doing everything you can to make a healthy including me. Writing less sugar would be a good thing to do. No sugar but Finally whatever it is they always end. Don't they do? Maybe whatever it is. We'll it runs. Its course and then it ends. Well I mean most of these viruses will disappear. Although there are some instances where they become endemic. Thank you Dr. I am bowing into you. Pretended always come on. All right is the New York Times bestselling author of the New Book Code Red. How how? Progressives and moderates unite to save our country E. J. Dion great to see you back there all right. Here's the Chairman Nebraska Democratic Party and author of harvest the vote how Democrats can win again in rural America. Jane Club Jane how you doing and he is a former CIA officer and is now the nationally syndicated host of the buck sexton show buck sexton back with running. So.

Bernie Bernie Leslie officer buck sexton New York Times Democratic Party E. J. Dion Hughes Howard CIA America Chairman Nebraska
"kristof" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

08:42 min | 10 months ago

"kristof" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"The status quo is what led us down. There is definitely that attitude. I mean for instance. They'll say you say. President trump is corrupt. I mean he's actually monetize the president. Oh they all do that. They do feel that but then when it is such a large problem then they start to focus on issues that they care very much about so for instance will one person. I like my guns. I don't want I don't want anybody who really wants to take away my guns and another one said know. I don't like immigrants and so that's really contain issue that they can deal with and it's it's the issue they'll vote on and the other woman who it's very hard to explain. But she is a pastor. She's really a very down to Earth. Person upstanding person in her community but she said. I vote for trump because I think he represents family values because he he he. He's up on. Tv's got his beautiful family there. And so I think that you know He. Projects varies accessible. What projecting this image. And it's something that really strikes and he's been embraced around issues like judges abortion by evangelical community. Which is his strongest core of support? I said that you wrote also a hopeful book. Talk about the things that gave you. Hope one is that we know what works partly because these issues are ones that Germany dealt with Canada dealt with life expectancy is not falling in those countries. Portugal decriminalized drug possession including heroin cocaine and mounted a public health effort. Then you write a lot about this. About how pervasive. The drug problem is and how drug diversion programs that decriminalize drugs and use the resources to move. People into treatment programs have been very affect so much more successful. You know we get. We still deal with drugs. Basically a law enforcement toolbox when it is cheaper and infinitely more humane and successful to deal with with with the public health and the treatment toolbox. And so we've seen programs that work and we we write about in Tulsa Oklahoma a incredibly successful program that deals with women who had addictions for fifteen years on average facing prison. Instead they go into a program that provides counselling provides treatment and gives them jobs. And we've also seen that we can address some social problems when we put our mind to it. The Obama Administration in Two Thousand Ten address veteran homelessness. And this was. The country was embarrassed that there were so many veterans on the street and we put our minds to it. It became a priority and over six years veteran homelessness was reduced by have if we were similarly embarrassed by child homelessness then we could reduce child homelessness by half as well. You know. This is the age of innovation in these in these areas. I mean it's incredible. How much research has done all universities across the country trying to prove what works? And what doesn't work in terms of dressing these social problems so we? We have a plethora of examples of randomized control trials that I could show what works what doesn't work. We are funding some of them. But they're all done on sort of piecemeal basis would really need is a systematic approach. That allows you need government intervention. You just can't you know cure all of society's ills with these patchwork of philanthropic endeavors. We need much more systemic. Let's return to economics for a second. We've got historic levels of inequality you write about this. I think you wrote that. The annual bonus pool for Wall Street exceeded this popular around town exceeded the income of minimum wage. Workers in this country collectively. That's a stark statistic. Can you solve these problems without solving that problem? I Say I think you definitely can solve these problems. And it doesn't necessarily mean taking away from other people that means lifting the bottom half we need to focus on addressing the lack of opportunity and the lack of investment in human capital at the level of the fifty percent of people at the lower income level. Those people we need to lift them up. But but I mean doesn't it also require those people who've done very very well to recognize their responsibility to make those investments. And how do you we are so silo? D- I mean the the thing about this book and why so recommend everyone read? It is that there is a crisis in this country that we can't see from the apartment towers of in Chicago and San Francisco and New York a mile or two from here. We see all of these problems that you're writing about in communities in Chicago and yet they seem distant. If you live downtown how we create a national sense of interconnectedness and a national conversation about these to the point where it becomes politically tenable to do big things. I mean that's terrific and I really do think a lot of it has to do with improving. Empathy is really recognizing that we sort of lost empathy because because we live in bubbles and we don't see people outside of the bubble was very interesting is that you know people in the top twenty percent. They contribute in terms of charity less as a percentage of income than people at the bottom twenty percent. And you're thinking how could all these people who are so poor? How can they contribute? Moore's percentage of their income and it's partly because they live in neighborhoods where they see need and people who and the top twenty percent. They don't see the need so much and so when people in poor neighborhoods confront the need they give they respond and I think that if we saw that also with the top twenty percent if they saw the need they would also respond. Nick as I said you've written about some extraordinarily difficult challenges all over the world that people are facing. You've shown a light on these kinds of challenges and yet often you write that. You're optimistic in fact you wrote about what's happened around the world in your urine column. Are you optimistic right now? Yeah I and don't feel pressured I know I am. I mean for a couple of reasons one is that I think the. Us really took some fundamental missteps fifty years and that involved cutting taxes and cutting investments in human capital in safety nets as they look at the that trajectory. I wonder if Kansas under Sam Brownback mark kind of the governor who cut taxes dramatically and was ultimately ultimately. Kansas voters rebelled. And because there are schools were doing too poorly and when Kansas voters rebel and want to raise taxes that strikes me as a really interesting moment. Likewise you have red states like Idaho Utah that are expanding Medicaid so. I wonder if there isn't something of a of a mental switch. You Begin to see as a lot of white suffer from drug addiction. A change in the frame of reference is a sad commentary which is normal hypocrisy and double stand but but maybe a step toward a better policy so as Kansas goes so goes the nation. Let's hope I mean. Let's let's hope that that's the case and you do see that. People are reaching four some big ideas and new approaches as an Oregon and Oregon. We were always raise on this and a pioneer mythology. Are these Perot. Eric Ancestors you cross the country and they would never relied on benefit plan. Well it of course the whole reason that the pioneers went to the Willamette valley was because of benefit plan every benefit plan. It was the homesteads at the end. My area was transformed by these big ideas for homesteads rural electrification. Gi Bill of rights. And that is what I think can indeed again transform the opportunities for the kids on the number six bus well Nick Kristof and Sheryl Wudunn thank you so much for shining a light on.

Kansas Nick Kristof president Oregon trump Chicago Tulsa Obama Administration drug possession Portugal Willamette valley Germany Oklahoma Perot Eric Ancestors Sam Brownback Sheryl Wudunn Moore
"kristof" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

12:48 min | 10 months ago

"kristof" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"Pulitzer Prize for Journalism in Nineteen Ninety for their coverage of the Cinnamon Square protests as China correspondent. For The New York Times Nick Kristof is of course the longtime columnist for the New York. Times he won a Pulitzer Prize for his commentary. There too but now they've turned their attention. Closer to home with a book called tight rope Americans reaching for hope and it's a really personal examination of what's happened to the middle class. In many of the small towns of America including the one in which Kristof grew kristof and Wudunn who are married came to the Institute of Politics a few weeks ago for a live recording of the X. Files to discuss their journey this book and the State of our nation Nick Kristof and Sheryl done welcome to the Institute of politics in keeping with the time. I'm going to hand my questions to the chief justice and he will ask them for you know really in this very very powerful book tight rope. You're talking about the journey of Americans in small towns and rural areas and inner cities and forgotten places all over this country. But I wanNA talk about your Stories Nick. First of all let me start with you like myself. You're the son of an immigrant from Eastern Europe. Who had his own Harrowing Journey to get here? Want you share a little fat? Yeah my my dad's family. They were Armenians who were living. It was actually kind of funny. My my dad would describe him. If you ask his origin he would say who was from Romania. His sister was hey she was Armenian and his brother would say Polish and my dad's spoke to his brother when he would call and Polish into his sister when she would call in Romanian mixed up family. Flag would change periodically overhead and then in nineteen forty the area which was at that time. Romania were seized by the Soviet Union. Family was meanwhile a busy spying for the free. Polish government part of network sending information back to London and so the family ended up. Being various people ended up getting executed by either the Nazis or the Soviets. My Dad was in prison for He he fled was in a concentration camp in Yugoslavia for a while and eventually made his way to France and decided that France was not a place that had a future for a Slavic immigrant and began to dream about coming to the US and eventually made it not speaking his name when he came over here was Vladislav Christoph bits of it all right okay. Three attempted that and he showed his name to create. Yeah he arrived and he would say his name. Whiskas DZAFO VEG. And you know people tried to spell it and that was pretty helpless shortened it to Kristof. I thought it was because he had the foresight to know that Kristof would look better in a bio byline. We'll his first purchase on arriving in the US to teach himself. English was a Sunday New York Times. There's something poetic about there is there. Is He ultimately became an academic? That's right he and your mother were both academics. That's right so my dad arrived in Oregon not speaking English and worked at a logging camp for a year or to earn a little bit of money to learn English and then went to Reed College and studied political science then applied to University of Chicago. Political Science Department and was initially told it was not accepted the HD program. His professor appealed and said this is a brilliant get and so they took him and my mom was studying here at the International House. One more marriage produced excellent and they ended up at Portland State and then they were both at Portland State. My mom teaching art history. My Dad Teaching Political Science you ended up in Yam Hill Oregon. The way you described in this book and I want to get into the details of the book untold bit later. Because we've got some other business do Cheryl about your story and how we got to this place but it didn't sound like a haven for academics. We were real. We were way beyond the normal commuting range so most people in Portland. You know lived in Portland or nearby but my parents really wanted to have a farm and so we had this farm and Yom Hill and they were pretty much the only people commuted to Portland and so it was I mean I obviously had this connection to that larger world but I was deeply embedded in the community. I was very active in future farmers of America and the school was a you know kind of very typical farm town school. You knew you want to be a journalist way back then why so when I was when I turned sixteen and got a driver's license. I the local county newspaper hired me to write and it was. I just couldn't believe that I was getting paid to go. Talk to interesting people and write stories about it. It's not the usual teenage about what you do when you get your first drivers. Go ahead but it was but it was a great way when you're sixteen. That turned out to be a great way to impress. Sixteen year old girls and it. It really was a I love. I love the writing. I love the just aesthetic pleasure from writing. I like being around interesting people and the idea of being paid for it was truly incredibly cool. I was later in danger coming law professor but I escaped that fate fortune. Yeah good for you good for you. As journalists I applaud your Judgment Cheryl. Your family had a classic immigrants story as well only one generation earlier. Tell us about that. We're actually trying to prove are working class credentials. I would say that I actually even come from the peasantry. China my grandparents were from tiny little villages In Very Agricultural Guandong province both of them escaped to Macau and then to Joe Johns and the Golden Mountain here in the US One. You say escaped escaped from well. They were playing really poverty. I mean everyone was trying to get to sort of the promised land here in the US and So because it was extremely impoverished there and so they were able to scrape their way to get to to the. Us Let me ask you both You tell these stories and they have this common element which is people who wanted to come to the promised. Land wanted to come to America. We're in this period now where we have a sign on the at the border saying refugees need not apply immigrants discouraged. Do you look at this. Current debate through the prism of your family experiences. Oh of course. Clearly the American dream still exists for the most part for people outside of the US. I think that what we actually write about in tight rope is that for many Americans. The American dream is broken but the allure and the magic of the American dream is still alive and well and the rest of the world which is why so many people want to come here. But what does it mean? If we closed down and say don't apply in today's context. My Dad were never be admitted. I mean people would see him as somebody from potential saboteur potential spy from an enemy part of the Soviet bloc and said we don't need more refugees. I mean I'm struck that when my dad was on this ship. Arriving in New York there was a woman from Boston who was on the deck watching with him and my dad's no English but she said him Welcome young man and then she corrected herself and said welcome young American and he was just so blown away that here he is. He's never set foot in America. He can't speak English. And this American woman is welcoming him as a already as a young American and that deeply moved him and he spoke about it. And it's kind of the opposite of the attitude that we're seeing your grandparents certainly would have failed the current tests now especially as established by the Supreme Court just in the last few days because they were peasants they were probably not educated for they're worth would be absolutely in fact my grandfather on my father's side had someone else's papers when he came across didn't even own papers but it's remarkable that in my my parents went to college so in that one generation You know they went from rags to really intellectual riches and so. It's still possible to do that. And it's really a shame that we don't think that people who look though they're grovelling INS and starving and can't get anywhere. We don't think that they can actually rise up when they really can. Well speak to me from the standpoint of you're steeped in business and economics speak to me. About what the impact of it is to the country beyond what it means to the people who get to come or don't get to come but what does the infusion of immigrants mean to the country. Well it's a lot of different things on different levels so of course you have technology people who are technology experts. We are homegrown. We are home growing of people who study stem but there are a lot more people in Asia who study stem much more intensely and so we are obviously the technology companies. Want more people who are intellectually. They're gonNA move towards the Canadian model. Where you're GONNA get all those people that's one thing but still there's a restriction on that but in Japan we actually when we were there because Japan also very fearful of immigrants and they started letting people in partly because they had to do the jobs that no other Japanese wanted to do The the three Ds Dangerous Dirty and disgusting and here. We have a similar phenomenon because what are the jobs that a lot of the immigrants are taking their jobs that Americans really don't want to do so in Oregon? We see that. There are huge numbers of immigrants who are incredibly productive doing jobs and actually we have an experiment on her own farm farm. There you you family farm. My mom is transformed the farm and purposed it for weather uses and we still. We still have been an orchard for a long time a cherry orchard. Now we're actually changing over to making growing grapes and apples and we kind of did an experiment and that we hired middle aged white men who we thought okay. We want to give them jobs. They're struggling so we give them jobs. But you'll also have some immigrants who are on on the farm to working and the contrast is unbelievable. I mean it's and we've had other businessmen tell us that if I'm GONNA pay a local worker an American worker thirty dollars an hour. She takes him twice as long to do anything. And if I pay a Mexican worker fifteen dollars an hour I get so much more productivity out of him it makes me. It makes absolutely no sense for me. Ever hire the local American worker. My business could not survive. The local American worker probably looks at this an entirely different way which is and. I'm hoping they don't listen to your podcast. We're trying to build audience. You guys met as competitors. You went to business school. You got a masters in business from Harvard. You went to Princeton and we're Rhode Scholar. You went to Harvard. Where Rhodes scholar and then you both became journalists. I don't have time to ask you how one goes to get an MBA to become a journalist but nonetheless there we are. You're in Los Angeles for the Wall Street Journal. You were there for the New York Times and you you met..

Nick Kristof US America New York Times Pulitzer Prize New York Oregon Portland professor China Institute of Politics Romania Portland State Eastern Europe Cinnamon Square Soviet Union Harvard
Americans on a Financial 'Tightrope'

The Book Review

07:37 min | 11 months ago

Americans on a Financial 'Tightrope'

"On January fourteenth in the first of a year long series of Book Review Live Events. My colleague Jennifer Celaya the critic here at the New York Times interviewed Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl Wudunn about their new book tightrope. The following is a little bit of an excerpt from from that event and that conversation. I wanted to start off by talking about the genesis of this book project. which you know is it's really interesting for a variety of reasons but one of the things that struck me was that this is your fifth book together and your other books have taken you across the world you've looked at AH poverty initiatives Kenya you've looked at education for girls in China? And you know this is something. That's much closer to home home. I mean literally is home for you neck. So can you tell us a bit about how you decided to write about Yam hill well. It's partly exactly that we were traveling around the world covering humanitarian crises. And then we would go back to my beloved hometown of the Am Hill. Where my mom still lives on the family farm and we saw a humanitarian crisis unfolding there and You know I my old school busses. This is kind of a network of old friends and you know we realized that about a quarter of the kids on that bus had passed passed away from consequences of Drugs Alcohol Suicide Ruckus accidents and and and related pathologies. And this was. This wasn't just one towns problem. This was a nation's problem and that there is something of a great social depression Russian happening across the country even in the Great Depression. Life expectancy didn't fall the way does. Now it's three years in a row in the US and it seemed to us is that this wasn't getting adequate attention that we could write about it and to some degree. Use My this town that I care very very deeply about as a narrative thread to tell that story nick and channel I I want to talk about the themes in this book on the subject took the spokane the issues and the questions that it raises because those are really important. The really urgent and I think it's something that everybody needs to think about and confront but I it did want to have a bit of a process question because I think there's a number of people I know maybe myself included. Who the idea of writing a book with one Spouse House seems maybe complicated and so this is your fifth book together and I just wanted to know a little bit about how that works the division vision of Labor? What happens when you disagree about something was so I write the subjects and he writes the verbs? We each right half a book but the Nice thing is that you only have to write half a book somehow magically appears to be a whole book but we we are we do have very similar views have a slightly more sort of economic business taken. He is slightly more sort of political socio economic. Take so it's actually very complimentary and we do discuss things a lot We you know the treatment of certain topics we really do discuss. We each right sections We don't necessarily know what's going to be a full chapter in the very beginning and then we mix and match and then our editor speaks up and then this chapter the two goes to chapters sixteen and sixteen goes to chapter four. And you know. There's a lot of mixing and matching and moving around when editing. Of course the voice of the book is very much in a unified voice. I mean do you end up going over each other's chapters just to make sure that we coast constantly totally editor I mean and that's because we were. I'm I'm a former report but we're both sort of journalistic experience and so we're just used to being edited fair. That's we're still married so one of the things that I noticed in the book from the from the get goes that you start off with some some really arresting analogies so you make mention of Dante's inferno you call the situation in America Today Today Twentieth Century futile them. I think you know and I think for a number of Americans. Those are really striking. Maybe startling analogies and I was wondering during what did you mean when you decided to use those those words so we talked a lot about that because they are very striking images and we used to to think that when we were traveling around the world visiting some of the places both in China and other other parts of the developing world that the poverty and the pain and the suffering that we saw their overseas was of a dimension that was just far greater than anything that one could see here here in America and then when we started learning more about what was going on in our own backyard. We started learning a lot more about how the pain and suffering that people were. Were feeling here and it really is about the human condition and it's about just the Catharsis sometimes but also the intense searing depression that that people feel and so it really is very comparable it was it was surprising surprising to us and shocking to us. And if you look back at what is happening in many towns across America. It isn't inferno for these people and for these families. I mean we were really searching for metaphors to Kinda grab people by the Lapel and high offered the metaphor. I'm going to go but great great social depression you know. At least in the Great Depression there was an enormous effort through government policy to address it and mitigated and it feels as if now there is this horrendous suffering out there and there isn't a similar government effort to address it and indeed that that suffering isn't all that even noticed by those who were doing better at in the first class deck. There's a party going on. And meanwhile the ship of state is kind of capsizing in ways that obviously affect those below decks but it ultimately affect our whole country and we were searching for ways to convey that urgency. And that's what we hope. Tight rope will will do to try to broaden the conversation from just trump's tweets of the day to this larger convulsion that the country is enduring part of the country is just feeling something far worse than the Great Depression because what is driving that decline in life expectancy is depths of despair. It's basically the debts let's That had been well documented by Angus Deaton and Anne case Very elegantly in their research. That shows that These debts are basically three of three types. Alcohol related deaths deaths from overdose related to drugs and suicides. We're at the highest rate of suicides in this in in this country since World War Two. These are stunning statistics. And somehow or other they're not yet rising to the surface

America China Editor Kenya Jennifer Celaya New York Times Nicholas Kristof United States Yam Hill Sheryl Wudunn Am Hill Angus Deaton Spokane Nick Dante Anne
Anna of Untamed Borders Teaches Locals to Ski in Afghanistan

Counting Countries

04:14 min | 1 year ago

Anna of Untamed Borders Teaches Locals to Ski in Afghanistan

"Have a brief conversation with Anna. She has a unique job besides is being a tour guide for untamed borders. She's a ski coach in Bamiyan Afghanistan teaching locals how to Ski. Untamed border specializes alizes and bringing travelers to challenging. Locales like Afghanistan Samaya in Iraq check out their agendas on their website. And right now now. Here's my conversation with Anna. He welcome to accounting countries. Please take a moment introduce yourself. Hi My name is on Savannah where I live on a fire I like to travel abroad and in life free time I like the Pumpkins pumpkins interesting. Anything to do with Halloween. Not really I just like the Pumpkin CDO traditions living. Yeah Okay so besides travel. I understand you are really passionate about skiing. And you've worked as a ski teacher for several seasons plus in Switzerland. I know you've also met some interesting people in Switzerland when you were a ski coach. Tell me about three of them fister still. He is a Swiss journalist journalists. Who enabled me to come to spend the first time? And he was the one who started this project a one C up and the the to say remind friends from Dallas and the best years for Benetton suggest in Asia Around who are now. My Co workers. Keep Up Okay and as he cites side note I understand. There is a documentary. Made about the two skiers. What's the name of that documentary? The light shines okay. It's pretty cool. I just saw that the other day so you should check that out and I know Afghanistan. Ghanistan was high on your list to visit for quite a long time and Kristoff. You just mentioned in. Switzerland gave you the opportunity to travel there in February. Three of two thousand sixteen. What brought you there? What did you do when you got to Bamiyan so it was really cool their helicopter and so the big snowcapped mountains and then I stayed there for a month? I worked with the Ski Club Club. And we organized against challenge inge. Okay and just for some further background. Christoph is one of the founders and supporters of the Bamiyan Ski Club and the idea behind the club is. What's the club doing in by me on we are basically Young people from surrounding villages is to spend their free time in winter when they don't have school to learn some new activities into her funding was now and we need to know a little bit about Balmy on. How many meters high is this area? There's a lot of mountains so gunmen lies. One two thousand five hundred meters that's valley and when we go skiing we start in two thousand eight hundred meters high and we go from there We have to say also that there are no lifts so we start down we walk up and then we see them. Some good exercise besides Kristof. Untamed borders is also one of the supporters of the Bamiyan Ski Club and and when you went to Afghanistan in February of two thousand sixteen you also became part of the untamed border steam and you guided several travelers who came to Afghanistan for the ski challenge at that time. Tell me a little bit about working with untamed borders and guiding in travelers. Who are coming to bomb young to participate in the Ski Challenge? I actually got quite a lot of interesting people to ski here And some of them are very well traveled. Some of them are good skiers. It's rarely the whole package. One person But they're always always surprised and amazed by mountains here and I everyone has so far on. I've been here his really enjoyed. There's a

Bamiyan Ski Club SKI Afghanistan Bamiyan Afghanistan Anna Switzerland Ski Club Club Skiing Bamiyan Kristof Fister Asia Christoph Iraq Inge Dallas Ghanistan Kristoff One Two Thousand Five Hundred
Tear Down This Wall: The resistance

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:53 min | 1 year ago

Tear Down This Wall: The resistance

"The I on curtain was not the creation of a mindset or a system which had any time for dissent. The curtain was at its height. Seven thousand in Columbus of wires watchtowers walls fences minefields and sentry posts stretching from the Arctic Tundra Finland to the Black Sea coast of Greece. This old dedicated to preventing captive people's from fleeing somewhere they might speak think and vote freely. Nevertheless there was resistance courageous inventive and surprisingly rarely violent it took foams as different as the imprison nations of Eastern Europe would different in this third episode of the foreign discs series reflecting on the thirtieth anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. We look at Poland where the regime Asia was confronted by a trade union and joined by Pope the country then known as Czechoslovakia where revolution was led by poets playwrights and rockstars and Romania the only one of eastern Europe's liberation struggles of nineteen thousand nine to descend into bloodshed. This is the foreign desk. My impression of the strike in the Lenin shipyard was that this was going to happen as they were going to get way because there was nothing credible calm about the way people are going about the strike. There there was no panic. There was no drinking no rushing around people were just waiting for the government to give in and the government did get enough to series of public negotiation. I mean we knew something something was going on but we still wear not sat in that be able to live to see the end all the system. We knew Tom Unsustainable in the long run but most of our perspective close sustainable for longer than our lives about the thing about people on television television or a heads of the secret believes in the army and they were giving contradictory instructions to people in the field but there was fighting on on the streets. Nobody knew who was on whose side and the sea turns out of course neither there or no sides there was a single side and the churches were along and they had no loyal troops in August. One thousand nine hundred eighty a group of workers at the Lenin shipyards in Gdansk went Own Strike they called their fledgling trade union solidarity and hoisted a Groovy flag based on Poland's national banner with the Solidarity Name emblazoned in red on the White Stripe in cheerful friendly font within a year of its foundation solidarity had ten million members within within a decade. It had the country a few weeks after the Berlin Wall fell solidarity leader Falesa an electrician by trade was elected. President President of Poland Kristof Bobbin. Ski Is the President of Union and Polska a pro European think tank in Wausau. He's also the former Warsaw correspondent Brandin of the Financial Times. He picks up the story in Gdansk. In the summer of nineteen eighteen to strike in the shipyard had two phases one was a phase which which went from about this Thursday to the Saturday afternoon when the shipyard authorities the management gave into the demands and tell people go home that he said we've we've got the money or go home and at that point it was. The younger workers also led by young dissidents. I suppose who went round the ship out saying don't go home. The strike is not over people out there in the restive discuss still on strike. They were driving around in this small electric electric trucks telling the people not to go home and a lot of people go home but enough state from the Saturday afternoon and I arrived on the Saturday Saturday afternoon and I saw young people saving shy making it continue into the Sunday. On the Sunday people started coming back on the Monday morning people came back and strike got underway big strike on underway. So actually I had the impression that it was actually a young people's movement at that moment it was saved by the young people by the shipyard workers wasn't quite solidarity then because it was formed as it were off the strikes extended but my impression of the strike in the Lenin shipyard was that this was gonna happen this they were going to get their way because it was incredible calmness about the way people we're going about the strike. That was no panic. There was no drinking. There was no rushing around people. Were just waiting for the government to give it and the government did give enough to series the public negotiations and is the reason for those public negotiations were a certain number of Social demands pay demands but also the the main demand with for this supplements of independent unions

Lenin Shipyard President Trump Berlin Wall Gdansk Poland Eastern Europe Black Sea Columbus Finland Poland Kristof Bobbin Czechoslovakia Warsaw Greece Tom Unsustainable Romania Financial Times Union SKI Army Falesa
News in Brief 24 May 2019

UN News

03:17 min | 1 year ago

News in Brief 24 May 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations in Afghanistan. Children suffering from the most serious form of malnutrition may die on seven million dollars in funding is found within weeks. Unicef. Said on Friday, you end children's fund spokesperson Kristof billions told journalists in Geneva. The two million children are acutely malnourished and six hundred thousand are in an even worse state. He likened the humanitarian situation in the water and country to one of the worst disasters on earth. I can tell you from experience and I'm not vicious that when you have six hundred thousand children suffering from severe could my nutrition, some of them are in very bad condition. And some of them need to be treated immediately and likely that some of them will die. The I'm just not in a position and the my nutritionist colleagues are not in position to tell you how many reliable evidence based that it's extremely worrying forty years of violence and last year's severe drought have compounded problems in the west and north of the. Country, mr. Bouillon Rak said the problem is particularly acute because UNICEF is the sole provider of treatment for severe acute malnutrition in Afghanistan, providing supplies to health facilities across all thirty four provinces. The Brazilian governments bid to tackle tobacco giants to recover the cost of caring for people who fall in ill from smoking, or exposure to tobacco smoke has been applauded by the UN health agency in a statement, the World, Health Organization or WHO cited the view of the authorities that public health spending triggered by tobacco consumption in Brazil amounted to billions of dollars annually and it warned that these so-called tobacco epidemic who is still one of the biggest public health threats in the world killing more than seven million people year. The WHO comment is in line with the framework convention on tobacco control a global pact signed by one hundred and eighty one countries that helps governments tackle the burden that the product places on people and national health systems, and finally to Bangladesh where water shortages have reached critical levels for one. Hundred forty thousand or hinge refugees living on the country's Teknaf peninsula, u n refugee agency, UNHCR said on Friday that it was expecting to begin delivering water by truck within ten to twelve days and put in new projects that will help the region cope with long dry seasons. Here's spokesperson Andrea Matsch because of the changing weather patterns. In fact, six months of longer dry-season without sufficient rainfall resulting now in, in critical cuts to the to the day supply of water to refugees. We are talking here about twenty liters a day. This is a minimum standard in an emergency. And we re cause of the shortage of water had to go even lower now to fifteen liters a day per person. This is opposed to meet all of people's need for water during the day. The array hinge, make up the majority who fled me on March during a government led security operation against separatists in raccoon state in the summer of two thousand seventeen Troy. Water to them and host communities will cost some sixty thousand dollars a month, according to you, and which is warned that it's humanitarian appeal for more than nine hundred thousand people is only one fifth funded so far this year. Daniel Johnson, UN news.

Unicef Afghanistan United Nations Mr. Bouillon Rak Kristof Geneva UN Teknaf Peninsula Unhcr Andrea Matsch Daniel Johnson Troy Brazil Bangladesh Sixty Thousand Dollars Seven Million Dollars Fifteen Liters Twenty Liters
News in Brief 23 April 2019

UN News

03:40 min | 1 year ago

News in Brief 23 April 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations nearly three weeks since fighting began in the Libyan capital Tripoli, the U N health agency want on Tuesday that large numbers of people are sheltering in medical clinics, while civilians continue to be killed or injured and refugees and migrants remain trapped in detention centers in an update to journalists spokesperson targes Revich from the World Health Organization or WHO said that two hundred sixty four people had died so far in clashes between the UN recognized government of national accord or GNA and the Libyan national army Ellena, including twenty one civilians echoing those fears above our Bella from UNHCR, the UN refugee agency appealed for humanitarian access to thousands of refugees and migrants believe trapped in state run detention centers, south of the capital. Our concern is for some six thousand who still remain in detention inside some of the detention locations. But also the. Major concern is for about three thousand six hundred refugees that are currently trapped in some of the detention center, which are very close where the fighting is taking place now in the past two weeks UNHCR has moved five hundred and forty one vulnerable refugees from the detention centers of are Casablanca Garcia IB Salim and genzer to a safe location in central Tripoli to the DRC now or Democratic Republic of the Congo where the World Health Organization or WTO says it has been forced to suspend some Ebola related activities following the killing of a N epidemiologist in Battambang last Friday, according to the U N health agency, the body of Dr Richard Valerie, Mizuko Kibben, a father of four will be flown back to Cameroon on Wednesday. In addition to Dr Masuku's death to other people were injured in the attack on temple university hospital, but they are recovering WHO spokesperson Tarik Jezora, which said it was not yet clear who was responsible. But that the. Incident had forced at WHO to suspend some activities in potential, although not elsewhere. But cannot really give you the answers on who did this and why they'd be number of incidents whether being directly targeting evola responders or security incidents on something else where we were caught in the middle. But the result is that we do not provide vital services. And then once we get back to community, then we see increasing number of cases because the transmission was ongoing while we were not their latest data from the authorities indicate that the Ebola outbreak has claimed more than eight hundred seventy lives since it was confirmed last August and finally to Sri Lanka where some forty five. Children are now believed to have been killed in the coordinated terrorist suicide bombings across the country on Easter Sunday. According to you and children's fund UNICEF today to more than three hundred and twenty people are believed to have died and around five hundred more have been injured in a statement condemning the outrage. Which targeted churches and hotels. The UN agency said that the young victims were a mixture of both Sri, Lankan and other nationalities. The youngest victim is believed to have been eighteen months old, UNICEF spokesperson Kristof. Billions and said twenty children have been admitted to hospital in Colombo with four of them in intensive care. As a result of the plastic in Columbine, many children have lost one or both parents and countless children have been witnessed to shocking and senseless violence, according to reports, Sri Lankan police have arrested dozens of suspects in connection with the bombings. Daniel Johnson UN news.

United Nations Unhcr World Health Organization Tripoli Ebola Libyan National Army Ellena Unicef Casablanca Garcia Ib Salim Sri Lanka Targes Revich Colombo Dr Masuku Kristof Tarik Jezora Temple University Hospital U N Cameroon Congo Daniel Johnson
News in Brief 19 March 2019

UN News

03:53 min | 1 year ago

News in Brief 19 March 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations the humanitarian emergency caused by tropical cyclone ID in South West Africa is getting bigger by the hour. The UN's will food program or WFP said on Tuesday five days after the storm made landfall in Mozambique. At least at one thousand people are dead, there alone, although Malawi and Zimababwe were also badly hit victims are reportedly trapped by floodwater awaiting rescue you and agency said while across all three countries. Tens of thousands of lost their homes with roads bridges and crops washed away, here's Kristof billions from you and children's fund UNICEF many people are in disparate situations. Several thousand are fighting for their life that the moment sitting on rooftops in trees and other elevated arenas. This includes families, and obviously many children, according to WFP an estimated one point seven million people were in the path of the cyclone in Mozambique. In addition to the nine hundred. Hundred twenty thousand people affected in Malawi and thousands more in Zimbabwe. Eight access is the biggest challenge with WPA stuff on the ground reporting that the flooding resembled inland oceans extending for miles and miles with water above tree level. The agency has airlifted high energy, biscuits, water and blankets to people crammed on rooftops and elevated patches of land outside the port city of Beira when ninety percent of buildings damaged to the Human Rights Council now which has heard that the election of president Felix Chiesa, Katie in the Democratic Republic of the Congo is an extraordinary opportunity for the country to advance civil and political rights speaking to the council Geneva, you an assistant secretary general for human rights. Andrew Gilmour welcomed Mr. Tshisekedi's inaugural speech in January in which he made a clear commitment to respect citizen's rights and end discrimination. The president's recent decree ordering the release of all political prisoners was also to be welcomed, Mr. Gilmore said in an -ticipant of their actual. Will release and the closing of all unofficial detention centers, I measures if fulfilled would represent an exceptionally positive development towards the opening up of democratic space, which has been increasingly restricted in recent years during the electoral process such restrictions what we're obvious in the weeks just before and after the elections, the joint human rights office in the documented killing of at least thirty six civilians in elections related balance most guild by security forces using disproportionate use of force including live ammunition. The assistant secretary general's comments coincided with the publication of reported to DLC violence had rights abuses in two thousand eighteen it found that more than eleven hundred people were killed in conflict related violence almost nine hundred west subjected to sexual violence in war setting including two hundred seventy nine children, staying with the Human Rights Council. The form also heard a warning on Tuesday that people in Mali's central and northern regions are highly vul-. Amid a worsening security situation there. In addition to extremists to use molly's desert regions as a base and terrorized communities and upsets of government and the rule of law has prompted people to use violence to settle their differences. Independent expert L unity in said, delivering his report to the council. Mr. teen welcomed the fact that the presidential election took place in two thousand eighteen despite attacks by extremist groups against election officials, but he noted that there has been little progress in implementing the agreement on peace and conciliation in Mali more than three years after it was signed government. Authorities remaining capable of combating violence in the center and north of the country. The expert also warned noting that ambushes and the use of improvised explosive devices against security forces remain, one of the main threats to the peace process. Daniel Johnson UN news.

Human Rights Council WFP Mozambique Malawi Assistant Secretary Mali President Trump UN United Nations South West Africa Kristof Zimababwe Beira Mr. Tshisekedi Zimbabwe Andrew Gilmour
Kellen Moore Holds Key to Jason Garrett's Future

K and C Masterpiece

09:11 min | 1 year ago

Kellen Moore Holds Key to Jason Garrett's Future

"For a lot of Cowboys fans. Hell will freeze over when Jason Garrett no longer has a job. And at the moment, he does not have an extension segue. He does not have an extension to be the Cowboys coach beyond next season. And there this is a real weird way of of things working today. They made an announcement. You don't get a contract extension. Why would you announce that we're not extending him because he got a call from Mark Cuban? And they said, hey, we're about to make this blockbuster deal. And he goes oh good people won't keep asking me about Jason Garrett. So I'm gonna go ahead and release this. So tell me when the trades going to happen. And I'm going to news dump it, right? Then like, you always see like politicians do this and the Friday evening news downpour when they hope nobody's paying attention. And so they tried to slip it into the Kristof trade, and they're like, oh, by the way or yes. So base. The news early today. I think it was around noon, we got the Kellen more news and the Cowboys relied Kellen Moore will be the offensive coordinator. And he will call the plays for the Dallas Cowboys. And then you're right around later in the day no contract extension for Jason get right now. Here's one of the things, and I wanna talk about Kellyanne more a little bit. And how he's going to help Dak. Maybe give Dak a different perspective on the way. They should go about things deck loves him. Dak said he's a super genius on when it comes to being creative with plays. You called them that this morning was Sean and RJ. I like that. That's a lot of superlative. I I don't know. That's not in that order. But it was one of the gene young genius FINA. Arms is what he threw out there. And that's that's great. I love hearing that from Dak I I am very interested to know how they are are planning to expand on what is already learned what that can do. And what that should be doing in the future. I'm interested to know more about that. And maybe we can talk about that. And a lot of a lot of Cowboys fans are gonna say, Nope. Not gonna work. Nope. No chance now going gonna work killing more stupid. I can't see he's a he's terrible. And then Dax no good there. That's what a lot of Cowboys fans feel and there's nothing that can change their mind until next season. And so there's going to be a lot of bait about it beyond that. Now, one of the reasons I think. He got the position is the Jason Garrett does not have an extension. Jason Garrett is going into his final season. And a lot of times you see a lame duck coach. Yup. And when that happens teams, give up coaches come in his last chance efforts to hey, we're gonna I'm gonna bring in this guy bringing this guy. Why didn't they go out and bring in the greatest football mine to help Garrett in this last possible effort in telling more Jason Jason Garrett. You're right. He's the one do I get told. How smart he is? He's the wonder can when it comes to football. And I think though Jason Garrett has had a lot of say on his coaching staff. Think Jason Garrett is that was one of the things that he was like, I don't want to get caught in this whole like you hire my assistance before I before I get hired thing. Like he did with Wade, right? He was like I wanna be able to have control that. And I think that's one of the things he actually has control of. I mean, he fired Paul Alexander. And he. He was recruiting Hudson hawk to come back. And hey, we gotta work on this offense of line while we're at it. I'm moving I'm elevating Marc Colombo. So how how yes Hudson? How terrible Bruce Willis move. It wasn't terrible. I've seen more than ten times hands. All right. So yes, India McDowell is gorgeous. But in but in this whole situation you've seen him make things and even Jerry yesterday said Jason is going to have an announcement very soon. When I when he said that he didn't say I'm going to have an announcement, very soon. He didn't say the Cowboys are going to have an announcement very soon. He said Jason because Jason's the one making the decisions on his coaching staff, and you saw the video you saw the weird video clip of Jason standing there staring at Kellen Moore while he was talking to Russell Wilson right behind. Russell wilson. Russell Wilson steps out. And Jason just staring at him. Like. Yeah. That's what I want you to do. I want you to say those things. So he got a really good. Glimpse of offense coordinator Kellen Moore. But I think the other thing is killing Moore's not a threat. There would be nothing worse than Jason GARRETT'S last year approving look I can coach this team and having some outside force that he brings in that says. You know, we're not that good. There's still a chance I could keep the job. I could be the interim coach mid season if our offense just isn't clicking. And then, you know, he's gone. I get my chance to prove that I could be the head coach you go out and get a veteran offensive coordinator. There's a chance that happens easy. I got bad news for him that threats already there. It's just on the other side of the coach he thinks Chris Rashard. Yeah. And that's fine. It's even better to not have another threat. Right. You're not have some what I think is going to happen. And I think he looks at killing more and says, okay. This is my chance to start my coaching tree. Scotland a hand wasn't going to be part of a coaching tree. Hey, this is a chance to grow somebody, and I can grow this guy can grow Marc Colombo. I can grow these this this offense of side of the ball. And I can be the guy that did that or he's going to be gone. And I think that more is not a threat to him. So he just says, okay, I'm gonna you're gonna do everything. I ask you to do. I will have control over you and your offense, and we will have good input together. But I'll have control over what you do. It's not going to be taken away from me. And that's the way I see. That's the reason that Kellen Moore is the offense coordinator of this team. And look at what his how quickly evolved for him. This is nobody does this. Nobody goes from broken ankle to backup quarterback. Broken ankle loses job to Dak to backup quarter. Back to quarterbacks coach to offense coordinator as quickly as he did. Nobody does this. Can I ask you a question is it at all possible that had nothing to do with Garrett? And it's going down like this. Because that's what the people who really made the decision decided. I don't think. So man, I think Garrett I think Garrett made this decision. Okay. I really do. And I think it's because one of the things you look at Scotland hand why did he have the job because Garrett new his offense new his tendencies and said I want that as my offense. And if you bring something else in it's something that's completely different that has nothing to do with what gear at once. And I think in Kellen Moore is a guy that will still work within the the structure of what Jason gear at once. And I really do think that they gave him a lot of power on who they brought in who they bring in for these positions because. They had somebody else in mind for the offense of the offensive line position didn't work out, and they had panicked and go do that. I mean, even even said that he had a lot of power whenever it came to Chris Rashard and bring him in that he was kind the last the last call on that. And obviously Jerry approves it at the end of the day. But he was kind of the last one and said, yes, this is the one I want, okay. And Marinelli being around as long as he has to has been a guy that he's always wanted around. I what Cory most me doesn't want. What you're saying to be exactly what's going on? In part of me thinks that. You're obviously, you've got a good theory running here and seeing some of the evidence that that's dropped off as kind of laid the seed for this to be what is actually happening. I just go back to when Jason Garrett was on with Sean and RJ, and they asked him what all was going is everybody safe. And is there do you see any changes in his immediate answer was no, I don't remember what I said. And then he had to get his then he had to get his mind changed by upper management. The no, no there's gonna be stuff that's going to happen. And I also think that they knew exactly what they had in Kellen more. Now, we're the we know it or not or whatever's going to happen if they're right. I have no idea, but you go back to when he was doing his quarterback training when he was about to be drafted. And he started explaining what you needed to have happened was basically the same ideas that we see from McVeigh as far as you need to show them a lot of things. But do what you need what you do. And you you you use an offense that has some smoke and mirrors and the ability to move players were you want them. So you can get the best match ups for your players and us what your players can be right. That's a great offense of scheme. That's a great offense a theory. Now, he's able to do that. I think they're putting this in place because I think Jerry Jones wants to see Garrett when I think Jerry Jones wants to be. Proven. Right, adjacent -solutely. Then what he's noticed is that Jason Garrett style of offense is doing it with what they have currently here and he wants to change and he saw a change available

Jason Jason Garrett Kellen Moore Cowboys DAK Jerry Jones Marc Colombo Coordinator Dallas Cowboys Mark Cuban Chris Rashard Kristof Russell Wilson Scotland Bruce Willis Sean Football Hudson Hawk Kellyanne Wade
Young Russian Musicians Struggle Under Government Scrutiny

NPR's World Story of the Day

04:15 min | 2 years ago

Young Russian Musicians Struggle Under Government Scrutiny

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Comcast business having the nation's largest gig speed network was just the start. Now, they're providing gig fueled apps and solutions that exceed expectations and help businesses perform Comcast business beyond fast back in the days of the Soviet Union. The government tried to control everything from the way. Young people dressed to the kind of music. They listen to well now generation is coming of age that was born after the collapse of the communist system. Young Russians are rebelling against the rules and regulations of the Putin regime through rap music. Here's NPR's Lucian Kim from Moscow at the end of November Dmitri Kuznetsov a twenty five year old rapper known as husky made headlines when thirty stopped him from performing the southern Russian city of Krasnodar. Husky jumped onto a parked car outside the club and started rapping with fans before being hauled off by policemen. It has latest track poem about the motherland. He raps about the hardships in his gritty hometown eastern Siberia. The book. With McCain skis arrests set up a wave of protests by Russian musicians, but also sparked even more concert bands across the country. The 'electronic music duo ice peak who jokingly call their work audiovisual terror or detained by police at the Novosibirsk train station causing them to miss a scheduled gig their troubles began after they posted a macabre video on YouTube called death. No more. Gutty than me. Yes. Martha sad. I see video lead singer and a C Chris Lynn described setting herself on fire in front of the Russian government building. And things that are blood is pure than the purest drugs on us Puccio obsessionally could heap. It's a descriptive video. We're not revealing anything new in it. We're just saying out loud, the things that people would like to say, but they're afraid to describe the state of mind of a person of our generation who really has nothing to look forward to and can't expect any changes Christly and our partner nNcholas Kristof are both in their mid twenties. Coastal says that young people who may not have cared about politics before are now paying attention because their music is being targeted and what connects young people everywhere he says is the internet systems, Moses due to them. Slow shoots, everyone watches YouTube. Listen to the same American rappers and follows the same TV show that we have a lot in. Common with people our age around the world, I'm more like some guy my age in Mexico than my neighbor, who's two generations older Costello might as well be. Speaking about President Putin who sixty six years old the uproar over the band concerts was so loud, it even reached Putin's attention during a meeting with cultural figures mope approaches than than to get the said rap Brisson three pillars sex, drugs and protests. He said simply banning concerts would be counterproductive, but added that the government's job is to lead and guide youth culture. It wasn't long before a video appeared on YouTube sampling Putin's words into a wrap of zone. Yes. Six. Six. Gil in a meal. Ch- Inca says young people in Russia's large cities are already culturally oriented toward western Europe and follow global trends. When you call my three two. Melting because his communication between the government and young people is broken down because they live in two parallel worlds. She says the authorities are still molded by the Soviet impulse to regulate but that their attempts are bound to fail since Russia's youth cultures diverse and very hard to control Nikolai custody of the group ice peak can confirm that moving his throat on the some dude of discipline says even though half the concerts were canceled on their last tour. They returned home with new inspiration their fans, he says really want to make a change for the better in Russia. Lucian Kim NPR news Moscow. That. With on the McGill. The.

President Putin Youtube Russia Comcast Moscow Soviet Union Lucian Kim Npr Nncholas Kristof Dmitri Kuznetsov Lucian Kim Chris Lynn Novosibirsk Krasnodar Mccain NPR Martha Moses Partner
Kevin Cooper, Jerry Brown And Senator Kamla Harris discussed on Marketplace

Marketplace

00:38 sec | 2 years ago

Kevin Cooper, Jerry Brown And Senator Kamla Harris discussed on Marketplace

"News now governor Jerry Brown is ordering new DNA tests that a death row inmate says could clear him in a thirty five year old murder case the case of Kevin Cooper, drew national attention back in the early nineteen eighties. Perhaps you remember? It's Cooper maintains that he was framed for killing four people in chino hills. Brown has ordered new testing of four pieces of evidence and named a former judge to oversee all of this. Prosecutors say in previous tests show Cooper killed Doug and Peggy Ryan their young daughter. And a neighbor New York Times columnist nNcholas Kristof US, Senator Kamla Harris and reality television star Kim Kardashian are among those who urged Brown to reauthorize

Kevin Cooper Jerry Brown Senator Kamla Harris New York Times Chino Hills Peggy Ryan Kristof Us Kim Kardashian Murder Doug Thirty Five Year
"kristof" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"kristof" Discussed on KGO 810

"Cumulus station. Now on Amazon Alexa, open cagey. Oh, eight ten scale. Border death Peres protests. I'm Barbara Kusak. Advocacy manager of the ACLU Boorda right-center is calling for a rigorous investigation into how a seven-year-old migrant girl died less than forty eight hours after border patrol agents detained her correspondent eleven Deras pressure is mounting for the Trump administration to change the asylum process, more focus should be put on the Trump administration's immigration policies that has tightened the ability for immigrants to legally request asylum here at official border point entries in its fifth week on Saturday, the yellow vest movement. Saw far fewer protesters in Paris and around France. But correspondent Bill Michaels says there was another protest related death. The French interior minister Kristoff cost. There says that an eighth person has died since the start of the nationwide protest movement that began in mid-november over fuel tax hikes, but has expanded to include an array of issues Causton air said in the tweet. That the death occurred Friday night, but provided no details about what happened. He did suggest that it occurred at one of the traffic circles that dot the French countryside, and where the majority of the deaths have occurred. I'm Bill Michaels fighting has resumed on the fringes of Yemen's port city of who data according to residents raising fears for a newly agreed troops. Correspondent nNcholas Kristof has more on what the United Nations is calling the world's worst humanitarian crisis war itself. As fact empowered Al Qaeda and empowered Islamic state. So undermined our security the same time. They did a twelve million Yemenis to the brink of starvation. If you look into the night sky on Sunday, you just may see what looks like a fuzzy ball with a greenish tint, it's a comet that orbits between Jupiter and the sun making its closest approach to earth in centuries sometimes referred to as the Christmas comet it glows green. Because the gas is amid light in green wavelength. I'm Barbara Kusak. The Westwood.

Bill Michaels Barbara Kusak Trump administration Cumulus station Amazon Peres ACLU nNcholas Kristof Paris Yemen Westwood France Causton United Nations official forty eight hours
"kristof" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"kristof" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Global news update. Border death, Paris protests. I'm Barbara Kusak. The advocacy manager of the ACLU Boorda right-center Senator is calling for a rigorous investigation into how a seven-year-old migrant girl died less than forty eight hours after border patrol agents detained her correspondent eleven Deras pressure is mounting for the Trump administration to change the asylum process, more focus should be put on the Trump administration's immigration policies that has tightened the ability for immigrants to legally request asylum here at official border point entries in its fifth week on Saturday, the yellow vests movement saw far fewer protesters in Paris and around France. The correspondent Bill Michaels says there was another protest related death. The French interior minister Christoph cost an air says that an eighth person has died since the start of the nationwide protest movement that began in mid-november over fuel tax hikes, but has expanded to include an array. Of issues to their said in a tweet that the death occurred Friday night, but provided no details about what happened. He did suggest that it occurred at one of the traffic circles that dot the French countryside, and where the majority of the deaths have occurred. I'm Bill Michaels fighting resumed on the fringes of Yemen's port city of data. According to residents raising fears for a newly agreed truce correspondent, nNcholas Kristof has more on what the United Nations is calling the world's worst humanitarian crisis war is hell as empower al-qaeda and empowered Islamic state. So undermined our security the same time. They did twelve million Yemenis to starvation. If you look into the night sky on Sunday, you just may see what looks like a fuzzy ball with a greenish tint, it's a comet that orbits between Jupiter and the sun making its closest approach to earth in centuries sometimes referred to as the Christmas comet it glows green because the gases amid light in. Green wavelength..

Bill Michaels Paris Trump administration Barbara Kusak ACLU nNcholas Kristof Yemen Senator Christoph France United Nations al-qaeda official forty eight hours seven-year
"kristof" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"kristof" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Ten percent discount Kristof that you wanna buy that. Day so you just have to get a badge when you check in and get all that. Stuff so that'll be. Fun all. Right so that's the garden. Railroad and that's the. Tour August eight teams on. Saturday nine to. Three they UCSE master gardeners August classes coming. Up see this is the Gilroy again, planting California, natives August eleven from nine to eleven as that is held at the St Louis hospital teaching and demonstration. Garden and that addresses ninety four. Hundred no. Name, no it's no name Luneau in. Gilroy. Yes so address. Thing and that's August eleven and nine to eleven. Planting counterpoint natives claiming your fall and winter vegetable, garden August twentieth from seven to eight. Thirty this is A library. Class the Morgan hill library and that's at sixty six six zero or six six six. Two six west main avenue in Morgan hill Morgan hill library this twentieth from seven to eight. Thirty that's coming up. And then. We go north so we. Go to the UC. Master gardeners of Napa county. They invite you. For a fall and winter vegetable gardening workshop. Saturday August eighteen to two thousand eighteen, from nine, thirty to eleven thirty AM and that meeting room is at seventeen ten so skull avenue in Napa so. August eighteenth from nine thirty to. Eleven thirty. AM, seventeen ten so Scott.

Morgan hill Morgan hill librar Morgan hill library Gilroy Kristof Napa St Louis hospital California Scott Ten percent
China welcomes Kim-Trump summit as 'important step'

02:13 min | 2 years ago

China welcomes Kim-Trump summit as 'important step'

"The region correspondent imaging folks has more details to escape the violence thousands of families in cows i fled to the bush where they stayed for months sure to food and water nene died now some are returning to villages laid waste by the fighting where no crops have been planted unisex kristof julia rack has been in kazai assessing the needs i was really shocked by what i thought oh they're iv three hospitals where children suffering from cbo could mandatory and then they came back to the beatles tweet days later and several children have died and new mother had come with new different so the situation is extremely difficult to the point that we have we are not saying that are at risk of dying of money tuition kasai we are saying that she will not all really dying they are dying they have died in silence in the bush unicef estimates that almost four million people in case i need aid malnourished children are the most vulnerable without immediate help unicef says many more will die the organization has appealed for eighty eight million dollars to fund its relief operation it wants to scale up feeding centers train medical staff and support children who were forcibly recruited by armed groups at a campaign style rally in indiana president trump has outlined just what at stake at the forthcoming summit in singapore when will meet the north korean leader kim jong un mr trump said he had a good relationship with mr kim and predicted a successful summit dwell in singapore i'll be meeting with kim jong un to pursue a future of peace and security for the world for the whole world we're going to set the table we're gonna make a great deal for the world for north korea for south korea japan china l correspondent in washington chris butler has been listening to what mr trump had to say foreign policy remains something that is deeply important that.

North Korea Washington Kim Jong President Trump Indiana Julia Rack Chris Butler South Korea Bush Kim Jong Un Mr Kim Mr Trump Singapore Unicef Bush Unicef Beatles CBO Eighty Eight Million Dollars
"kristof" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"kristof" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Jane oh your previous callers have hit on a lot of the things i was going to talk about with regard to the cheap coverage in the news media feeding off itself in paparazzi kind of style as far as some of the issues that don't get covered one of the things that i always want mentioned on the air and nobody ever gives me an opportunity to is most of the problems that we face and humanity are related to overpopulation i mean if we had four billion people on this planet instead of seven point five billion people a lot of healthcare issues a lot of the crime issues the many of the issues that we deal with would be and nobody ever talks about it i it's it's an idea for another show we just have two minutes with nick kristof and and i'm gonna let you take the microphone here and and leave us with your thoughts after this terrific column over the weekend about our addiction to trump our obsession with trump what would you have no nick as as we go out of here now so you know as i think about issues that are under covered i do think that there is a systematic pattern that the issues that we in america are worst at developing policies toward are those that are hardest to talk about for one reason or another maybe it's because they involve sex which were which always is kind of an awkward conversation or sexual violence or because they involve a certain amount of shame or a mental health for example just a huge national problem that clearly were under addressing domestic violence and the news media should be trying to break some of these taboo should be trying to cover some of these difficult issues but i i think we in the media have to figure out had a simultaneously provide real accountability over president trump and cover the incredibly important things that that he is doing i certainly.

Jane nick kristof america president two minutes
"kristof" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"kristof" Discussed on WDRC

"One point especially here that number one half the three quarters of the evidence that the fbi use to unleash ables ostom of surveillance powers this is a secret warns which is based on this is about national security these are warns that you used for terrorism all right not a normal criminal thing this is about terrorism and national security came from inner circles of uh from sources tied rugby to his democratic opponent uh but when he says surveillance powers upon donald trump's inner circle that in to say kristof or a carter page does that mean it's more than carter page does the memo dudes mammals combined tell us that there was more than one fiso warrant and more than just carter page and because that's the only thing that we've known in terms of a fis worn he's the only individual that we have really known for sure right and and as recently as this week they said well this just about the fis warn of carter page and herbs okay but he really nothing to do with the campaign so because you asked the question would samantha power and uh the former un ambassador to the un who according to trade gouty i told uh the intel committee that no we i do that that wasn't me that did all the unmasking by may have done some of those but i didn't do the most of those weren't me so if that's the case we also asked those hundreds and hundreds of times was at one person were those different people uh these rawl the the answers that we may get very very soon more coming up eight six six ninety red eye ag's secretary sonny perdue went to michigan one of the most diverse specialty crop states in the country is we could so the farm bill coming up on this whole variety is shortly by look the usda the give them advice and counsel over there in relation to the farm bill he especially pointed to the safety net issue closely loan understand the farmers are participating in a safety net through crop insurance and we want to enable him to continue to do that some of the.

fbi donald trump kristof intel committee usda carter samantha power un secretary sonny perdue michigan three quarters
"kristof" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"kristof" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Oppressed and go the real scandals which had only recently come to light and the scandal of fgm and so on but i do take arm lars point and i do think we are talking about here what my colleague nicholas kristof has talked about in his wonderful book half the sky about how guest the he would capital of one kind has been ignored an underestimated and if only women can the empowered more so much can be done particularly the most difficult parts of the world one of the things like look at his microfinancing in aid in international a really works when it goes through matriach is that at matriarch is under the cover that have made it worked i've witnessed in places like afghanistan a superb but actually for all the billions of western powers spent in afghanistan the state and the status of women in afghanistan today is an absolute scandal and it is very very worrying indeed lower the less would briefly well i thought i mean i agree with what you're saying and i think men should be allowed to speak and encouraged to speak out listen and speak out because there are many men who have wonderful feminism merit to a fantastic feminist the one thing i would pick up on and robots point is that when it should be in power but i also think men should be disempowered and i think it's the same with race i think black people should be empowered but white people will sunny to be this it's about to try and find a balance some of us have to lose and that that that's part of the problem is that men do not want to be this empower they don't want to lose the.

nicholas kristof afghanistan
"kristof" Discussed on The Cooler

The Cooler

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"kristof" Discussed on The Cooler

"And this is how we do it motel jordan not my fellow man is a raging libido in search of an outlet s for sex the bible clearly states that this is how we don't do it i feel like they're living out some fantasy to actually right for rolling stone i was going to say somebody thinks they're actually ready class you know there has to be some racism right of course okay stand as just go there about crisscross out seat lesson them up because i i will i will find you quote like reading animals in a zoo they proudly parade beasely hormonal urges before an adoring public crisscross and their handlers should be ashamed handle is right in her that jemaine to pre question what i think about kristof across of ride like the wind fame gargoyles slack gets on godly get out of my house don't come from my kristof the spice girls oh he should have known they were going down there in do it the space girls tell young girls to make your own rules to live by which could include defying parents and having sex the girls also long for lovers with quote gentle hints an issue a vague threat to any guy who comes between them inappropriate inexcusable content if preteens ask you to give them this album remember the song do it and then don't do it all again with that as lovely lovely little coda weaser refers approvingly of dungeons in dragons the ban sings a beer in blasphemy and alludes to jesus is healing power while spewing the profanity goddamn weaser belongs on a respirator not in teens music libraries rat concrete how put these extended metaphor so dangers in dragons is also like on their on their shit gargoyles slack it yet again all of that era.

kristof