17 Burst results for "Kristin Schwab"

"kristin schwab" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:22 min | 9 months ago

"kristin schwab" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From the desk of even those companies can't escape inflation Ikea says it's going to raise the prices of a bunch of products around the world because of higher transport and raw materials cost Earlier this year the Swedish retailer said a lot of its products simply weren't available on its shells but that didn't hurt the company's cash flow Ikea is privately owned but said in October that its revenue rose by 6.3% this year Marketplace morning reporters supported by Twilio the customer data platform for companies looking to unlock and unify real-time data and deliver truly personalized campaigns at scale more at Twilio dot com And by the slowdown join poet Ada lemon for a hand picked poem and a moment of reflection every weekday subscribe to the slowdown wherever you get podcasts It's not going to be the New Year's Eve celebration that a lot of businesses were hoping for Concerns about the rapidly spreading acron variant along with labor shortages or derailing celebrations at bars restaurants and clubs marketplaces Kristin Schwab has more New Year's Eve is a big money maker in the food and drink industry There are the prefix menus open bars and special events all marked up for higher profit margins And though some businesses will still toast tonight at midnight others have decided to close because of safety concerns or limited staff Many are dealing with a mess of canceled reservations Steve zay gore a restaurant consultant who teaches at Columbia business school says the fourth quarter can make up as much as 40% of the year's business And that really comes to a crescendo in December where we've got the holiday season that people really let it go and have an exciting time and spend a lot of money He says businesses need that end of your income to sustain themselves during the lull that comes in January and February I'm Kristen Schwab for marketplace In that normally huge New Year's Eve gathering in Times Square is being scaled back to but the amount of confetti being dropped on those celebrating is not 3000 pounds of tissue paper confetti is going to be thrown by hand on some 15,000 people Now while large gatherings are less common these days more people are looking to confetti to liven up their private celebrations in New York marketplaces Stephanie Hughes explains There's been a New Year's Eve celebration in Times Square for more than a century the first ball drop was in 1907 Then in 1993 on live television host.

Ikea Twilio Ada lemon Kristin Schwab Steve zay gore Columbia business school Kristen Schwab Times Square Stephanie Hughes New York
"kristin schwab" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:47 min | 11 months ago

"kristin schwab" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"Somehow escaped your notice, Korean culture is the new new thing in this country. The Netflix drama squid game crazy popular. It's creator, by the way, says there is going to be a season two. Last year, parasite became the first non English language film to take home the Oscar for best picture. There's KPop, of course, also kimchi also crazy popular. Korean culture has made such an impression that 26 Korean words have been added to the Oxford English dictionary. One of which is how you, which translates roughly high and told to Korean wave used to describe global interest in that country. Marketplace is Kristin Schwab, looks at South Korea's growing cultural power and the economic engine behind it. At a tiny storefront in downtown Manhattan, lives a skin care lovers Paradise, called OO 35 millimeter. The shop is the size of a hallway, stalked floor to ceiling with Korean lotions and potions. Manager Winnie's ong shows off her favorites. I really like on the circle, vegan kombucha tea essence. With real kombucha tea, you know, snail mucin, actual snails lime. So this is actually something we created. The angel shark. So it's completely shark free. No sharks harmed in the process. No sharks. Song says when the store opened a decade ago, most customers were of Asian descent. Now shoppers of all backgrounds stop in. Kate arena is looking for a cleanser and sheet masks. She got into Korean skin care after watching K dramas. That kind of like sparked interest right to once you have like a peek, I think into the culture. You can expand and so many ways. This is what South Korea is betting on that a little bit of western curiosity will snowball into a cultural obsession. And this bet is decades in the making. Is the author of transnational how you? Starting in the middle 99 days the Korean government made the effort to bring the cultural industries education in the national economy. South Korea's economy at the time relied mostly on conglomerates like Samsung and Hyundai. Brands, the government helped create. So the government goes to these corporations and says, hey, we funded you. Now we want you to help fund the entertainment industry. And part of the pitch is that Samsung and Hyundai will benefit to. Everything. Because of popular culture, they like a Korean tail like a Korean product like a smartphone, like at the end of the semiconductors during the influence that it's big. And that cultural influence can help Korea sell makeup fashion and food, the way the U.S. sells Coca-Cola and Levi's jeans. So Samsung and Hyundai start their own film and TV companies. At first, the goal is to get East Asia hooked, and it works, leading to more investment in entertainment, especially KPop. Music labels open boarding schools to groom teen superstars, the government creates a ministry of culture and ends censorship laws that forbid Korean artists from singing in English. KPop grows right as social media explodes. And in 2012, Gangnam style becomes the first video to.

Kristin Schwab South Korea Manager Winnie Kate arena Netflix Korean government Oscar Hyundai Manhattan Samsung Song Brands Coca Cola Levi Korea East Asia U.S.
"kristin schwab" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"kristin schwab" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of retirement to not match the reality. But reality has never quite looked like this. I'm Kristin Schwab for Marketplace. Mm. I saw on the weather today that there's another storm coming in New York City. That is quite possibly the last thing that city needs more rain, the prospect of more flooding even as it And communities and industries that we're in hurricane ideas path. Are still setting things right. So we've gotten Austin Golding on the phone down in Vicksburg, Mississippi, where he runs the Golden Barge line. It is one of those industries where the weather can be a big factor. Hey, Alison, how are you? Hey, guy doing wonderful How you doing? I'm alright. I'm alright. But I have to tell you when I heard that storm is coming through, And maybe this is me being too close to my sources. First thing as well, Not first thing, but one of things I thought it was man. I wonder how Vicksburg is doing. So you guys did you do all right? Oh, yeah. We were lucky to be on the West side of it. So all that dryer that kind of Cooled it off. Once it got into the mid part of Mississippi. We barely had any rain. It was nuts. Wow. But But, I mean, I heard from the corps of Engineers like the Mississippi River reversed itself. Did that not hit you? It did. Yeah, it did down around Baton Rouge, You know, probably two or 300 miles south of here, and it wrecked Probably 3 to 400 barges and and a couple dozen boats at least. No injuries or death, which was pretty unbelievable. But the hurricane came through in a path. It was.

Alison New York City Kristin Schwab Baton Rouge 3 two Mississippi River First 300 miles Mississippi today Austin Golding 400 barges one Golden Barge couple dozen boats first thing Vicksburg, Mississippi Vicksburg
"kristin schwab" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"kristin schwab" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"To not match the reality. But reality has never quite looked like this. I'm Kristin Schwab for Marketplace. Uh Hmm. I saw on the weather today that there's another storm coming in New York City. That is quite possibly the last thing that city needs more rain, the prospect of more flooding even as it And communities and industries that were in hurricane ideas path. Are still setting things right. So we've gotten Austin Golding on the phone down in Vicksburg, Mississippi, where he runs the Golden Barge line. It is one of those industries where the weather can be a big factor. Hey, Alison, how are you? Hey, guy doing wonderful How you doing? I'm alright. I'm alright. But I have to tell you when I heard that storm is coming through, And maybe this is me being too close to my sources First thing. Well, not first thing, but one of things I thought it was man. I wonder how Vicksburg is doing. So you guys did you do all right? Oh, yeah. We were lucky to be on the West side of it. So all that dryer that kind of Cooled it off. Once it got into the mid part of Mississippi. We barely had any rain. It was not. Wow. But but, I mean, I heard from the corps of Engineers like the Mississippi River reversed itself. Did that not hit you? It did. Yeah, it did down around Baton Rouge, You know, probably two or 300 miles south of here, and it wrecked Probably 3 to 400 barges and and a couple dozen boats at least. No injuries or death, which was pretty unbelievable. But the hurricane came through in the path. It was.

Alison New York City Kristin Schwab Baton Rouge Mississippi River two 3 300 miles First today Mississippi Austin Golding 400 barges one Golden Barge Vicksburg, Mississippi first thing a couple dozen boats Vicksburg
"kristin schwab" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"kristin schwab" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of retirement to not match the reality. But reality has never quite looked like this. I'm Kristin Schwab for Marketplace. Oh, I saw on the weather today that there's another storm coming in New York City. That is quite possibly the last thing that city needs more rain, the prospect of more flooding even as it And communities and industries that were in hurricane ideas. Bath. Are still setting things right. So we've gotten Austin Golding on the phone down in Vicksburg, Mississippi, where he runs the Golden Barge line. It is one of those industries where the weather can be a big factor. Hey, Alison, how are you? Hey, guy doing wonderful How you doing? I'm alright. I'm alright. But I have to tell you when I heard that storm is coming through, And maybe this is me being too close to my sources First thing. Well, not the first thing but one of the things I thought it was man. I wonder how Vicksburg is doing so you guys did you do all right? Oh, yeah. We were lucky to be on the West side of it. So all that dryer that kind of Cooled it off. Once it got into the mid part of Mississippi. We barely had any rain. It was nuts. Wow. But But, I mean, I heard from the corps of Engineers like the Mississippi River reversed itself. Did that not hit you? It did. Yeah, it did down around Baton Rouge, You know, probably two or 300 miles south of here, and it wrecked Probably 3 to 400 barges and and a couple dozen boats at least. No injuries or death, which was pretty unbelievable. But the hurricane came through in the path. It was.

New York City Alison Kristin Schwab Baton Rouge two 3 Mississippi River first 300 miles Mississippi today 400 barges Austin Golding one Golden Barge Vicksburg, Mississippi First thing Vicksburg couple dozen boats industries
"kristin schwab" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"kristin schwab" Discussed on KCRW

"Not match the reality. But reality has never quite looked like this. I'm Kristin Schwab for Marketplace. Uh huh. I saw on the weather today that there's another storm coming in New York City. That is quite possibly the last thing that city needs more rain, the prospect of more flooding even as it And communities and industries that we're in hurricane ideas path. Are still setting things right. So we've gotten Austin Golding on the phone down in Vicksburg, Mississippi, where he runs the Golden Barge line. It is one of those industries where the weather can be a big factor. Hey, Alison, how are you? Hey, guy doing wonderful How you doing? I'm alright. I'm alright. But I have to tell you when I heard that storm is coming through, And maybe this is me being too close to my sources First thing. Well, not first thing, but one of things I thought it was man. I wonder how Vicksburg is doing. So you guys did you do all right? Oh, yeah. We were lucky to be on the West side of it. So all that dryer that kind of Cooled it off. Once it got into the mid part of Mississippi. We barely had any rain. It was nuts. Wow. But But, I mean, I heard from the corps of Engineers like the Mississippi River reversed itself. Did that not hit you? It did. Yeah, it did down around Baton Rouge, You know, probably two or 300 miles south of here, and it wrecked Probably 3 to 400 barges and and a couple dozen boats at least. No injuries or death, which was pretty unbelievable. But the hurricane came through in the path. It was.

Alison New York City Kristin Schwab Baton Rouge two 3 Mississippi River first 300 miles First Mississippi today Austin Golding 400 barges one Golden Barge Vicksburg, Mississippi couple dozen boats Vicksburg
"kristin schwab" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"kristin schwab" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"In Los Angeles. I'm kind raised all it is Wednesday. Today. The 16th there June Good as always to have you along, everybody, You know that thing. Or you're waiting and waiting and waiting for something to happen. And then it happens and you're like That's it. That's kind of the way fits your J Palace press conference went today. I mean, there was never going to be an interest rate increase out of this meeting, and it's not like he was going to say Who boy that inflation. Did You see that? That's really bad. But somehow I expected more. This is extraordinarily unusual time, and we really don't have a template or, or, uh, any experience of of a situation like this. I mean that much. We kind of knew right? Powell did say inflation is going to be a bit higher than the Fed had been thinking for a bit longer, Maybe as well. Also their big bond buying program. They are no longer to quote pal from a couple of months ago, not even talking about talking about cutting back here he is today. But you can think of this meeting that we had as the talking about talking about meeting if you like. And I now suggest that we retire that term, which is which has served its purpose. Well, I think I kind of liked it. I don't know why he's bugs him a little bit. I don't know. Hell was, though going on bullish on the American labor market. There's every reason to think that will be in a labor market with very attractive numbers with low unemployment, high participation and rising wages across the spectrum. So that's the upshot of the Fed meeting today, but it is handy actually the chair Powell. Said that about the labor market because we have spent every single month since the start of this pandemic, picking apart jobs, numbers and unemployment claims, But there's a lot happening in the labor force that doesn't get captured in that data right, like the toll that long term unemployment. During a once in a lifetime pandemic can take and how that long term unemployment is creating a less predictable back to work. Economy marketplaces. Kristin Schwab has that one. Lieberman's daughter has an auto immune disease. So in the Virginia High School, where she teaches computers encoding mandated that teachers come back to work last August, she quit. I really thought I could find something, even if it was part time employment. She applied to software companies that work with schools. But she has no sales experience. She applied to teach Spanish, which she's taught before no bites. She applied to jobs that have nothing to do with computers or teaching like an hourly position at the D. M B. He really lost hope. You just have so much time with just your thoughts, and it eats you up. Losing a job is already isolating, says Art Goldsmith, an economist at Washington and Lee University. And now there's the isolation of the pandemic itself. That has created a lot. Of poor mental health more so in this recession And in previous recessions, long term unemployment changes how people feel about their worth as workers. Sarah Damaske is a sociologist at Penn State before the pandemic. She followed people who lost their jobs by the 12 month mark. They were describing themselves as having fewer and fewer johns that they felt that they were qualified for. This can create a pattern. Someone gets a job below their skill level or one that has nothing to do with their skills, their unhappy and leave or are let go because they were never a good fit. And then they're back out there searching. It's devastating for their career in the long run each time they scramble and find something and fail, they fall further and further behind. That's not the case for B Liederman. Next month, she'll start teaching computer classes again. But the new job comes with a compromise the commute Is 50 miles each way. I'm Kristin Schwab for Marketplace. That's a long way. Sorry. One more quick thing on Pell and the Fed. Remember Yesterday we told you about the dot plot kind of a Graph showing where individual members of the federal Open Market Committee and presidents of the regional Fed banks think interest rates are going to be in the near term future. Here is Powell on the dots. Today? The dots are not a great forecaster of future rate moves, And that's not because it's just because it's so highly uncertain. There is no great forecaster of Future does so so dots to be taken with it with a big big grain of salt, noted Ms Chairman Budweiser. Do they do them then? On Wall Street. Today, Equities were kind of lukewarm on the Fed. The yield on the 10 year spiked. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. No one thinks you're people didn't really say anything about today was housing, not.

Sarah Damaske Kristin Schwab Art Goldsmith Wednesday 50 miles Today Los Angeles 12 month Lieberman B Liederman Virginia High School today Powell 10 year last August Penn State Next month June Budweiser Yesterday
"kristin schwab" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"kristin schwab" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"You want to get something from point A to point B. In this economy, Chances are real good. It's going to get there on a truck. Trucking companies have been complaining for years. About a shortage of one kind of very essential worker truckers, one of many reasons, freight costs are high, a situation exacerbated by the pandemic. But filling out that labor pool had already been getting harder last year, due in part to increase access true drug test results for truckers And this your national drug testing data base is about to enter its second year marketplaces pre Benesch or has more on that. It's hard to run a trucking company. If you can't find truckers, Mary Ball works for heading your trucking in Missouri. At one point, they had 17 truckers. Now they have nine. It's not fun at all. We really struggled to get people in here. Nationally. Speaking part of the issue is demographics. Sean Garni is VP of scope, elitist consulting. Truck drivers in general are older than the general working population, which means that there are more of them retiring and it's hard to find new drivers. You gotta be 21 to get a commercial driver's license, and by that age people have invested in other careers. Bob Costello, chief economist with the American Trucking Association, says the pandemic made things worse. You can't train is many new drivers to the industry. When you talk to truck driver training schools, they have trained 20 to 50% fewer drivers in 2020 compared to 2019. This year. On top of all of that drug tests, A federal clearing house went into effect early last January that allowed states and companies to share drug test results nationwide. So a driver who fails the test in one state can't just go drive in another. Tens of thousands of drivers have been disqualified again, Sean Garni. It's hard to deny the fact that 47,000 drivers have been identified as you notable to operate a commercial motor vehicle since the beginning the clearinghouse. Half of the violations are for marijuana, a drug that is increasingly legal or tolerated in many states, but is a controlled substance at the federal level. Here's Mary Bowl again over it, heading our shipping. She says. Some drivers are put off. We've had some that have said Yes, until they found out about having to register with the drug and alcohol clearing house and they didn't want to do that. Of course, one consequence of high demand for truckers could be better pay in New York. I'm simply been ashore for marketplace Busses in Washington, D C. Are charging for rides again. Fares had been waived since beginning back in March, Passengers got on through the back doors as a way to keep drivers safe. Collecting payments again is an indicator of how transit systems are just trying to hang on until things go back to normal or Really? Whatever the new normal is going to be. Ridership is down in every major city. As we have been telling you. Marketplaces Kristin Schwab has more now on how transit funding an investment could change. Transit ridership had been falling long before the pandemic..

Sean Garni Mary Bowl American Trucking Association Mary Ball Benesch Bob Costello Kristin Schwab Missouri marijuana chief economist VP New York Washington
"kristin schwab" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"kristin schwab" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You want to get something from point A to point B. In this economy, Chances are real good. It's going to get there on a truck. Trucking companies have been complaining for years. About a shortage of one kind of very essential worker Truckers, One of the many reasons freight costs are high, a situation exacerbated by the pandemic. But filling out that labor pool had already been getting harder last year, due in part to increase the access True drug test results for truckers and this year national Drug testing Data base is about to enter its second year. Marketplaces prevent ashore has more on that. It's hard to run a trucking company. If you can't find truckers, Mary Ball works for heading her trucking in Missouri. At one point, they had 17 truckers. Now they have nine it not fun at all. We really struggled to get people in here. Nationally. Speaking part of the issue is demographics. Sean Garni is VP of scope. Elitist consulting truck drivers in general are older than the general working population, which means that There are more of them retiring and it's hard to find new drivers. You gotta be 21 to get a commercial driver's license, and by that age people have invested in other careers. Bob Costello, chief economist with the American Trucking Association, says the pandemic made things worse. You can't train is many new drivers to the industry. When you talk to truck driver training schools, they have trained 20 to 50% fewer drivers in 2020 compared to 2019. And this year on top of all of that drug tests, A federal clearing house went into effect early last January that allowed states and companies to share drug test results nationwide. So a driver who fails the test in one state can't just go drive in another. Tens of thousands of drivers have been disqualified again, Sean Garni. It's hard to deny the fact that 47,000 drivers have been identified as you notable to operate a commercial motor vehicle since the beginning the clearinghouse. Half of the violations are from marijuana, a drug that is increasingly legal or tolerated in many states, but is a controlled substance at the federal level. Here's Mary Bowl again over it, heading our shipping. She says. Some drivers are put off. We've had some that have said Yes, until they found out about having to register with the juggernaut called Clearing House, and they didn't want to do that. Of course, one consequence of high demand for truckers could be better pay in New York I'm simply vanish or for marketplace Busses in Washington, D C. Are charging for rides again. Fares had been waived since beginning back in March, Passengers got on through the back doors as a way to keep drivers safe. Collecting payments again is an indicator of how transit systems are just trying to hang on until things go back to normal or Really? Whatever the new normal is going to be. Ridership is down in every major city. As we have been telling you. Marketplaces Kristin Schwab has more now on how transit funding an investment could change. Transit ridership had been falling long before the pandemic..

Sean Garni Clearing House Mary Bowl American Trucking Association Mary Ball Bob Costello Kristin Schwab Missouri marijuana chief economist VP New York Washington
"kristin schwab" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"kristin schwab" Discussed on KCRW

"You want to get something from point A to point B. In this economy, Chances are real good. It's going to get there on a truck. Trucking companies have been complaining for years. About a shortage of one kind of very essential worker Truckers, One of the many reasons freight costs are high, a situation exacerbated by the pandemic. But filling out that labor pool had already been getting harder last year, due in part to increase the access True drug test results for truckers and this year national Drug testing Data base is about to enter its second year. Marketplaces prevent ashore has more on that. It's hard to run a trucking company. If you can't find truckers, Mary Ball works for heading her trucking in Missouri. At one point, they had 17 truckers. Now they have nine it not fun at all. We really struggled to get people in here. Nationally. Speaking part of the issue is demographics. Sean Garni is VP of scope, elitist consulting. Truck drivers in general are older than the general working population, which means that there are more of them retiring and it's hard to find new drivers. You gotta be 21 to get a commercial driver's license, and by that age people have invested in other careers. Bob Costello, chief economist with the American Trucking Association, says the pandemic made things worse. You can't train is many new drivers to the industry. When you talk to truck driver training schools, they have trained 20 to 50% fewer drivers in 2020 compared to 2019. And this year on top of all of that drug tests, A federal clearing house went into effect early last January that allowed states and companies to share drug test results nationwide. So a driver who fails the test in one state can't just go drive in another. Tens of thousands of drivers have been disqualified again, Sean Garni. It's hard to deny the fact that 47,000 drivers have been identified as you notable to operate a commercial motor vehicle since the beginning the clearinghouse. Half of the violations are from marijuana, a drug that is increasingly legal or tolerated in many states, but is a controlled substance at the federal level. Here's Mary Ball again over it, heading our shipping. She says. Some drivers are put off. We've had some that have said yes, until they found out about having to register with the drug knockoff clearing house and they didn't want to do that. Of course, one consequence of high demand for truckers could be better pay in New York I'm simply vanish or for marketplace Busses in Washington, D C. Are charging for rides again. Fares had been waived since beginning back in March, Passengers got on through the back doors as a way to keep drivers safe. Collecting payments again is an indicator of how transit systems are just trying to hang on until things go back to normal or Really? Whatever the new normal is going to be. Ridership is down in every major city. As we have been telling you. Marketplaces Kristin Schwab has more now on how transit funding an investment could change. Transit ridership had been falling long before the pandemic..

Mary Ball Sean Garni American Trucking Association Bob Costello Kristin Schwab Missouri marijuana chief economist VP New York Washington
"kristin schwab" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"kristin schwab" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The Tpp a tall order given everything else on the to do list in New York. I'm simply been ashore for market. One might think that Taylor Swift, mega star pop icon, pick your superlative. Has it all. And in a way she does what she does not have. The O is ownership of the master writes to her first six albums. Kind of a long story goes back to deal. She signed back when she wasn't Taylor Swift, Taylor Swift, So I'm just gonna cut to the news. Those rights again writes that Swift does not own Have been sold to a private equity firm for $300 million. Swift, obviously not happy about that is firing back by re recording the music so she can license her own versions. Marketplaces. Kristin Schwab has today's music industry primer before there was old Taylor. Now there's new Taylor. Forget the difference of style or lyrics. New Taylor's voice is 14 years older. Chris Delia Garcia teaches intellectual property law at the University of Colorado. Of course, you can re sing the songs, but they won't be the same fans would have to choose these new recordings over the old ones for them to have value. She may come up with something creative enough to do in her re recordings of these, but it's not all about popularity and plays. It's also about the massively profitable business of licensing for commercials and movies, says Tonya Butler at Berklee College of Music. Forget whether it's called a master or sound recording or musical work. It's an asset. Most artists don't own their music the record labels do they get ownership of the Masters because they pay for the recording's. That's how it goes in the music business. And Butler doesn't think swifts move will change how labels work with new talent who are desperate to get signed? They can say, Well, there's 10,000 artists behind you. We're willing to take this deal. Goodbye. Power moves are reserved for powerful artists. Prince spent much of his career fighting Warner Brothers for his master's, and he eventually got them back. But.

Taylor Swift New Taylor Berklee College of Music New York Chris Delia Garcia Tonya Butler Kristin Schwab University of Colorado Warner Brothers Prince O Masters
"kristin schwab" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"kristin schwab" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A good percentage of which may well be forgiven to keep this economy from getting even worse than it has and let's say you wanted to know who got that public money from the paycheck protection program treasury secretary Steven Mnuchin and the director of the national economic council our total say the names of the companies that got that public money should be withheld market place's Kristin Schwab is on the transparency desk you know who's funding the Kerrs act the treasury department with your money yeah you the taxpayer and when the government sells out your hard earned cash it usually tells you where it's going and the common Jordan teaches law at Georgetown University the accountability for who gets it how much they receive and whether they're entitled to it that is a trust factor the trump administration says what we should care about is that the loans comply with the carers act but who got on the treasury secretary told Congress last week it's proprietary information Meursault broader on a law professor at UC Irvine thinks there's a couple of other things at play part of this still isn't they left a lot to banks and so it's possible that they just don't know what the funds also it's possible that they do know and they don't want us to know we do know where some of the money went to big names like shake shack and pot belly who pledged to return the loans but we only know that because they're publicly traded companies Aaron Klein is a fellow at the Brookings Institution he was sold to the American public as loans to help small business workers and if they become grants to pay big business creditors notice he says the word grants not loans because businesses don't have to repay them if they fulfill certain requirements like re hiring staff Klein says that makes transparency crucial failing to disclose who got this money undermines this response and future responses and he doesn't just mean future bailouts he means like tomorrow because they're still about a hundred and thirty billion dollars left in the PPP pot I'm Susan fox for market there will be no remote internships mired have their perks but first let's do the numbers.

Steven Mnuchin director Kristin Schwab Georgetown University Congress professor UC Irvine Aaron Klein Brookings Institution Susan fox Meursault
"kristin schwab" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"kristin schwab" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Thanks for he had grabbed the terrible reality of the April unemployment report that we've got this past Friday is going to be with us for a while but there was a sliver of hope in all the doom and gloom seventy eight percent of the people who said they were out of work reported that they had been temporarily laid off the big question then is how confident they ought to feel about going back to the jobs that they lost market place Kristin Schwab has been looking into worker confidence and economic reality not long before stay at home orders went into place savanna Jordan started a dream job as a guest relations manager at a new upscale restaurant in Scottsdale Arizona three days before the restaurant's grand opening she was furloughed I was upset only because I was so excited to open up the restaurant to get started she's collecting unemployment but she loves her job and that's why she's not looking for anyone also she sings states start to open up I'm in full confidence that we will open up their own and then once we do we're going to be extremely busy a recent poll by the Associated Press and the university of Chicago says of people in households where someone has been laid off seventy eight percent think they'll go back to their jobs not new indigo at Northwestern University thinks that's a little optimistic but not far from the reality at least for now every month that you say you're on layoff temporarily there's some chance that that becomes permanent he says some industries will have an easier time re hiring like healthcare and construction jobs that are public necessities or where it's easier to follow social distancing rules dean Baker at the center for economic policy and research says restaurants and tourism will be Shakir but they may need to bring people back to take on slightly different jobs are the stories are gonna need people to pursue the social distancing in the meantime Baker says the confidence furloughed workers are showing is good it's what could actually save us from a longer downturn when people believe they still have jobs waiting for them to continue to spend money.

Kristin Schwab Arizona Associated Press Northwestern University Shakir savanna Jordan university of Chicago dean Baker
"kristin schwab" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"kristin schwab" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Thank you at the top of the in a way you lose your job you don't care what the word play is right maybe it's a furlough maybe it's a layoff maybe it's whatever but what your employer calls it matters both for your personal economy and for the economy at large market place's Kristin Schwab as they'll take fever was working from home on Friday when he got the call it was pretty jarring it's not like they had an office to call me in to give me the bad news and after the phone call I just kind of stuck there like did that really just happen his law firm in San Francisco put him on furlough we'll have a salary and health insurance till the end of March then who knows the furlough doesn't have an end date it just feels like if they don't really know what's going on they don't really know how the future is going to be and they're passing that uncertainty on a furlough is usually better than a layoff because it's temporary and often planned for instance some construction workers are put on furlough during winter Jesse Rothstein directs the institute for research on labor and employment at UC Berkeley he says right now furlough layoff it's all kind of murky I think for most small and medium sized businesses they kind of are the same thing right now because I don't think any business can be confident it's going to come back in the same form they're still pluses to being furloughed as opposed to being laid off you don't have to show the state you're looking for work to collect unemployment benefits because technically you still have a job and Heidi sure holds at the economic policy institute says furloughs are good for employers to they would have to spend so much time and money replacing workers later on when the threat of the corona viruses over we can just get the economy back on line really quickly and she says there's a bigger takeaway here furloughs mean businesses are still somewhat optimistic about the economy if we see the needle swing toward layoffs it means that business confidence is falling but what about worker confidence I'm treating it as a as a way off I mean I've I've been telling people in my in my life that it's a layoff Jake fever the lawyer in San Francisco is job hunting and if you still quote unquote furloughed in.

Kristin Schwab fever San Francisco Jesse Rothstein UC Berkeley Heidi economic policy institute Jake
"kristin schwab" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"kristin schwab" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is market place on car result in immigration news today this item from the front pages of the Wall Street journal the trump administration the paper reports is planning to raise the caps on the number of foreign seasonal workers the president's been doing all it can to limit legal immigration during his term but with the seasonal jobs it's been a little bit different marketplace Kristin Schwab has that one Joe Durkin is already thinking about summer he's been operating Mister softy ice cream trucks in New Jersey for more than twenty years in twenty seventeen he didn't get the temporary or H. two B. visas he needed and more than half of his trucks went silent I ran a skeleton crew and I'd lost a lot of money he says it's really hard to recruit locals when they hear oh you mean the jobs done in October at the end of it H. two B. visas are capped at sixty six thousand per year but the law allows homeland security to nearly double that this year the administration reportedly plans to allow forty five thousand additional workers for seasonal businesses like resorts and landscaping a visa lottery application is no guarantee Peter Kramer is an immigration lawyer in Boston you know there's the much much higher demand for the visas than there are actual he says the trump administration has allowed more seasonal workers each year that is restricting legal immigration in other ways just today the public charge rule took effect that allows the government to deny green cards to people who are more likely to use Medicaid or other programs Alan hi teaches immigration law at Rutgers University he says H. two B. visas are a safer bet for the trump administration there are reasonably well regulated they're not the views of it struck to be particularly subject to abuse he says more H. two B. visa workers go back home and work in the ice cream truck owner got a good spot in the lottery and expects to get the V. says he needs to keep slinging those rainbow sprinkle combs and Christian shop for market you're listening to market place on W. NYC on this first day of it W. N. Y. C.'s winter fundraiser and we are kicking it off with a challenge to all of you were asking our listeners to become sustainer is today that's right sixty percent of our listeners are sustaining members it's a quick and easy way to become a member and then not have to think about it again no reminders no worrying did I give am I a member that's right you do it you forget about it you feel good about.

Wall Street journal Kristin Schwab Joe Durkin New Jersey Peter Kramer Boston Rutgers University NYC W. N. Y. C. president Alan
"kristin schwab" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"kristin schwab" Discussed on KCRW

"This is market place I'm chiras doll in immigration news today this item from the front pages of the Wall Street journal the trump administration the paper reports is planning to raise the caps on the number of foreign seasonal workers the president's been doing all it can to limit legal immigration during his term but with the seasonal jobs it's been a little bit different marketplace Kristin Schwab has that one Joe Durkin is already thinking about summer he's been operating Mister softy ice cream trucks in New Jersey for more than twenty years in twenty seventeen he didn't get the temporary or H. two B. visas he needed and more than half of his trucks went silent I ran a skeleton crew and I lost a lot of money he says it's really hard to recruit locals when they hear oh you mean the jobs done in October at the end of it H. two B. visas are capped at sixty six thousand per year but the law allows homeland security to nearly double that this year the administration reportedly plans to allow forty five thousand additional workers for seasonal businesses like resorts and landscaping a visa lottery application is no guarantee Peter Kramer is an immigration lawyer in Boston you know there's the much much higher demand for the visas than there are actual V. says the trump administration has allowed more seasonal workers each year but is restricting legal immigration in other ways just today the public charge rule took effect that allows the government to deny green cards to people who are more likely to use Medicaid or other programs Alan hi teaches immigration law at Rutgers University he says H. two B. visas are a safer bet for the trump administration reasonably well regulated they're not the views of it start to be particularly subject to abuse he says more H. two B. visa workers go back home and work in the ice cream truck owner got a good spot in the lottery and expects to get the V. says he needs to keep slinging those rainbow sprinkle combs and Christian shop for market we'll talk a little bit it's up the program about the markets in corona virus consumers as well so how about a little B. to be now business to business if your company American or otherwise truth be told depending on a China centred supply chain things aren't great so we decided today would be a great time to hear from Gretchen blouse she's the customs broker we talked to a time or two working for logistics plus any Yuri Pennsylvania where it is literally her job to help American companies move products around the world I mean we're we're known as a company that likes to think outside the box and this is really you know any available option is truly thinking outside the box at this point.

Wall Street journal Kristin Schwab Joe Durkin New Jersey Peter Kramer Boston Rutgers University Yuri Pennsylvania president Alan Gretchen
"kristin schwab" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"kristin schwab" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm David Brancaccio in New York known infections from the corona virus in China reached forty five hundred a sixty percent increase in a day now Hong Kong is putting strict limits on travel to and from the mainland more than a hundred have died in China the U. S. said yesterday people in the U. S. should quote reconsider travel to China more international companies today are releasing their quarterly results in outlooks for this coming year could be affected by the corona virus and some of those forecasts are being altered today we'll hear from Starbucks and apple here's market place's Kristin Schwab for American companies doing business in China Nick sat here on with one push security says there's nothing to do for now but wait there's nothing in terms of the business outlook that really they can change there's going to have to absorb the impact such in says that might eat into profits in the short term but it could also give the brand a chance to build goodwill in its second largest market by showing Chinese customers it cares about employees and I think they're going to come out of this stronger apple has other concerns Frank Gillette Forrester says for now the company is probably most worried about its supply chain if a factory pauses for a couple of days a couple of days the airplanes are caring supply the night it states its factories are forced to shut down apple may have to move some of its production elsewhere but again analysts say it would take months for most companies profits to be affected one company that may be seeing an immediate impact three Adam one of the world's biggest makers of face masks I'm Kristen Pham for market place but about last quarter there's news today three Ms profits did not meet expectations and the stock is down nearly four percent Fizer said today its quarterly sales were lower with its losing exclusivity on its pain medication Lyrica the stock is down nearly four percent they're checking the broader indices the Dow Jones industrial average is up two hundred thirty one point eight tenths of a percent the S. and P. up one percent the nasdaq up one point two percent US consumer confidence for January came in just now much higher than expected the highest since August marketplace morning.

US Ms Fizer Kristen Pham Adam David Brancaccio Frank Gillette Forrester Nick Kristin Schwab apple Starbucks Hong Kong China New York