27 Burst results for "Kristen Schwab"

"kristen schwab" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

05:37 min | 3 weeks ago

"kristen schwab" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"We got personal spending numbers this morning. Consumer spending is probably a more clear way to put that still growing just slower than they were up. Three tenths percent in july consumer spending was that is compared to more than one percent growth in june. the variable here of course is the delta variant. That probably also played into this morning's report on consumer sentiment from the university of michigan neela. I think mentioned that at pandemic lows was the headline and consumer sentiment marketplace. Kristen schwab explains what all that is going to mean. For the businesses that have been thriving in this pandemic and for those that haven't for a glorious few months sarah garlic's in pennsylvania felt like she could breathe easy. I would go into stores. Went out masks. And the i would even let my son do it but that has definitely backtracked in the past couple of weeks. She's worried about the delta variant so she cancelled a road trip she planned with her father is working from home more often and is doing early morning grocery shopping again. I have liked turned into my mother and waiting in the parking lot and that i go in as soon as i got a lot of messages today from people who have canceled gym memberships and travel to work conferences. And sure these are anecdotes. But there's also data open table. Reservations have been declining since june. Southwest airlines recently said bookings have dropped and cancellations have increased and there are those softening consumer spending numbers. Wendy attleboro is an economist. At the brookings institution the delta variant create some significant risks for what happens to overall spending over the next couple of months if people stay home again she says demand for services could dip and demand for goods could flatten. How many more home improvement projects can people really pick up and carlos torelli a marketing professor at the university of illinois at urbana-champaign says the fortune of companies like peleton jordache and netflix could rise consumption on the goal as you please embiid's force generation is becoming more the norm. And there's where you start seeing changes that may give these companies more permanent place in our everyday lives. Torelli himself is working in person but still doing meetings on zoom. I don't have to be more than from office. Do i go there sometimes. In different buildings.

Kristen schwab sarah garlic university of michigan Wendy attleboro pennsylvania Southwest airlines carlos torelli university of illinois peleton jordache urbana champaign netflix Torelli
The Psychological Toll of Long-Term Unemployment

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:59 min | 3 months ago

The Psychological Toll of Long-Term Unemployment

"Spent every single month since the start of this pandemic picking apart jobs numbers and unemployment claims. But there's a lot happening in the labor force that doesn't get captured in that data. Right like the toll that long term unemployment during a once in a lifetime pandemic can take and how that long term unemployment is creating less predictable back to work economy. Marketplace's kristen schwab has that one be. Lieberman's daughter has an auto immune disease so in the virginia. High school where she teaches computers and coding mandated. That teachers come back to work last august. she quit. I really thought i could find something. Even if it was part time employment. She applied to software companies that work with schools but she has no sales experience. She applied to teach spanish which she's taught before no bites job. That have nothing to do with computers or teaching like an hourly position at the dmv helped. You just have so much time with just your thoughts and it eats you up. Losing a job is already isolating says art goldsmith economist at washington and lee university and now there's the isolation of the pandemic itself that has created a lot of poor mental health more so in this recession and in previous recessions long-term unemployment changes how people feel about their worth is workers sarah damascus associate at penn state before the pandemic she followed people who lost their jobs by the twelve month mark they were describing themselves as having fewer and fewer john's that they felt that they were qualified for this can create a pattern. Someone gets job. Low their skill level or one. That has nothing to do with their skills. They're unhappy and leave or let go because they were never a good fit and then they're back out there searching. It's devastating for their career in the long run each time they scramble and find something in fail. They fall further and further

Kristen Schwab Lieberman Sarah Damascus Lee University DMV Virginia High School Goldsmith Penn State Washington John
Local Governments Promoting Incentives to Encourage Covid Vaccinations

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:06 min | 4 months ago

Local Governments Promoting Incentives to Encourage Covid Vaccinations

"According to the centers for disease control just a bit more than forty six percent of the entire. us population. that's everybody has gotten at least one dose of covid vaccine thirty five percent is fully vaccinated but things are slowing down. Millions of people are still hesitant and herd. Immunity is for now maybe not looking so great so local governments are partnering with businesses to offer free stuff in exchange for getting a shot incentives matter that we know but do they work. Marketplace's kristen schwab has more on that. The mission to get more vaccines into people's arms is starting to take on a bit of an oprah. winfrey vibe. west. Virginia is giving one hundred dollars savings bonds to adults under thirty. Five main is offering free hunting and fishing licenses and in new orleans a pound of crawfish. Incentives are nice. Because they're the bronx near leading people toward something in a positive way. Knoll brewer researches vaccination behavior at the university of north carolina. He says incentives appeal to people across party. Lines and studies show. They increase vaccine uptake by about eight percent. If the incentive is of value mario macho is a behavioral economist at johns hopkins. There are costs and benefits to any any action and a person engages in the action if her perceived benefits exceed her received. The costs costs can be literal like to and from a vaccination site. The biden administration has partnered with uber and lift to provide free rides but benefits can also offer people. Something they want. New jersey is running a shot and a beer program macho says this can make a needle in the arm. Seem fun ause you. They might go without with a friend or a group of friends and get vaccinated together and then go out and get their free beer and incentives. Like new york's free tickets to a mets or yankees game. Also whisper freedom like. Hey remember when we high five strangers after home runs without fear gretchen chapman who studies vaccine behavior at carnegie mellon says incentives usually work on people who only need a little push and researchers. Don't know if they'll work for the covid vaccine like to have for others

Kristen Schwab Knoll Brewer Centers For Disease Control Mario Macho Winfrey Biden Administration University Of North Carolina New Orleans Virginia Johns Hopkins West United States New Jersey Gretchen Chapman Carnegie Mellon Mets
How small stores are cutting through the noise from the big-box stores this season

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:19 min | 10 months ago

How small stores are cutting through the noise from the big-box stores this season

"Are a business show. So yes we're going to start with what today means for a big chunk of the economy retail because the deals extravaganza. We still call black. Friday has actually already begun. The pandemic has a lot of us. Rethinking our shopping. 'cause we really wanna live in a world where only the big national chains survive. A survey from at taxi found that seventy five percent of shoppers planned to make an effort to shop local. This holiday season marketplace's kristen schwab reports usually this shopping weekend at territories in austin texas is one big celebrating and they walk in. They think they've joined like some mosh pit of Toys shoppers sylvia edwards says the general manager children running up and down everywhere loud music. You know noises from different toys being played with a cacophony of magic madness. And so it'll never get like that this year and not just because of social distancing territories has divided shopping hours. Grownups only ten to four all ages. Welcome four to six. The store is also offering night owl tours. Private appointments for shoppers after closing. You get a whole hour in the toy store and then a little personal salesperson that walks you through the store shows. You are twee workshop where we still cut wood and make toys. These are the kinds of personal touches. That could help. Small retailers cut through all the noise coming from big box stores. Disol- the keller at mintel says traditionally a third of shoppers to most of their buying this weekend and the message from retailers. She says is that they hope to see even bigger numbers this year. Basically start thinking about your holiday shopping and now because it's just only going to be more of a challenge to get what people want on time. The goal this season make day an occasion to shop. Frank reese who owns acapella books in atlanta is doing that with extra virtual book clubs and author events. A lot of our business in normal times. is not in this little store. What a lot of businesses is offsite events. And he's doing the free delivery thing by hand because you know amazon sells books to. I'm kristen schwab for marketplace.

Kristen Schwab Sylvia Edwards Austin Texas Mintel Frank Reese Acapella Books Atlanta Amazon
"kristen schwab" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"kristen schwab" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Taking a look now at how Cupid 19 is affecting California today. Statewide, there are over 830,000 cases and more than 16,000 deaths. Let's have been decreasing steadily since August, and hospitalizations have bean dropping as well since a peak in August. This is marketplace. I'm Kai resolve the name International business machines. Now just IBM has been around for a little bit more than 100 years, which means the company is old enough to have changed with the times a few times, but it's never really strayed too far from its core business of computer hardware and software. Now, though, there are going to be fewer EMS in IBM, the company is spinning off its infrastructure unit to focus on the cloud marketplaces. Kristen Schwab has that one. IBM started out selling tabulating machines but knew early on it had to evolve. There's even a company song from the 19 thirties that talks about new fields were sure to conquer. Ah, ever onward. So when punch cards became outdated, the company got into mainframe computers. And when personal computers came along, IBM expanded to software and other services. Michael Cusumano is a professor at MIT E. They've been systematically shedding businesses that become commodities. And in tech, he says. Commodities don't come with high profit margins. So IBM started dipping its toe into the cloud business. Just the toe. Jim Cortana wrote a book about the company. IBM has a history It does not like to be. The first one to do something because the first person to do something normally doesn't get it quite right about 90,000 employees will split off to continue with infrastructure services. While IBM focuses on the cloud. This will force IBM to live and die based on artificial intelligence and cloud computing. It's a good call for IBM, says Moshe Katri at Wedbush Securities. But he also says it may not be enough. They'll have Tio either, like another large acquisition. Or they're gonna have to go on with other spin else of the business. Because giants like Amazon, Microsoft and Google already dominate that market. I'm Kristen Schwab for marketplace. Hey, what are you doing Monday morning. Really early. Do me a favor. Would you tune into the marketplace? Morning Report David Brancaccio and the crew on the early shift getting you ready for your economic day. A lot of people. A lot of people are not.

IBM Kristen Schwab Moshe Katri David Brancaccio California Wedbush Securities Michael Cusumano Jim Cortana professor Amazon Google Microsoft
"kristen schwab" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"kristen schwab" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Billion billion for for track track phone, phone, the the country's country's biggest biggest cellphone cellphone service service reseller reseller that's that's phone phone industry industry speak speak for for those those monthly monthly prepaid prepaid plans. plans. Marketplaces Kristen Schwab looks at why a contract king like Verizon might want to expand into the contract. Less phone business. People who use a prepaid month to month phone plan are usually people who are living month to month. Angela See for directs the national digital inclusion Alliance having a prepaid phone. It means that you control what the charges are are and and when when the the charges charges are are maybe maybe your your credit credit history history means means you you don't don't qualify qualify for for a a traditional traditional contract contract plan. plan. Or Or you you can't can't afford afford your your plan plan one one month month So So you you downgrade downgrade With With a a track track phone. phone. Prepaid Prepaid plan $15 a month gets you 500 minutes 500 tax and 500 megabytes of data and you, Khun Top off your minutes at a retailer like Walmart or best buy. It's a huge market on in this recession we can on Ly assume that the market would increase. When you see higher unemployment levels when the economy takes a dip, there's often a shift more towards prepaid Brandt. I adore Ola at Frost and Sullivan says prepaid phone plans make up almost 20% of the U. S market. And Verizon is taking about this number will grow fast faster than the time it would take to bolster its own prepaid service. Because why spend money on a makeover if you could just buy Trac phones, 21 million customers. Is kind of the faster equate the gains and significant share on the pre stateside and this deal isn't just a pandemic grab. It's a purposeful expansion. Ever since the market was boiled down to three major providers, Verizon T Mobile and AT and T these companies have had to become everything to everyone. Terry Kramer directs the Eastern Technology Management Center at The carriers there having a look at other ways to grow. The deal still needs approval from antitrust and telecom regulators. But Kramer says, it'll probably go through because unlike the T Mobile in Sprint merger that happened earlier this year, prison and track phone can argue there in complementary, not competing markets. I'm Kristen Schwab for Marketplace on Wall Street

Kristen Schwab Angela See Verizon
Verizon to buy prepaid phone seller Tracfone for $7B

Marketplace

02:08 min | 1 year ago

Verizon to buy prepaid phone seller Tracfone for $7B

"Billion billion for for track track phone, phone, the the country's country's biggest biggest cellphone cellphone service service reseller reseller that's that's phone phone industry industry speak speak for for those those monthly monthly prepaid prepaid plans. plans. Marketplaces Kristen Schwab looks at why a contract king like Verizon might want to expand into the contract. Less phone business. People who use a prepaid month to month phone plan are usually people who are living month to month. Angela See for directs the national digital inclusion Alliance having a prepaid phone. It means that you control what the charges are are and and when when the the charges charges are are maybe maybe your your credit credit history history means means you you don't don't qualify qualify for for a a traditional traditional contract contract plan. plan. Or Or you you can't can't afford afford your your plan plan one one month month So So you you downgrade downgrade With With a a track track phone. phone. Prepaid Prepaid plan $15 a month gets you 500 minutes 500 tax and 500 megabytes of data and you, Khun Top off your minutes at a retailer like Walmart or best buy. It's a huge market on in this recession we can on Ly assume that the market would increase. When you see higher unemployment levels when the economy takes a dip, there's often a shift more towards prepaid Brandt. I adore Ola at Frost and Sullivan says prepaid phone plans make up almost 20% of the U. S market. And Verizon is taking about this number will grow fast faster than the time it would take to bolster its own prepaid service. Because why spend money on a makeover if you could just buy Trac phones, 21 million customers. Is kind of the faster equate the gains and significant share on the pre stateside and this deal isn't just a pandemic grab. It's a purposeful expansion. Ever since the market was boiled down to three major providers, Verizon T Mobile and AT and T these companies have had to become everything to everyone. Terry Kramer directs the Eastern Technology Management Center at The carriers there having a look at other ways to grow. The deal still needs approval from antitrust and telecom regulators. But Kramer says, it'll probably go through because unlike the T Mobile in Sprint merger that happened earlier this year, prison and track phone can argue there in complementary, not competing markets. I'm Kristen Schwab for Marketplace on Wall Street

Kristen Schwab Verizon Verizon T Mobile Terry Kramer Khun Top Angela See Brandt LY Walmart Eastern Technology Management Frost AT U. S Sullivan
"kristen schwab" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"kristen schwab" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Similar Similar nice nice weather weather lots about their living. Eating outside is kind of a way of life in restaurants pretty much have it down in New York. Different thing serving outside can be a big and expensive pivot, especially in places where outdoor space is limited. Sidewalks and parking lanes have their limits, You know, and also nobody wants a side of truck exhaust with their meal. All right now outdoor dining and take out are the on ly options, so thousands of New York restaurants are giving it a go. Marketplaces Kristen Schwab checked in with two of them to see how it's going. Walk down Franklin Avenue in Brooklyn at night, and in some ways, the new normal doesn't look quite so bad. Franklin is like one big, socially distanced outdoor dining party with table spilling onto the sidewalk and into the street. Sounds and smells of different restaurants bleed together. There's Mexican, Caribbean, Ethiopian, Chris Chris Calamity Calamity and and Lincoln Lincoln Wheeler Wheeler are are at at a a table table outside outside Roz Roz Plant Plant based based Ethiopia. Ethiopia. Yes, Yes, we we just just ordered ordered and and We We got got a a tip tip with with injera. injera. And And then then we we ordered ordered was was the the other other one one so so food food dish dish within within Jared Jared on on a a kind kind of of salad salad and and some some some. some. They're They're celebrating their friend who didn't want to talk. Just got a pandemic puppy. And after four months of not being able to eat out, calamity, says ST Dining feels good, But it uh it actually felt a little bizarre the first time Right now. It's sort of just feels normal, like walking around seeing everyone outside eating. Very like very European vibe that I think it's pretty refreshing for New York. A lot of time and money went into creating that vied Romeo Rigali owns a restaurant with his wife, Milica. Ultimately, they sank $5000 into that outdoor space, and it's tiny, just six tables in a parallel parking spot on the street with a few more on the sidewalk. The day they announced that outdoor dining was allowed. I went online and I applied. You gotta prove right away. And then I just ran to Home Depot for Rigali. It would be the first of many trips that one was for plans started. You want 30 for? I believe I counted right. We wanted to make love Tropical tropical tto help diners forget they're eating just inches away from honking cars and idle ing delivery trucks. Then there was the trip for cinderblocks to keep those cars and trucks where they belong. Then another trip for wood fencing city inspected, recalled his parking spot patio three times. And each time he had to shut it down and make adjustments feels like the rules are always changing. Just every day. There's something new was tired of Home Depot. Just a lot. With takeout as the only other option every square foot counts and for many restaurant owners that comes down to luck. Narrow storefront, narrow patio, fire hydrants, bus stops and subway grates. Forget about it. Corner location. Nice. A few blocks away from Rigali is restaurant, Izaak Solace, a French American restaurant with a Michelin star. Solace is known for its $70.6 course meal or it wass. Steve Wang is the director of operations. Six courses, servers at the table, talking with the gas clearing the plates that had been eaten on six times a guest seemed like a lot of contacts. Also, Boxall is his patio is pretty far from the kitchen with steps and uneven pavement along the way, and during that long walk food gets cold or doesn't stay cold. So now the raw yellow fin tuna comes with the tomato dashi water on the side in a bottle on ice. Don't know what tomato Darcy Water is No worries. I had to ask to assault tomatoes down. Let the water drain out. And then you infuse it with kombu and Benito. So guess, pour the tomato water onto the fish. And it kind of keeps the dish cool while they eat it properly Chilled tomato water isn't Wangs on Ly challenged. The dining area is in what was a vacant lot behind the restaurant. Long's team cleared out the trash and added twinkly lights and white fencing to glam up the space. Beyond that, it's not very easy to control the elements. You know everything from the heat. Teo pests, mosquitoes around I'll explain. Finally do not go together. Maybe not. But customers don't seem to mind. And for now, outdoor dining is helping the business break even It is on a good day. Axel's had to close early that evening. A peak night Friday at a peak hour, eight PM Because even after you control the food and the space and the bugs, one thing you can't control is rain. I'm Christian Schwab for marketing.

New York Ethiopia Kristen Schwab Los Angeles Franklin Roz Plant Jared Chris Calamity Brooklyn Lincoln Wheeler
New York City restaurants give outdoor dining a go

All Things Considered

04:49 min | 1 year ago

New York City restaurants give outdoor dining a go

"Similar Similar nice nice weather weather lots about their living. Eating outside is kind of a way of life in restaurants pretty much have it down in New York. Different thing serving outside can be a big and expensive pivot, especially in places where outdoor space is limited. Sidewalks and parking lanes have their limits, You know, and also nobody wants a side of truck exhaust with their meal. All right now outdoor dining and take out are the on ly options, so thousands of New York restaurants are giving it a go. Marketplaces Kristen Schwab checked in with two of them to see how it's going. Walk down Franklin Avenue in Brooklyn at night, and in some ways, the new normal doesn't look quite so bad. Franklin is like one big, socially distanced outdoor dining party with table spilling onto the sidewalk and into the street. Sounds and smells of different restaurants bleed together. There's Mexican, Caribbean, Ethiopian, Chris Chris Calamity Calamity and and Lincoln Lincoln Wheeler Wheeler are are at at a a table table outside outside Roz Roz Plant Plant based based Ethiopia. Ethiopia. Yes, Yes, we we just just ordered ordered and and We We got got a a tip tip with with injera. injera. And And then then we we ordered ordered was was the the other other one one so so food food dish dish within within Jared Jared on on a a kind kind of of salad salad and and some some some. some. They're They're celebrating their friend who didn't want to talk. Just got a pandemic puppy. And after four months of not being able to eat out, calamity, says ST Dining feels good, But it uh it actually felt a little bizarre the first time Right now. It's sort of just feels normal, like walking around seeing everyone outside eating. Very like very European vibe that I think it's pretty refreshing for New York. A lot of time and money went into creating that vied Romeo Rigali owns a restaurant with his wife, Milica. Ultimately, they sank $5000 into that outdoor space, and it's tiny, just six tables in a parallel parking spot on the street with a few more on the sidewalk. The day they announced that outdoor dining was allowed. I went online and I applied. You gotta prove right away. And then I just ran to Home Depot for Rigali. It would be the first of many trips that one was for plans started. You want 30 for? I believe I counted right. We wanted to make love Tropical tropical tto help diners forget they're eating just inches away from honking cars and idle ing delivery trucks. Then there was the trip for cinderblocks to keep those cars and trucks where they belong. Then another trip for wood fencing city inspected, recalled his parking spot patio three times. And each time he had to shut it down and make adjustments feels like the rules are always changing. Just every day. There's something new was tired of Home Depot. Just a lot. With takeout as the only other option every square foot counts and for many restaurant owners that comes down to luck. Narrow storefront, narrow patio, fire hydrants, bus stops and subway grates. Forget about it. Corner location. Nice. A few blocks away from Rigali is restaurant, Izaak Solace, a French American restaurant with a Michelin star. Solace is known for its $70.6 course meal or it wass. Steve Wang is the director of operations. Six courses, servers at the table, talking with the gas clearing the plates that had been eaten on six times a guest seemed like a lot of contacts. Also, Boxall is his patio is pretty far from the kitchen with steps and uneven pavement along the way, and during that long walk food gets cold or doesn't stay cold. So now the raw yellow fin tuna comes with the tomato dashi water on the side in a bottle on ice. Don't know what tomato Darcy Water is No worries. I had to ask to assault tomatoes down. Let the water drain out. And then you infuse it with kombu and Benito. So guess, pour the tomato water onto the fish. And it kind of keeps the dish cool while they eat it properly Chilled tomato water isn't Wangs on Ly challenged. The dining area is in what was a vacant lot behind the restaurant. Long's team cleared out the trash and added twinkly lights and white fencing to glam up the space. Beyond that, it's not very easy to control the elements. You know everything from the heat. Teo pests, mosquitoes around I'll explain. Finally do not go together. Maybe not. But customers don't seem to mind. And for now, outdoor dining is helping the business break even It is on a good day. Axel's had to close early that evening. A peak night Friday at a peak hour, eight PM Because even after you control the food and the space and the bugs, one thing you can't control is rain. I'm Christian Schwab for marketing.

Romeo Rigali New York Ethiopia Home Depot Izaak Solace Kristen Schwab St Dining Roz Roz Plant Plant Jared Jared Lincoln Lincoln Wheeler Wheele Brooklyn Boxall Franklin Christian Schwab Steve Wang LY Chris Chris Axel Michelin Cinderblocks
"kristen schwab" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"kristen schwab" Discussed on KCRW

"That's one reason the stock is up 8% now. Marketplaces Kristen Schwab has this teachable moment. So despite the pandemic, Tesla has been doing really well. It's one of the most expensive stocks on Wall Street and hit an all time high in July with a value of more than $600. What's the point of chopping up the stock? Though? Well, a 5 to 1 stock splits one share into five, both in quality and price for investors. This means if you had one share now, you have five. Each stock is worth less. But collectively, the value of your shares is the same. But for potential investors it makes the stocks seem more accessible because it reduces the cost per share. OK, cheaper. But really, so what? Well inflated stocks are intimidating to small investors were talking about individual people who trade on their smartphones, and Tesla has a stronger following among these types of investors than big institutional ones. So stock splitting encourages more trading within the very group that helped test last stock becomes so valuable. The split goes into effect after markets close on August 31st but it's already had an impact. Tesla's stock jumped as much as 6% in after hours trading yesterday, and it hasn't been the only company to do this lately. Apple announced a 4 to 1 stock split in July, and experts say this could be a trend that we might see other high value companies follow suit. Alright, Kristen. Thank you. Turning to markets. The S and P 500 index is getting close to its all time high of 33 93 Again. It's a 33 77 of 1.3% this morning. The Dow is up 260 points 1%. The NASDAQ is up 1.9%. The consumer price index that's the inflation that we all live went up 6/10 of a percent in July. Fuel is a big part of it. New car prices cutting against what you may feel at the grocery store food prices fell 4/10 of a percent last month after rising in June..

Tesla Kristen Schwab Apple
"kristen schwab" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"kristen schwab" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That's one reason the stock is up 8% now. Marketplaces Kristen Schwab has this teachable moment. So despite the pandemic, Tesla has been doing really well. It's one of the most expensive stocks on Wall Street and hit an all time high in July with a value of more than $600. What's the point of chopping up the stock? Though? Well, a 5 to 1 stock splits one share into five, both in quality and price for investors. This means if you had one share now, you have five. Each stock is worth less. But collectively, the value of your shares is the same. But for potential investors it makes the stocks seem more accessible because it reduces the cost per share. OK, cheaper. But really, so what? Well inflated stocks are intimidating to small investors were talking about individual people who trade on their smartphones. And Tesla has a stronger following among these types of investors than big institutional ones. So stock splitting encourages more trading within the very group that helped test last stock becomes so valuable Split goes into effect after markets close on August 31st but it's already had an impact. Tesla's stock jumped as much as 6% in after hours trading yesterday, and it hasn't been the only company to do this lately. Apple announced a 4 to 1 stock split in July, and experts say this could be a trend that we might see other high value companies follow suit. Alright, Kristen. Thank you. Turning to markets. The S and P 500 index is getting close to its all time high of 33 93 Again. It's a 33 77 of 1.3% this morning. The Dow is up 260 points 1%. The NASDAQ is up 1.9%. The consumer price index that's the inflation that we all live went up 6/10 of a percent in July. Fuel is a big part of it. New car prices cutting against what you may feel at the grocery store food prices fell 4/10 of a percent last month after.

Tesla Kristen Schwab Apple
The pandemic has been especially hard on Black-owned businesses

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

The pandemic has been especially hard on Black-owned businesses

"For the last several months we've been watching the pandemic hit. Black businesses particularly hard and a new report from the New York. Federal. Reserve confirms that and look into the reasons why as marketplace's Kristen Schwab reports a lot of it comes down to relationships with banks getting that first round of P, P P funding was running a

Kristen Schwab New York
Where things stand on the extra $600 in unemployment benefits that ended Friday

All Things Considered

02:04 min | 1 year ago

Where things stand on the extra $600 in unemployment benefits that ended Friday

"To report it was more talk. But no action again. Today in Washington has roughly 30 million people began to face their economic futures without an additional $600 a week in federal unemployment benefits. Until and unless Congress hammers out a deal for more pandemic relief. Most jobless people will have to rely on state unemployment insurance and his marketplaces, Kristen Schwab explains when it comes to state benefits. Geography Just maybe destiny. If you're unemployed in Mississippi, your life could start to feel a lot different than if you were unemployed. In Massachusetts, the maximum benefit in Mississippi is around $230 a week. In Massachusetts. It's over $800 the gap isn't just about cost of living. The big difference is the philosophy is unemployment, something that supports the labor market, or is it a business costs to be minimized? Chris O'Leary is with the Upjohn Institute for Employment Research. There is no federal standard for unemployment benefits, so states create their own rules around who qualifies how much they get. And for how long. Michelle ever more is with the National Employment Law Project, you know, in some states like Florida and North Carolina, only about 10% of people who are unemployed or even able to get a benefit that impacts people's access to food and shelter. During a pandemic that also dramatically increases their risk of getting sick because of monetary concerns. They have to take an unsafe job, and that's gonna actually spread the virus and slow the recovery even further. She says black and Latino workers may suffer most because states with the smallest benefits have the biggest minority populations. And Sylvia Allegretto, labor economist at UC Berkeley, says differences it benefits can have direct effects on the state's economic health. Unemployment benefits have a Really important effect of propping up the greater economy. Well, that extra $600 meant a lot to workers who lost their jobs. It also meant a lot to all the businesses, relying on people who were spending it. I'm Christine

Massachusetts Michelle Mississippi Upjohn Institute For Employmen Washington Kristen Schwab Chris O'leary Congress Sylvia Allegretto Uc Berkeley National Employment Law Projec Christine North Carolina Florida
Unemployment benefits vary wildly in this country

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:04 min | 1 year ago

Unemployment benefits vary wildly in this country

"I'm sorry to report. It was more talk but no action again today in Washington has roughly thirty million began to face their economic futures out an additional six hundred dollars a week in federal unemployment benefits until and unless Congress, Hammer out a deal for more pandemic relief most jobless people will have to rely on state unemployment insurance and as marketplace's Kristen Schwab explains when it comes to state benefits geography just maybe destiny. If. You're unemployed in Mississippi. Your Life could start to feel a lot different than if you were unemployed in Massachusetts, the maximum benefit in Mississippi is around two hundred and thirty dollars a week in Massachusetts. It's over eight hundred dollars and the gap isn't just about cost of living big differences. The philosophy is unemployment something that supports labor market or is it a business cost be minimized? Chris leary with the Upjohn Institute for Employment Research. There is no federal standard for unemployment benefits. So states create their own rules around who qualifies how much they. Get and for how long Michelle Evermore is with the national employment. Law Project in some states like Florida north. Carolina. Only about ten percent of people who are unemployed or even able to get a benefit that impacts people's access to food and shelter during pandemic. It also dramatically increases their risk of getting sick because of monetary concerns they have to take an unsafe job and that's GonNa actually spread the virus in slow the recovery even further she says black and Latino workers may suffer most because with the smallest benefits have the biggest minority populations. And Sylvia Grow Labor economist at UC Berkley says differences it benefits can have direct effects on a states. Economic Health unemployment benefits have A. Really, important affect of propping up the greater economy well, that extra six hundred dollars meant a lot to workers who lost their jobs. It also meant a lot to all the businesses relying on people who were spending it.

Mississippi Michelle Evermore Massachusetts Kristen Schwab Upjohn Institute For Employmen Chris Leary Uc Berkley Washington Hammer Congress Sylvia Carolina Florida
Where Things Stand on the Extra $600 in Unemployment Benefits That Ended Friday

Marketplace

02:06 min | 1 year ago

Where Things Stand on the Extra $600 in Unemployment Benefits That Ended Friday

"Sorry to report it was more talk. But no action again today in Washington, as roughly 30 million people began to face their economic futures without an additional $600 a week in federal unemployment benefits. Until and unless Congress hammers out a deal for more pandemic relief. Most jobless people will have to rely on state unemployment insurance and his marketplaces, Kristen Schwab explains when it comes to state benefits. Geography Just maybe destiny. If you're unemployed in Mississippi, your life could start to feel a lot different than if you were unemployed. In Massachusetts, the maximum benefit in Mississippi is around $230 a week. In Massachusetts. It's over $800 the gap isn't just about cost of living. The big difference is the philosophy is unemployment, something that supports The labor market, or is it a business costs to be minimized? Chris O'Leary is with the Upjohn Institute for Employment Research. There is no federal standard for unemployment benefits, so states create their own rules around who qualifies how much they get. And for how long? Michelle ever more is with the National Employment Law Project, you know, in some states like Florida and North Carolina, only about 10% of people who are unemployed or even able to get a benefit that impacts people's access to food and shelter. During a pandemic that also dramatically increases their risk of getting sick because of monetary concerns. They have to take an unsafe job, and that's going to actually spread the virus and slow the recovery even further. Jesus. Black and Latino workers may suffer most because states with the smallest benefits have the biggest minority populations. And Sylvia Allegretto, labor economist at UC Berkeley, says differences it benefits can have direct effects on a state's economic health. Unemployment benefits have a Really important effect of propping up the greater economy. While that extra $600 meant a lot to workers who lost their jobs, it also meant a lot to all the businesses, relying on people who were spending it. I'm Christine Schwab for marketplace.

Mississippi Massachusetts Kristen Schwab Christine Schwab Upjohn Institute For Employmen Washington Congress Chris O'leary Sylvia Allegretto Uc Berkeley Michelle National Employment Law Projec North Carolina Florida
"kristen schwab" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:55 min | 1 year ago

"kristen schwab" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Are doing dangerous work, too. I'm Kristen Schwab for marketplace. One of the reasons the global economy works as smoothly as it does most of the time. Is that all those interlocking supply chains are well oiled machines. Everything gets where it needs to be when it needs to be there. No sooner no. Later. Until a pandemic. It's because just in time manufacturing and unexpected spikes in demand do not good partners make we've seen a couple of examples past couple of months. Think toilet paper, right? Now it's cans. Demand for canned goods is so strong wholesale distributors are running out of empties to pack up the soups and the Chilean, the tuna and all that kind of stuff. Marketplaces. Scott Tongue has our supply chain story today. James Kwan is the CEO of E Pallets, Technology and logistics company that connects food manufacturers and buyers. He says. A shortage of cans means foods that are normally unavailable for a week or two are now delayed for months, especially and ready to eat meals like chili soups and prepared to meet the cans are in short supply, Kwon says. Materials like tin and steel from China are scarce as our labels for cans, he says, one food manufacturer had label sent by plane instead of ships to get them quickly. Still, he worries about people who rely and canned food. A senior citizen's school kids who are Required these emergency food packs and the newly unemployed. Awaiting a month. 23 months is just on the left stick. And as the pandemic worsens, demand for nonperishable food is spiking again. The analytics from Ai R. I says grocery store purchases are up 13% but soup is a 25%. IRA vice president Joan Driggs. I would not associate with the peak of summer to be when people would be purchasing things like condensed soup or canned chili. Fight. The sales levels for those products are up significantly. Still, from a business perspective, it may not make sense for soup and can't cos to spend on supersizing production. If things return to normal, saying a year Rudy Loy Sinner teaches supply chain management at Rutgers. We all wanted to go back to the way it Wass and Elsa don't think that when all of this is over that people going to keep hoarding weeks of food in the house before this pandemic, sales of soup and other canned foods Had been trending down. I'm Scott Tong for Marketplace. Every time we turn around, it seems scientists are telling us this year or even this month. Is among the hottest on record. And in fact, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says this summer is going to be hotter than average across pretty much the whole country. But even in an average summer heat kills hundreds of Americans cooling centers have been and they still are a popular solution, but his marketplaces Eric Barris, reports. Getting a bunch of people in the air conditioned rooms in the middle of a pandemic. Is a little problematic. In the age of social distancing and trying to keep people from spreading. Corbett, 19. Do you invite them to leave their homes and congregate under a communal H vac system to stay safe from the heat? It's a hard time because every choice we have seems to be a decision between two really bad options. That's Eric Klinenberg, a sociologist at in You who wrote a book about the 1995 Chicago Heat wave that killed more than 700 people that prompted cities to start opening cooling centers. It worked fine until this year because, as Jackson, Mississippi chief Administrative Officer Robert Blaine says, the same communities that are vulnerable to challenges from heat are also most vulnerable to the virus is well, that is the poor, the elderly and people of color. Jackson is 85% black. And in a typical summer, the city has at least 25 days when the heat index rises above 95 it opens cooling centers. But this year, Blaine says, we have not open centers because we've been concerned about our ability. Our resource is to control social distancing in those spaces. Cities across the country are facing the same tough decision. Christie by researches the health risks of climate variability at the University of Washington, she says. It's not an either or Cities can't do one or the other. They can't either protect their citizens from heat or protect their citizens from Cove in 19. They have to do both. Before the pandemic. People had a lot of options when it got hot, says sociologist Eric Klinenberg. A cooling Senate doesn't have to be a government building with the words cooling center stamped on it. It can be a mall. It could be a movie theater. It can be a restaurant. It can be a coffee shop. The problem this summer is that many of those places are closed and that has left city scrambling. Instead of careful planning. Now we're getting all sorts of ad hoc measures. Phoenix has used its convention center as a cooling center, Philadelphia parked city buses and kept the running. New York City is just giving away air conditioners. But some places aren't doing anything because of state orders. Marks Demon, a geography professor at Cal State, Chico worked on the city's extreme heat plan. Chico's cooling centers. They cancelled that programme and we're really just running without anything right now, And that's a problem. Chico already was strapped and recently gained around 20,000 residents who have been displaced by wildfires as these disasters kind of stacked up on top of each other that they just become more more difficult for a community like ours. For now, they're distributing cold water to homeless camps and low income residents as temperatures climb above 100 degrees while trying to stop cloven 19 from spreading in the community and planning how to evacuate as wild fires break out. Hands. While all of that happens, Steven says the city doesn't have the capacity to make long term plans. America Baris for Marketplace.

Eric Klinenberg Chico Robert Blaine Jackson Kristen Schwab National Oceanic and Atmospher Eric Barris New York City Rudy Loy Sinner Scott Tongue Scott Tong China Kwon Senate
"kristen schwab" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:56 min | 1 year ago

"kristen schwab" Discussed on KCRW

"Are doing dangerous work, too. I'm Kristen Schwab for marketplace. One of the reasons the global economy works as smoothly as it does most of the time. Is that all those interlocking supply chains are well oiled machines. Everything gets where it needs to be when it needs to be there. No sooner no. Later. Until a pandemic. It's because just in time manufacturing and unexpected spikes in demand do not good partners make we've seen a couple of examples past couple of months. Think toilet paper, right? Now it's cans. Demand for canned goods is so strong wholesale distributors are running out of empties to pack up the soups and the Chilean, the tuna and all that kind of stuff. Marketplaces. Scott Tongue has our supply chain story today. James Kwan is the CEO of E Pallets, technology and logistics company that connects food manufacturers and Byers. He says a shortage of cans means foods that are normally unavailable for a week or two are now delayed for months, especially and ready to eat meals. Like chili soups and prepared meets. The cans are in short supply, Kwon says. Materials like tin and steel from China are scarce as our labels for cans, he says, one food manufacturer had label sent by plane instead of ships to get them quickly. Still, he worries about people who rely and canned food. A senior citizen's school kids who are Required these emergency crew packs and the newly unemployed Awaiting a month. 23 months is just on elastic. And as the pandemic worsens, demand for nonperishable food is spiking again. The analytics firm I R. I says grocery store purchases are up 13% but soup is a 25%. IRA vice president Joan Driggs. I would not associate with the peak of summer to be when people would be purchasing things like condensed soup or canned chili. Fight. The sales levels for those products are up significantly. Still, from a business perspective, it may not make sense for soup and can't cos to spend on supersizing production. If things return to normal sane a year. Rudy Loy Sinner teaches supply chain management at Rutgers. We all wanted to go back to the way it wass and I also don't think that when all of this is over that people going to keep hoarding weeks of food in the house before this pandemic, sales of soup and other canned foods had been trending down. I'm Scott Tong for Marketplace. Every time we turn around, it seems scientists are telling us this year or even this month. Is among the hottest on record. And in fact, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says this summer is going to be hotter than average across pretty much the whole country. But even in an average summer heat kills hundreds of Americans cooling centers have been and they still are a popular solution, but his marketplaces Eric embarrass reports getting a bunch of people in the air conditioned rooms in the middle of a pandemic. Is a little problematic. In the age of social distancing and trying to keep people from spreading. Corbett, 19. Do you invite them to leave their homes and congregate under a communal H vac system to stay safe from the heat? It's a hard time because every choice we have seems to be a decision between two really bad options. That's Eric Klinenberg, a sociologist at N. Yu, who wrote a book about the 1995 Chicago Heat wave that killed more than 700 people that prompted cities to start opening cooling centers. It worked fine until this year because, as Jackson, Mississippi chief Administrative Officer Robert Blaine says, the same communities that are vulnerable to challenges from heat are also most vulnerable to the virus is well, that is the poor, the elderly and people of color. Jackson is 85% black. And in a typical summer, the city has at least 25 days when the heat index rises above 95 it opens cooling centers. But this year, Blaine says, we have not open centers because we've been concerned about our ability. Our resource is to control social distancing in those spaces. Cities across the country are facing the same tough decision. Christie by researches the health risks of climate variability at the University of Washington, she says. It's not an either or Cities can't do one or the other. They can't either protect their citizens from heat. Or protect their citizens from Cove in 19. They have to do both before the pandemic. People had a lot of options when it got hot, says sociologist Eric Klinenberg. A cooling Senate doesn't have to be a government building with the words cooling center stamped on it. It can be a mall. It can be a movie theater. It can be a restaurant. It can be a coffee shop. The problem this summer is that many of those places are closed and that has left city scrambling. Instead of careful planning. Now we're getting all sorts of at Hak measures. Phoenix has used its convention center as a cooling center, Philadelphia parked city buses and kept the running. New York City is just giving away air conditioners. But some places aren't doing anything because of state orders Mark Steam in a geography professor at Cal State, Chico worked on the city's extreme heat plan. She goes cooling centers. They cancelled that programme and we're really just running without anything right now, and that's a problem. Chico already was strapped and recently gained around 20,000 residents who have been displaced by wildfires. As these disasters kind of stacked up on top of each other that they just become more more difficult for a community like ours. For now, they're distributing cold water to homeless camps and low income residents as temperatures climb above 100 degrees while trying to stop clothed 19 from spreading in the community and planning how to evacuate as wild fires break out. Hands. While all of that happens, Steven says the city doesn't have the capacity to make long term plans. America Baris for Marketplace.

Eric Klinenberg Robert Blaine Jackson Kristen Schwab National Oceanic and Atmospher Chico Eric embarrass New York City Rudy Loy Sinner Scott Tongue Scott Tong China Kwon Senate Joan Driggs
"kristen schwab" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"kristen schwab" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Reality of this pandemic is that it's disproportionately affecting and killing people of color that is reality Number one. Actually, Reality number two is that structural inequality and systemic economic racism have been a kind of pandemic of their own for centuries now. So Minnesota as have more than 60 other states and local government is moving to declare racism a public health crisis Now is that actually going to change anything? Miss Marketplace of Kristen Schwab to find out Milwaukee County was the first to pass the resolution declaring racism a public health crisis in May 2019. The move wasn't inspired by a big event, but study after study showing economic inequality in the county was among the worst in the country. Part of the work is to name and acknowledge that those things are true and that people in power believe that it's true. Paula Tran Indio is with the University of Wisconsin's Public Health Institute. The institute works with nearly 100 local organizations, including hospitals, research groups and schools to set goals for diversity in hiring or measuring outcomes for things like infant mortality. Tamara. Phyllis Jones, an epidemiologist at Morehouse College, says, declaring a crisis invites accountability and six months from now. The public can say so. County X or city. Why? What are you doing? What have you done? And what are you going to do about this? Most of the counties and states that have declared this a crisis just did it in the last few months. But actually measuring progress is complicated and funding doesn't always follow, says Thomas Love East who teaches health equality at Tulane University. The public health emergency here of Racism is quite M office because racism is a foundation of much of what we do in the society housing, education, jobs, health care. It's not like a vacuum. Dramatic then, like a hurricane or was great that we know has a beginning a middle and when and unlike a national disaster, a racism crisis doesn't trigger a flood of government funds. So until the national entity creates rules, states and cities will make them up as they go. I'm Kristen Tribe for Marketplace..

Public Health Institute Milwaukee County Kristen Schwab Paula Tran Indio Kristen Tribe Minnesota Morehouse College Tulane University Phyllis Jones University of Wisconsin
"kristen schwab" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"kristen schwab" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The reality of this pandemic is that it's disproportionately affecting and killing people of color that is reality Number one. Actually, Reality number two is that structural inequality and systemic economic racism have been a kind of pandemic of their own for centuries now. So Minnesota as have more than 60 other states and local governments is moving to declare racism a public health crisis Now is that actually going to change anything has marketplace of Kristen Schwab to find out Milwaukee County was the first to pass the resolution declaring racism a public health crisis in May 2019. Move wasn't inspired by a big event. But study after study showing economic inequality in the county was among the worst in the country. Apart of the work is to name and acknowledge that those things are true and that people in power believe that it's true. Paula Tran NGO is with the University of Wisconsin's Public Health Institute. The institute works with nearly 100 local organizations, including hospitals, research groups and schools to set goals for diversity in hiring or measuring outcomes for things like infant mortality. Tamara. Phyllis Jones, an epidemiologist at Morehouse College, says, declaring a crisis invites accountability and six months from now. The public can say so. County X or city. Why? What are you doing? What have you done? And what are you going to do about this? Most of the counties and states that have declared this a crisis just did it in the last few months. But actually measuring progress is complicated and funding doesn't always follow, says Thomas Live east who teaches health equality at Tulane University. The public health emergency here of Racism is quite M office because racism is a foundation of much of what we do in the society, housing, education, jobs, health care. It's not like in a queue. Dramatic then, like a hurricane or earthquake that we know has a beginning a middle and when and unlike a national disaster, a racism crisis doesn't trigger a flood of government funds. So until the national entity creates rules, states and cities will make them up as they go. I'm Kristen Trump for Marketplace..

Public Health Institute Milwaukee County Kristen Schwab Kristen Trump Paula Tran NGO Minnesota Morehouse College Phyllis Jones Move Tulane University Thomas Live University of Wisconsin
"kristen schwab" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:41 min | 1 year ago

"kristen schwab" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Just my duty to protect my family. But with movie theatres closed a little musical called Hamilton stole the show after the company moved up its release on its streaming platform. Disney plus But Disney can't on Lee. Take a shot on streaming right now. Remember Disney pluses. Pretty new subscription is just 6 99 a month, and the company doesn't expect the platform to become profitable for a few years. So it needs to look elsewhere. Stephanie Lou is with Forrester. So Disney has multiple businesses, and most of them are hurting right now, there's the movie theater thing. Plus, there aren't many live sports playing on ESPN. Disney Cruises are suspended but parks they have some more control over the experience and what reopening means. The company also has experience managing a reopening during Cove in 19 its resort in Shanghai started welcoming visitors again in early May. And Michael Smith, a professor of information technology at Carnegie Mellon, says the parks were about much more than thrilling rides. Parks is a big piece in the puzzle, but I think it's also a key part of the overall is the experience the park's Air Disney's interactive PR tool and their key to sustaining the brand. Once people visit the Magic kingdom, they may be more likely to subscribe to Disney Plus or buy a stuffed toy at the Disney store or someday See The Lion King on Broadway. And if not the money the company makes off the park's. That's not too shabby. The price of standard admission these days, $109 a day. I'm Kristen Schwab for marketplace. Here is my favorite theme park. Anecdote of the day. Non Diz need to be clear. So in the Wall Street Journal this morning, the Fuji Q Highland amusement park in Japan is asking people not to scream on its roller coasters. Right pandemic screaming Khurana has got it. Please scream the park's messages. Inside your heart, which I love. 2020. Come on. Not a lot of screaming on Wall Street the day cheers mostly among traders also buying that, despite the warning from United Airlines of as many as 36,000 layoffs this fall. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. Brooks Brothers filed for the legal protections of Chapter 11 of the U. S bankruptcy code this morning. Lockdowns and working from home obviously had not been great for the menswear industry. But Corona virus isn't the only thing Brooks Brothers has been dealing with of late. It's go to offering the business suit has been going out of style for years now. Oregon police Justin Ho has more on the rise and the fall of the men's uniform of the business World. Brooks Brothers opened its first store in lower Manhattan in 18 18 when the U. S was made up of 20 states. Future customer Abraham Lincoln was only nine years old when the suit as we know it today started becoming popular in the late 19th century Brooks Brothers cashed in They were right there at the heart of finance at the heart of politics, really when America was getting it starts. Susan's Graffiti is the founder of the Fashion Law Institute at Fordham Law School, she says Brooks Brothers really popular. I suits that were ready to wear off the rack that helped that suits fit more people. That's graffiti says It also made the suit and the high status it represented more accessible. Everybody had tohave Brooks Brothers suit if you're going to be and the whole class or upper middle class or even another class business person, graffiti says by the middle of the 20th century, the suit also became a symbol of corporate conformity. Think mad men. But in the 19 nineties, casual Fridays had become a thing. Then Silicon Valley. Okay hoodies and sneakers and casual became mainstream. Justin Shack, managing director at Rosenblatt. Security's on Wall Street, remembers the suit and tie days I used to own Brooks Brothers suits back when I'm starting my career, and I can't remember the last time I did. Since 2014 the market for men's suits has shrunk by 11% according to the research from Euromonitor and Menswear has changed with the times. Ken get in Cohen's Rothman's menswear store based in New York, he says his biggest seller these days is denim. So we saw a lot of genes and we sell a lot of sport codes with it given says the suit isn't dead. But the suits he sells tend to be fashionable suits meant for special events. It's not really classic work where that's not what the young guys looking for in a suit The Koven 19 pandemic has only made things worse for the suit industry is people work from home in stores have closed as Brooks Brothers files for bankruptcy. It says it's seeking a buyer for the grant unjust in how the marketplace Trying to get a new job often comes with challenges trying to get a new job in a pandemic. Comes with a whole lot more challenges Steve unemployment the.

Brooks Brothers Disney Fuji Q Highland amusement park Disney store Euromonitor and Menswear Parks Wall Street Journal ESPN founder Hamilton Rothman Michael Smith Carnegie Mellon Kristen Schwab Stephanie Lou Shanghai Cove Forrester
"kristen schwab" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"kristen schwab" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"SOIL. Paper for some weird reason pasta also for much more straightforward reason rice as well and other section of the supermarket shelves. Have Been Bear flour and yeast. Demand is way up in these corona virus. Times as marketplace's Kristen Schwab reports the recipe has a picture of a fluffy loaf of bread fresh out of the Oven Golden Brown with beautiful cracks in the crust. It's easy it's fun it's delicious. It came out much more gooey and I tried to make it into a baguette and it came out looking like Rocketship Antonius Julia. Julia in New York has attempted the recipe five times with mixed results. And why not? He's got all the time in the world. He actually ordered baking kit from a local bakery for fifty bucks because he couldn't find flour or yeast at the store. Red Star Yeast. One of the country's major producers says demand right now is unprecedented and at King Arthur. Flower sales are three times higher than usual even for whole wheat flour. Typically this time of year were kind of operating at fifty percent capacity Karen Kohlberg is co CEO. And in the past three weeks we have turned onto. Full Tilt in their operating twenty four seven. Kohlberg says we aren't running out of wheat much like toilet. Paper shelves are empty because of logistics. But why has baking bread become an obsession? Amy Bentley a professor of food studies at Nyu says bread shortage in. Some places is one reason and let's be real. Carbs are comforting. There's the needing Joe with your hands. There's a distinct way that the yeast smells and and I'm not sure there's any better smell. The Aroma of baking bread also bred his cross cultural sourdot non or hollow. It all makes us feel more connected to family so it turns out during a pandemic. The best thing since sliced bread is any bread. I'm Kristen Schwab for marketplace..

Red Star Yeast Kristen Schwab Karen Kohlberg Antonius Julia King Arthur Nyu Amy Bentley New York CEO Joe professor
"kristen schwab" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"kristen schwab" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"German. I estimated time line was three years from now and I imagine that that's going to have to be pushed out. I'm Magin so thinking retirement in a corona virus economy. But first let's do the numbers Dow industrial's down three hundred and sixty points today. One point six percent. Twenty one thousand fifty two. The Nasdaq down. One hundred fourteen. That is one point. Five percent percent half another way to say that seventy three seventy three five hundred thirty eight points also a percent half twenty four and eighty eight. For the week the Dow gave back more than two percent. The Nasdaq down a little more than percent and a half the S&P five hundred by two percent to downside tesla charge the five point six percent today delivered. Eighty eight thousand four hundred of its electric cars. During the first quarter that is up forty four zero percent from a year ago. Tesla did not however saying about how the pandemic would have would affect future listening to marketplace. This is marketplace. I'm Kai Ryssdal. You know the thing about this crisis the economic crisis right not the healthcare crisis is it. There's really no playbook for almost anything not shutting down whole industries not for keeping a meaningful level of consumer demand go and not for how companies ought to connect with those consumers whether it's even in good taste to try and that last part businesses reaching out to people who by the way are spending more time than ever in front of a screen that kind of puts a premium on ad marketplace's Kristen Schwab looks at the art of striking the right tone in a pandemic the great messaging makeover has begun marketers have been scrambling to pull TV ads. That may have once been a good idea but now feel tone-deaf like this one for apple air pots. A woman is walking the streets of New York City. It's cramped and overwhelming. So she puts in her air pods and Poof Manhattan. Streets are empty. What a fantasy. Then there's this. Kfc AD set to Chopin. The camera zooms in on people eating fried chicken and licking their fingers. Looking your partners fingers. You Know Finger Lickin good advertising is all about capturing the moment and the moment has changed take this. At ad that started airing in late March. It's a montage of photos of empty streets and shuttered storefronts these days. It's anything but business as usual. That's why working together is more important than ever shift from consumerism. To quiet contempt of family. I is not so easy these days while it's not too tricky to swap out an ad on a website or on social media. It's almost impossible to shoot a sweeping new. Tv commercial during quarantine. Jim Nail is a marketing analyst at Forrester. Literally we're getting a lot of calls from clients asking us. Well what does anyone else doing? Just because there's never been an experience like this that you can reach back to and and draw on to give you any gardens. Nail says some companies are replaying old ads. Others are making new ones with footage from previous shoots that was left on the cutting room floor. Nielsen data shows that when people are forced to stay home they watch about sixty percent more content than usual and the companies that can connect during this chaos made you better in an economic downturn but only if they strike the right note says Edward Russell a professor of advertising at Syracuse University. It's easier to get the eyeballs. But at the same time you have to take into account the state that people are in and what you can do to maybe less than that and comfort them. Russell Says Comfort in uncertain times comes with a theme Red White and blue after nine eleven. We saw very pro America. Let's all get together kinds of advertising. Here's a commercial General Motors. Put Out after September eleventh. It was part of its keeping America Rolling series. There aren't any cars in it. It's shot as if you're the driver rolling through what looks like Middle America Flat Grassy and green. The American dream refused to let anybody get away ads. Like this tells a lot about the moment we're living in emotionally and also economically. Think back to the Super Bowl in February when the market was good and employment was rock bottom and we still had live. Sports commercials were energetic. Funny even snarky. We probably won't see much of that for a while. I'm Kristen Schwab for marketplace..

Kristen Schwab America Jim Nail Edward Russell Dow industrial Tesla Kai Ryssdal New York City apple Manhattan Middle America Chopin General Motors Forrester Syracuse University
"kristen schwab" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"kristen schwab" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"Make so many people stay home? Obviously that's going to have an economic downside and we're seeing that all over the place but you you make so many people stay home. There are some economic upsides to right. No they don't balance out for sure but there are some companies in industries that are able to capitalize one video games. People are staying home putting up their consoles and playing for hours and hours. In fact an official with the World Health Organization suggested video games as a way to play with others while being socially distant marketplace Jasmine gars reports the pandemic has caused mass migration to a tropical island filled with talking animals. I'm talking about Nintendo's new game animal crossings new horizon. It sold millions of copies in less than two weeks. The goal catch fish. Befriend locals wonder around? Dmitri Williams is a professor at USC. Annenberg it is a kind nice environment and at a time when the world is dark and uncertain in grim. Sometimes the best thing you could possibly do is to go into a warm safe-space with people forced to stay home around the world. Online Games are also a great way for friends to stay connected. Fifteen million people plead the latest call of duty game in the first three days after its recent release. That's a record Neil Mackie. An analyst with Morningstar says more players also means the should sparks demand for micro transactions and which are basically in game purchases. Things like better guns or new costumes. It's not all good news for the industry so needs new console. The playstation five is supposed to launch this Christmas. Mike Salmon is with Majid a consumer research company normally they would start production in China about right now to get enough. Consuls made norcal launch globally. Salmon says that will likely get delayed and new games are also hitting snags. Creative teams figure out how to work from home. I'm jasmine cars for marketplace. When you get right down to brass economic tax we kinda have to keep shopping now right stuck at home or not that whole consumers account for seventy percent of this economy thing that we say all the time but for a lot of people buying stuff. That's discretionary anything that's not food and supplies to get them through. This pandemic feels kind of weird and maybe a little bit wrong. Marketplace's Kristen Schwab looked into the ethics of non essential shopping right now. Twenty five percent off converse sneakers two for one yoga pants. Free Shipping. Like a lot of US job alinsky in Illinois has been watching the sales pour into her in box. But she's not buying much. It just doesn't seem appropriate. She says it feels silly to buy stuff. She doesn't need and she doesn't want to put warehouse and delivery workers at risk but she did break down. Once lipstick from Sephora it was half off with free shipping you know Prasad purchase no CERITA CA Dolly at Forrester says stores are discounting stuff. They might not normally put on sale a nice shirt for those meetings and sweatpants to pair with them. She says big picture buying right now is good. If you've had your eye on something and it's on sale you actually are helping a retailer manage its cash flow in the meantime I mean. I don't think that that's that's at all a bad thing. But what about those bad feelings? Surprise DISGUST EMBARRASSMENT. That you were so excited about a sale. So He Johnson King teaches ethics at New York University. Look and feel a sense of disorientation where we're wondering is what we care about out of line with what's really important. She says it's normal to question the tiny things you can control. When the world feels chaotic and Johnson King says give yourself a break if a fancy new coffee maker helps you start your day. An scented candle helps you. Relax when it's over. Consider those joys essential items for your mental health. I'm Kristen Schwab for marketplace.

Kristen Schwab Johnson King World Health Organization Jasmine gars Neil Mackie Mike Salmon Nintendo official norcal Dmitri Williams New York University analyst Morningstar USC alinsky professor China
"kristen schwab" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"kristen schwab" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"So as I said. Downstream is where. We're headed what this virus is going to do to the regular buying and selling that fundamentally is this economy marketplace Justin Ho spent his afternoon at a clothing store in Manhattan the stores called Rothmans upscale menswear shop with suits casualwear in custody hillary. It's a little before noon store's been open for a couple of hours and things have been quiet. There's really no foot traffic. We've had a couple of appointments that came in co owner. Ken Get it. He says lunchtime in this part of town is normally really busy as I'm standing here. There's there's literally nobody walking down the streets. The store's been cutting back on orders to make sure it doesn't have too much inventory cans brother co owner. Jim Getting says they're also reaching out to customers. They know who might want to buy something? But you gotta be respectful of the customers. 'cause they're all going through the same thing? We're going through about an hour later. A couple of shoppers of trickled in but things aren't much better. At one point Jim get into another employee. Tried ordering more hand. Sanitizer NO DEITZ. That's our number. One priority now is to try and find supplies to keep our customers healthy and keep us healthy by one thirty store. Traffic still hasn't improved can get in says revenues down roughly sixty to eighty percent compared to this time of year ago. Rothmans has been around for decades and has withstood other disasters like hurricane. Sandy nine eleven but the uncertainty of Corona virus. Right now has him concerned for his twenty eight employees. What do you do when the decision is? Do you go out of business. Try and pay your employees. We're not there but if this thing lasts four months will be there this week. New York City announce zero interest loans for small businesses seeing big drops in revenue. Ken has already applied. I'm Justin Ho for marketplace as we were talking about yesterday. There is a real life behavioral economics experiment happening right now. Is Consumers clean out grocery stores stocks of Pasta and rice and yes toilet paper. Scarcity is the actual economic concept at play here but its application in practice has grocers scrambling to keep up with demand. And as marketplace's Kristen Schwab reports the grocery stores supply chain. It's Kinda complicated able. Oh Monte is feeling conflicted about the empty shelves at Grocery Store in Queens. It's fair to say that. Yes we're happy with the with the Ingram and business but at the same time it's kind of difficult keeping it's stocked. He gets truck deliveries twice a week and the last one was missing about a third of what he ordered to keep shelves full. He goes shopping. He bought rubbing alcohol from a medical supply store. And I've even had a by some cases of stuff from Walmart. That's how bad has gotten all Monte and Walmart have different supply chains on Monte uses a middleman. It means a can of soup goes from factory to a third party distribution warehouse and then to his store Walmart has its own distribution centers more than one hundred and fifty self distribution works brilliantly particularly in crisis burt flick jer is with strategic resource group. Like Albertson's like kroger like BJ'S COSCO. They all can go from one truck it day to several trucks. Day seven days a week and Restock the stores around the clock. Big Stores have twenty four seven access to inventory and their own fleet of trucks and Ananth Higher who teaches operations management? At purdue says they have something else. The little guys lack lots of cash. If you're a small player. Do you have the financial wherewithal to go. Get the supply ahead of the demand is all Monte in Queens has to keep using Walmart to stock his shelves. It's going to eat into his prophets but he says he's not going to raise prices. He hopes that keeps people coming to historic instead of competitors down the street. I'm Kristen Schwab for marketplace..

Grocery Store Walmart Monte Justin Ho Kristen Schwab Jim Getting Ken Queens Rothmans co hillary purdue New York City Ananth Higher Manhattan Ingram Albertson
"kristen schwab" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"kristen schwab" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"Uh-huh ah I. I'm a libra. Make that what you will. Millions and millions of people make a whole lot of astrology and some are making money off it. Marketplace's Kristen Schwab looks at what's written in the stars for the astrology. Business Commute Ero- rebellious doesn't take astrology too seriously. Well until mercury goes into retrograde it happens three or four times a year and astrologer say it. The world into total chaos. Knowing that. I'm like okay this week. I need to try to get as much done with my business as I can before. That era rebellious owns a personal training. Business in New York she's thirty nine and a capricorn. She pays twenty bucks a month for serious joy. A service that e mails her daily horoscopes and weekly videos. Kind of like a psychic weather report looking at your day mood cast. The week is very mellow except for Tuesday. That's the day we're conscious. Dorms may stir things up. Euro rebellious gotten to astrology a few years ago when she says work and technology and politics felt overwhelming. She says horoscopes. Give her the guidance others may get from Church. Astrology gives you a structure for understanding yourself. You're trying to make sense of a world that may be challenging Pew. Research shows. Millennials are less religious than other age groups but sixty percent of them. Believe in new age spirituality and these days they don't have to flip to the back of a magazine to find their horoscope. There are more than two hundred astrology. Apps in the APP store which claimed to do everything from tell you if your date is a love match to show you what you and your dates baby would look like. The question. Isn't whether astrology real or not. It's whether the effects are real or not. Banu Goulart is a Scorpio and the founder of Co Star. An APP that has seven and a half million users. And has launched a Zillion memes. We designed the APP and the content. All around how we actually talk with each other and really try hard to nail that exact tone that's really loving but also kind of snarky and also kind of mean the other day co-star told me I keep falling in love with the wrong people. It literally said no false hope no excuses. No tears and that message is personal. Co-star USES NASA data to plot your birth chart a map of the solar system from when you were born then comes the secret sauce. An Algorithm spits out your horoscope and it's that Algorithm. That's helped coast our poll in six million dollars in venture capital funding. The company isn't profitable yet but Goulart believes that can make money from extra features right now. The APP has won for three bucks. But let's compare your horoscope to your grants or even your dogs. The industry has changed tremendously in the last fifteen years. Rebecca Gordon is a virgo and an astrologer in New York. She's been doing a lot of corporate events for companies like Schnell Simon and Shuster and adobe. I meet her in her Manhattan apartment. The walls are wrapped with shelves of astrology books. She plugged my birth Info into a program on her computer. Are you ready to see your chart? I guess the little nervous. This is a snapshot of the sky. At the exact moment you were born. It looks like a pie chart sprinkled with the Zodiac signs. But what can it reveal? It would seem to me that you very much came here to impregnate consciousness with new ideas and to share it with the world. Well she does. No I'm a journalist. I was hoping for something a little more crystal ball like but they're no predictions about my future. She says that's not the point. What astrology will do is it will bring perspective and reframing situation. It can change the way we see ourselves. And the way we act in the future the price of perspective in this case two hundred and fifty dollars an hour. I'm Kristen Schwab an Aquarius for marketplace..

Shuster Kristen Schwab Banu Goulart New York NASA capricorn Rebecca Gordon adobe Schnell Simon founder Scorpio virgo Co Star Manhattan
"kristen schwab" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"kristen schwab" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"We're watching stocks slide again today. I'm David Brancaccio. In New York to a large extent the stock market has become a numerical expression of ebbing and flowing concern about the Kovic nineteen corona virus after a stock market. Rally on Wall Street fizzled and turn mixed yesterday. Hong Kong and Shanghai indexes are up modestly today but Europe is down hard. The footsie index in London is down more than two percent the DAX in Germany. Down two point two percent. Here's Andrew Walker the economics correspondent for our editorial partner the BBC financial markets. Going through a reassessment of the likely economic impact of the new virus beyond China been a surge in cases in Italy followed by some draconian restrictions on movement in and out of towns in the north of the country at the center of the outbreak. Reports of infections and other European countries have provoked concerns that there will be further constraints imposed on the movement of people and goods companies with travel related businesses. Were especially hit. They have to contend with official restrictions and customers choosing not to travel the airline Easyjet for example which operates largely in Europe so a further sharp falling share price today bringing the total decline. This week to well over twenty five percent Andrew. Thank you right now. Dow S&P Nasdaq Futures. Here are all down between seven and nine tenths of a percent the benchmark ten year. Us interest rate is at an all time low with money flowing into bonds and on a bet that a slower world economy needs less oil. Crude is down more than two percent in New York forty seven sixty nine of barrel the lowest since December twenty eighteen now just looking through the long list of events canceled around the world because of concern about the virus as collated by the business publication courts facebook's global marketing gathering in San Francisco was march ninth but not anymore the Milan furniture fair. The world's biggest his postponing from April to June the Dalai Lama's stopping ordination ceremonies and public events. Storms these tour through Asia is postponed and there's news today. Every school in Japan will close from Monday through April eighth now to signs of economic dynamism in places sometimes the US economy leaves behind a new study from the Center for American. Progress says some rural communities are seeing new energy especially in what it calls graying. America marketplace's Kristen Schwab reports businesses growing in rural America. Because there are more graying Americans Ben Gadgil Laura of the center of American progress led. The study is population growth and so areas that have a lot of population. Growth are going to see a lot more business. Dynamism the Census Bureau says almost a quarter of people sixty five and older live in rural areas. Many are moving to rural places within reach of smaller cities where they can still get what they need and for less and the Florida is still a big place to retire. Aging Americans are also moving to Colorado Utah and Wyoming states that have revamped their image to bring in new residents have one nice natural amenities places that are of pretty in rural areas. Retirement benefits can make up more than fifty percent of local spending. Megan Lawson with headwaters economics caused that the mailbox economy labor income really can be a tremendous support particularly in rural places That maybe don't have a robust Job Marquette and that retiree spending means more healthcare retail and construction jobs that in turn bring younger residents in. I'm Kristen Schwab for marketplace..

Kristen Schwab Andrew Walker Europe America David Brancaccio New York Ben Gadgil Laura Easyjet Megan Lawson Census Bureau Florida Hong Kong Asia London facebook Colorado China
Grounded Boeing jet holds back profits, growth at airlines

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

01:34 min | 1 year ago

Grounded Boeing jet holds back profits, growth at airlines

"The faulty Boeing jet that has moved profits from one part of the airline industry to another. I'm David Brancaccio. In New York there were ugly quarterly orderly results from Southwest Airlines today profits. Were Down Twenty. One percent stock is down one point seven percent. Now this is an airline that have been especially reliant on the grounded seven thirty-seven Max jet which may not get recertified to fly until mid year American Airlines also used a lot of Max jets but it's prophets. Today were better than expected yet. The stock is down more than three percent. Marketplace's Kristen's Schwab has more. It's not an American southwest are losing business because of the seven thirty seven Max. It said they're missing out on growth. Michael Boyd is president of Boyd Group. International flights are being cancelled not being scheduled in other words American and South West. I might not have enough aircraft to add flights out of small cities that customers want think Charleston to London though until the maximums in south west is the only airline that won't be able to really to expand its fleet at this time. Southwest has more Max planes in its competitors. Part of the aircraft's appeal is its flexibility. It can take short trips and those Popular International International Flights Ego teaches aviation management at purdue. He says it'll be a while until airlines. Get the Max off. The ground bowing says the planes may be cleared to fly this summer. You're not guaranteed. A lot of things do happen before this and for months after while mechanics and pilots are trained until then dreams of adding more flights flight three bit in the clouds. I'm Chris and Traube for marketplace

American Airlines Southwest Airlines Southwest Michael Boyd David Brancaccio Boeing New York South West Boyd Group Schwab Purdue Kristen Chris President Trump Traube Charleston London