31 Burst results for "Krista Tippett"

4 Ways to Live Each Day With Intention by Shelley Levitt

Optimal Living Daily

04:27 min | Last week

4 Ways to Live Each Day With Intention by Shelley Levitt

"For ways to live each day with intention by. Shelley. Levitt with live. Happy Dot. com. I WANNA move through life energy and a sense of discovery achievement, joy and engagement. That is my intention. My hope is that living according to it would be the antidote. The uneasy feeling I often have at the end of the day when I flop into bed filled with self-reproach and wonder where my time went. My. Intent is to be guided by purpose instead of feeling that I'm spending my time haphazardly succumbing to whim or distraction according to expert Mallika Chopra creator of the website intense dot com and psychologist Eliot. Berkman. Head of the social ineffective neuroscience lab at the University of Oregon setting intentions. Confession is a kind of internal northstar lighting, the path to greater fulfillment and life satisfaction. These are the changes I've made in the few weeks since setting my intention. Number One, I meditate almost daily. Is taking me years to commit to a meditation habits but the ten or fifteen minutes I spent doing a guided meditation on the common APP has been transformative. The turning point was a workshop I took with so Kessedjian Norman Fisher, a poet and Zen Buddhist priest. When people say they don't have time to meditate. He said I asked them how do you have time to not meditate with a regular mindfulness practice he went on you'll have fewer accidents you lose things less frequently your focus will improve making decisions will become easier. Remarkably found all these things to be true and when I'm feeling stressed I summoned the image I visualized during my meditation I imagine my breath as a long string of pearls and it helps reconnect with that experience of stillness yet as good as meditation makes me feel I'll skip it unless I keep to a schedule. So make sure to meditate daily at eleven am with four PM has a backup. Number two, I've stopped binging on the news. More than ever I. Feel it's important to stay informed but watching new show afternoons show wasn't bringing greater insight into the issues. I care about is only fueling a sense of outrage and I'm happy to have added The Washington Post, my beloved New, York Times subscription reading either one in bed was only deepening my chronic insomnia. So of made some rules, no new shows or Newspapers after nine. PM. Instead I think about how? I WanNa feel inspired amused transported and lanes and I choose what I want to read watch listen to based on that this has led to fewer hours with CNN and more with globe netflix's comedy about a real life women's wrestling league from the eighties the on being with Krista Tippett podcast and Elena Ferrante as beautiful Neapolitan novels. Number three, I cook more. I'd like to lose five or ten pounds, but resolving to lose weight is usually both joyless an unsuccessful. So instead I think about nourishing myself in ways that will align with my intention to feel more energize. And that helps to your me away from takeout Chinese food and into my kitchen when I cook pots of Faro. Embrace Swiss chard practice poaching the perfect tag and dig into cookbooks like Paulo I of food of Morocco and what to eat for how you feel the new all your data kitchen by divvy alter. And try new dishes like Paulo's egg plans a luke or devious sprouted among solid also experienced that sense of discovery and achievement that I'm looking for. Number four, I do at least one new thing each weekend. I've been having all sorts of new experiences, a meeting interesting people volunteering to do kitchen prep at a food pantry hiking trail taking a class in brewing booja walking the Los Angeles River in a meet up led by long distance, swimming champion Diane, and yet attending a talk by no Levine author of Dharma police at the inaugural Budapest in La. Some outings have turned out to be less than inspired. The less said about the mass meditation held at a conscious life expo the better but I always feel like falling through on my intention to step outside my comfort zone. I'm far from living completely in line with my intentions. Three countless ways I stray from the path but feeling courage rather than defeated I've more clarity about the way in which small things Afar too messy desk and unmade bed can undermine your vision of how you want your life to unfold and I think it'll be able to put some new habits in place soon.

Berkman Elena Ferrante Paulo Mallika Chopra Levitt Shelley University Of Oregon Kessedjian Norman Fisher Los Angeles River Insomnia Afar Krista Tippett CNN Eliot Netflix Diane Morocco LA York Times Levine
Why 2020 hasnt taken Rev. angel by surprise

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:04 min | Last week

Why 2020 hasnt taken Rev. angel by surprise

"At such a pace what we're experiencing now in our society were just cycling through it were digesting the material of the misalignment were digesting the material of how intolerable it is to be intolerant. We're digesting the material if four, hundred, five, Hundred Years of historical context that we have decided to leave behind. Our heads and we are choosing to turn over our shoulders and say I must face this because it is intolerable to live in any other way than away that allows me. To be in contact with my full loving human self. I feel like you. Name something here. That this evolution, we were in a moment we're using this language of the moment. and. We we were already in the moment in a way we were building to this in all its complexity. Yes which not all pretty and not all hopeful, but it's all of a piece. You know I wonder yeah. Were You Almost WANNA ask you you know I want to ask you how I WanNa ask you this personally as well as in terms of drawing out your wisdom, your spiritual wisdom I wonder if the price you. Know. That at all. I think we are This body. This body that we call a nation is ready for this. And Anybody that has had a great amount of. Toxicity as part of the IT system has to heave out that toxicity. And we've had a lot of ways to suppress it and a lot of ways to get it a lot of ways to. Purchase things and distract ourselves and Watch net flicks. All sorts of other things that we can do. But. We have had a long history in this country. It's sort of baked into the structure of. The design I talk a lot about the design of this country to have so many people disembodied. And I think that we had an amazing extraordinary painful. And yet collective experience of a sufficient quieting. Allowed us to feel this collective body that we are as a nation. New and there's a whole bunch of. Individual bodies in there that said enough. I can't I can't tolerate this. What is here? Because I can feel it now I can see it and The uprisings and the particular. The potency of. George. Not only his death, the means of his death and the. The expression of his death and I mean. Literally, right the expression. The physical embodiment, the expression on the officer's face. The expression of his death through the media, the expression of his death. Was Too much for this body to continue to bear. Yeah. I. Also think about how? Soft we were. Elected body and our individual bodies. We had each and every one of us whatever their circumstances of our lives kind of felt for the ground beneath our feet. And our defenses down. There the pandemic created A. Four strict treat. Wounds we unforced retreat. and. I've done retreat many years. And there's always this point in during retreat where you feel you're not knowing come into. Into into your view. There's there's one thing to move around the world and say, Oh, I don't know we have not. No. It's another thing to just feel it to to come into confrontation. With your knowing and it is tender as you said, like it is a tender. Place to be in confrontation with that and and it's different. I think entirely. To have been not just individual, but to also feel the reverberations of. The collective not knowing. And as a as a country, we've

Officer George
Mary Oliver Is Listening to the World

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:20 min | 2 weeks ago

Mary Oliver Is Listening to the World

"The question I always start with whether I'm interviewing physicist or poet is I'd like to hear whether there was a spiritual background here life early life your childhood however, you would define it now. Well I would defied it very differently from what I was a child. I was said to Sunday school as many kids are. And then I had trouble with the resurrection. So I would not join the church but I was still probably more interested than many of the kids did at enter the church it's been one of the most important interests of my life. And continues to be. And it doesn't have to be Christianity I'm very much taken with the poet. Rumi who is a Muslim Sufi poet. And read him every day. and. Have no answers but have some suggestions I know that a life is much richer with spiritual. Part. To it. And I also think nothing is more interesting. So I, cling to it right and then. You I mean you talk about growing up in a sad depressed place a difficult place I mean in another you don't you don't Belabor this I mean in another place there's a place you talk about. Your one of many thousands who've had insufficient childhoods. But that you spend a lot of your time walking around the woods. Yes Ohio I did and and I think it saved my life. I to this day I, don't care for the enclosure of buildings. It was a very bad childhood. For everybody, every member of the household, not just myself I. Think. And I escape did. Barely with years of. Trouble. But I did find that the entire world. In looking for something. But. I got saved by poetry and I got saved by the beauty of the world. Yeah and and there's such a convergence of those things. Yeah. It seems all the way through in your life as a poet. It is it is a convergence and. Have a little difficulty now having lived for fifty years in small town in the north. I'm trying very hard to love the mangroves. Well I know it takes a while I have to say you and your poetry. For. Me are so closely identified with province town this and that part of the world and. And that kind of dramatic weather. Yes. Kind of shore. Yes. and so when I you know and I had this amazing opportunity to come visit you and I and I look and great, we're going to Cape Cod. To Florida. Well, I just sold by Condo to a very dear. this summer. And I bought a little house start here, which is needs very serious reconstruction. So I'm not yet. But sometimes, it's time for the age. Though for all those years for decades of your writing. This picture was there view this pleasure of walking and writing and? I don't know standing with your notebook. Yes and actually writing while you're walking. Yes. I did it and it is, and it seems like such a gift that you've found that way to be a writer and have that daily. Have Well I. Don't as I say I don't like buildings. Yeah. So I was I the only the only record I broken in school was truancy. I went to the woods a lot with with books right Whitman in the. Knapsack. But I also liked motion. So I just began with these little notebooks and scribbled things as I they came to me and then work them into poems later. And always I wanted the I many of the poems I did this I did this. I saw this I I wanted them the I to be the possible reader. rather than about myself it was about an experience that happened to be mind but could well have been anybody else's and that was my feeling about the I. I have been criticized by one editor who felt that the I would be felt as ego. And I thought well I'm going to risk it and see. And I think it worked. It adjoined. The reader into the experience of the poem. I became the kind of person who did the walking in the scribbling yeah. But shared it. Yeah. If if they wanted it, yes. You also use this word. You know there's this place where you're talking about. Writing while walking listening deeply and I love this listening listening conviviality. Yes. Yeah and listening really to the world the stick to the world. Well, I I did that I still do it. I still

Rumi Physicist Cape Cod Florida Ohio Whitman Writer Editor
[Unedited] Michael McCarthy with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:41 min | 3 weeks ago

[Unedited] Michael McCarthy with Krista Tippett

"I'm so delighted to be. Speaking with you. I can't tell you how much I love your book and I'm telling everyone about it. Yeah. It's as marked up. Emmy Book I have ever read. In the Bible including the Bible and I picked it up just on a table in a bookstore in Saint Paul Minnesota Twin cities. Different questions for me before we get going I think. Okay. I'm happy to respond to you. Yeah I don't I. So I don't usually do Generally do book interviews but really, and I've dug little bit and I've also looked at your. Some. Of Your other writing but I really. So so we're we're not talking about the book, but essentially we're talking about. Everything, the book is about. So I yeah so Chris I think we're good great. Okay. Yes and so we have a nice amount of time to have a big. Real wandering conversation. I would like to start I I I. Start Most of my interviews with a question just just wondering about The religious or spiritual background of someone's childhood I find. That is a very fertile place and everybody's imagination whatever their story is. It's full of questions and searching and softness so. However you would. However, you would begin to to think of that. How would you? How would you Described the religious or spiritual background of your childhood. I would use a curious phrase to describe. What I am now I would describe myself as an ethnic Catholic. Okay. that was a phrase I can't claim authorship of it was used by. British woman politician about twenty years ago meaning there's I grew up a Roman Catholic. and I have abandoned the faith. The formerly at any right but the belief system if not not necessarily. Belief in heaven now but the. The sense of right and wrong I think Stays with you all your life and you relate to it. Was it Mary? McCarthy who read a book called wants to Catholic. And I think the sense of right and wrong and also I think he'll go strong sets. Of Original Sin Yeah I. Think I'm quite aware that is a very dark side to the species mom. If, we can say that these days I think the the species is still called mind it's a human being. and so even though I'm not formally religious. I, like to think I. Suppose that I carry with me what people might describe as a religious sensibility. And I feel like right at the beginning of of your book The Moss snowstorm nature enjoy. You I mean this is this is a this is a book about our bond with the natural world. Right and you and you start it. It's also woven, and that bond is both civilizational. It's at once civilizational and species something about our species, but it's also personal. and so and you do we've that personal story all the way through your reflection on this large subject. End You know you're use the word a soul in this way rather early you describe your mother's illness and She she was away for a time institutionalized and. One of the things that happened to you as a child is it you you had a lack of feeling about that. that you could perceive, but then you describe this day. And here's just the sentences. That there was a singular window. Of observing butterflies and he said when I was a skinny kid in short pants, butterflies entered my soul. So where'd you just tell a little bit of that story as and why that is a vantage point for you on again, this large civilizational issue. It was really just a personal way. Of, my own way through my own personal experience. Of. Beginning explore. the strange conundrum which it seems to me that we can actually love very fiercely the natural world I we sort of take that for granted as commonplace. But as I got older, it seemed to me rather curious phenomenon because after all the natural world is only the the environment from which we emerge to species like every other species. Unlike. Every other species there are two things that they're not sure world has for us. One is danger. One is utility because the natural world can be dangerous and it can kill you. You can have thousands of people killed by snakes in India every year still or not show world can be a great advantage. It can provide you food and shelter and various other things. And all species are aware even if instinctively of these things but we have a third thing, which is that we can actually love the natural world.

Emmy Saint Paul Minnesota Twin Chris Mccarthy India Mary
[Unedited]  Dario Robleto with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:06 min | Last month

[Unedited] Dario Robleto with Krista Tippett

"Ning and. Welcome back to winter. Someone someone wrote me today instead it's raining feathers. So welcome to the institute. I'm Liz Armstrong. Curator. Of Contemporary Art, and we are very pleased to be hosting the second live interview with Krista Tippett for her show and broadcast of on being. As. Many of you know Christa was here two months ago when she spoke with Hamilton and what was a fascinating and far-reaching conversation they covered everything from spiritual act of art making to the strange intimacy of museums where people can be alone together. The the this interview, and that one we're presented. In conjunction with the exhibition currently on view. In our target wing simply called sacred, which is a series of installations, the probe, the nature of the sacred within a secular multi-faith society. By, juxtaposing works of art from Multiple Times in places, the sacred exhibition invites visitors to explore historic and contemporary. Expressions of the divine, the spiritual, the essential in the beloved and to ponder the words meaning in their personal lives. I want to thank the MIA's affinity collectors, group contemporary art for their support of this program, and for helping us visits from artists such as Hamilton. Dario. And now let me just briefly introduce each of our guests. KRISTA Tippett Enduro. Christie needs little introduction on this stage. She's a peabody award winning broadcaster and New York Times bestselling author WHO's highly acclaim radio program on being fills a huge void in the public discussion of spirituality and faith. She's not afraid to. to discuss the big animating questions of human life from how do we want to live to what does it mean to be human? She and her guests explore meaning ethics and what is sacred miss the political cultural and technological turmoil that is first century life. Dario fo was houston-based artists who's known for his highly original repurposing of rare and archaic materials. Like a DJ sampling music and he just told me tonight, he was a DJ once Doria spins in shapes such unconventional materials as dinosaur fossils, meteorite remnants, hand bones, and hipbones, and pulverized vinyl from vintage records. He's been called materials poet. I think of him as a passionate alchemist who memorialize the past while finding new meaning in the tangled roots its history. He's a maker of extraordinary objects that are meditations on war, love death, spirituality, and healing. It's going to be really interesting to him talk about these objects without seeing them. But you can imagine and then you will see them So I'm really looking forward to this conversation. Please join me in welcoming Chris step and Dario. Thank you lose. It's great to be back at Minneapolis Institute of Arts. Feel like I'm an old timer now. So I welcome you. So, Dr. you grew up in San Antonio I grew up in Oklahoma. It did not snow in March where we came from. I've really been looking forward to this for several months as way I planned it. Thank you. Very much. So if I ask you a about the spiritual and religious background of your childhood, where would you start to think about what that means? San Antonio is maybe Catholic central. In America So it's It's hard not to be around that in San Antonio. My grandfather was a Baptist minister. I didn't grow up around ten so much but his is influence definitely. was there the Beckham ahead? And he was definitely a passionate passionate man. My mother. Religion in the home was not ever really an issue but as. I searched it out on my own. I'd asked my friends I could come to church. Catholic methodist I probably sample every every church. Afraid I had. And? I continually. Even at that early age was was very, very interested. So my childhood it I would say it was very self directed. maybe always within the background knowing that thing about my grandfather, there was still this mysterious thing that I didn't really understand. So, maybe it was fairly field that to the searching.

Dario Fo Peabody Award Krista Tippett San Antonio Contemporary Art Hamilton Liz Armstrong MIA Beckham Christa New York Times Minneapolis Institute Of Arts Doria Catholic Methodist Oklahoma America Chris
Jane Goodall on What it Means to Be Human

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:46 min | Last month

Jane Goodall on What it Means to Be Human

"WanNa Start where I always start which is how how if I ask you about be spiritual background of your childhood of your earliest life. However, you understand that word now where does that memory take you? Well I wouldn't have thought of anything spiritual when I was a child. Now my grandfather was a congregational minister. I never met him. We mom my sister. Came to live in this house for I. Am now with my grandmother and Moms two sisters. So was he the husband? Of Danny? Was He that other of your grandmother you call Danny as? He was the husband of Danny. I wish I'd met him because he sounds completely wonderful, but I didn't and so we sometimes went particularly religious. And I love to spend most of my time outside in the garden was pre television, pre laptops, cellphones another event. And so we had. Books and imagination a nature. So I learned a lot from nature I was outside. And I, love climbing. Trees had special tree which I'm looking at right now be. Spend hours and hours up beach. Feeling chose to the sky and the buds. I. Suppose that was the chose this to some kind of spiritual feeling nature. That I had I wouldn't have thought of it as that that time. Right you've. You've said that you really feel like you. Loved animals and loved nature I think from the womb onwards a woman would. My first serious observation of animals was four and a half when I waited for hours to see a headland. To, say, it was my to Muslim. WHO's enabling me to do what I've done because she didn't know where I was. I was hiding a hen house waiting because nobody would tell me what the hell was. The came out and it wasn't logical as it was. It was a logical observation that it didn't make sense. Wasn't obvious. So I handle into a hen house where they slipped night and the next. Round the. You. Know she must. So I crawled off to, which was a big mistake she flew out with school Safiya. and. So in my little four and a half year old mine, I must've thought well, no Hanrahan. I think five, the hen houses. So, I went into an empty one, hundred waited at apparently awaited about four hours. They even called the police. They will also change Jomie Ghana for a holiday onto this farm. and. By mother must be really nervous. You can imagine your little. Has Disappeared on, he show me rushing towards the house. She saw my shining eyes on. Sat Down the wonderful story of how a hand lays egg on the reason I love that story is. Isn't that the making of a little scientists asking questions not getting the right on some citing defined out. Making a mistake, not giving up dining issues. You know a different mother. How Day off without telling us don't you depth donated again might have crushed that early scientific curiosity at my might not have done. I've done.

Danny Jomie Ghana Hanrahan
Marilyn Nelson  Communal Pondering in a Noisy World

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:32 min | Last month

Marilyn Nelson Communal Pondering in a Noisy World

"Maryland Nelson is a storytelling poet. She gives winsome voice forgotten people from history and from her own family. She shines a light on the complicated ancestry. We have in common and can help us in the work we have to together. Now she's written for both adults and children. She's taught poetry and contemporary practice to West, point cadets, and alongside the gentle, but mighty steam. Maryland Nelson Commands in the communion of modern poets. She's a voice for all of us in the work in the privilege of what she calls communal pondering to sit with her is to gain a newly spacious perspective on what that might mean and on why people young and old are turning to poetry with urgency. Poetry consists of. Words and phrases and sentences that emerge like something coming out of water. They emerge before us and they call up something in us, but then they turn. US back into our own silence, and that's why reading poetry reading it. Alone silently. Takes us some place where we can't get ordinarily poetry. Opens us to this otherness that exists within us. Don't. You think we read a poem and you say. And you listen to what it brings out inside of you, and what it is, is not words, it's silence. I'm Krista Tippett, and this is on being. Maryland Nelson is professor emeritus of English at the University of Connecticut and a former Chancellor of the Academy of American poets. I interviewed her at the University of North Carolina Asheville in two, thousand sixteen. So, here we are and I'm just delighted to be here with Marilyn. Nelson. It's been such a treat to be reading your poetry these last few days. missed. You were born in Cleveland of a teacher mother. And a father who was a member of the last graduating class of the tyskie airman. I wonder any, we're moving around a lot a lot. Yeah. You and your sisters always imagined that when you left each place. Disappeared cease to exist. And you did. This book how I discovered poetry. It's a memoir in poems a and I just wondered. So I WANNA say I said to Maryland I have a few books here and I have some. We'll read some poetry throughout I'm going to ask her to read some things. We'll read some at the end, but I also said to her that if she just feels called to grab one of these books and read she can. But I wondered if you would just read the last poem in this in this collection how I discovered poetry. Yes. Okay. This one is called thirteen year old American Negro girl. On each of these poems has a little byline of choir. We were at the time. This we were on an air force base in Oklahoma in nineteen, fifty, nine, thirteen year, old American Negro girl. My face as foreign to me as a mask allows people to believe they know me. Thirteen year old American. Negro girl headlines would read if I was newsworthy. But that's just the top of the iceberg me. I could spend hours searching the mirror for clues to my truer identity. If someone didn't pound the bathroom door. You can't see what the mirror doesn't show. For instance, that after I closed my book and turn off my lamp, I, say to the dark, give me a message. I can give the world. Afraid. There's a poet behind my face. I beg until I've cried myself to sleep. Thank you. That's my sister banging on the bathroom. And I don't know what me to talk about it. I for me. The. The. Crux of this poem is the fact that I really did pray. Give me a message that I can give the world. If you give me a message that I can give the world I promise, I'll be true to it. I'll be honest to it. That was. That was my thirteen year old. Prayer. Let me be a poet. Give me something to share. So.

Maryland Nelson United States Maryland Krista Tippett Academy Of American Poets Cleveland University Of North Carolina A Oklahoma Marilyn Chancellor University Of Connecticut
Its really settling in now, the losses large and small

On Being with Krista Tippett

07:35 min | 2 months ago

Its really settling in now, the losses large and small

"So. I have not prepared my questions I just want to. Settle into talk with you for. Twenty thirty minutes. And you know we are putting the show that we did a few years ago. which really lays out the notion of ambiguous laws, the myth of closure? But, but what I wanna just reflect on with you. This morning very directly is. What does ambiguous loss mean. In a global pandemic. Well I. It means a essentially the same thing that it meant on the individual and family level, but suddenly it has this global meaning which I never intended until the phone started bringing so to speak the emails came in. With the pandemic saying isn't this ambiguous loss, so as irritation, I was delighted that people, journalists and ordinary people put it together That's that's a dream that an academic wants. Is that whatever you do is useful to the general public. but then I began thinking. Of course it's ambiguous loss but it's more abstract, and it's beyond the individual or family now it has been raised to a higher level. Right to help us make sense of this nonsensical thing. That's going on this invisible. Annemie. So so. We're kind of going through a a global civilizational. Moment of ambiguous loss at a societal level. Yes we we We have lost indeed. We have lost our freedom to go about our day. As we always have we have lost our freedom to visit with our loved ones or to have lunch with their friends and and I must say again because the school thing is coming up the young people have lost. Not only a year it may be two years. of what they usually do is go to school in the usual manner, make friends socialize, learn, learn and that generation will have to carry that the rest of their lives. I. I I'm finding personally and and picking up A in others. Obviously, this is not a you know scientific. Study I've done, but it feels to me and myself and in others that. We I've I've kind of hit this moment I don't know how many months we are on now from March but Yeah certainly, but certainly in March and April and May. There was a sense that you know this will. Right that this is something we have to do so that we can get through this. And even things that got canceled got rescheduled for I July and then September October. And I feel like. What's? It's really settling in now. The the losses and are large and small as you say I mean I mean people have lost loved ones, but there's also this loss of. Going to the office of certainty like your kids will go to school I mean on. My son didn't really graduate from College of. Some of these things. People will bounce back from you know I. I actually really trusted our kids. Who knows how this will affect them? It it. It might be just you know. transformative in in generative ways that we can't imagine. And yet they're all these losses large and small all at once. And were carrying them individually, but were also carrying them in the same at the same time. Yes I just wonder how for you. This stretches open. This note because this is ambiguous loss, but it's a form. You perhaps could never have imagined. It's happening to you, too. Personally it is, it is as you know. Caregiver. For my husband, although I have help, which is why I'm talking with you right now, and that that went quite well because I could get respite by going out for lunch with friends or going for a walk I mean the four the pandemic before the. Yeah! Yes, uh-huh, and then pandemic kid and Caregivers are finding that The can't they don't have their freedom. They had to take a break You're stuck inside, and and that makes it doubly stressful. I think for caregivers including myself. So. So I've heard you say that. It's one thing to write the book about this about ambiguous loss. And another thing to go through yourself. and. I wonder. What you might share what you might offer about how you have been wrestling with that and what there is. In this. You know I'd say ambiguous. Loss is a description of a human experience hadn't quite been described before. You didn't invent the experience you invented the language named. Right you named it and so here we are with this. A magnitude of you say it's been completely taken out of the individual level, or even sometimes it would happen to two distinct communities. So. What are you know from being in this field from being the person her name this to? This helping you walk through these days you might offer up to other people about walking through these days these months and these years ahead. I think I'm in it to everybody else. Struggling and I suspect I've spent forty years studying ambiguous loss because I don't like ambiguity. I remember when I first went to the University of Wisconsin in Madison in one class or another, we were describing each other, and somebody called me decisive. And I took that as a high compliment. I don't anymore I mean I've I've come to believe in both and thinking which I write about. I don't like binary thanking. You're working with your banker or some someone like that. And there's a middle ground. A middle way to go when you're dealing with people and when you're dealing with problems, we have huge problems right now and to see that someone was wrong when the pandemic began about what they thought about it a scientist. and now they think differently. That's binary. Thinking and I can't I can't. I can't take it anymore.

University Of Wisconsin Scientist. Madison
Race and Healing: A Body Practice

On Being with Krista Tippett

04:31 min | 3 months ago

Race and Healing: A Body Practice

"In terms of a practice, this is a very simple practice. If you're listening to me right now, one of the things I want you to do is i. want you to just to sit for second. And I want you just to stare straight ahead just. Look straight ahead. And as you're looking straight ahead. Chest and notice. What is actually landed? In, what is actually still kind of in the air? All you're doing is just kinda noticing what's happening. Noticing how much you dislike my voice, noticing how much you dislike or you like some of the things. That Christie said not just not those peace. Now would I want you to do? Is? Look over your left shoulder and use your neck and your hips so turn and look over your shoulder. In in back to center and now look up. And look down. Come back to center. And now look over your right shoulder using your neck and your hips. Reason why you use your neck and your hips as I want you to engage that, so ask. Engaged of some parts of the vehicle. And then now come for. Now, just be quiet and notice. Different. Would you notice? Well I was I was kind of aware that it was half thinking about what it was gonna come next, but I don't know. I felt more settled more so I felt and there was also a feeling of There's kind of comfort yeah yeah. So one of the things about the animal part of the body is that even know mean you are in this room this nice place. There's a part of the body right that saying. Yeah But what else is going to happen? Right in the reason, why especially when I'm working with bodies of culture, one of the first things I do is orient just like like like orient to the room right not orient in a mystical way, but actually literally because many times the bodies of culture are waiting for danger. Even know you know nothing's behind you right letting the body. No, it actually helps some pieces now. If you get reps in with that, not just do a one time or just when I tell you to right, which you might, which you may notice is that you may have a little bit more room for other literally for other things to happen. That can't happen when the constriction is like that. You know that makes sense to in terms of how trauma is in the terminal presence. It's not you're not remembering. It is reliving itself and you're like getting. You know just for that minute. You're actually settling in the real presence. And in the body goes. Oh, you mean that's there to. And then your body starts to do this thing where you go. I don't WanNa do that no more and then if you can get another, there's a thing called the The ridiculous activation says right the RAZZ right. That is the thing. Where will you go buy a car? And you say managed beautiful car in. Nobody else got a car like the. There's this color, and then you drive off the lot you go down blocks you like damn. That's the same damn. That's a everybody got this car. Right is was always there, but now because your brain said, this is important, it makes it can't right see it everywhere. You see it everywhere. That's why the reps are so important because when you get the reps in it like if you get direction. Where that's right. Because if you get? The reps around racist important is that because as you get more reps in about it? All of a sudden other things start to become important. That weren't important. Because now your brain to say Oh i. need to read that. Oh, I need to pay attention to that. Oh, I need to track her body. Oh I need to understand or I need to ask questions about right. That, and now those things become attracted to you. which creates more angst, which forces you to

Christie
Living the Questions: When no question seems big enough

On Being with Krista Tippett

06:41 min | 3 months ago

Living the Questions: When no question seems big enough

"Well hello again. We started recording, and then we. But. Yeah? WE'RE LIVING IN A. Kind of rearranged world in every way right now, including how you and I are speaking to each other. I so you know this living the questions is about not. Being scripted and about honoring Questions? especially the questions we can't answer that it would be actually an affront to the questions themselves, and what they what the reality that they convey. To. Positive answer or an opinion? And And that and so we decided to Near. You are my my beloved and esteemed colleague. In! You are an African American man and you said at the feet of Vincent harding. And have learned from our great elders and In Warren Ferguson. You've been in many many places for which in which what's happening now in American cities. Is In in other American. Cities to is more familiar. And of course there's nothing new. That's part of the problem. There's nothing new there's there's a rebel. There's a revealing maybe an maybe maybe. a New Light Being Sean. That it's something coming to the surface again. That's been there so when we've been having. We've been having it at Oriel. Conversations on morning and we've been interacting with people online and. In our audience. Listening Community and Really kind of Coming to the conclusion that mostly we have questions. And deciding to be transparent about that I was just reading through. On social media. Siri put out a call to ask people how we can accompany them and. You know and it's it's questions. And and including the question of why like how how can this be happening? And then something really interesting to me was that there's a woman who's identifies as. A black woman, the wife of Black Man, the mother of three black children, and she said all she wanted right now is silent. It her favourite show of us is the Gordon Hampton show. So I guess. A question. kind of an anguish that rolls around for me is. It's not even it doesn't even, isn't it? It's not even enough question. It's like. The inadequacy of everything. That's been done and all of my best motivations and. Desires person. I guess maybe I thought maybe I'm thinking that what I'd like for you to do. It and the you know I think people feel helpless and they feel outraged. One of the things res- momentum said in the conversation that I. Had with him that that. Were just putting on the air is that? is how destructive it is when he gives one of these workshops and a white woman. Starts crying. Food that is so useless. So Okay I've just talked a lot, but I think I. Think the question. I guess I would like for you to help me. Think through. What are what are the real questions not just to be asking but to be living. WILL I. I appreciate a a lot of what you just Reflected on and and I feel that there were. A couple of questions there that. That had resonance with me. One is this notion of? You know I I was. This notion of what. What more can be said in a moment like this? I mean when when? You know when I I'm. Aubrey was killed in then George Floyd I mean I. You know there's. there. Are these calls for people to safe something and there's this. This impulse to say something and yet at the same time. I kept feeling like there is. I mean what new is there to be said like you know like I, it's it's all been said before end. And by people more eloquent than I end. and. People with. More capacity than I have to speak in an and I just. I think that's a part of the grief is the idea that? In I think about the. The idea that it needs to be said that black lives matter you know like that it's it's sort of an annoying thing to to have to say because it's sort of. It's such A. It's not a you know. For me if I'm going to reflect on. On on black life in the relationship to the United States. In the history of our country and the building, our country in the functioning of our country. We we much more than matter we. We are essential. We are. We are critical. We we don't just matter. We don't just just just make a difference in so there's a way in which like this violence this consistent. Dehumanisation is. Is So self destructive? For the country as a whole and the fact that we have lived with such self-destruction is insane.

Siri Vincent Harding Warren Ferguson Gordon Hampton United States George Floyd Aubrey
How can we find connection in disconnection?

On Being with Krista Tippett

10:10 min | 5 months ago

How can we find connection in disconnection?

"Hey Krista my name is Vanessa. I'm calling from Melvin Australia. I'm I'm curious to hear your thoughts given the current situation. The world finds itself in how we can find connection in in disconnection. I think we'll have a judy. The health and being our world and the people that live in it to disconnect but in a timely connection has never been so important. How do we? How do we balance the two? How do we disconnect physically while remaining emotionally socially connected to others? Oh it's such an interesting question because So thank you Vanessa? It's such an interesting question in one way because I feel like What's coming to mind for me and my own experience of what you're describing Has EVOLVED A lot. In these weeks of lockdown corentin enforced disconnection him so Physical disconnection as you say And Yeah I mean I I I will try to see if I have anything anything Really practical to add in terms of advice but really what the question One makes me want to do is reflect on this week on some of the things I feel like I'm learning or some of the things that maybe this This strange experience is teaching me. Is Teaching US You know it's something that I've thought about across the years but now feels like the most present thing is just the primacy of our bodies and I've thought so much about how in the Western World In Madeira not. We've we've just structured so many sophisticated and inventive ways of pretending like everything doesn't always come back to our bodies that we you know it begins and ends in our bodies and in there's mess and frailty fair and limitation but also energy and life itself and so one of the things I've been thinking about is this you know what I'm calling zooms Austin. The technology is so miraculously but this experience of only connecting to each other by way of pixels is also really laying out some of the very severe Limitations of it. And so you know one thing I've become aware of is what I what I think that I've never thought about before but I think how much energy we actually draw from each other like raw energy at a primal animal level when we are in the room together and the that doesn't communicate through this green. You know the the view of someone's face And to some extent the The emotions that can be read in and responded to their the voice which I feel is so embodied but I think that the the way I feel and everybody talking to feel so completely worn out and depleted by the only connection being By way of technology has something to do with the fact that we were not were not Replenishing just

Vanessa Melvin Australia Austin
[Unedited] Ellen Davis with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

06:08 min | 5 months ago

[Unedited] Ellen Davis with Krista Tippett

"I'm Krista Tippett up next Mike unedited conversation with theologian. Ellen Davis. There is a shorter produce version of this which includes poetry from Wendell. Berry that he read for this show. Find that wherever you get your podcasts. I'm just I'm looking. I'm sort in an enclosed blue booth looking at a black thing that I'm pretending as you. Okay very convincing. Just close your eyes. That's what I'll be doing okay. I'm hearing Chris. I think my microphone is pretty hot and I was but I'm not. I was hearing an echo at first but I'm okay now Illinois. Are you hearing me all right. And his any. I'm I'm hearing you fine. And you're without an echo all right Help just in one more second crystal all right just before we start are you well. Is dwayne wells. I'm well yes. Thank you dwayne Zvili. Well HE'S A. He's a year into recovery from hip surgery and it makes a huge difference so things are good. Thank you and and you and your children. Yeah every everything's good I just Have been doing way too much. Travelling at this new book come out the new. Yeah Einsteins God it's It's a it's A. It's it's drawn from my interviews with scientists and it's a lot of fun to be out there talking about but I'm I'm happy to be back in. My kids are happy to have me back. I bet well congratulations on the US. Send you a copy I should. I actually think I had put that down on a list somewhere. It's important for God so Chris. I'm still feeling kind of loud or it went up again. My volume went up again Okay well now. We're hearing an echo on the other end. What's that okay? I think I'm fine now. Did you hear that now? There's an Echo Ellen. I wonder if I wonder if her headphones are up. A little bit high. If we could have allenton her headphones down a little bit okay. Is there someone turn yes? Can someone turned my headphones down. We're not getting any response to okay. How is this Test is tax defense. I think it does yes. The echoes gone. Okay okay Christie and I have also just to let the engineer now. I've also lowered the microphone. Just a bit because it was above the level of my mouth and I was sort of reaching up toward. How does that work? That's fine? Thank you okay all right so Chris I think I could have even a little. Bit less volume. And then maybe why don't I let me ask you something mundane like What you had for breakfast. I had cereal and food doesn't give you much experience. What have you need a little more? Tell me about lunch that tell you what's in bloom and a guy. Yes Virginia Sweet. Spire and the irises Just peaking and going down. The ECHINACEA is coming up. It's actually a pretty time in North Carolina. I imagine it's tulip time in it is to the people don't think of Minnesota as as lush but it really is. Our neighborhood is just incredible. It was it was. It's it's a very special neighborhood and it was. It was kind of constructed to be harmonious with the natural world and creatures and we even have the occasional wild Turkey and Fox squirrels and birds and So I was travelling in April and I missed that period where the snow is gone. But there's nothing growing and I came back and it was all their everything in bloom feeling. I it's beautiful. It is beautiful. Yeah doing good about levels. I think we're great okay. So I- slightly daunted interviewing my teacher like this and I'm going to have a different role with you I think we can get okay and You know as I was thinking about the questions I might want to ask you some of which I always ask people. I realized that even though you and I have had conversations around these things. I've never quite skewed these questions. I don't know all the answers so so so one place. I always start with people. Whatever we're talking about is Was there a religious background to your childhood and actually. I'm not sure that I know the answer to that question. Yes I grew up. I'm a cradle Episcopalian. Okay I've there's never been a time in my life when I haven't gone to church but I would say that church means quite different thing to me over. Religion means quite a different thing to me. Then I think it did to my parents. Anyone almost anyone else in my family I did not grow up in a family that would have defined itself as particularly religious although we would church always when and how did you start heading towards a career in Biblical scholarship and theology. How did that happen consciously? I was an exceedingly late bloomer. I was in my third of four years of seminary before I decided that I was going to teach But if you look at my resume it looks as though when I was eighteen and I went to the Hebrew University in Jerusalem for Year. I decided I was going to be a biblical scholar So unconsciously what they say in Hebrew Elohim Finger of God. I think I sort of being pointed if not pushed in that direction at a much younger age

Chris Dwayne Wells Krista Tippett Ellen Davis Wendell Dwayne Zvili United States Illinois Berry Hebrew University Jerusalem Younger Age North Carolina Virginia Mike Christie Engineer Minnesota I
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

06:12 min | 6 months ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm Krista Tippett and this is my unedited conversation with the gardener poet Rosca. There is always a shorter produced version of this. Wherever you found this podcast I think I'll go ahead and start talking okay. It's such a pleasure to be at this inaugural wordplay festival and I have been handed. Some notes from our sponsor which I'll read the lofts word play is presented by Saint Catharine University. And the Star Tribune. Thank you to our sponsors target children's Minnesota Ryan companies the Hatfield Family Foundation Western Bank and Hanley Wood Marketing. None of this would be possible without them. I would like to begin by acknowledging. We are on unseeded. Land of the Dakota people there will be books sold after this. Ross will be signing some books and I'm like the the person in the airplanes has just WanNa make sure you're here for the flight to Philadelphia. Just WanNa make sure you're here for the interview with Ross Gay. I'm Krista Tippett so here we are and what we're GONNA do. Is I have your these three beautiful books. And if at any time you feel called to read something. You may have a lot okay. That's all right. We have an hour. We're going to be in conversation up here and it is my plan that the end will have read a few things both maybe what occurs to you and also. I marked at least one that I'd like you to read so we will get to that no matter what but I just want to give you that opportunity for spontaneity so you grew up between us. You're born in Youngstown. Ohio and grew up in Levittown Pennsylvania lineage of farmers teachers. So interesting to me. Also you you talk your. Your parents were a mixed race couple in the they got married in the era of loving versus Virginia. You you talk a lot of you. Write a lot about how your mother especially. She got older. Your mother's white feathers black that she started to talk about what it was like to get married then and it's it's injury. I feel like that's an important story that we tell ourselves because things have changed so much in that regard least. Yeah just say a little bit about what you what you got from what your parents getting. Just your parents getting married. And it's sort of amazing to me like you know my mother. Yes so as I say she sort of is talking. More about Their life together. Which many things and among them was this sort of you know. difficulty That mostly they didn't talk about you know and you know. That's part of my. I realize that's part of my like one of the many things that I'm sort of constantly curious about like what what was back and my mother does tell some things now but I I sometimes think of that of their experiences and I just. I'm just curious about what are the sort of sorrows that they were just sort of like. Not You know and also that people would say to her. Of course you can do this and just know you've doomed your children. Yeah my mouth. She says yeah Sylvia's he's the one who said it was GONNA be okay. I just I just I just wanted to name that because it you know. It's almost like she's the first Jenner. It's like the first generation of trauma first-generation people and make it through something that feels unimaginable. Often don't talk about it now. We're in such a different place when you're but that's also part of the story of how we got here right right So your last two books are the book of Delights and the Catalog of unabashedly gratitude unabashed gratitude. 's I usually start my conversation asking about the spiritual background of someone's childhood however you would think about that now. I've really curious with you wherever you trace the origins of being attuned to delights and unabashed gratitude. Where's it come from? That's a really good question of to some extent. I feel like you know like I. I feel like I've always loved the smell of honeysuckle. I feel like I've I've been kind of like I could love staff. You know really love stuff. I feel like and I feel like I've had periods of my life harder to be like that but I feel like maybe that's there but I also feel like You Know My folks sort of model recently remember this story and I will never remember it that my dad told us me and my brother we were in the car and I guess we wanted to push the little water The windshield WIPER FLUID. And my dad was wanted us not to and told us that if we push that he said that that picture on there was a flower in the car will turn to a flower which makes him like a hero and then he said in a big.

Krista Tippett Jenner Star Tribune Ross Gay Saint Catharine University Delights Dakota Youngstown Minnesota Hanley Wood Marketing Virginia Hatfield Family Foundation Wes Ohio Philadelphia Pennsylvania Sylvia
Wayfinding: Remember the True Self {Part 3 of 3}

The Mindful Minute

08:41 min | 6 months ago

Wayfinding: Remember the True Self {Part 3 of 3}

"You know every week Rather than record this podcast in my live Monday night class as I normally do now. I am sitting at home in my closet recording these episodes and as I do I try to picture the thousands of people across the world that are tuning in to this podcast and each of those little threads of connection keeps me going brings me truly joy in my days and lets me feel less lonely. I really hope as you listen. You feel those threads of connection to and if you're looking for more connection I'm really excited to share with you guys and offering That I am putting into the world alongside my business partner at our studios sacred chill West sacred show. West is a yoga and meditation studio here in Atlanta and as of now it is also a virtual studio. This is something we have been working on for the last few months. With the intention of launching in June of twenty twenty in the pandemic we find ourselves in now has asked demanded of us that we release the sooner and so we have. I'm really excited to share with you. Guys the series of videos that we've created this is Meditation with me. Of course there's Yoga classes with myself. And my partner Octavia Yin restorative flow. You'll gonNA drop every week. More videos are being added every month. We're doing a live virtual call to introduce the intention of the month the meditation series of the month to connect and talk and share with you. So if this feels like something that might bring you a little bit of joy and a little bit of connection in these days of being at home. I hope you will take a look visit. Sacred WEST DOT COM. Click on classes and look for the at home link. Take a look. We'd love to see you there. Be Sure you let us know if you're signing up from the mindful minute I would love to know where you are in the world when you sign up and I look forward to with you virtually. Thanks welcome I am so happy to Get to connect with you. So last week's episode. Which was the second installment of the way finding series that episode was recorded in my closet? Because you get really good sound quality in your closet However it was very lonely and so I'm really happy to get to record today's Podcast episode and offer this class zoom to our members at sacred. Shell and to record it out in the open. If you're listening to the podcast so this is our third installment this week. Three of the way finding series and this whole series was actually inspired by a quote. This is a quote that I heard in an episode of on being which is another podcast and the woman Krista Tippett. Who Does that? Podcast was interviewing a civil rights activist named Ruby sales and in this interview. One of the things that Ruby sales says is I think that one of the things that theologies must have is hindsight insight and foresight that is complete site and I think that fragmentation really shatters that site. It says that it's not an eyesight. It's a waste site and when I heard that something about that terminology and the structuring of complete site as all of these pieces hindsight insight foresight. Immediately I just knew that this directly relates to meditation practice. And as you've heard me say already in a way finding really it's hard is just a series of elements that come together to provide guidance in some way and our meditation practices offering these little forms of guidance. So we looked at hindsight right. We look to this idea of tracing our way backwards to look for those little hidden hints and whispers guidances as to our souls calling what we're here to do what we're here to feel and be in our supposed to move through the world and we looked at insight inside. Is the direct translation of mindfulness. Meditation when you translate the Pali Words. The original language that meditation came from when you translate those words it translates to incite this practice is directly turning us in words to see for ourselves. And today what we're GONNA do is. We're GONNA talk about foresight and foresight in my mind relates to what's called the Dharma and the Dharma is just another way of saying the teachings the teachings of Meditation What. I'm doing right now. This talk that. I do at the beginning of all of my meditation classes. This is called a Dharma. Talk Right so this is a talk that is designed to share teachings inspiration and insight for our journey really. What teachings are there like a map that people who are few steps ahead of us on this path have left for us? There little hints. And if you remember if you listened to last week's meditation class the way finding to episode I tell the story of Touching into this deep well of peace inside right and the short version of the story is is. I was meditating with a friend and about three minutes into the meditation. I realized that I have this. Tickle in my throat and all. I want is glass of water and a cough. Drop to sued this tickle but I don't WanNa get up because I don't want to disturb my friend I don't WanNa cough and I was kinda comfortable and so even though I was really feeling that discomfort of needing to get a glass of water. I was sort of equally in this place of wanting to stay in my meditation and see what happened and eventually where I landed in this meditation was what I call in. What many teachers called this deep well of peace inside meaning that no matter how much agitation was on the surface underneath it was really still. It was really calm and really quiet. I was able to stay. I didn't have to get up at the class of water and I wasn't suffering. It wasn't like I was choking back a cough and fighting to stay. I was really truly comfortable in the discomfort and so the idea that people who practice have experiences and then they share these experiences with others as little glimpses of what might happen if you keep practising and it's not to say that we have to buy into everything every teacher says or trust without question. It's not that at all but the teachings are really meant to be a hint at what's to come an invitation to see for yourself so you might hear me or somebody talk about this mythic deep well of peace or any of these teachings right any of the things that we say meditation does for us and you can just keep a beginner's mind and open curious mind. Is that true for me? What happens when I practice? That's the question that we ask ourselves and so I wanNA share an example of how this might unfold in terms of incorporating teachings into our practice. So what you're doing right now is incorporating teachings into your practice. You could really easily just sit down. Set A timer for ten minutes closure as a meditate but by carving out even once a week to sit with a teacher to listen to a talk and then practice. You're giving yourself that tool of foresight

Cough Partner Atlanta Krista Tippett Twenty Twenty Octavia Yin
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

13:05 min | 9 months ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Of all. It's so great to be here and I'm so honored to be in a conversation with you. I'm a big Fan. Though I do you have a recurring nightmare that I'm interviewed by Krista Tippett and I'm I'm found shallow and lacking faith. This is way better than the actual nightmare. Well educated by Jesuits so for me they were always sort under this Combo Burger of absolute hilarity and joy. And the most fun people to be around and they were prophetic. So this was during the time time of the Vietnam War and so we'd laugh a lot and And I go with him to protesting the war. And so the the combination of the Prophetic and the hilarious. I love that so I I thought boy I WANNA I want. I'll have what they're having. So that's what I did the deep but that's kind of the reasons you joined an organization like the Society of Jesus aren't the reasons you stay but that's kind of was my initial hook right. Why did you stay feeling you no I again? It's it's a companion the his sources Kind of what. Saint Ignatius called the thing. So it's about being in companionship. Bannon ship with Jesus and seen each in his spiritual exercises has a meditation called to standards and in it. He says very simply see see Jesus standing in the lowly place and so that is where I wanNA stand that in the end. It's about standing with Jesus. Sus It's not about saluting a set of beliefs necessary it's about walking with Jesus and being a companion companion and and I haven't found anything that's brought me more life or joy than standing with Jesus but also with the the particularity of standing in in the lowly place with the easily despised and the readily left out and with the demonized so that the demonizing will stop and with the disposable so that the day will come when we stop throwing people away that gives me life. That's where I WANNA be. I think that's where Jesus insists on standing. And and I I find the fullness of life trying to two best I can in my own way to stand there so that particular place where the Jesuits took you in one thousand nine hundred six is that right as is to the Dolores mission. which at that time? I don't know if this is so true. Was the poorest parish in the city and had the highest concentration of gang activity tiffany in the world at that time. Now you had grown up in Los Angeles but I think a different Los Angeles. Yeah well I had been in Bolivia Libyan that sort of changed my life at right after I was ordained and then I was supposed to go to Santa Clara University to kind of help transition students. They're into kind of having immersion programs with the poor and then it didn't feel like enough once. I had a converted by the poor really in Bolivia so I asked my provincial. Send me to the poorest place we have and he sent me to Dolores mission which at the time as you mentioned was had the highest concentration of gang activity in the world was my parish. We had gangs hangs at war with each other and it was the largest grouping of public housing west of the Mississippi so it had a lot of issues and I buried my first young person killed because of the sadness and eighty-eight and buried my one hundred eighty third of about three weeks ago not all from that community but because I work with gang members. I get asked to do this so it didn't really fully understand what this is going to mean but I grew up in the gang capital of the world as well. Ah in Los Angeles and yet you know I can state with certainty that I wouldn't have joined a gang. I wouldn't have known where to defined one if you sent me on a scavenger hunt and the fact the fact that I would not have joined I couldn't have joined a gang. It wouldn't have happened. It doesn't make me morally superior too young men and women. I've been privileged to know for a quarter of a century quite the opposite. You know that what they have have to carry a navigate is not what I ever was asked to carrier navigate as a teenager growing up in the same city as they did so I was on the West recited indoors. Mission was on the east side. You've often told the story of the first. I kid you buried is that right. Who is identical twin twin? As kind of a parable about the tragedy of this his name was Rafael. Ah dentist twin. Even the MOM. I had a hard time telling them apart. And but at the funeral as he was laying in his coffin his identical twin Robert Dole was peering tearing down into the coffin. As if you had slapped a mirror and he was kind of gazing at a mirror image of himself and there was something about Young men Dan staring at frankly the mirror image of themselves in a coffin that seemed to get at what this was at least in part but at least that was my first introduction to the great loss and the unspeakable grief of it. And there's there's so much grief and so much heartbreak in these kids lives and in the stories that you tell and yet you always come back again and again to talking in this way. You know that spiritually theologically. This is not so much about helping others. I'm I'm saying that. But this is fundamentally about our common call to delight and one another. I think that's very unexpected. Language will the Dorothy Day. I think she quotes Ruskin when she always talks about the duty to delight. And I think it's right to see it as a duty. Because has it you have to be conscious of it. And but it's really a delighting that enters into full kinship with each other that the idea is how do we find ways to luxuriate in in mutuality greatly privileged in my life have to not to have known sesame Jarvis who was an extraordinary leader of a movement but was also one of the best listeners. I'd ever known he could. Just you were the only the person who existed if you were having a conversation with him but I remember once a reporter had commented to them and said wow these farmworkers they sure love you and Sesa- just shrugged and smiled and he said the feelings mutual and that's what you hope for you know I'm not the great healer in that. Gang member over there is in need of my exquisite healing. The truth is it's mutual and that as much as we are called to bridge the distance that that exists between us. We have to acknowledge that there's an distance even in service a service provider. You're the service recipient and you WANNA bridge even in that so that you can get to this place of utter mutuality where the feelings mutual and I think. That's where the place Lisa Delight is that I've learned everything of value really in the last twenty five years from precisely the people who you think are on the receiving end of my gifts and talent and wisdom and advice but quite the opposite. It's it's mutual and I think it's really. I always like hearing people tell about the things they did. That didn't work out on the way to the things that they that they know. And it's very interesting head when you tried to serve when you first arrived. There was you. We're going to be peacemaker. You were GonNa make truce between these warring gangs and you found that in fact that which may be seemed obvious wasn't right well you know a lot of anything worth doing is worth of failing at. I think that'll be on my tombstone We have seven businesses. But you know not all of them worked. You know homeboy plumbing was really not a huge success. You know. A- apparently people didn't want gang members in their homes I. I didn't see that coming but in the early days you know those eight gangs were are indigenous inasmuch as they all lived in the projects and they lived in Paris which is Kinda not true. Now gangs sort of a commuter reality at least in Los Angeles so it seems sensible to me and we have these pyrrhic victories of let's agree not to shoot into each other's houses. I mean that seems kind of not much of a victory But those were kinds of we'd have cease fires and truces and peace treaties and shuttle diplomacy. Where I would I'd actually right up? Oh kind of thing you know. And they sign it. The other side would sign. It would work for a time but I don't regret that I did that and I never do it again. Just because it it it If you work with gangs you provide oxygen gangs. And that's not a good thing and I can see that now but it was a historically necessary moment probably so it's enough to say that I honest to God. Don't regret it but at homeboy industries. We don't work with gangs things. We work with gang members in that feels more sensible right and is that. was that part of your path on the way to learning to that emphasis you. You don't WanNa serve the cohesion of the gang. Because as I just was texting a Homey who who. They've taught me how to text and I couldn't be more grateful to them and I'm finding that it sure beats the heck out of actually talking to people so so what did he text you about today. Will he he had. I don't know how they do this. Sometimes I have a tag line. I don't know what that is and you give text. And then there's a little tagline that you've put in that sort of permanent feature to every missive and his was the name of his gang and so a question that and I said why do you still have that and and I said if you can name a single good thing that's come into your life because of that gang. Please continue to have that as your tagline or whatever the word is like I think think I'm not sure what's it called Hashtag Hashtag this right lame with but it forced him to kind of say name. I'm one good thing and he couldn't name one good thing which is precisely the point. And so if you can't name a single good thing then why are you saluting. And why are you pledging allegiance to it but this is all part of the process. So you're having this conversation with him via texting texting. It's great to talk while you're ahead of me to talk but I mean one of the things you've one of the realizations you said you made out of that is that peace making requires conflict and while there's lots of violence between gangs. There's not conflict conflict that you can define the war. It's difficult because I'm sort of a dissenting voice. I think in the country at the moment when it comes to this thing and sometimes people will say to you. How can you be against peacemaking? Well obviously I'm not against peacemaking but I'm old fashioned. I think you know a peace making requires tires conflict and it's important to say that there is no conflict in gang violence violence but there's no conflict so it's not about anything so you want to understand what languages his gang violence speaking. That's important to me. It's about a lethal absence of hope. It's about kids who can't imagine a future for themselves elves. It's about kids who weren't seeking anything when they join a gang. It's about the fact that they're always fleeing something always without exception so it shifts the way you you see things and you know a somebody Bertrand Russell or somebody said if you want to change the world change the metaphor a four and that's kind of how we want to. I think we need to proceed in something like this. So if you think it's the Middle East you're quite mistaken if you think it's Northern Ireland.

Los Angeles Jesus Society of Jesus Krista Tippett Bolivia Mississippi Saint Ignatius Robert Dole Bertrand Russell Dorothy Day Santa Clara University Bannon Middle East Lisa Delight sesame Jarvis Rafael reporter Ruskin Dan
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:41 min | 9 months ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"And friends I'm really Percy executive producer for on being studios when Krista and our Small Team First Formed a nonprofit organization twenty thirteen on being was the only show that we were producing and we were one department now in two thousand nineteen we have four teams. In over twenty staff members each of them create experiment and innovate in digital media. PODCASTS and the work of social healing and all this work is made possible abol through generous partnership with foundations and are listening community Lisa listens and supports our work from Edmonton Canada. I have been really enjoying on being for the inspiration of the spark of ideas that it's given me the insights it's also the pace of it and the kindness. Thank goodness of the conversations that are had and the wonder and the joy of it and sometimes the pain of it is well. I feel quite intimate listening to it. It has a podcast and I believe that if you like something you should tell them. And if somebody's doing important work you should help them. I like what on being put on the airwaves and I want to continue and that doesn't happen by accident. If on beings had an impact in your life please consider supporting us with a financial contribution in any amount. You can do that at on being dot org forward slash give and thank you for making taking our work possible and for being a part of our community. I'm KRISTA Tippett up next my unedited conversation with Father Greg Boyle of homeboy industries trees. There is a shorter produced version of this. Wherever you found this podcast.

KRISTA Tippett Lisa executive producer Greg Boyle Edmonton Canada
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:11 min | 10 months ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm Krista Tippett the host of on being a love. This new piece of writing by David White in his new book essentials and I'm happy. He gave me permission to read it to view here. It's called close. Close is what we almost always are close to happiness close to another close to leaving close to tears close to God close to losing faith close to being done close to saying something or close to success and even even with the greatest sense of satisfaction close to giving the whole thing up our human essence lies not in a rival but in being almost there we are creatures are on the way our journey a series of impending anticipated arrivals we live by unconsciously measuring the inverse inverse distances of our proximity an intimacy calibrated by the vulnerability we feel in giving up our sense of separation to to go beyond our normal identities and become closer than close is to lose our sense of self in temporary joy a form of a rival that only opens opens us to deeper forms of intimacy that Blur are fixed. Controlling surface identities to consciously become close is a courageous form of unilateral disarmament. A chancing of our arm and our love a willingness to hazard our affections in an unconscious declaration that we might be equal to the inevitable loss that the vulnerability of being close. We'll bring human beings. Do not find their essence through fulfillment or eventual arrival. But by staying close to the way they like to travel to the way they hold the conversation between the ground on which they stand and and the horizon to which they go we are in effect always close always close to the ultimate secret that we are more real in Dr Simple wish to find a way than any destination. We could reach the step between not understanding that and understanding. That is as close close as we get to.

Krista Tippett David White
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

14:39 min | 11 months ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Visiting Fetzer Dot Org I'm Krista Tippett up next my unedited conversation with artistic conflict transformer John Paul let Iraq and conflict Geo tag fourteen forty days seven high coups numbered one stop sit light wine bread tender sharbat shallowness braided as we are who proximate to pain experiential divides demand are fierce love three wild and unruly quiet enough to be held silence between words number four today wideawake America patients you America patience you spoke and blessed me fife when shards flying flea supple- hearts forests NC's hold space for babies.

Fetzer Dot Org Krista Tippett John Paul Iraq America NC fourteen forty days
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Are so honored host her today on this return visit to Chautauqua. Please join me in offering a warm Chautauqua Michael Welcome to Amana Perry Imani Perry and Krista Tippett the morning. I'm so happy to bring Imani Perry back to Chautauqua. I brought her here. Once before. When we did a week of programmes on the stage of the hall the philosophy and it was a day of Biblical rains torrential we actually had to stop up the recording two or three times to stop the conversation two or three times a and because you know just the nature of that that's space and the rain just deafened it and so we were able to create a program from it but it was it was hard. The production was complicated and so so I'm delighted to bring her back and we will not be interrupted. Thank you so much for having me again. It was wonderful. Despite the rain you know and many things have changed. I was also we were sound is incredible in his amphitheater congratulations ratchet also there was no tweeting back then right.

Perry Imani Perry Krista Tippett
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

11:09 min | 1 year ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"And please make sure to follow us more generally across the social media channels at Pulitzer Center for those of you who are new to the Pulitzer Center. We're a nonprofit journalism and education organization based here in Washington. DC WE partner with journalists and newsrooms to support indepth reporting around the world now resulting in over one hundred fifty projects a year are journalism appears in major news media outlets across the country reaching millions on the most critical issues of our time. We also believe that education is as important to our mission as the journalism awesome that we support and in an effort to build a better informed public and rebuild trust in journalism we bring our journalists and their stories out into classrooms uh-huh across the country and public events like these we believe in creating a new generation of informed citizens and news consumers and we welcome from your support in our journey we can further our important mission. If you haven't already please subscribe to our email newsletter. It's the best way to find out about events like this and also more intimate conversations that happened with our journalists throughout the year and wasting no time this Monday some of you may have heard this already. I apologize if this is repeating petting but we have a screw very special screening. US Premiere of the ballymurphy precedent which is a film by award winning filmmaker Callum MacRae and it's it's looking it's really searing investigation into the killings of ten on armed Catholics in nineteen seventy one and that'll be at the street cinema so we hope you can join us for that. It's free and they'll be a little reception at the end of that. Oh and also please join us tomorrow morning. If you are a fan of Krista Tippett she will be also conducting a workshop in conversation with Tom Gjelten and one of our freelance journalist critic other Ira Gore and that'll be followed by a session by Dahlia Komo go ahead and Cat Kopplin from the Institute for Social Policy and understanding and that the registration starts at eight thirty tomorrow and program starts at nine so thank you again for joining us and to Krista Tippett and her team for being part of the conference this year were truly honored and looking forward into the conversation. Thank you thank you thank you. Natalie and we're so happy to be here. I am here with my colleagues. Aches Zack Rose Liliana Maria pursue use and Siri Grassley who we stole from NPR happy to claim her and I'm very happy to be here with Eric Fence and so let me tell you say we're going to we're going to speak up here for about about forty five minutes fifty minutes and then we are actually going to open this up to the room or their cards on the are we didn't over this and should ten res- has before at some point. I will invite you to to send up your questions and then we'll have a conversation all of us and then pull back up here here for the last ten or fifteen minutes to close out the conversation as we are taping this for possible broadcast so eric the you the question. I often ask whoever I'm interviewing is about the religious background of someone's child how you would describe that and and and your the religious back on your childhood is very intricately interwoven with a lot of the science writing you've been done and certainly the research behind your book suggestive will you so yeah if I just I just ask you to start talking about the religious background of your child in how you described that now sure so. I was raised in Christian Science. I don't know how many here are familiar with Christian Science. it's famous. Thomas for being a faith healing religion and criticize. You know don't go to doctors sort of what they're known for It's it's an interesting faith. it is Christian. I studied the Bible we just also studied a book called Science and Health by Mary Baker Eddy who started the religion and it when I described Christian Science Science. I know I'll probably offend criticise by doing this but this is the way I've always considered it is it's kind of like the movie the Matrix the Matrix for basically everything you see it. It doesn't really exist you know the world is sort of a mental construct and that's not a terribly new idea. I mean you look at the NAS sticks gymnastics or the Sufis. There's a lot of people over the course of human history who have a lot of mistakes have sort of had this idea that that the that the world doesn't really exist to construct in your mind but physicists talk that way these two. It's interesting how that works It's just it's if you take it to its logical aw conclusion then why bother going to a doctor when you can just fix it with your mind and it isn't so there is you you know. I think as you say there's this simplistic idea that Christian Science Christian scientists don't go to the doctor but there is very much and I really got this from your writing a culture of healing thing yeah practice of healing and the way I understood it and tell me if this is correct. Is that what you're what you're talking about. Is this that there is health and wholeness and it's this is about living into that true a reality well. That's yeah it's very true mm-hmm and if you read my book what you'll learn is this actually does work now. There are limits to it but I mean this. This is a theme I saw throughout working on in this book and and in my career is people are not crazy. People don't do irrational things and stepping on the outside it might look odd or crazy but if you get inside and and really get to know the people involved people aren't crazy. Christian scientists aren't crazy. They are acting in a way that is the that isn't the they believe in the best interest of their children and themselves itself is the best pathway to health and what I saw growing up is that is that these things did work. I mean obviously I believe I was in a very repossession it for a number of years and and it did work saw healings happened so as well after I got out of the religion. We'll tell you so you went went to the doctor for the first time when you were eighteen eighteen. Tell me about that. What was that like well. I was not a good patient and you guys probably know that your experience. The doctor is only as good as the as the patient is willing to be working with them. I didn't really know how to give information the doctor I had these horrible stomach pains and and and I was in great pain and I went to the doctor and he sort of felt around on my stomach like some sort of like which doctor which now no he was checking my appendix you know it was is looking for gallstones but but he just felt my stomach and then he said oh it's growing pains and on your way. I have not been missing. That's it feel your stomach can tell you is growing. I didn't tell them that I had been in Mexico the year before I understand like the cycles of parasites era sites how that works clearly. I had some sort of parasite that hung around for a couple of years until for another reason took a bunch of antibiotics in it went away but I mean that was kind of on me. I didn't understand that what I'd done a year before it could could be relevant but I remember walking being like wow. These guys are all quacks uh-huh. Oh that's funny a did you feel did it feel transgressive to you having never gone and thought from for your much of your life to them that you never would go to it. I think at that point I was really questioning a lot. you know I sort of broke away slowly holy I I got very passionate about rock climbing and then I got very defensive of my Sunday mornings when I was truck living so I wasn't as likely to go to school. I go to Sunday school. Church and I Christian science requires you to be one hundred percent in. That's one interesting thing about people who are into it like you. Don't there are people who go just every now and again but for the most part if you're serious Christmas is urine. You're not going to doctors so I I wasn't really willing to do that and at that point I was ready to try something new that that is one of the tricky parts of Christmas sciences there is sort of a culture of I've noticed these real condemnation nation if you do go to doctors and there's actually nothing technically against going to a doctor if you're in the religion but there is sort of the peer pressure element in that and so I did I feel well I mean I was. I was a teenager so I didn't really you know peer pressure from the people at Church was not much active rebellion natural so yeah you studied biology you got into your rock climbing you payment rock climbing guide and environmental consultant in environmental mental educator and a science journalist and you've been all over the world and it seems like you. I wonder if this is true. It's feels like you this this question. You was always there which is in the reporting behind suggest suggest w which was you know as you said people. Will you never even come out of this. Thinking people are lying or they're fooling themselves but there's something happening something else happening and he wanted to know what that something else yeah. That's the thing is you can tell yourself whatever you want but I mean if you if you've been in the faith community as long enough you have had healing. We've had a pain or some sort of condition that went away when you changed your your mindset around something and that you you can't ignore that so rather than trying to look for reasons why that might not have happened. I got interested in why that might have happened when my next explained that and it actually came out I was at a brain mapping conference and one of the keynote speakers. was is a name. His name is Torah waiter as an unusual name also turned out to be a Christian Science Society recognize them from the same college. Yeah I wanted to see in college I was I was like that's weird and he's giving a talk on placebos and it was a little light went off and I was like wow that you know that and it's a little like I always say it's a little like a a former Catholic studying the you know the brain circuitry around guilt. You know I mean it's it's hard to ignore. There's like once you know once you get this question and you grown up with us. It's very hard is not to be wondering what the mechanisms might be in what you've seen and so I I was hooked you know about him and then I just kept trying to do more stories about this Donna so you have likened likened brain scientists to to.

Krista Tippett Pulitzer Center Christian Science Science Church Christian Science Christian Science Society Washington Callum MacRae US partner Mary Baker Eddy Tom Gjelten Natalie Thomas Donna Torah Ira Gore
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Powerful love that helps us live in sacred relationship with ourselves others and the natural world learn more by visiting fetzer dot org. I'm krista tippett and this is my unedited conversation with acoustic ecologist gordon hampton and inventor of silence activism. There is always a shorter produced version of this. Wherever you found this podcast i think que- aright krista just getting set up here. Okay brought along some orange juice. I'm going to have a swig. Okay great <hes> so you're in minneapolis yes and and where are you well. I'm in a quiet place here in seattle okay yeah in fact <hes> by was <hes> couple of noisy hours just getting here. I i was hoping that i'd be able to sneak in this room early just to heal from that big bang and outside but any case i'm ready. We we actually have some construction going on here and we're wondering with the sensitivity of you're listening ability whether you might even hear here it across these thousands of miles well. I read wish but i'm fifty eight years old well. I'm really glad to have you at the other end it on microphone. Have you done one of these <hes> i._s._d._n. Interviews before i i find it very <hes> wonderful and intimate show to just have the the voice to work with so now i have a question for you. I <hes> santa link to nancy just this morning before i left with some audio files which since we have a ninety minute session today. Is that correct yeah. We'll we'll probably go seventy five or so but we like to give ourselves room in case so it it does give us an opportunity for me to refer to a particular sound file. Yes illustrate my point and let's listen to it together so i can get your impression yeah. No we definitely can and <hes> and if we want to listen together we can but you you can also assume that we can you know the the art and craft of radio <hes> will serve <hes> the fullness of what you do you and what you care about because we can talk about it and and we're also going to be able to bring it in for our listeners to hear so. That's really exciting about this. Yes well. We'll thank you. I'm really looking forward to this. This is the first time that so many minutes have been devoted to the subject and yeah guys islands especially. We need some breathing space. Yeah one thing people often say about our show is <hes> people in radio and they say it with a little bit of trepidation russian. There's a lot of silence in your show. Which in radio is measured in you know nanoseconds <hes> because it's it's kind of a it's forbidden being dead air right but you'll understand that dead air isn't bad oh yeah it's never never really dead but you know you wait longer than three seconds with silence and you know your listeners it probably pounding on top of their dashboard just trying to make sure other radio still looking yeah or the or the engineers in the building doing. It's a we'll get this good. Okay so let's let's start at the beginning and maybe we will circle back around to why it makes all of us nervous too much silence sure <hes>. Where did you grow up up. I didn't see that anywhere well. That's assuming that i did grow up. Okay well a whole child. Let's say it that way. Ask child. I was a member of a military family started out in southern california than went on to hawaii why then back to california before going to washington d._c. Seattle san francisco and then i can say about a dozen other places before i got out of high school so by the time it was my chance to go to college. That's when i decided fill the space in between seen by going to the mid west university of wisconsin so there wasn't really there's not really a place where you were which felt like like a center of gravity even even with all that moving. Oh there definitely is and that is hawaii. Okay yeah the place of of hawaii a place that i've recorded many times.

krista tippett hawaii Seattle nancy california gordon hampton minneapolis mid west university of wiscons san francisco washington fifty eight years ninety minute three seconds
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm krista tippett up next my unedited conversation with acoustic biologist katie pain. There is a shorter reproduced version of this wherever you found this podcast <hes> mitch. I'm hearing a slight echo although ah very slight well. Maybe they closed the door. It'll go okay. How's that that's good do you. Do you have any questions of me before we begin about the show or well i have listened to several recordings that were sent and and i just loved the interview with <hes> wami see one ghauri multi it. It was just a beauty <hes>. It's a very nice program good so now. I don't know what you're going to ask but well we can. We can demolish what we don't want you will you will do that and <hes> mitch. How are you with levels. Can we just okay he. He wants to hear you with a little bit more. <hes> uh-huh tell me what you had for lunch. Hello hello hello l. I don't really remember head solid. I guess how is this doing. Is it right that you had. You have a daughter his pregnant yes. That was what i that was what i was doing when i should have been talking to you what the new grandchild squirming around inside my daughter though all relations thank you all right well. Let's dive in <hes> okay. I usually start my conversations just by talking a little bit about the background of your life. You know where you grew up in <hes> you you grew up on a farm son's like most most of your most of those years if your child is that right yes hi spent the first seventeen years of my life on a farm <hes> on the edge of a waterfall waterfall in this area here near new york all the finger lakes region and this is where i live again now so oh my life has has sandwiched <hes> and <hes> and both the beginning and the end are are here <hes> upstate new york. Were you quicker. When you were growing up now. I was sort of a nothing <hes> <hes> i think i sang in what was then called a quaker meeting but quaker meeting shouldn't have singing so it i sang for the sake of singing my father <hes> was biologist. A a fruit growing agricultural farmer guy and my mother was a scholar who had studied works have done to and was very much a humanist so i had both both sides of possible religion or non religion <hes> available but <hes> became a quaker by my own choice later as an adult and you then in college studied both music nick and biology. Yes this is right well. Nobody told me i was going to have to earn my living through what i did in college and i loved music and wanted to learn a good deal more about it than i'd been able to learn back in the farming days. <hes> my wasn't a great musician but got to sing <hes> and then after college <hes> i was married to you just <hes> roger payne who became very interested in studying wales and when we went to see we heard for the first time time <hes> the wonderful sounds that humpback whales make in the ocean at that time. Nobody knew about him. Really nobody knew about the song then no no they didn't..

roger payne new york krista tippett katie pain wales seventeen years
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm Krista Tippett and this is on beings. Unheard cuts up next. My unedited conversation with lyric poet, Gregory. Or there is a shorter produced version of this wherever you found this podcast. We are thought about this because we were listening, very closely to the programming that Krista Tippett was doing with poets, and Astro physicists, and mathematicians and philosophers, and monks, and social activists, and she asks essential questions about what it means to be human being in the world and poetry is always asking those questions, and it seemed like a natural partnership. So we contacted her producer and here we are with Krista Tippett, and Gregory or with unbecoming and poetry. So happy to be sitting here again today with Gregory or. Let me say, I have some books and I will propose some poems read. And then if you feel just inspired to read some you can just tell me to throw one of these over to you at any time. Okay. Yeah. We are taping this to broadcast later. I don't know if we've said that which is exciting. So I think there's something really magical about. An experience that you have, like we're having a we are going to have an experience here in this room together for the next hour. And, and then you send it out and many, many more people are kind of are in the room, that's kind of the magic of the medium of audio and radio, which is now. Podcasting. And the experiences are different and yet communal. And so anyway, that's what we're pertaining of right now. Thinking as I was getting ready to speak with you. That about how human beings become wise, sometimes by discovering things. No one had ever known before. And sometimes we become wise by remembering and rediscovering things that people knew forever once, and then we forgot and I'm aware in the circles in which I move this really this really unexpected movement of our time often led by young people by millennials who are claiming grief and loss and death as human experiences. And there are things held death, cafes and the dinner party, which is a movement and is founded by people who had terrible loss in their early lives, and there was no place for them to talk about that in the world. And so that what they wanna do is claim grief and death as something that's not not to pathologies it. But as a part of life. That we reckon with and show and can asked and kind kinda company others in and be accompanied. In. Yes, it is. It's fascinating and bring the greed ver- person who's lost back into some form of human community. Sounds fascinating. I'd need to know more before. Well, I mean I thought about it, obviously, because an origin point and really enduring focus of your poetry. And of you becoming a poet was with this terrible, terrible death, and boss. Which was your younger brother's death, and you're on the cusp of adolescence. You're as you said, you're a kid participating in popular American ritual ritual hunting, firing a gun becoming a man. And actually, I'm not going to ask you to read the poem that ice in every interview, I've seen everybody hands, you this poem, right at the beginning, which begins I was twelve when I killed him. And I just I we're gonna talk about that. But I kind of just want to start someplace a little softer. I mean, I think small talk has a purpose, right? He's us into other conversations like this where did you grow up? Where yes I grew up in upstate New York rural Hudson valley. We had one stop light to drugstores, one jukebox in the dark drugstore and. Seven or eight churches..

Krista Tippett Gregory New York producer Hudson valley
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm Krista Tippett, and this is on beings. Unheard cuts up next my unedited conversation with Buddhist ecologist and Rilke translator Joanna Macy. There is a shorter produced version of this wherever podcasts are found. And Chris somewhere, it'd be able to get your. Hello. Hello. Hi, Joanna heights Krista Tippett high. I can't hear you very well. All right. When I say, we can turn up the volume turn, I'm late maybe a minute or two because of the parking confusion. No problem. Don't worry. Take your time catcher breath. Yeah. That'd be good. That good catch my breath. Let me tell you. Let me tell you what I have in mind. I don't I need more volume to hear you better. Oh, okay. I see that's going to happen. The your end. Can you are you is that any better? Or are you hearing me now as a little better? Okay. Sorry. What's the now? My voice is very lower to me. Right. So let's get it adjusted a little bit of that shouldn't. Are you are you working on that Chris? Or is that that's better. Okay. Good. Okay. Let me tell you what I have in mind while you catch your breath. Okay. I I own now, I'm hearing an echo. Let's see that's probably that's her headphones being a little bit loud day. Maybe if I. You know, it's not too bad. If I stay back from the Mike Nowak should get you where you're comfortable, Chris. If we can't get the headphones down just a little bit. I think I'll be okay, there's a that the thing that happens with headphone volume as if it's too high your end than I hear an echo and vice versa. So we need. We'll get a happy medium here. So can they if what's the engineer's name, Chris Harris, Kelly, Harris or Kelley should be able to hear us? Okay. Okay. Now, I think this is Kelly Kelly. Are you still hearing the go it turned on the headphones year? We're still hearing it. So I mean, it's it's tricky because do you have mixed that you can have her level be adjusted in comparison with Christos? Yes. Yeah. Working on that. Yeah. So, you know, it's probably more difficult because having a little hard of hearing. And I took off my hearing aids. Well, we'll we'll be able to work it out. But I'm sure you have is not the first time you've had to deal with that. The thing is with technology. It's amazing and something different is difficult. Every time. Kelly is your Mike open right now. Yes. My my guess here alternate off, and we'll see if that makes it different, okay? Testing testing. I'm not hearing myself now Joanna can you still hear me very well? Good. Okay. So so let me tell you what I have in mind. I am a lover of real like you. And I I I don't for your translations have Rilke good. I I spent most of the eighties in Germany, most of that in divided Berlin. And I speak German, and and real has German is, you know, one of the most beautiful things in the world to me. And I could never find translations that captured that.

Chris Harris Krista Tippett Kelly Kelly Joanna Macy Rilke Mike Nowak Berlin Germany Christos engineer Kelley
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:14 min | 1 year ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Org. I'm Krista Tippett, and this is on beings. Unheard cuts up next my unedited conversation with the great Christian teacher of the prophetic imagination. Walter brueggemann. There is a shorter produced version of this wherever podcasts are found. Or was that was supposed to pick me up with off with some other passengers? So then they had to mobilize another car. But I guess if you if you travel enough it's going to happen. So, you know, I I didn't meet you. But I saw you years ago at. Do you remember Edina that preaching conference that they who is it the episcopal ES? Ex- preaching excellence conference if they do they still do that in the summertime. So when I was at why d s I got invited to do that. And it would have been like the like I was pregnant with my daughter. So it was like ninety two or something ninety three ninety three. And you were there. It was in Saint Louis is that we're eating right? Okay. And also that amazing woman. Peggy was her name the way, I think so. Here. It's only Peggy I know in the feel Peggy's right name. Do you? Remember who else spoke with you someone else from aid more? She in a wheelchair. Vinci. Okay. So. Yeah. So I I so do up then. I read you, of course, too. But one thing, you know, even my colleagues who haven't gone to seminary when your name came up more. We realize you'd be in town trend. I think especially said your name comes up people, quote you as often as anyone else gets a quote in your name gets dropped a lot. Appreciate that. Well, we can't get the real thing. Oh, and you got your bible. Well, should we just go or Chris? Yes. Okay. All right. Let's just do it. Do you have any questions of me before we start? Okay. All right. I take off this loud. I slept. So we're start with everyone is I just like to hear a little bit about the religious background of your childhood. Son of a a pastor. My father was. A german. Evangelical pastor in rural Missouri, and I grew up in very much, a church culture. And I think that shaped be cheap be not only as a believer. But it shaped between ministry, and that was that's the flow of my life. And that was an antecedent of the United church of Christ. So that's my home denomination has been all my life. Yeah. I read somewhere that you remembered the conflict when your father urged his congregation to abandon German or yes. So it was a German speaking congregation will the that that crisis really came in the second World War when didn't wanna speak German anymore. But my. It's like every immigrant community, the older people really thought that true theological talk could only happen in your mother tongue and my father, then preached once a month in German into the nineteen fifties because the old people needed to hear those sounds and his insistence was if you don't if you don't move away from that you will like every immigrant community lose the next generation. So he had some tough nut to crack about that. Did he speak did you speak German at home? No. She the years when I should have learned of home were the years when you didn't want a German, but both my parents from childhood were bilingual. And that's when I should have learned it as an Old Testament teacher. I've been trying to learn it all my adult life instead of that and funny with German. I am I spent most of my twenties most of the eighties in Germany in Berlin was not religious. I was completely political person. I was a journalist as with the State Department, then when a couple years later, I ended up going to seminary which is not something I would ever imagined in those political years reading and speaking German was a huge advantage. Right. She could go to the library. You can get all these great texts and read them. Well, maybe even twenty twenty five years ago. The important stuff was still in German. That's changed now. But yeah. I this may be a stretch. But when I read that story, it it made me wonder if if that is that struggle over language..

Germany Peggy I Walter brueggemann Krista Tippett Peggy Chris Edina Saint Louis Vinci Missouri State Department United church of Christ Berlin twenty twenty five years
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Visiting fetzer dot org. I'm Krista Tippett. And this is on beings. Unheard cuts up next my unedited conversation with Rebecca tracer and AVI Klein, there is a shorter produced version of this wherever podcasts are found. And so this is really fun because how often do you get to introduce one of your own journalistic heroes mentors and friends at it's very funny. Chris it because I cannot see you at all. So it's like I. Like. Like this. This woman probably requires no introduction, but Krista Tippett as a Peabody award winning broadcaster, national humanities medalists New York Times bestselling author. She founded and leads the on being project hosts, the globally, esteemed on being public radio show and podcast and curates the civil conversations project. She grew up in a small town in Oklahoma, attended Brown University and became a journalist and diplomat in Cold War Berlin and later received a master of divinity from Yale University, and she's working on a new book her last book was becoming wise an inquiry into the mystery art of living, which is a really beautiful book. I thought it'd be funny. If I told my meeting, you story, Krista, which I don't even know if you remember, but I we were at the same conference and I'd never met her. And I have this thing, right? Never really want to meet any of my heroes because I'm afraid that if I meet them, I will just babble it and say nothing that they haven't heard before and just inconvenience them. And I always talk myself out of it. It. So I was at a conference and Krista was there, and I was turned turned to my friend. And I said if I do meet Krista Tippett, unlike all these other times where I don't talk to the people who I like really look up to I'm going to tell her this gonna tell her that. And we'll toes other thing. And all of a sudden, I feel this like light touch on my elbow and Kris Jenner and she's like, hi Courtney. I'm Chris, and I was like oh God. Okay. Well, I've already told all the things so at least now I can just sort of slink away. But it was the banning of a very beautiful friendship, which I am. So deeply grateful for I'm going to let her introduce the other two brilliant humans up here. Both of which I also very much admire, but please take it away Krista. You courtney? Now, I don't know where you went. So I I wrote out some remarks to begin with because I wrote them out because I think we all agreed. It's this it feels it's hard to talk about all of this feels a little perilous. And I know you've all been together all day. And so it may not feel that way to anymore, and I don't want to say it goes without saying, but I still think it's worth saying again. And again that metoo is a moment and it didn't just start a year ago. And Rebecca tracer is one of the people who has been reminding us of that this year in Toronto Burke, who I gave rise to these worse in two thousand six spoke to the times just this past week of her concern that the movement that is now underway really the movement that are now under around this don't lose sight of the central mission, which was and still is to connect survivors of sexual assault to the resources they need in order to heal. Will. And I read and I thought that the h word he'll has not had much of a place in the journalistically driven public reckonings of the past year and that word can be employed to quickly in the face of trauma. But surely the complex of reckonings because that's what it is that we are societally naming and wrapping our arms around with the impetus of metoo is at best an opening to a long term cultural reckoning to grow up humanity to grow up our species to grow up our society. I think that a solutions lens on me too. And I just love the framing of this day would ask can journalism can journalists be among the culture, interrogators shapers who helped create and shine a light on the spaces the vocabulary. The imaginative muscle the processes and the pragmatic forms to support healing where it is possible now and in time. I believe that the that grappling with the me too movement through solutions lens, which show us ways to cover this and live this not as a liberal issue..

Krista Tippett Rebecca tracer Chris Courtney Burke Peabody award New York Times bestselling Kris Jenner Oklahoma AVI Klein Yale University Cold War Berlin Brown University Toronto assault
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm Krista Tippett. And this is on beings. Unheard cuts up next my unedited conversation with contemporary of teacher Mira by Bush. There is a shorter produced version of this at apple podcast, Google podcasts Spotify or wherever you like to listen. That was that wasn't. You was it. Yeah. That's what I thought. Hello. Hello. Hello. Hello. Does that Mary by it is mere by hi, Krista? I I'm so glad you made it safely. I did not want to have any any damage to you on my conscience. The roads were great. Okay. You know by the time I got on. There was I've been on texting in on Email. It's various friends that area who are all kind of freaked out about the weather. Yeah. It's been a lot. Yeah. We're weary. Yeah. Yeah. And it's a lot of shoveling and snowball somebody said grumpy grumpy. Yeah. So Chris are do you want us to just Chit chat for a minute. All right. Sure. So tell me something let's not want. I'm so happy. We're doing this first of all, but I don't want. I don't want to risk using I think profound until we're going so tell me something mundane like what you had for breakfast. I add. Granola yogurt and banana was very good. Okay. Although I wanted something warm, but I couldn't figure that out. So. I have for breakfast. Get a gold star for healthiness. Last week. I was out at canyon ranch. So you know, one has to be healthy for a while. After after that. That's. I though it was that your award for having that. Yeah. Well, I went there's one right near us and lenox mass. Yeah. I went there to work with some funds to set up a program, you know, for re strengthening, and I've actually had a fabulous recovery. I feel great. But I wanted to keep strengthening so and basically, of course, they told me everything I already know. But it was nice to hear from somebody else. I actually haven't been to canyon ranch. I mean, I've heard that. It's really wonderful. So it's one of my aspirants. Okay. Doing it. Okay. Chris few think, we're good. Oh, okay. All right. Okay. I do have what I do have water. Okay. And we don't do we have a hard stop or anything. Heart. Stop at two thirty our time three thirty your time. Okay. Is it? Okay. If I drink water during absolutely. And this is totally this is completely non linear. And you can you know, we can edit things out if you need join a stop or if you want to go back to something we'll edited for broadcast. Yeah. Just a real conversation. Nothing. I would rather do. Okay. Well, let's see. We can we begin. Okay. Terrific..

Chris Krista Tippett canyon ranch apple Mira Spotify Google Mary Bush
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm Krista Tippett and this is on being today a conversation with sociologist of emotion, arly hook shield on how our stories as felt rather than merely factual shape our life together, the five years she spent between Berkeley California and southwest Louisiana. While writing her two thousand sixteen book strangers in their own land has given her singular insight into current political and social dynamics. We started out speaking about your your work in sociology and your focus on the sociology of emotion and taking a motion seriously, which I really hard for me to magin. Anybody could argue that emotion doesn't in fact seriously matter in politics now, but you know, and then there's a an obvious extension of that here, which is that we need a motion intelligence, right? I mean, that's what mediation to, and we need to say this is important is all of our other forms of intelligence that we that we wield wheeled very confidently in boldly. Yes, absolutely. You could say that much of my work. Nine books now has been an effort on wear nother to honor and prion get the world owner, the importance of emotional intelligence as especially as used by service workers. You know, caregivers, childcare workers, elder care workers who. Anybody in the service industry is using emotional intelligence in it matters enormously that we all learn to do well and don't sneer at it..

Krista Tippett Berkeley magin California Louisiana five years
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm Krista Tippett and this is on being today with Francis Kissling. So I want to ask you also you have been struggling with kidney disease. Now I've things over the last few years. Do you have a donor? I've been reading about your. Did that happen? Well, my kid, my kidneys have have continued my kids as I call them how. How are your kids people ask me. My kids have been behaving well, and so I have not. I have. I have not yet had to even cross the threshold of, you know, getting a donor finally approved, you don't what? What I what occurs to me is I wondered how this experience yet has flowed into all the thinking you've done and all the patch put all these years towards thinking about our bodies as at once private and public. Yes. And the concept of donation, the concept. I mean, I'm fat. It really extended my consciousness around the notion that the whole idea of the gift of life. I have written a little bit about the relationship between someone giving a part of their body to me. And that it's, it's like, this is so terrible. It's sort of like communion. Okay, that a part of someone else's body is going to be in me. For the rest of my life and a foreign part that I am going to have to work through drugs for my body, not to reject it. These are very interesting philosophical reflections that I've made. Also, for example, when somebody gives a kidney. We applaud that person. As the most out truest dick of human beings. But women give their bodies every day to fetus to bring it into the world, and every pregnancy carries with it. The risk of death. Pregnancy is normal. Having babies, normal. It's not true. It's no big deal that women do this. It is a big deal that women give their bodies to bring new life into the world. I've always thought that if we were really talking about this theologically as opposed to politically, yeah, we would have to speak in terms of gifts rather than rights. I mean rights exact concept foreign to the bible, but gift, but choice and life, right? If it's right. What do you think you've learned about how social change happens? Like what? What would progress look like now in these years? Ahead of you with with your own kidneys or with other people..

kidney disease Krista Tippett Francis Kissling
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm krista tippett and this is on being today with the singular cellist and citizen artist yoyo ma we're kind of pieces of music or experiences of working with other musicians or particular concerts like they've been cathartic moments where you where you discovered this or started to be able to articulate it or even something going on now i'm just i'm just wondering if you could embed that in a piece of music or a story sure we'll give you too so one of the composers that wrote for cello alone six of these one wonderful sweets and they're different movements and i've moment of going between the moment the end of a movement to the beginning of the next movement so actually not necessarily coded a written by the composer if they just separate movements that i would member often playing loving the connection between the end of the sarra of the i the g major sweet going into the minuet than the next movement because there was something asadabad is like a slow dance and it goes into a minuet which is a slightly more lively dads and there's something about the incredible restfulness of the way the first movement and and suddenly the some like.

krista tippett
Waffle House shooting suspect Travis Reinking in custody

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:34 min | 2 years ago

Waffle House shooting suspect Travis Reinking in custody

"The people are at now is like no no bring it on i have to face it we have to face it i'm krista tippett and this is on being stay with us live from npr news in washington i'm jack speer a terrifying scene in downtown toronto today where police say at least ten people are dead fifteen others were hurt after a white van jumped the curb and plowed into pedestrians still not clear is why the vehicle struck pedestrians oh video taken nearby when the van driver was apprehended showed him armed with what appeared to be a gun deputy police chief but this date us the city of toronto pray for all victims and also to assess the tarpley service in bringing this matter to a successful conclusion as i stated earlier we have one person in custody and the investigation is ongoing toronto police have shut down the area where the incident occurred they say they're still trying to figure out a motive in the case the suspect in a quadruple slang at a nashville area waffle house restaurant has been taken into custody after being at large since early sunday morning authorities say say they arrested twenty nine year old travis ryan king taking into custody not far from his apartment photos posted by police showed him in a police car police and agents from the f b i and the bureau of alcohol tobacco firearms and explosives joined by tennessee highway patrol officials and mounted a massive manhunt for ryan king police allege ryan king was wearing only green coat opened fire with a semiautomatic assault style weapon killing four people early sunday for others were hurt the.

Krista Tippett Washington Jack Speer Toronto Ryan King NPR Tarpley Nashville Tennessee Assault Twenty Nine Year