35 Burst results for "Krista Tippett"

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

07:06 min | 2 months ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"In the phone is your dream ladder to divinity. The tiny speaker in the phone is your dream ladder to divinity. Put down the weight of your aloneness and ease into the conversation. The cattle is singing even as it pours you a drink, the cooking pots have left their arrogant aloofness and seen the goody new at last. All the birds and creatures of the world are an utterly themselves. Everything, everything. Everything is waiting for you. I love that line. Alertness is the hidden discipline of familiarity. Exactly. Yes. You could take that into a relationship or marriage with good results. And that this is the hidden discipline. And you make the point also that that everything that is waiting. Includes things that will surprise us in both directions. But that everything also includes your own demise. Exactly. Yes, half of all human experiences mediated through loss and disappearance. And this is one of the reasons why we won't have the conversation. Because we don't want to go there. We don't want to open that acknowledge that possibility. If you have a really fierce loss, the loss of someone who's close to you the loss of a mother or father or brother or sister, a friend, God forbid a child, then human beings have every right to say, listen, God, if this is how you play the game, I'm not playing the game. I'm not playing by your rules. I'm going to I'm going to manufacture my own little game. And I'm not going to come out of it. You know, I'm going to make my own little bubble. And I'm going to draw up the rules. And I'm not coming out to this frontier again. I don't want to. You know, I want to create insulation. I want to create distance and many human beings do that for the rest of their lives. Many do it for just a short period and then reemerge again. About all of us are struggling to be here, one of the great theological questions is around incarnation, which simply means being here. In your body, not anywhere else, just here with life's fierce need to change you know. And the fact that the more you're here and the more you're alive, the more you realize you're a mortal human being and that your past from this place. And will you actually turn up? Will you actually have the conversation given that is so will you become a full citizen of vulnerability loss and disappearance which you have no choice about? You know, I sense all the way through your writing in your poetry and your other writing. You. Say it this way, but there's a sadness in you, which is in all, I bet you and it's in all of us, but you walk with it as a companion. I think more openly than we're taught to do. And perhaps that's also something that poetry allows. I so you and I both loved John o'donohue and I think we also both love real care and real good talked about loving the dark hours of his being. Yes. And yeah, I just wanted to note that. I appreciate it. And it's also one of these things about what you say about what you bring into the world that is, I know people recognize it, but it's also a little bit frightening. Yes, and I describe it more from my own experience as wistfulness and poignancy. A kind of elegiac approach to life. And analogy, you know, a good allergy looking at it from the poetic point of view is always a conversation between grief and celebration. The grief of the loss of the person and the celebration that you were here at all to share the planet with them. And we have that initial shock, I had that shock. You know, it's such a close. Friend to John o'donoghue who we've mentioned. And he was I'm a poet philosopher. He would have been a philosopher poet, and we were like two bookends, and there was always someone in the world I knew. Who was traveling and speaking from the same place, although using slightly different language and a slightly different accent. But when he went, it was like the other half of me disappeared. And we have this physical experience in loss of falling towards something. It's like falling in love except it's falling into grief. And you're falling towards the foundation that they held for you in your life that you didn't realize they were holding. And you fall and fall and fall and you don't find it for the longest time. And so the shock of the loss to begin with. And that hermetic ceiling off is necessary in grief. But then there comes a time where you finally actually start to touch the ground that they were holding for you. And it's from that ground that you step off into your new life and been very strange phenomena in that instance, for instance, of losing John whereby I'll start a sentence and feel like John has finished it. Or I'll hear John speaking and I'll start in his voice and finish in my own. And sometimes we're both talking together, which happened a lot when we were when we were actually together. And so there's this really astonishing melding that occurs, which is a kind of dream time, which human beings start to move into in their maturity actually, where what is passed, what is present and what's about to occur are not so clearly marked out, you know? One of the things the Irish say is that the thing about the past is it's not the past. That's right here. In this room. In the ears of all the listeners who are who are listening to us, each listener has their own astonishing foundational inheritance that they're bringing to this conversation that they're overhearing between the two of us. And there's so many different kinds of loss and across our lifespan. I mean, right now, just about my second child, my son is about to leave home, and I love thinking about that. It's just kind of just kind of sinking in on me. And I love to think about that. What will that mean? For this particular loss to fall into that foundation of.

John o'donoghue John o'donohue John
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

06:57 min | 3 months ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Road as a fork in the road here. I could become indignant. I could flame up this flame of negativity, or I could say, recalculating. I'll just go back here. This is an example of technology and telling us what spirituality is. Well, I think it's fun so much. And no matter how many times I don't make that turn, it will continue to say recalculating. The tone of voice will stay the same. I think it's a good analogy. But you know, about the technology, a lot of people have said, as you said, when we began life is so much different now and so much speed it up. And I noticed that people I was watching the news in the airport and not only did I was watching the news of the demonstration in Cairo and which was so exciting but underneath that in the rolling tape that's underneath it was every 15 seconds. And other piece of information on top of all this information is so much stuff to process. And it's so stimulating. And it's very seductive to say in a life has become so whizzed up and so busy, how can people possibly pay attention long enough to fix the world, which really needs many levels to get fixed. And I've been saying for a long time and I think that because of this technology because I remember a journalist saying that the reason the Berlin Wall came down, the proximal cause of the fall of the wall was the fax machine. Especially if I wrote that recently. And I've been thinking since then that the proximal cause of the world stopping and saying, you know, we have to do things a different way is going to be people all over the world saying just a second we destroying the biosphere and everything else will stop and look and say everybody. I usually carry a poem by Pablo Neruda. I'm going to have you read that. You brought it. I brought it. Oh, good. I brought it. I brought it to Detroit, but it's in my hotel room. I carried it with me always. I work to read that. We're going to give that as a gift to everyone because you gave it as a gift to me. Here's our radio moment. I'm Krista tippett on being conversation about meaning, religion, ethics, and ideas. Today, in a public conversation, on raising children in complex times, I'm with Buddhist teacher and psychotherapist. Mother and grandmother, Sylvia borstein. Her books include happiness is an inside job practicing for a joyful life. Sylvia, I want to ask you to this question of raising children, human beings who are kind. Who have a heart for the world, in a world that's troubled. When you and I met on a panel in Southern California two years ago. You told a story about leading mindfulness teaching sessions. And you told a story about, I think it was a man who at the end of it said, I'm frightened to go back out into the world. I feel so vulnerable and in here I'm safe. But I don't know how I can be out in the world and be vulnerable. And that story came back to me as I was thinking about interviewing you on this subject because I think as a parent, there's a version of that that goes through my mind. How much do I expose my children to? How do I teach them to be kind and open to the world's pain? And vulnerable. And yet, I want them to be safe. And I actually want them to be tough out in that scary world at the same time. Talk to me about that. Well, I remember misses it's a two part answer. I remember that I don't remember exactly that moment, but I'm sure it happened because it comes up often. And people will come and spend a week at a retreat center or a weekend or however many days. And then they do say, here everyone is safe and it's quiet and to go out. I feel too vulnerable. And it gives me a chance to say, you know, really, I don't think we can become too vulnerable. I'm waiting for the time that the whole world is suddenly too vulnerable and looks around and says, wait a minute, we're making a very big mistake. We all have to stop. We have to share. We have to make sure there's enough to eat all over the world. We have to stop. We can teach each other our ways and tell each other our hopes and dreams. But we can't kill each other. That doesn't work. And we can't kill the earth. And we can't despoil it as we're doing. So in a sense, that's a half of an answer, but because that's what I'd say to an adult who's leaving a retreat to a parent, I say, you know, as a child is growing up, inevitably, they live in the world, and they'll hear about things. If they live in a house that's a relatively peaceful, and we have a certain amount of control as parents about how much the TV is on and what's on the TV and how much how much they are confronted by the pain of the world. And you know what, I think, since for myself, really, sometimes with the pain of the world seems incomprehensible. And unbearable to me. But I think if there's anything that balances it, it's the wonder at the world, the amazingness of people, how kind they are. How resilient they are, how people will take care of people that they don't know, somebody falls or someone's in trouble in a public place. People take care of them. People take care of people that they don't know that human beings have that ability. I don't think they have to learn it. They don't have to have lessons. I think we're a companionable species. And for the most part, every once in a while, we meet hermitage people, but for the most part, we're companionable. And congenial, and we care about other people, and we take care of them. So to be able to look at human beings and say, human beings are amazing, life is amazing. The sun came up in the exact right place this morning. And celebrates seasons. I think that's a wonderful part of being part of a group of people who celebrate seasons and birthdays and holy days. So that here.

Krista tippett Sylvia borstein Pablo Neruda Cairo Berlin Sylvia Detroit Southern California
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

11:15 min | 5 months ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm Krista tippett, up next, my unedited conversation with ornithologist and poet drew lanham. There is, as always, a shorter produced version of this wherever you found this podcast. It's great to meet you. Thank you so much for doing this. Thank you for having me, Christa, really appreciate it. It's good to be here. We're there. Or wherever we are. Whatever place means right now. Do you have your do you have the home place? And sparrow envy with you? I do. I do. Okay, okay. 'cause I think I have some things marked that I might ask you to read at the end. Okay. But I'm also happy for you to pull something out if you feel if you feel called. Spontaneously, and also, you know, to yeah, so I think, yeah, so absolutely feel free if you just feel like you want to read something as we're going that illustrate something we're talking about in conversation, but also know that when we get to the end, I want to just have you read some pieces of your writing as well. Sounds good. Okay. Zach, are we good from your end? Let me go to settings, right? Okay. Let's see here. Setting system, sound, output is road. And input is road. Okay. Great. Well, here we are. Is it true that you're in a writing shed? Yeah, well, yeah, that's what I play it off as a little shit called the thicket. It was originally a storage house, and I converted it out of necessity for hoarding stuff that I want to surround me and also to have a little escape pod. So that's where I am today. Yeah, I'm actually. I would say out of necessity, but what feels like more out of despair. Building. A writing, what I'm calling a writing retreat in my backyard. I don't actually want it. I mean, I actually want to think and write back there rather than because in my house, I do the zoom and I do work. And yeah, especially since here we are with all these months of being in this one place. So yeah, so I'm jealous, I'm jealous. That you already have you. Well, Christa, I mean, it came together really out of despair in many ways because I was, you know, my story is one of really sort of searching for space constantly because as a child I really didn't have it, I sort of always shared it. I didn't have my own room. I shared my grandmother's bedroom and the bed for a good while until I got bigger and then so this place is, it's the in a way in that Thoreau's Walden was really not very far from. His mother's home and this is the side yard, it's not the backyard, only because I couldn't get it in the backyard. But so it sits like this appendix of a building on the side of the house, but it's important when I don't get out here, I miss it. So yeah, I understand. I can empathize with that desire of despair. Yeah. I want to read what I think are the first lines of the home place, the introduction. You wrote, let me just actually have a typed it out, but I just want to read it from the book. That's not special. I am a man in love with nature. I am an eco addict, consuming everything that the outdoors offers in all its in its all you can sense seasonal buffet. I'm a wildling born of forests and fields and more comfortable on unpaved back roads and winding Woodland paths than in any place where concrete asphalt and crowds prevail. You write also in that somewhere in that same passage, why does my blood run wild that's a question you've asked. I just want to ask as we start like how far back and can you even feel it in your body? Does that question and your sense of being this way go? Wow, probably to, I don't know, four or 5 years old maybe? That point in time when I was given some freedom allowed to wander a little bit beyond my parents, I view or my grandmothers, I view so. I would think maybe then, but certainly by 6. Because by 6, I was in head start and that kind of thing. And out. And sort of wandering around the yard at least and not long after that had my first bicycle. So I think back to those times with my grandmother and if I was still sleeping in the bed with her, then it would have been 5 or 6 years old. That places me at her place and so when it places me there, I'm thinking of her throwing out handfuls of grits to what she calls snowbirds that we know is junko's and but sparrows and all these other things. Or her talking about owls being bad omen when they were calling around the house. So most of my life I've thought about things beyond four walls and what was in the Woods or what was roaming in the darkness that I couldn't see, so it's been, it's been a long time. You call your grandmother, your mama? My math. Right? And yet, you kind of, it sounds like you kind of grew up both in your home, your parents home. And called the ranch and my math is house, the ramshackle, and you kind of straddled these physical and symbolic worlds that both imprinted you. Yeah, I'm an age creature, I guess that kind of straddled a lot of worlds it seems, but that was the arrangement my grandmother, my grandfather died, and in 61, and I was born in 65 and when I was born and named Joseph, I was sort of my grandfather's namesake, his middle name was Samuel, my middle name is drew, but my grandmother asked for me. So I was with her for about half of my life up until I was 15. So I slept over there every night. I usually and she kept me until it was until I was a school age, and so that imprint was very, very strong. Just sort of her coming of age in the 20s and 30s and 40s met that I sort of grew up with a very different sensibility. She never called a refrigerator a refrigerator. It was an icebox. And so I grew up with that language too. In Oklahoma. There you go. I mean, so we never lose that. Yeah. You know, it's not a gas station is a filling station. Yeah. You know, all those things really informed me there. So that was a big imprint, but then when, again, I was able to roam, I would walk over to my parents house, the ranch, which, back then, it seemed like it was miles away, but really it's only about a quarter of a mile. At most, and that was, that was a modern place, both of my parents were school teachers. And my siblings were over there, and some of my toys were there, not many, but some of them were over there, and so that was the other half of my existence was at the ranch, so yeah, I was straddling two worlds. And edgefield county, South Carolina, where you were your home. Place where you grew up. I wonder if you would just describe it to me ecologically, which is how you, it feels to me you describe places. I will say I was really intrigued that even when you talked about there's a place you talk about, the political boundaries drawn by human hands, a vegetable county. Give it the appearance on maps of a cartoonish chicken's head. So even then you were making bird analogies. Well, it's an odd place. It's a beautiful place, ecologically, and as edge field is on the edge of the Piedmont or at least portions of it in the upper or inner coastal plain, many different places meet. So there's this sandy ridge, and portions of in southeastern portions of the county that grow the best peaches in the world, Georgia can call itself the peach state, but its mistaken. Glad we've corrected that. Well, South Carolina and specifically on that ridge, the peaches grow, especially sweet, but then where I grew up in up near colliers community, which is sort of smack dab in the middle of the most pied mine of the.

Krista tippett drew lanham Christa Zach Thoreau Walden junko edgefield county Samuel Joseph Oklahoma South Carolina Piedmont Georgia
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:32 min | 5 months ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Welcome. Welcome to this live podcast recording of on being featuring conversation between very special guests. Louisiana native, a climate activist and lawyer. And Krista tippett, the Peabody Award winning broadcaster, New York Times bestselling author, national humanities medalist, and our very own Minnesota treasure. I'm Kate Nordstrom. I'm the executive and artistic director of the great northern. And every year, our festival shares dozens of performances are installations. Outdoor activations and solutions focus climate talks over ten days in January and February. We hope that they enrich the mind and inspire the body and this conversation is our first in a series of climate talks. It is part of our climate solution series that runs through February 6th and you can find more information on our website, which is the great northern festival that come. So we are especially pleased that collette traveled from the warmth of the south. To experience our cold and hearty winter here in the north. So we are grateful that you're giving Minnesota winter a chance. And it's now my great honor to turn over the stage to Colette and Chris to share this very special live on being conversation..

Krista tippett Kate Nordstrom Peabody Award great northern Louisiana Minnesota New York Times collette Colette Chris
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

08:18 min | 6 months ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"In the morning and come out of your house. Whether your belief you're walking into dead geographical location, which is used to get to a destination. Or whether you're a emerging out into a landscape that is just as much if not more alive as you, but in a totally different form. And that it subsists primarily in silence stillness and solitude. But that if you attend to it, and if you go towards it with an open heart and a real watchful reverence that you will be absolutely amazed at what it will reveal to you. And I think that that was one of the recognitions of the Celtic imagination that landscape wasn't just matter, but it was actually alive, and the more I've been thinking about this. You know the way we make divisions all the time between the visible world and the invisible world. And it's as if the invisible world is the poor relation and the visible world is ultimate ground and reality. And the more I have been thinking about this the more it seems to me, actually, is that the visible world is the first shoreline of the invisible world, and the same way I believe with the body and the soul that actually the soul, the body is in the soul, not the soldiers in the body, and that in some way the poignance of being a human being is that you are the place where the invisible becomes visible and expressive in some way. And I think it's the same way with landscape. But amazes me about landscape. Is zen there. And I've heard your wonderful interview with tig not Han. And the beauty and gentler of mindfulness as the ultimate capacity for witness. And in a certain sense, landscape recalls you into a mindful mode of stillness solitude and silence where you can truly receive time, rather than mangling it which we do with it most of the time. Are you just talking though about landscape as the natural world around us? I'll tell you, I remember a summer I spent a few years after I had first gone to this beautiful raw wild edge of Scotland. And I was working with children in a very impoverished inner city neighborhood. And I would often wish that I could just transport them, you know, for an hour. So that what they saw when they opened their eyes and looked around them was that kind of beauty that opened so much possibility. Such a sense of generosity in the universe because what they saw around them. Many of them when they walked out the when they opened their eyes in the morning when they walked out their door was, you know, they didn't have access to that. So I wonder how this Celtic sensibility would also speak to people who don't have that kind of beauty at hand. That kind of beauty. Yeah, I do agree with you that and the implicit critique in your question is that an awful lot of urban planning, particularly in poor areas, has doubly impoverished the poor, by the ugliness which surrounds them, and I think it's really coarse and grotesque. And it's understandable that it's so difficult to reach and sustain gentleness there. And I do think like a friend of mine just in the last week it was absolutely exhausted and London just came away down to Southern England and spin the weak by the slow ocean and she's totally recovered and come back to herself. But I do think though that it's not just a mash her of the outer presence of the landscape. I think that if you're brought out there, or if you have some sense of the elemental, I mean the dawn goes up on the Twilight comes even in the most roughest in our city place. And I think that connecting to the elemental can be a way of coming in to rhythm with the universe that's there. I mean, I think I heard Brian swim said one time that we are one of the first generations that have successfully managed to forget that we actually live in a universe. And I do think that there is a way in which the Auschwitz presence even through memory are imagination can be brought inward as a sustaining thing. I mean, I think it's the question of beauty. I mean, you're asking essentially. I mean, I think that as we are speaking, that there are individuals holding out on front lines, holding the humane tissue alive. In mental institutions and prisons in refugee camps in war zones and areas of ultimate barbarity, where things are visible to the human eye should never see. And they're able to sustain it because there is in them some kind of sense of beauty that knows the horizon that we're really called to and somewhere. I love Pascal's phrase, you know, you should always keep something beautiful in your mind. And I've often like in time so it's been really difficult for me. If you can keep some kind of little contour that you can glimpse sideways at now and again, you can endure great bleakness. And I'd like to talk some more about you mentioned your father being able to have a sense of the invisible. And I do think that is such a an intriguing and strong part of the Celtic sensibility and so foreign to this culture in the United States. I've always been intrigued by this notion of thin places, also this sense that the spiritual and the eternal and the temporal can touch. How was that, how was that communicated to you? How did that enter your imagination as a child? And how do you live with that kind of just part of who you are? Yeah, well, I mean, philosophically just begin philosophically. I mean, I think there's one of the real excitements of being a human being as heidegger said, is that you are the place in which the universe are the earth, becomes visible to itself, or becomes conscious of itself, are you become a mirror version somewhere what you call does and that being there, there is an opening in you. That's the vulnerability of humans is that there's a helpless opening to the eternal in us. And we all have to do it like we might invite it for 70 years. But you never get out of here without having to do it in some way. And philosophically understood, I mean, it's this distinction between being unconsciousness, you know, that being is always there and we are knee deep, neck deep in it, and consciousness somehow separates us because the little splinter, the fragment that doesn't belong, and that opening means that we're always trying to get home to come in home. It also means that we are always confronted by dualities, like you have outlined as their crystal like time and eternity. You could also say soul and senses. You could say God and human you could say masculine or feminine. You could see a memory and possibility. And I think this is where the beauty of the imagination works. I think the imagination is committed to what I'd call a justice of wholeness and bringing all these together. The mind separates and when the mind separates and draws, barriers and the heart of these dualities which and the barrier becomes a real barrier so they're no longer porous space for breathing, then you have dualism and then you have things cut off that should belong together. And that's the heart of all fundamentalisms and fascisms. And I think that keeping one's imagination alive all risk keeps you in vital conversation with the other nurses that you tend to avoid are neglect. So in terms of being brought up in a folk culture, I mean it was naturally there to as natural, as any other thing to us to know that there were fields where there were things seen that you shouldn't kind of interfere with, to know that I think we were always told, for instance, because we had land up the mountain and after we were working late and the bug or the meadow and you should go up and get the cows to make them and to be almost dark and there was this disaster village that should come through. And we were always sure as kids like that it was full of ghosts..

Brian swim Southern England Scotland Pascal London heidegger United States
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:53 min | 7 months ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm Krista tippett, up next, my unedited conversation with the late sharing maples. I interviewed her around the edges of a retreat with tick knot Han in 2003. Parts of this interview, as well as my conversation with tick not Han, appear in our show, remembering tick not Han, brother tie. So we've been a monthly national program. We've just become a weekly national program on public radio stations and this will be an hour around taking that Han and sort of based at this retreat. And I interviewed him yesterday, which was wonderful. So that'll be sort of the interview. Yeah. Yeah, it was. So that'll be sort of the anchor of the program, but then we'll also have sounds from plum village and from this experience. And then a few voices from people who are here. Okay. So I just want to start by asking you how you first came in contact with this teaching in this man. Well, it was almost it depends on whether you believe in accidents or miracles or coincidences or miracles. I had read a book and was kind of curious. You don't think much about this stuff as a cop. I'd been a cop, I've been a cop for 19 years now at the time I'd been a cop for 7 years. And I found I was on this call where involving a stolen moped where I had to take the stolen moped somewhere. The short story is, as I hurt my back very badly pulling the moped out of the squad of the trunk. So I had a workers comp in tree that needed to be treated by a chiropractor. Decided to go to the chiropractor that was closest to the building that I started my shift at my patrol shift. Which was downtown at the time, so I went to this chiropractor who had a flyer. For retreat in Wonderland, Illinois in 1991, honor bulletin board. I had read a book as kind of curious, I thought, why not? So I went to this retreat. And kind of changed my life. Can you tell me some more about that? What happened? What changed your life? When you have a chance to deeply experience the practice, the idea of learning to stop doing and to start being and at that retreat, it was a little longer and there was much more silent time. We only talked really during the things that were together. We maintained noble silence, which was a very new concept for me. But I started to experience a lot of just the refreshing wonders sort of started to be able to taste the divinity of life at that retreat in a way that I had never ever experienced. I wouldn't have had words for it then. But it was what became very, very clear to me is that if you can live in the present moment, there are all kinds of wonders available to be able to nourish and refresh yourself with. Well, as a cop, what started to happen to me got very interesting because I don't know if you attended the 5 mindfulness trainings last night, but that was one of the things that happened at my first retreat and I just assumed well, I'd listen to this, but I can't do it. I'm a cop. You know, I mean, I might be in a position where I have to kill somebody at some point. I can't think about taking these. And sister chewing Kong, who is one of the probably the senior monastic here. Was that that retreat? And she pulled me aside, and she had this very wonderful conversation with me. The essence of it being who else would we want to carry a gun except somebody who will do it mindfully? Of course you can take these trainings. And I thought about it over the course of the week and it felt right to me. So I did. I took the 5 mindfulness trainings. And then when I came back and what happened to me is my heart started to soften and kind of break open for the first time I had gotten very mechanical about how he's doing my job. I had no idea that I had shut down that way. And I came home and. I go on probably especially that first week when it was so new and everything felt so fresh. I started to understand that in a very, very deep level that it's possible to bring this into your work as a cop because as my energy started to change the energy that I got back from other people started to change, even including the people that I had to arrest and take to jail, but probably the first example of that was. I was on a domestic violence call and it was one of these calls where I would have just arrested the guy. I would have just enough, you know? He was felt very strongly about the issue and mandatory arrest. As a female officer who's had a lot of contact with domestic violence victims and this was a scenario where breaking up is hard to do and they were exchanging. There was a little girl and they were exchanging custody and he was kind of holding a little girl hostage. Not wanting to give her back to mom. And there had been no violence that had taken place, but both mom and the little girl were very scared and intimidated. An ordinarily I would have said that's it throwing the hand slapped the handcuffs on him taking him to jail, but something stopped me. And I just come out of this retreat and I got the little girl, I got him to give me the little girl to care of her, got her and her mom said, told them just to leave went back. And I just talked to this guy from my heart and within 5 minutes, I got this big gun belt on. I'm about 5 three right in this guy's like 6, 6, and he's balling, you know?.

Han Krista tippett Wonderland Illinois Kong
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

04:09 min | 7 months ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Org. I'm Krista tippett, up next, my unedited conversation with the late venerable tick not Han. I had this rare intimate conversation with him around the edges of a retreat he led in 2003. He died in January 2022. You can find a produced, longer, remembrance of him, wherever you found this podcast. I think what intrigued me and I know since we don't have lots of time on your very tired. Is that you actually wrote the miracle of mindfulness in those years when you had somewhat withdrawn from that great political and social activism. Of the 1960s. And so I wondered if mindfulness that emphasis on mindfulness was really the core of the learning that you took away from those years of such turmoil and activism on your part. That was the practice that kept us alive, help us to survive. And the miracle of mindfulness was written for our social workers first in Vietnam because they were living in a situation where the danger of dying. Is I was there every day. So out of compassion, how to pregnancy help them to continue their work. Well, the back of my finance was written as a manual practice. And after that, many friends in the west, they think that it is helpful for them. So they allow it to be translated into English and so. And I know that the elements of mindfulness the way you describe it are in traditional Buddhism, the teachings of the Buddha, but you do seem to have placed a very special kind of emphasis and interpretation on breathing and also what is the word what is the Vietnamese word that you're translating is mindfulness? What are the connotations of that? I wonder. Call mindfulness. And your mind fully present in the hand and now. Okay. And mindfulness is the heart of Buddhism meditation. Because with muffins, you'll be concentrated. And mindfulness and concentration have you to see things and to touch things more deeply so that you might understand the true nature of what is there. And that kind of understanding you said you're free from your own perceptions and from the affliction that come from your grand perception. What have you done with this concept, though, that is different? I mean, how did you interpret it or apply it differently that it had such an impact mindfulness is a part of living. When you are mindful, you are fully alive, you are fully present. You can get in touch with the wonders of life that can nourish you and hear you. And you are stronger, you are more solid in order to handle the suffering inside of you and around you. When you are mindful, you can recognize embrace and handle the pain, nasara in you and around you. To bring relief and if you continue with concentration and insight, you'll be able to transform the suffering inside and help transform this happening around you..

Krista tippett Vietnam
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

07:20 min | 8 months ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Said that this for you was about walking into the next day. Yeah. So this book, the first poem in time that went into this book is the next one I think you're going to ask me to read. The prologue poem. But that was written in 2014. And that was written as the first of a current series of poems. I had written about the climate catastrophe and the perils and crisis of the biosphere. Probably in every one of my books going all the way back. But of course, knowledge has become more urgent, more precise, more demanding of our attention. And our experience of that has become more urgent more well in demand. Something no longer in the future. That's right. That it is now our present. We live in it every day. I breathe that smoke every summer and fall. But the other thing which was happening over the course of the years of writing this book was also, of course, the 2016 election and the ensuing four years. And so the murder of George Floyd, the political, the way a fracture that was always in our earth and always giving us tumblers became earthquake. Became something in which you could see the buildings literally falling down around us and old ideals, shattering old hopes being so deeply challenged. And so, you know, this poem of the ball, that is our existence, that is our life, slightly behind it is the idea of the ball that Buddhist monks in Asian countries carry in what in Japan is called takahata, the practice of begging. So you would go out from monastery every morning with your empty bowl, go from household to household, and if the community in which your temple existed, if people didn't think you were worth feeding, you would go hungry. And so that is if it's a Buddhist monks are supposed to be vegetarian, but it made us put into the bowl and meat is eaten. But that then becomes far beyond that, my sense of I have been given this life. I have been given this existence these years on this earth. To accept what has come into my lifetime, wars, loves, trucks, betrayals, and kindness. I must take them. I must find a way to live in this world. You can't refuse it. And along with the difficult is the radiant, the beautiful, the scent of the herbs. The cardamom star anise long pepper cinnamon that cover all of the spices of the globe. And our hands are 54 bones. Our ten fingers, the intimacy with which each one of us enters the life of all of us. And takes what comes to our own door. And figures out, what is our conversation? What is my responsibility? What must be suffered? What can be changed? What can I know? How can I meet this in a way which both lets me open my eyes the next day and also perhaps if I'm lucky can be of service to a changed future. Which is, which is a perfect way into, as you say, the poem, that is the prologue of the book. Let them not say. And I wonder if you would allow me to read this one. And I'd like to ask you to read it at the end. Thank you, I'd love to hear confession that I also want to make that you put into words. So present again, actually a lot of things I'm not a writer like you, but I do write and a lot of things I wrote years ago people have said, well, what were you thinking of? Weren't things all right then. So this poem, this was true years ago when you wrote it. When did you say 2014? Yes. I just think there's a way in which some of this is just more vivid more unavoidable unseeable and it feels like it speaks directly to the present. So yeah, let them not say let them not say we did not see it. We saw let them not say we did not hear it. We heard. Let them not say they did not taste it. We ate, we trembled. Let them not say it was not spoken, not written. We spoke. We witnessed with voices and hands. Let them not say they did nothing. We did not enough. Let them say as they must say something. A kerosene beauty. It burned. Let them say we warmed ourselves by it. Read by its light, praised. And it burned. You can give all of my readings for me. That was beautifully red. Can I just say that when I read this, I set it out loud to myself, right? Yeah. Yeah. So it is a poem very much imagining the future looking back on our generation, our time, and seeing how did it turn out? What did we do? What did we not do? And it is a prayer, it is a poem hoping to make itself some day incomprehensible. Yes, that you know if we make it through, if in 200 years, it all turns out all right. I want someone to look back at this poem if they stumble upon it and say, why was she so worried? She was so pessimistic. The writing of the poem was my own way of engaging my own heart, mind, body, intentions, vow to have this poem not be true. Yeah. And so yes, very much a poem of this moment of great uncertainty. We don't know yet how it will turn out..

George Floyd takahata earthquake Japan
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:41 min | 9 months ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Very arrogant to think that way. And, you know, some people still do. The other thing which very dangerous about science, I was told that Cambridge that you have to be absolutely objective and you must not have empathy with your subject and to me that right from the beginning was so wrong because when I was watching a chimpanzee family, for example and one of the young ones did something a little strange. And so because I was empathetic towards them, I thought, well, if, you know, if they were human, they do it because of whatever. And that gives you a platform and you can stand on that platform. And then try to analyze what you've seen in a scientific way. But it's the empathy that it gives that intuition that aha moment which you wouldn't get if you didn't have empathy. I don't think and also the cold scientific approach, I believe has led to a lot of suffering on this planet. Yes. I mean, you also experienced because I think you were open because you were seeing observing, you also experienced empathy on the part of the chimpanzees. You were studying, right? I mean, there's that moment with David greybeard that you've described about offering him a piece of fruit, which he did not take, but he took your hand instead. He took it and then gently squeezed my fingers, which is how chimpanzees reassure each other. Right. Which you understood as him. Sensing your motivation and honoring it. Well, you know, the thing was we totally understood each other in a language that clearly predated human spoken language. The language of the language of one to say that the gestural and possible languages that almost the same holding hands, passing one another kissing, embracing, you know, just when we communicate non verbally, virtually the same as the chimpanzees. We also swagger and shake off his and male chimpanzees sometimes remind me of the number of human male politicians. Named Bristol and they tried to look big and important and intimidate by bunching their lips in a furious skull..

David greybeard Cambridge Bristol
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:36 min | 9 months ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm Krista tippett, up next, my unedited conversation with psychiatrist and trauma researcher bessel vendor kolk. And there is a shorter produced version of this wherever you found this podcast. Hello hello. Yeah, okay. There we go. Got it now. You hear me now? Hello? Yes hello. Oh, hi. It's Chris. Tell me a little louder if you can make it. I'm working on the headphone. Okay. Go ahead. Hello, it's Christopher. Hi, Krista. Hi. Would you say your name for me? I want to say it perfectly. Okay. Do you have any thank you, first of all, thank you for coming. I have so enjoyed steeping in your work. And I'm really looking forward to this conversation and I'm glad we could reschedule it for today. Do you have any questions for me before we start? No, I'll just plunge into the unknown. All right, that's good. Okay, let's talk about something mundane first so we can get levels of tell me what you had for breakfast. I had some yogurt and various breakfast. Okay, that's good. Yeah. There's some locks. Oh, you did. Good breakfast, yeah. Okay. How are we Chris? Can we start? All right, let's do this. Okay, I'm gonna step out of the booth. Okay. Oh,.

Krista tippett bessel vendor kolk Krista Chris Christopher
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

04:13 min | 10 months ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Team, and I was very surprised to learn that these ecologists who, of course, are trying to protect all of these just endangered species and systems and the area we love so much. They were working with climate information that was, you know, ten or 20 years out of date. It was the equivalent of trying to drive a model T four down down a racetrack when everybody else has got like Formula One race cars. Right. And so as you know, as a climate scientist, I should have took personal responsibility for this. I said, this is not acceptable. They need to be using much more up to date information, and they said to me, well, where do we get that information from? And I said, I don't know. I'm going to figure that out. So I started digging into it. And it turned out that we get our future information on what is going to be happening in terms of how our temperature and our rainfall patterns are going to be changing and what's going to be happening to Lake levels and hurricanes and droughts and things like that. We get those from really big physics based climate models that are run on some of the most powerful supercomputers in the world. But the output of those models is still quite coarse. And back in those days, it was very coarse in terms of its spatial resolution as temporal resolution. You would just have, you know, 6 grid cells covering the whole Great Lakes area. And, you know, as someone who lives in Minnesota, you know that the part of Minnesota that's right on the Great Lakes is very different than the part of Minnesota on the other side of the state, right? Yeah, absolutely. It's own world. Exactly. It's micro climates. Yeah. So and the same obviously for Michigan and Ontario and more. So that's when I started to dig around to look at four ways to try to get higher resolution information that people could use to make these decisions about managing endangered or native ecosystems, or other areas. And so I started to get into that. And I said to the people who were doing the study, the ecological society of America and the union of concerned scientists, I said, you know, really the way to do this is to start with high resolution climate projections. And then you give those projections to all the different people who are studying impacts and you get them to all use the same projections. So they're singing off the same score, so to speak, when they look at how that's going to affect, you know, wild rice or Lake levels, or the progression of Lyme disease through Minnesota or something like that. So they took me up on it and they said, all right, we're going to do that in California. You're on the hook. Right? So that was where I had to sort of sit down and figure out who was doing this work. What already existed? What could we look for that kids could add to that? And we were focusing on the state of California. So we actually figured out how to combine observations with global climate model output. Because observations are a lot higher resolution, either from weather stations or from high resolution grids, combine observations with climate model output to get projections that are highly localized, like for individual weather stations, like for the Sacramento airport, for example. Or for a fine grid covering the central valleys. You can see the difference between the north and south parts of the east or west of the central valley. And that's the downscaling is the is the is this, again, this language of statistical downscaling. Is that the application of this high level science to very local events and conditions? Exactly. Okay. It's downscaling and it's translating because we get the raw output is daily maximum and minimum temperature and precipitation and humidity, but often what people are really interested in is how many days are going to be over a 100°. Or how many days in Minneapolis will be below freezing. Or when droughts come how long and how strong will those droughts be? So that's where I started what I still do today, which is developing super high resolution information for local scales like here for the city of Houston. Here's what's going to be happening to your extreme heat days to your drought risk to your heavy rain risk because of course they are very worried about flooding. And here's the important part. Here is the difference. Between what your city will look like in 20 years or 30 years or 40 years. Here's the difference between what your city will look like depending on the choices.

Minnesota Great Lakes ecological society of America Lyme disease California Ontario Michigan central valley Sacramento Minneapolis Houston
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

10:01 min | 11 months ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm krista tippett up next my unedited conversation with the late micros. He died in august of twenty twenty. One there is a shorter produced version of this. Wherever you get your podcasts. Then let's just go. Do you have any questions of me before we start Gee i don't think so. Just well i guess one question Since we're taping. If i find myself going down a road and i'm in a dead end. Can i just start over again. Yes and you know when we We will edit this later and switch means we to have a real conversation. It doesn't have to be completely linear and if you go down and did end you can back up and walk down another direction and great. We have a lot of freedom and Terrific and digital editing. It fantastic invention. You know we could all use it in our daily lives. I'm for that. Yeah and you know. I know. I know you're familiar with this show and i think that there's such a the way you write and think and work is is very kindred to what i do i mean. It's it's getting big ideas but narrative. Lee so i i mean i think you know that but that's what i wanna do. I wanna talk about some some of the important ideas that you think about and write about and and also draw on who you are and what you know through experience as well but again i feel like i don't even have to explain that 'cause that's that's the way you approach these things so it's nice to hear it though and and You know. I really do want to have a big deep discussion and not get too bogged down in some of the discussions of education that get hashed and rehashed like no child left behind. I mean i know you've written. You know what i mean because i want us to talk about something that can endure and so we may talk about some of that near the end but but i really want to Pulled back from some of those Things those hot button issues of the moment so little man. I'll tell you. I'm hungry to do because you can imagine interviews that i do. Yeah always gets just nail down to well. What about high stakes testing or blah blah blah. Yeah like oh my god. Can we please talk about something just a little broader that. Yeah well so we thank you. Well so what we don't do. Is you need to talk about the broader things in order to have a really thoughtful critique all of this right or to caddo vision about where moves next. Okay so that's a we'll try to do And you know. I always them. You've written a lot and you've written quite personally but I i haven't seen much About this spiritual or religious background of your child if there was one that was very active In that's a place. I'd like to start. You know what. What was that in that world of your childhood. You know there wasn't it. It's interesting that the the the way religion played or didn't play in my childhood. My parents were both italian immigrants. They were catholic as guessing that yes. I was raised in the catholic church baptized first communion. You know all of that They were not cho- churchgoers particularly. My father was sick. Most of the time. I knew him and my mother had to work to keep us afloat so she was working all the time waiting tables. So we weren't. We weren't observant catholics in that sense. You know we. We didn't go to church. A lot and I did go to a catholic school and at some point krista somewhere around my sophomore year in high school. It just ceased to make a lot of sense to me I i mean. I certainly wouldn't have called myself. An atheist had fourteen or fifteen. And i'm not that now but there was a sense that the church and its dogma and what it represented It just felt distant to me. And without i guess without the close surround of a of a of a family connection to church I found myself drifting away from all however having said all that you know when you grow up in a working class italian family The catholic church is ever present. Various ones fabric and things isn't it it is in the fabric and interestingly for immigrant folk it's also mixed with various and sundry kinds of rituals and beliefs that the catholic church would find opponent so i remember his as a little boy. My mother took me when when we were still. We moved to los angeles. When i was about seven or eight and before that i grew up in altoona pennsylvania which is a town about an hour east of pittsburgh a classic train town the pennsylvania railroad made and then broke altoona pennsylvania and before we laughed to come west. I remember my mother taking me to my grandmother's who then took us down. The to the good witch in the neighborhood and right there on the wall is a crucifix and pictures of our lord and the blessed virgin and she's also doing good witchcraft. Right she pronounced some some incantations over me. And if i remember right i think she hung some garlic from my neck or put it under my armpits and said some other things and that made me good to go. I was protected from the evil eye therefore when we moved west so it was a really interesting Almost novelist Exposure to that side of working class immigrant italian religious life this bland this mix of of catholicism and and beliefs. That would be more. i guess. Certainly non-catholic This is intimate blend of the two. So so so these notions about damnation and hell and redemption and salvation and these iconic images of you know of jesus on the cross and all that that is part of my consciousness. It's part of my makeup. And even though i ceased to be a practicing catholic has a young as a young man All of that stuff stays with you and he. It's been true for lots of folks right. I mean joyce the writer james joyce The the the ever-present irish catholicism is just the woof and warp of his fiction. And let me ask you. I mean ask you this How would you start to tell the story of how when you became attentive to what you would call the spirit of education. Maybe you wouldn't have called it that then but what you now think of as the essence of education right that's a lovely question And and you're right. I wouldn't talked about it that way. I've gotta say i've got to say that. It began for me in my senior year in high school. I you know. I didn't do so well in school. I i could read which was really fortunate since. That's the sort of meta tool right so i could read and that was immensely helpful but i was horrible in mathematics. I couldn't diagram a sentence if you held a gun to my head. I was just so much didn't learn. Didn't know i was a kind of a dreamy disconnected kid and just didn't do that well in school and so then i went to high school I ended up in the vocational. Those in the days went win schools. Were were pretty rigidly tracked right and you know you ended up in attract that geared toward going into into the world of work usually physical work and then there was a sort of large middle ground and then there was the college preparatory track and so i ended up in the vocational track for a few years and drifted through that and then a remarkable thing happened. Somebody found out that somewhere along the line might entrance tests to high school. Got confused somebody else. Who's last name was rose uh-huh and so suddenly my junior year. I find myself in this college. Prepartory i was. Ill prepared for that. As i was for playing the defensive tackle on the football team i i was so in the deep end of pool and so i- drifted through all that and my senior year had the sheer dumb. Good luck of getting an english teacher who himself had just left columbia university and came out west and wanted to teach for a few years and he ended up in this school and he was maybe six or seven years older than we were..

krista tippett altoona pennsylvania catholic church cho krista Lee pittsburgh los angeles james joyce joyce football columbia university
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"And chris he will learned arale and mauka fantasy now. Let's get to tonight's program in two thousand fourteen. President obama awarded. Krista tippett the national humanities medal at the white house for quote thoughtfully delving into the mysteries of human existence on the air and in print miss ms tippett avoids easy answers embracing complexity inviting people of every background to join her conversation about faith ethics and moral wisdom please join me in welcoming krista tippett and louise alberta good evening so happy to be here to venture out of across the border from minneapolis. Saint paul pasta water. You know people often don't know that on being is produced here. Does everybody know that. I'm happy to be getting out more and minnesota these days to to get that news out. I'm delighted to be here tonight. With luis alberto raya he has published in nearly every genre. He's written nonfiction memoir short stories and poetry his his. He's written historical novels historical novel. That hummingbird's daughter is based on the story of his father's aunt. Theresa is that correct. That's my book. My great great known as the mexican. Joan of arc a mexican mystic full healer and revolutionary and surgeon. And i have to say you have an inordinate number of characters like that on.

krista tippett arale mauka ms tippett louise alberta Saint paul pasta President obama luis alberto raya white house chris minneapolis minnesota hummingbird Theresa Joan
Author Luis Alberto Urrea on How He Discovered What God Meant to Him

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:11 min | 1 year ago

Author Luis Alberto Urrea on How He Discovered What God Meant to Him

"So how would you. How would you start to think about what what is the spiritual imprint on your perhaps the spiritual work that that left in you for the rest of your life. Straddling a border like that in your person from the very beginning of your life A couple of things i was. I don't know why. But i've always been good crazy. You know i have been drawn toward whatever the cosmic mysteries are from boyhood on and honestly back in those days. I'll reveal myself a little bit here. But back in those days in the early sixties. When i was there you know it was a different catholic church than now and there was a lot of grimness There were certainly no folk masses and it wasn't even in english yet when i was a kid and the nuns would terrorize us with these amazing stories. You know they'd say well. What are you going to do in the communists take over the country. We'd be like we're going to stand up for jesus she said are you. Are you so when they come to torture you. What are you going to do. We're going to renounce jason's she'd say when they're tearing flesh back with hooks. Then then we stand for jesus and we're like yeah and in the midst of that a franciscan friar came to my school full robes. Yeah and he was laughing and he was playing with the kids. And i think that was the moment when i thought. Oh that's what. Jesus is about that guy right. And so it was an instant in some way cutting of the court of all the traditional stuff and leaping into some childish mysticism. But i've always had that moment in my heart of seeing that guy and his laughter. And i thought oh. That's what i want to be right. And so god is always felt like my companion in

Jason
Meditation Teacher Sharon Salzberg Explains Her Saying, 'The Healing Is In The Return'

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:01 min | 1 year ago

Meditation Teacher Sharon Salzberg Explains Her Saying, 'The Healing Is In The Return'

"Of the things that i've heard you say across the years and i think have never taken it in so gratefully and it has never been so helpful before The healing is in the return. Not in not getting lost in the beginning but dances such a really fat is such liberation. I think it's powerful. Because i actually think it's true. You know like when. I started meditation like most of us. I had a different idea of success. And what it looked like in that you'd be very much about accumulation. Like if i could be with two breaths in the beginning with that my mind wandering then surely by today i should be with eight and then tomorrow should be with fifteen and then eventually my mind wandering. I found that the most unbelievable thing that that wasn't the point that learning how to let go more gracefully was the point learning how to start over with some compassion for yourself instead of judging yourself so harshly. That was the point. And it's so funny. 'cause it's like really you're like less than one on one for me and it's one in life too and it's the most precious thing i use it every day. You know. it's still the most significant thing i've ever learned from meditation and that i use it every single day because we do we have to start over and kind of do course correction or pick up if we fallen down like every day frustrating but this is true but there's something about accepting it and even accepting it as a gift That the kind of does what you also Are so clear is that we can't change Often the conditions or circumstances that are immediately in front of us but we can change our relationship to our experience of them and that that can change everything.

Rev. Jen Bailey: What We Inherit & What We Send Forth

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:36 min | 1 year ago

Rev. Jen Bailey: What We Inherit & What We Send Forth

"Reflecting a lot lately about what is it. Has it been about my life experience that has helped me see this long view. It a relatively hung aids and i think i think it's been my proximity to death Having lost my mom at twenty eight when she was sixty three years old having last three or four friends all women of color to suicide early twenties two weeks after i gave birth to my best friends from high school died unexpectedly and experienced walking with my mom. Her last few months On earth when she was after battling cancer for fourteen years in walking with her and alongside her and feeding her and changing her and carrying for her and loving for her and being in the room when she transitions think those experiences throughout the course of my life have allowed me an insight into just how precious and finite and short life can be and so the question then becomes our time on. Earth is not guaranteed. It's okay to just do what we can do over here and enjoy it all happen And i wonder how much that might be. Reflected generational with other folks In particular of of young black folks in the us who had grown up alongside and becoming behind me who have seen death literally become spectacle in front of our eyes. He's constant encounter with via social media whether it be police shootings where other things that are. Now just right in front of our eyes And given that we live in a culture in the us that is not well we like like to shut it down any any case yeah I wonder if emerging out of this twenty twenty moment. There might be a reintregation of how he sit with death and grief not as like something that is sad that dwelling

Aids Cancer United States
Abby Wambach on What It Means to Find Your True Self

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:19 min | 1 year ago

Abby Wambach on What It Means to Find Your True Self

"The book you wrote you. The chapters are all ways. People had seen you write and categories. You'd but sometimes walked into willingly and and sometimes is that had been an armor right so it was everything from you or how you seen yourself. We fraud tomboy rebel teammate. Lesbian manic depressive captain leader romantic hero addict failure and then the last chapter is human somewhere. You said i had created yourself. All these categories that were both generated from you generated externally helped create you but shut you off from becoming human fully. Human glennon has said this a lot. you know. We're all kinda like russian nesting dolls and as we get older. We kinda keep putting on all of these costumes. And that's what i thought for me growing up. That's what i thought. I had to do to mature to age to get. Wisdom is to put on all these different costumes and see which one fit. And i think that now having gone through a lot of my life granted i'm still fairly young thirty eight but i realized that the more you can actually take those costumes off and get down to that little small immobile russian nesting doll. That is like who you are your true self that is like the humanity of all of us and we all are in there. I visited very random. But i just wanna share it. Because it was reading thinking he ended with human which seems like the simplest most elemental thing of all but is really the work of a lifetime. Right i was thinking about this you. When i studied theology paul tillich wrote the courage to be and he's called an existentialist feel ogen. I read it when i was older. Because i was emphasized when i thought that to be that being but the current the book is actually about how the courage it takes right. The courage is the work.

Human Glennon Manic Depressive Paul Tillich
The Importance of Self-Awareness Within Self-Care With Alex Elle

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:38 min | 1 year ago

The Importance of Self-Awareness Within Self-Care With Alex Elle

"I so love the way that you complicate this idea of self care and the fact that you name self awareness has being such a key component. Because you're right about that in your book after the rain that like your flawed like we all are right and you're learning hard lessons that needed to be learned but a lot of it was from not being self aware of who you were and your actions at the time And using that as an excuse to not learn to do better right. So i talk about that. Aladdin after the rain in the first chapter called change. Which is everyone's favorite chapter. I talk about like transitioning from working a nine to five nine years ago now to being in my career to how much up. I was an awful employees at one point to how i stepped into like really being a great employee and then faced some really challenging issues with my then boss and it really shows the duality of self awareness from grown from and where i was going And i think change plays a big role in my life. Because i've had to change so much and i've gotten really comfortable with being more okay with change and with learning that i always have worked to do and i think that's part of being a student of life is knowing that we will continue to expand and hopefully learn and grow until you know the day we transition off this planet and i think that that's extremely valuable and important especially as a black woman in this work in this

Exploring the Worlds Beneath Our Feet With Robert Macfarlane

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:50 min | 1 year ago

Exploring the Worlds Beneath Our Feet With Robert Macfarlane

"Really want to focus on under land. Which is your your newest book And also i think a book that people are discovering in this country in in a big way which has been exciting to see That use that as kind of a focal point to also more expansively explore. How you're thinking accumulated way of seeing the world and experiencing it rolls around inside you. And i feel like that also does find expression in in the writing of land so And it's always. It's so interesting to see how. I think you said it this way some in another interview that your body of work. The gradient of your body of work has been tending down because she began writing about mountain mountains of the mind. And then there were the values in moore's in wild places and then there's traversing the world on foot in the old ways and now you have gone down to the world's beneath our feet and you said we know so little of the world's beneath our feet i think just naming that not something that we even think about how little we know of the world's beneath our feet they. They are dark places in in several senses. That a sometimes say to my children. We walk on this thin above this raging space of life and matter in an oil its vibrancy and and fury and we knew nothing of it. site stops at our toes. It's tops at ground. Level in sight is so bind up with with with with modern ways of of of knowing we. Can i say alien unless we can look up and see literally trillions of miles. We can see light coming from starr's across the universe across the galaxy but we looked at and we we can't see beyond the grass or the tomczak

Moore Starr
Bryan Doerries' 'Theater of War' Activates an Old Alchemy for Our Young Century

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:21 min | 1 year ago

Bryan Doerries' 'Theater of War' Activates an Old Alchemy for Our Young Century

"Remember brian. Dory's likes to say in both physical and virtual gatherings you are not alone in this room and you are not alone across time. He is activating an old alchemy. For our young century ancient stories and texts that have stood. The test of time can be portals to honest and dignified grappling with president wounds and longings and callings that we aren't able to muster in our official places now performance of his public health project theater of war have been some of the most generative and repeatedly surprisingly joyful experiences of my pandemic year. This adventure began in two thousand eight at first bringing. Greek tragedies into many modern amphitheatres were trauma is present military bases and hospitals prisons even guantanamo bay. It expanded out from their offering sophocles and shakespeare and the book of job as crucibles for details and moving forward with the particular dramas of our time from caregiving and addiction and partner violence to the hidden wounds of war and open political fracture. Great actors have joined this company from bill. Murray to moses. Ingram from francis mcdormand to jeffrey

Dory Brian Guantanamo Bay Shakespeare Murray Francis Mcdormand Ingram Moses Jeffrey
Naomi Shihab Nye Shares Why Kindness Is The Deepest Thing Inside You

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:57 min | 1 year ago

Naomi Shihab Nye Shares Why Kindness Is The Deepest Thing Inside You

"Naomi. shehab nice. Childhood unfolded between ferguson missouri. Near where her mother grew up and her father's palestinian homeland. Our conversation in two thousand sixteen spoke to so much that he's even more alive in the world. Now i always start my interviews by inquiring about the religious or spiritual background of someone's tighted and i just wonder where you'd start reflecting on what that was in your life all. I felt very lucky as a child to have open minded parents. And i knew they were open minded because they were unlike any other parents. I met my friends parents I also knew that they didn't practice the religions of their upbringings. Either one of them so this fascinated me as even a little child. And i would ask a lot of questions. There was no sense of a taboo subject on. My father had not really had a difficult time telling his family that he didn't want to practice islam. He said i will respect it. But i don't want to practice it and they had accepted that my mother's family on the other hand had been more hard hearted about her rejection of their german lutheran missouri. Synod background but this was something. Both of my parents. Talk about with each other and with their children. You know that people are raised in all kinds of different ways. And if it doesn't feel a meaningful to you maybe you have to search more. You have to keep searching. And i was a religion major in college. Of course you work. Because of my appetite for this topic and i was fascinated to study more about zen buddhism which appealed to me very much from the beginning and it seems like hugh became a writer at a very young inch. You're like seven six. I was six. When i started writing my own poems and seven when i started sending them out and And just today Some students i was talking to a skype class in kuwait. How much. I love the modern world that we can do these things. I was with these students for two hours. And i feel like i'm going to think about them for the rest of my life but one young man asked me. How were you brave enough to do that. What gave you the confidence. he said. i've been trying to run a publication here at our university campus. And i can't get my friends to give me their writing. They're not brave enough. What gave you confidence. And i think just having you know that sense of voice while other people have done it. That's what we do if you know words if you compose wanna share them. Because they'll have a bigger life if you do that so you know. I certainly wasn't thinking about a career. Just thought of myself as having a practice you know if you have a practice of writing then you have a lot of pieces of paper on your desk and you can share the if you chose to. And it seemed more exciting or illuminating. Share them and see what happened next than just keep for myself. So i'm very interested in general in this question of you know what poetry works in us but i think even that question itself hasn't holds the implication that poetry is something separate something distinct but it seems that in your sensibility. You see it. As very organic i mean there's i think it was in in some of your writing for poems by children. He said i do think that all of us think in poems i do i do think that and i think that is very important enough feeling separate from text feeling sort of your thoughts as text or the world as it passes through you as a kind of text the story that you would be telling to yourself about the street even as you walk down or as you drive down as you look out the window the story you would be telling a. It always seemed very much to me as a child that i was living in a poem. The my life was the poem. In fact at this late date i have started putting that on the board of any room. I walk into. That has a board Came back from japan a month ago and every classroom. I would just write on the board. You are living in a poem. And then i would write other things just relating to whatever. We were doing that class. But i found the students very intrigued by discussing that you know. What do you mean. we're living in a poem or win all the time or just when someone talks about poetry and i'd say no when you think when you're in a very quiet place when you're remembering when you're savoring an image when you're allowing your mind calmly to leap from one thought to another. That's a poem. That's what a poem does and they liked that and grow in. Fact wrote me a note In yokohama on the day that i was leaving her school that has come to be like the most significant note. Any student has written me in years. She said well here. In japan we have a concept called you todi and it is spaciousness. It's a kind of living with spaciousness for example like it's leaving early enough to get somewhere so you know you're going to arrive early so when you get there you have time to look around. Or whether she gave all these different definitions of what you tori was to her but one of them was an after you read a poem just knowing you can hold it you could be in that space of the poem and it can hold you in its space and you don't have to explain it you don't have to paraphrase it. You just hold it and it allows you to see differently. And i just love that i mean. I think that's what i've been trying to say all these years.

Shehab Missouri Naomi Ferguson Hugh Kuwait Skype Japan Yokohama Tori
A Conversation With Author, Alain de Botton

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:54 min | 1 year ago

A Conversation With Author, Alain de Botton

"Hello hi krista honor. U2 it's great to speak with you again. I don't know if you remember our conversation in my life. Excellent i'm glad to hear that I'm very happy to have you at the other end of the micr conversation again. I'm so pleased. And i've loved following what you're doing with the school of life. I'm actually speaking at the school of life in australia this summer. All you great. I hear fuel you. It's making such a mark. And i'm really grateful actually for what you're doing about to say. Nice thank lisa these days in your republic. Indeed they are and you're swell you make us now look like a site you know i know but i you know i think Well actually i. Let's talk. Let's start talking on the air because i'm afraid we might venture territory that maybe we shouldn't but anyway well i'm ready when you are okay. All right no. I just i i actually don't i don't think it's completely unrelated to what we're speaking in terms of in terms of you know human dynamics purely human diagnose under surface which is on the political surface looking pretending to be something else. That's very interesting. Is this going out Soon or in a long time. We'll just kind of sense of times this one. We are planning to turnaround turnaround critic quickly. Think now i'm just looking behind the glass. I think we're doing it for valentine's day. Goodness okay that makes yeah so very soon. Okay right now. So we're excited now. Just give me a sense of you know how topical or not to be. Yeah well you know we. We try to do everything Return to step back from you. Know what is just merely momentary anyway so Let's have a big conversation you know. Don't worry one much too much. All these things you know these these are gonna be with us for a while to well. That's true but but people get fed up and it's good to give them company. Yeah well what happened. That's what you do so well thank you. I mean what happened. Twenty minutes ago is going to be covered in a million ways. And and yeah. We'd people want people. I mean that's what you're working at two elevating And also deepening Okay so chris good all right great. Then let's just. Let's just digging so so. We did speak a few years ago but on a on a very different topic and i'm Really Excited to be speaking you with you about this subject which is So close to every life. And i you know as i as i've prepared for this i just have realized that you've actually i mean i knew that you'd written the novel on love a long time ago. But you've really been consistently attending to this subject and building your thoughts on it in your body of work on. It was really interesting to me. I mean you wrote on love at the age of twenty three Which is so young. And you're already thinking about this. So deeply i mean. There's i think this is the first line. Every fall into love involves the triumph of hope over in homage. So just kind of curious as we start about You know always. I was start my conversations. Whatever talking about about talking with the background of someone's childhood and you know you you've you have spoken and written about your childhood is one that had a emotional deprivation and there was a lot of trauma actually in exile in your in your parents lives. But how do you you know. What would you say about in the background of your life. You know you learned and internalized about love and marriage which made this at such a young age such a deep subject for you. I think that's one of the things that parents nice parents try to keep from that children is that life is in many ways. Bleak lonely and Brief and i think these are the sort of horrific truths that children are. Shielded from what we call a difficult childhood. Is i think one in which for whatever reason Some of these adult insights come a little bit too early. Perhaps when one's not ready. Then i think that anyone who's had that sort of childhood will react with in some way They will be an element of needing to go back and redeem something atoned for something Patch something up and for me. You know i became a writer. I think in order to try and understand emotional life in a way that when i was a child emotional motions Tub to me. And i think that you know when people say why did you become a writer and intellectual etc Can almost just have a very basic on. So which is it was a way of coping. i'm one of those people and you know there are many of us out there right when something goes wrong Was the first thing they want to do. They want to be alone. Probably with some paper and a pen and write stuff down and they may not even want have any aspirations to publish anything. It's just the most soothing calming redeeming thing you can do. And that for me. Was the origin of writing long before they were was such. A book publisher. There was the need to write because writing was consoling calming by interpreting emotions. I got a handle on them. And they seemed less threatening less Alienating that's hurtful

School Of Life Lisa Valentine Australia Chris
interview With Nikki Giovanni

On Being with Krista Tippett

06:39 min | 1 year ago

interview With Nikki Giovanni

"Of the most striking things that just jumped out at me all the way through your writing and and writing about you and all the way to the latest volume of poetry published in two thousand thirteen is how from the very beginning you were held and cherished and taught by courageous loving women Your mother you were named your first name as yulon right yeah. It used to be when when mommy passed i I had it legally changed the nikki. Just because that's what everybody knows me. I would have never done when mommy was here. I wouldn't. I wouldn't want her to think i didn't want to carry her name. I'm rhonda junior. So how old were were you when you change your name legally ben mommy's been dead ten years so sixty two something like that sixty three years old. And how do you say your grandmother's name. Lavinia lavinia lavinia lavinia. Emma lou watson. Also that you were all sounds like foodies before the the word had been invented. Oh grandmother was a foodie and grandmothers. Friends were foodi. And of course i ended up. Living with grandma not ended up but Was was fortunate to live with grandmother. so mommy was a good cook because she was grandmothers daughter and My on an was a good cook Living with grandmother And i learned all of their tricks. My favorite was of course greens. And i'm still still still working on that because working making greens is one of life's difficulties. Just clean them and stuff. Well mommy mom and grandmother to you pull than to tie the stems and you put the leaves in and he uses stems to flavor and then you pull it out and so she was very good at that but the other thing. I was laughing and laughing about this. You didn't ask him about this. But in grandmother's day you know used to go the market and you bought a live chicken. Actually grandpa did the the marketing and he would bring it home and they put it in the backyard and then grandmother would go out saturday morning and we its neck but you learn to learn to do that and i guess i have learned to. It's something that i'm dealing with on another kind of level but for something to live something else usually dies. There's there's a transition is not something. I would have been able to even to say to you at Even fifty years ago my twenties. I wouldn't have it it's really It's been interesting You reported in nineteen forty. Three's that right And yes and you so you grew up in a i like this. You talk a lot about what we call the sixties what is called the sixties which which you really date from about nineteen fifty four to nineteen sixty eight Which was such a dramatic moment. I mean a lot of transition. I mean you've just been using that word one question. I ask people whoever been talking to you as you know how. Would you describe the religious and spiritual background of your childhood. And i wonder how you would start to talk about that. And i really mean the fullness of that you know that that your family but also that world do you came into I i grew up of course Baptist baptist mount zion baptist church but when when mommy married My father married we call them gusts because daddy gus. When mommy may gust they moved to cincinnati. Because he couldn't get a job he was college graduate. He couldn't get a job in knoxville and so they moved to cincinnati where he could get a job and mommy joined the Ame church but if we're just going to just kinda breeze on religion without getting into anybody's business you know. I recently have been fascinated with. Wyatt is that we don't actually look into the manger more. We always look at the cross. And i think that one of the problems with the manger is that we have to mary credit for bringing god to earth and The book that i'm working on right now actress called a good cry and it's just because Realize women keep a lot of things in them. I do know this for married. I'm gonna give credit having a baby hurts. I don't care who it is. A weird came from having a baby hurts. So i wanna give mary her. Craps and i also want to deal with the fact that as we are giving this birth part of the christian religion is supposed to do is give birth to a new human being you. Ask one kind of question. I don't know if i'm answering it. Strangely no but great. I think this question lands wherever in us. It wants to begin voice. I mean you you also want said you you said jos. Think it must have been a woman who developed the spiritual. Oh gosh when we look at savored which actually slavery is only going to be the end result. We have to look at the kidnapping in africa. We have to look at no matter. What the country. We have to look at the fact that somebody's sold and somebody purchased an and that just cannot be denied. We we're upset of course with the europeans because we say oh they create a slavery they might have but they didn't create the buying and selling of human beings that that had been going on for quite some time all over so we had the people coming across that ocean not knowing where they were going but knowing whatever it was they were not going to go back to where they used to be so somehow another. They had to make a decision. How do we go forward. But it had to be a woman because we're back to the manger we back to marry. We're back to this when women do it had to be a woman who said i need to settle my people down and when you consider there were a lot of languages. Going on yeah. She didn't speak english at that point. They didn't speak. Why healy at that point. They were in many languages. The only common language is going to be So when we get to going to ultimately become the united states these people had created a way to speak to themselves to each other through the language to spare chose. Yeah so when you were twenty five you road. I'm twenty five years old. A revolutionary poet. I- love seth. I want to ask you about the. The i love tacked on at the end of the sentence but i also want to ask you about what you meant at twenty five when you said you'll revolutionary poet and how you hey you look at that now as nikki. Giovanni quite a few years later i think twenty five was good but i always thought twenty five was one fourth of my life

Yulon Rhonda Junior Ben Mommy Lavinia Lavinia Lavinia Lavini Emma Lou Watson Baptist Baptist Mount Zion Bap Ame Church Nikki Cincinnati Grandpa Knoxville Wyatt JOS Mary Africa Healy United States Seth Giovanni
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

06:48 min | 2 years ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"High is at Arley. . Yes Hi Krista yes good to meet. . Thank you so much for doing this and I. . so apologize for the delay as we had in this totally unusual and I think it happened twice with you I. . Really Apologize. . No problem but but what we need to talk about has not. . diminished. . So here we are. . We have construction going on here in our in our studio and so like coming in. . itself is very quiet, but , there's just hammering as I walk in. . For an audio yeah program. . So good. . Are you? ? Are they going to I mean I don't hear it so. . Where where are you? ? Right now. . Are, , you talking to me? ? Yes. . Yeah. . I'm in North Gate Hall, , which is in. . The basement of the journalism department at UC Berkeley Okay Okay Yeah Berkeley. . Three blocks from our home. . Oh, , what a what a wonderful place to live. . <hes>. . I think we're pretty good here. . I. . Don't like to. . I. Don't . want to start talking about anything substantive until we're really doing it. So . yeah, , I. . Think we're fine. . Good and where you KRISTA. . Minneapolis. . Okay. . Yeah. . Yeah. . It's you'll. . You'll understand this <hes> I grew up in Oklahoma and kind of went far far far far far away and <hes>. . And that's become more important to me in these recent years that you know that he and <hes>, , and then our studios in Minneapolis has been for a long time and. . I've thought across the years about how the show might have been served by being on one of the coasts and. . And in these last few years since two thousand sixteen. . I'm I'm so glad we're in the middle of the country you know. . It's Really important in life giving. . So. . Good Yeah So, , you were the child of a Foreign Service officer. . So you sound like you grew up all over the world. . Well. . Yes to to some degree. . Yeah. . Starting at age twelve. . Yeah it was pivotal. . Father was ambassador us. . Ambassador to New Zealand. . Ghana and Tunisia. . Yeah we don't need to go into his rank spread. . Yeah. . But did you live where those places you lived in I <hes> lived in Israel? ? And from aged twelve to fourteen, , very pivotal experience. . And <hes> then <hes>. . New Zealand Wellington New Zealand. . The university. . <hes> there <hes> Victoria University so <hes> in New Zealand and then <hes> my folks <hes> were in Ghana and I spent a summer. . Ana But by then I was in college and then they weren't Tunisia and I. . Actually spent <hes> five months a doing a study on the emancipation of Tunisia and girls so. . These French questionnaires. . Second Year of Grad School at Berkeley. . So. . <hes> yes. . So I was very. . Fortunate, , really to <hes>, , get to experience all that. . Yeah. . Yeah was there <hes> a religious or spiritual background to your childhood <hes> in your family or in those places? ? Yeah. . Yeah. . I would say there there was <hes>. . And <hes>. . So. . Are we starting your going? ? Yeah. . All right okay. . <hes> yeah <hes> my parents were very religious, , unitarian? ? And <hes>. . So religious in the sense of it being a very important thing to go to church on Sunday and. . My brother and I would. . Kind of. . Wrestle with each other and tickle. . In the back seat of her whole sudden Hudson in Silver Spring Maryland and <hes>. . <hes>. . And Go. . Drive to all souls UNITARIAN church in Washington DC very important to my father especially and I didn't feel particularly religious. . At that point and. . But if I look back on it what. . <hes> the influence of that was is that. . There's <hes>. . An important part of one's self to express and <hes> to learn to develop and that. . For. . UNITARIAN inside the message I took away is that it's very big world and we have to learn to. . <hes> get to know and. . Empathize with. . People in radically different cultures and that that's a good thing to live in a big world. . I think by the time I was. . Sixteen. . I had that message, , but I felt something missing. . And <hes> I got interested in quakers who? ? Be Much. . More. . Okay Gang. . So what are we going to do about it? ? You know view terriers were very talky. . Talkers talk talk of the thinkers looked like they were kind of. . <hes> interesting. . They were doers, , and so I would say. . That that. . Connection for me. . <hes> when I was in high school <hes>, , very informal I didn't become a former quaker anything. . But <hes>. . It led me to <hes> volunteer on weekends when I was in high school <hes>. . At something we called Neighbourhood House on tenth and L.. . Street. . was in the middle of the. . <hes> the back area of Washington

Tunisia Krista Tippett New Zealand New Zealand Wellington New Zea Berkeley Arley Minneapolis Ghana Oklahoma North Gate Hall Silver Spring Maryland Israel Mike Victoria University Grad School Foreign Service officer
Arlie Hochschild with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

06:48 min | 2 years ago

Arlie Hochschild with Krista Tippett

"High is at Arley. Yes Hi Krista yes good to meet. Thank you so much for doing this and I. so apologize for the delay as we had in this totally unusual and I think it happened twice with you I. Really Apologize. No problem but but what we need to talk about has not. diminished. So here we are. We have construction going on here in our in our studio and so like coming in. itself is very quiet, but there's just hammering as I walk in. For an audio yeah program. So good. Are you? Are they going to I mean I don't hear it so. Where where are you? Right now. Are, you talking to me? Yes. Yeah. I'm in North Gate Hall, which is in. The basement of the journalism department at UC Berkeley Okay Okay Yeah Berkeley. Three blocks from our home. Oh, what a what a wonderful place to live. I think we're pretty good here. I. Don't like to. I. Don't want to start talking about anything substantive until we're really doing it. So yeah, I. Think we're fine. Good and where you KRISTA. Minneapolis. Okay. Yeah. Yeah. It's you'll. You'll understand this I grew up in Oklahoma and kind of went far far far far far away and And that's become more important to me in these recent years that you know that he and and then our studios in Minneapolis has been for a long time and. I've thought across the years about how the show might have been served by being on one of the coasts and. And in these last few years since two thousand sixteen. I'm I'm so glad we're in the middle of the country you know. It's Really important in life giving. So. Good Yeah So, you were the child of a Foreign Service officer. So you sound like you grew up all over the world. Well. Yes to to some degree. Yeah. Starting at age twelve. Yeah it was pivotal. Father was ambassador us. Ambassador to New Zealand. Ghana and Tunisia. Yeah we don't need to go into his rank spread. Yeah. But did you live where those places you lived in I lived in Israel? And from aged twelve to fourteen, very pivotal experience. And then New Zealand Wellington New Zealand. The university. there Victoria University so in New Zealand and then my folks were in Ghana and I spent a summer. Ana But by then I was in college and then they weren't Tunisia and I. Actually spent five months a doing a study on the emancipation of Tunisia and girls so. These French questionnaires. Second Year of Grad School at Berkeley. So. yes. So I was very. Fortunate, really to get to experience all that. Yeah. Yeah was there a religious or spiritual background to your childhood in your family or in those places? Yeah. Yeah. I would say there there was And So. Are we starting your going? Yeah. All right okay. yeah my parents were very religious, unitarian? And So religious in the sense of it being a very important thing to go to church on Sunday and. My brother and I would. Kind of. Wrestle with each other and tickle. In the back seat of her whole sudden Hudson in Silver Spring Maryland and And Go. Drive to all souls UNITARIAN church in Washington DC very important to my father especially and I didn't feel particularly religious. At that point and. But if I look back on it what. the influence of that was is that. There's An important part of one's self to express and to learn to develop and that. For. UNITARIAN inside the message I took away is that it's very big world and we have to learn to. get to know and. Empathize with. People in radically different cultures and that that's a good thing to live in a big world. I think by the time I was. Sixteen. I had that message, but I felt something missing. And I got interested in quakers who? Be Much. More. Okay Gang. So what are we going to do about it? You know view terriers were very talky. Talkers talk talk of the thinkers looked like they were kind of. interesting. They were doers, and so I would say. That that. Connection for me. when I was in high school very informal I didn't become a former quaker anything. But It led me to volunteer on weekends when I was in high school At something we called Neighbourhood House on tenth and L.. Street. was in the middle of the. the back area of Washington

Tunisia New Zealand Berkeley New Zealand Wellington New Zea Washington Minneapolis Ghana Arley Oklahoma North Gate Hall Israel Neighbourhood House Grad School Victoria University Silver Spring Maryland Officer Foreign Service
4 Ways to Live Each Day With Intention by Shelley Levitt

Optimal Living Daily

04:27 min | 2 years ago

4 Ways to Live Each Day With Intention by Shelley Levitt

"For ways to live each day with intention by. Shelley. Levitt with live. Happy Dot. com. I WANNA move through life energy and a sense of discovery achievement, joy and engagement. That is my intention. My hope is that living according to it would be the antidote. The uneasy feeling I often have at the end of the day when I flop into bed filled with self-reproach and wonder where my time went. My. Intent is to be guided by purpose instead of feeling that I'm spending my time haphazardly succumbing to whim or distraction according to expert Mallika Chopra creator of the website intense dot com and psychologist Eliot. Berkman. Head of the social ineffective neuroscience lab at the University of Oregon setting intentions. Confession is a kind of internal northstar lighting, the path to greater fulfillment and life satisfaction. These are the changes I've made in the few weeks since setting my intention. Number One, I meditate almost daily. Is taking me years to commit to a meditation habits but the ten or fifteen minutes I spent doing a guided meditation on the common APP has been transformative. The turning point was a workshop I took with so Kessedjian Norman Fisher, a poet and Zen Buddhist priest. When people say they don't have time to meditate. He said I asked them how do you have time to not meditate with a regular mindfulness practice he went on you'll have fewer accidents you lose things less frequently your focus will improve making decisions will become easier. Remarkably found all these things to be true and when I'm feeling stressed I summoned the image I visualized during my meditation I imagine my breath as a long string of pearls and it helps reconnect with that experience of stillness yet as good as meditation makes me feel I'll skip it unless I keep to a schedule. So make sure to meditate daily at eleven am with four PM has a backup. Number two, I've stopped binging on the news. More than ever I. Feel it's important to stay informed but watching new show afternoons show wasn't bringing greater insight into the issues. I care about is only fueling a sense of outrage and I'm happy to have added The Washington Post, my beloved New, York Times subscription reading either one in bed was only deepening my chronic insomnia. So of made some rules, no new shows or Newspapers after nine. PM. Instead I think about how? I WanNa feel inspired amused transported and lanes and I choose what I want to read watch listen to based on that this has led to fewer hours with CNN and more with globe netflix's comedy about a real life women's wrestling league from the eighties the on being with Krista Tippett podcast and Elena Ferrante as beautiful Neapolitan novels. Number three, I cook more. I'd like to lose five or ten pounds, but resolving to lose weight is usually both joyless an unsuccessful. So instead I think about nourishing myself in ways that will align with my intention to feel more energize. And that helps to your me away from takeout Chinese food and into my kitchen when I cook pots of Faro. Embrace Swiss chard practice poaching the perfect tag and dig into cookbooks like Paulo I of food of Morocco and what to eat for how you feel the new all your data kitchen by divvy alter. And try new dishes like Paulo's egg plans a luke or devious sprouted among solid also experienced that sense of discovery and achievement that I'm looking for. Number four, I do at least one new thing each weekend. I've been having all sorts of new experiences, a meeting interesting people volunteering to do kitchen prep at a food pantry hiking trail taking a class in brewing booja walking the Los Angeles River in a meet up led by long distance, swimming champion Diane, and yet attending a talk by no Levine author of Dharma police at the inaugural Budapest in La. Some outings have turned out to be less than inspired. The less said about the mass meditation held at a conscious life expo the better but I always feel like falling through on my intention to step outside my comfort zone. I'm far from living completely in line with my intentions. Three countless ways I stray from the path but feeling courage rather than defeated I've more clarity about the way in which small things Afar too messy desk and unmade bed can undermine your vision of how you want your life to unfold and I think it'll be able to put some new habits in place soon.

Berkman Elena Ferrante Paulo Mallika Chopra Levitt Shelley University Of Oregon Kessedjian Norman Fisher Los Angeles River Insomnia Afar Krista Tippett CNN Eliot Netflix Diane Morocco LA York Times Levine
Why 2020 hasnt taken Rev. angel by surprise

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:04 min | 2 years ago

Why 2020 hasnt taken Rev. angel by surprise

"At such a pace what we're experiencing now in our society were just cycling through it were digesting the material of the misalignment were digesting the material of how intolerable it is to be intolerant. We're digesting the material if four, hundred, five, Hundred Years of historical context that we have decided to leave behind. Our heads and we are choosing to turn over our shoulders and say I must face this because it is intolerable to live in any other way than away that allows me. To be in contact with my full loving human self. I feel like you. Name something here. That this evolution, we were in a moment we're using this language of the moment. and. We we were already in the moment in a way we were building to this in all its complexity. Yes which not all pretty and not all hopeful, but it's all of a piece. You know I wonder yeah. Were You Almost WANNA ask you you know I want to ask you how I WanNa ask you this personally as well as in terms of drawing out your wisdom, your spiritual wisdom I wonder if the price you. Know. That at all. I think we are This body. This body that we call a nation is ready for this. And Anybody that has had a great amount of. Toxicity as part of the IT system has to heave out that toxicity. And we've had a lot of ways to suppress it and a lot of ways to get it a lot of ways to. Purchase things and distract ourselves and Watch net flicks. All sorts of other things that we can do. But. We have had a long history in this country. It's sort of baked into the structure of. The design I talk a lot about the design of this country to have so many people disembodied. And I think that we had an amazing extraordinary painful. And yet collective experience of a sufficient quieting. Allowed us to feel this collective body that we are as a nation. New and there's a whole bunch of. Individual bodies in there that said enough. I can't I can't tolerate this. What is here? Because I can feel it now I can see it and The uprisings and the particular. The potency of. George. Not only his death, the means of his death and the. The expression of his death and I mean. Literally, right the expression. The physical embodiment, the expression on the officer's face. The expression of his death through the media, the expression of his death. Was Too much for this body to continue to bear. Yeah. I. Also think about how? Soft we were. Elected body and our individual bodies. We had each and every one of us whatever their circumstances of our lives kind of felt for the ground beneath our feet. And our defenses down. There the pandemic created A. Four strict treat. Wounds we unforced retreat. and. I've done retreat many years. And there's always this point in during retreat where you feel you're not knowing come into. Into into your view. There's there's one thing to move around the world and say, Oh, I don't know we have not. No. It's another thing to just feel it to to come into confrontation. With your knowing and it is tender as you said, like it is a tender. Place to be in confrontation with that and and it's different. I think entirely. To have been not just individual, but to also feel the reverberations of. The collective not knowing. And as a as a country, we've

Officer George
Mary Oliver Is Listening to the World

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:20 min | 2 years ago

Mary Oliver Is Listening to the World

"The question I always start with whether I'm interviewing physicist or poet is I'd like to hear whether there was a spiritual background here life early life your childhood however, you would define it now. Well I would defied it very differently from what I was a child. I was said to Sunday school as many kids are. And then I had trouble with the resurrection. So I would not join the church but I was still probably more interested than many of the kids did at enter the church it's been one of the most important interests of my life. And continues to be. And it doesn't have to be Christianity I'm very much taken with the poet. Rumi who is a Muslim Sufi poet. And read him every day. and. Have no answers but have some suggestions I know that a life is much richer with spiritual. Part. To it. And I also think nothing is more interesting. So I, cling to it right and then. You I mean you talk about growing up in a sad depressed place a difficult place I mean in another you don't you don't Belabor this I mean in another place there's a place you talk about. Your one of many thousands who've had insufficient childhoods. But that you spend a lot of your time walking around the woods. Yes Ohio I did and and I think it saved my life. I to this day I, don't care for the enclosure of buildings. It was a very bad childhood. For everybody, every member of the household, not just myself I. Think. And I escape did. Barely with years of. Trouble. But I did find that the entire world. In looking for something. But. I got saved by poetry and I got saved by the beauty of the world. Yeah and and there's such a convergence of those things. Yeah. It seems all the way through in your life as a poet. It is it is a convergence and. Have a little difficulty now having lived for fifty years in small town in the north. I'm trying very hard to love the mangroves. Well I know it takes a while I have to say you and your poetry. For. Me are so closely identified with province town this and that part of the world and. And that kind of dramatic weather. Yes. Kind of shore. Yes. and so when I you know and I had this amazing opportunity to come visit you and I and I look and great, we're going to Cape Cod. To Florida. Well, I just sold by Condo to a very dear. this summer. And I bought a little house start here, which is needs very serious reconstruction. So I'm not yet. But sometimes, it's time for the age. Though for all those years for decades of your writing. This picture was there view this pleasure of walking and writing and? I don't know standing with your notebook. Yes and actually writing while you're walking. Yes. I did it and it is, and it seems like such a gift that you've found that way to be a writer and have that daily. Have Well I. Don't as I say I don't like buildings. Yeah. So I was I the only the only record I broken in school was truancy. I went to the woods a lot with with books right Whitman in the. Knapsack. But I also liked motion. So I just began with these little notebooks and scribbled things as I they came to me and then work them into poems later. And always I wanted the I many of the poems I did this I did this. I saw this I I wanted them the I to be the possible reader. rather than about myself it was about an experience that happened to be mind but could well have been anybody else's and that was my feeling about the I. I have been criticized by one editor who felt that the I would be felt as ego. And I thought well I'm going to risk it and see. And I think it worked. It adjoined. The reader into the experience of the poem. I became the kind of person who did the walking in the scribbling yeah. But shared it. Yeah. If if they wanted it, yes. You also use this word. You know there's this place where you're talking about. Writing while walking listening deeply and I love this listening listening conviviality. Yes. Yeah and listening really to the world the stick to the world. Well, I I did that I still do it. I still

Rumi Physicist Cape Cod Florida Ohio Whitman Writer Editor
[Unedited] Michael McCarthy with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:41 min | 2 years ago

[Unedited] Michael McCarthy with Krista Tippett

"I'm so delighted to be. Speaking with you. I can't tell you how much I love your book and I'm telling everyone about it. Yeah. It's as marked up. Emmy Book I have ever read. In the Bible including the Bible and I picked it up just on a table in a bookstore in Saint Paul Minnesota Twin cities. Different questions for me before we get going I think. Okay. I'm happy to respond to you. Yeah I don't I. So I don't usually do Generally do book interviews but really, and I've dug little bit and I've also looked at your. Some. Of Your other writing but I really. So so we're we're not talking about the book, but essentially we're talking about. Everything, the book is about. So I yeah so Chris I think we're good great. Okay. Yes and so we have a nice amount of time to have a big. Real wandering conversation. I would like to start I I I. Start Most of my interviews with a question just just wondering about The religious or spiritual background of someone's childhood I find. That is a very fertile place and everybody's imagination whatever their story is. It's full of questions and searching and softness so. However you would. However, you would begin to to think of that. How would you? How would you Described the religious or spiritual background of your childhood. I would use a curious phrase to describe. What I am now I would describe myself as an ethnic Catholic. Okay. that was a phrase I can't claim authorship of it was used by. British woman politician about twenty years ago meaning there's I grew up a Roman Catholic. and I have abandoned the faith. The formerly at any right but the belief system if not not necessarily. Belief in heaven now but the. The sense of right and wrong I think Stays with you all your life and you relate to it. Was it Mary? McCarthy who read a book called wants to Catholic. And I think the sense of right and wrong and also I think he'll go strong sets. Of Original Sin Yeah I. Think I'm quite aware that is a very dark side to the species mom. If, we can say that these days I think the the species is still called mind it's a human being. and so even though I'm not formally religious. I, like to think I. Suppose that I carry with me what people might describe as a religious sensibility. And I feel like right at the beginning of of your book The Moss snowstorm nature enjoy. You I mean this is this is a this is a book about our bond with the natural world. Right and you and you start it. It's also woven, and that bond is both civilizational. It's at once civilizational and species something about our species, but it's also personal. and so and you do we've that personal story all the way through your reflection on this large subject. End You know you're use the word a soul in this way rather early you describe your mother's illness and She she was away for a time institutionalized and. One of the things that happened to you as a child is it you you had a lack of feeling about that. that you could perceive, but then you describe this day. And here's just the sentences. That there was a singular window. Of observing butterflies and he said when I was a skinny kid in short pants, butterflies entered my soul. So where'd you just tell a little bit of that story as and why that is a vantage point for you on again, this large civilizational issue. It was really just a personal way. Of, my own way through my own personal experience. Of. Beginning explore. the strange conundrum which it seems to me that we can actually love very fiercely the natural world I we sort of take that for granted as commonplace. But as I got older, it seemed to me rather curious phenomenon because after all the natural world is only the the environment from which we emerge to species like every other species. Unlike. Every other species there are two things that they're not sure world has for us. One is danger. One is utility because the natural world can be dangerous and it can kill you. You can have thousands of people killed by snakes in India every year still or not show world can be a great advantage. It can provide you food and shelter and various other things. And all species are aware even if instinctively of these things but we have a third thing, which is that we can actually love the natural world.

Emmy Saint Paul Minnesota Twin Chris Mccarthy India Mary
[Unedited]  Dario Robleto with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:06 min | 2 years ago

[Unedited] Dario Robleto with Krista Tippett

"Ning and. Welcome back to winter. Someone someone wrote me today instead it's raining feathers. So welcome to the institute. I'm Liz Armstrong. Curator. Of Contemporary Art, and we are very pleased to be hosting the second live interview with Krista Tippett for her show and broadcast of on being. As. Many of you know Christa was here two months ago when she spoke with Hamilton and what was a fascinating and far-reaching conversation they covered everything from spiritual act of art making to the strange intimacy of museums where people can be alone together. The the this interview, and that one we're presented. In conjunction with the exhibition currently on view. In our target wing simply called sacred, which is a series of installations, the probe, the nature of the sacred within a secular multi-faith society. By, juxtaposing works of art from Multiple Times in places, the sacred exhibition invites visitors to explore historic and contemporary. Expressions of the divine, the spiritual, the essential in the beloved and to ponder the words meaning in their personal lives. I want to thank the MIA's affinity collectors, group contemporary art for their support of this program, and for helping us visits from artists such as Hamilton. Dario. And now let me just briefly introduce each of our guests. KRISTA Tippett Enduro. Christie needs little introduction on this stage. She's a peabody award winning broadcaster and New York Times bestselling author WHO's highly acclaim radio program on being fills a huge void in the public discussion of spirituality and faith. She's not afraid to. to discuss the big animating questions of human life from how do we want to live to what does it mean to be human? She and her guests explore meaning ethics and what is sacred miss the political cultural and technological turmoil that is first century life. Dario fo was houston-based artists who's known for his highly original repurposing of rare and archaic materials. Like a DJ sampling music and he just told me tonight, he was a DJ once Doria spins in shapes such unconventional materials as dinosaur fossils, meteorite remnants, hand bones, and hipbones, and pulverized vinyl from vintage records. He's been called materials poet. I think of him as a passionate alchemist who memorialize the past while finding new meaning in the tangled roots its history. He's a maker of extraordinary objects that are meditations on war, love death, spirituality, and healing. It's going to be really interesting to him talk about these objects without seeing them. But you can imagine and then you will see them So I'm really looking forward to this conversation. Please join me in welcoming Chris step and Dario. Thank you lose. It's great to be back at Minneapolis Institute of Arts. Feel like I'm an old timer now. So I welcome you. So, Dr. you grew up in San Antonio I grew up in Oklahoma. It did not snow in March where we came from. I've really been looking forward to this for several months as way I planned it. Thank you. Very much. So if I ask you a about the spiritual and religious background of your childhood, where would you start to think about what that means? San Antonio is maybe Catholic central. In America So it's It's hard not to be around that in San Antonio. My grandfather was a Baptist minister. I didn't grow up around ten so much but his is influence definitely. was there the Beckham ahead? And he was definitely a passionate passionate man. My mother. Religion in the home was not ever really an issue but as. I searched it out on my own. I'd asked my friends I could come to church. Catholic methodist I probably sample every every church. Afraid I had. And? I continually. Even at that early age was was very, very interested. So my childhood it I would say it was very self directed. maybe always within the background knowing that thing about my grandfather, there was still this mysterious thing that I didn't really understand. So, maybe it was fairly field that to the searching.

Dario Fo Peabody Award Krista Tippett San Antonio Contemporary Art Hamilton Liz Armstrong MIA Beckham Christa New York Times Minneapolis Institute Of Arts Doria Catholic Methodist Oklahoma America Chris
Jane Goodall on What it Means to Be Human

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:46 min | 2 years ago

Jane Goodall on What it Means to Be Human

"WanNa Start where I always start which is how how if I ask you about be spiritual background of your childhood of your earliest life. However, you understand that word now where does that memory take you? Well I wouldn't have thought of anything spiritual when I was a child. Now my grandfather was a congregational minister. I never met him. We mom my sister. Came to live in this house for I. Am now with my grandmother and Moms two sisters. So was he the husband? Of Danny? Was He that other of your grandmother you call Danny as? He was the husband of Danny. I wish I'd met him because he sounds completely wonderful, but I didn't and so we sometimes went particularly religious. And I love to spend most of my time outside in the garden was pre television, pre laptops, cellphones another event. And so we had. Books and imagination a nature. So I learned a lot from nature I was outside. And I, love climbing. Trees had special tree which I'm looking at right now be. Spend hours and hours up beach. Feeling chose to the sky and the buds. I. Suppose that was the chose this to some kind of spiritual feeling nature. That I had I wouldn't have thought of it as that that time. Right you've. You've said that you really feel like you. Loved animals and loved nature I think from the womb onwards a woman would. My first serious observation of animals was four and a half when I waited for hours to see a headland. To, say, it was my to Muslim. WHO's enabling me to do what I've done because she didn't know where I was. I was hiding a hen house waiting because nobody would tell me what the hell was. The came out and it wasn't logical as it was. It was a logical observation that it didn't make sense. Wasn't obvious. So I handle into a hen house where they slipped night and the next. Round the. You. Know she must. So I crawled off to, which was a big mistake she flew out with school Safiya. and. So in my little four and a half year old mine, I must've thought well, no Hanrahan. I think five, the hen houses. So, I went into an empty one, hundred waited at apparently awaited about four hours. They even called the police. They will also change Jomie Ghana for a holiday onto this farm. and. By mother must be really nervous. You can imagine your little. Has Disappeared on, he show me rushing towards the house. She saw my shining eyes on. Sat Down the wonderful story of how a hand lays egg on the reason I love that story is. Isn't that the making of a little scientists asking questions not getting the right on some citing defined out. Making a mistake, not giving up dining issues. You know a different mother. How Day off without telling us don't you depth donated again might have crushed that early scientific curiosity at my might not have done. I've done.

Danny Jomie Ghana Hanrahan
Marilyn Nelson  Communal Pondering in a Noisy World

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:32 min | 2 years ago

Marilyn Nelson Communal Pondering in a Noisy World

"Maryland Nelson is a storytelling poet. She gives winsome voice forgotten people from history and from her own family. She shines a light on the complicated ancestry. We have in common and can help us in the work we have to together. Now she's written for both adults and children. She's taught poetry and contemporary practice to West, point cadets, and alongside the gentle, but mighty steam. Maryland Nelson Commands in the communion of modern poets. She's a voice for all of us in the work in the privilege of what she calls communal pondering to sit with her is to gain a newly spacious perspective on what that might mean and on why people young and old are turning to poetry with urgency. Poetry consists of. Words and phrases and sentences that emerge like something coming out of water. They emerge before us and they call up something in us, but then they turn. US back into our own silence, and that's why reading poetry reading it. Alone silently. Takes us some place where we can't get ordinarily poetry. Opens us to this otherness that exists within us. Don't. You think we read a poem and you say. And you listen to what it brings out inside of you, and what it is, is not words, it's silence. I'm Krista Tippett, and this is on being. Maryland Nelson is professor emeritus of English at the University of Connecticut and a former Chancellor of the Academy of American poets. I interviewed her at the University of North Carolina Asheville in two, thousand sixteen. So, here we are and I'm just delighted to be here with Marilyn. Nelson. It's been such a treat to be reading your poetry these last few days. missed. You were born in Cleveland of a teacher mother. And a father who was a member of the last graduating class of the tyskie airman. I wonder any, we're moving around a lot a lot. Yeah. You and your sisters always imagined that when you left each place. Disappeared cease to exist. And you did. This book how I discovered poetry. It's a memoir in poems a and I just wondered. So I WANNA say I said to Maryland I have a few books here and I have some. We'll read some poetry throughout I'm going to ask her to read some things. We'll read some at the end, but I also said to her that if she just feels called to grab one of these books and read she can. But I wondered if you would just read the last poem in this in this collection how I discovered poetry. Yes. Okay. This one is called thirteen year old American Negro girl. On each of these poems has a little byline of choir. We were at the time. This we were on an air force base in Oklahoma in nineteen, fifty, nine, thirteen year, old American Negro girl. My face as foreign to me as a mask allows people to believe they know me. Thirteen year old American. Negro girl headlines would read if I was newsworthy. But that's just the top of the iceberg me. I could spend hours searching the mirror for clues to my truer identity. If someone didn't pound the bathroom door. You can't see what the mirror doesn't show. For instance, that after I closed my book and turn off my lamp, I, say to the dark, give me a message. I can give the world. Afraid. There's a poet behind my face. I beg until I've cried myself to sleep. Thank you. That's my sister banging on the bathroom. And I don't know what me to talk about it. I for me. The. The. Crux of this poem is the fact that I really did pray. Give me a message that I can give the world. If you give me a message that I can give the world I promise, I'll be true to it. I'll be honest to it. That was. That was my thirteen year old. Prayer. Let me be a poet. Give me something to share. So.

Maryland Nelson United States Maryland Krista Tippett Academy Of American Poets Cleveland University Of North Carolina A Oklahoma Marilyn Chancellor University Of Connecticut
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Southern Baptist creatures. My grandfather was a southern Baptist preacher. My great grandfather was a southern baptist. Preacher my father was a southern Baptist preacher and a chaplain in the army and I was red on black folk religion which is not the same thing as empire religion it was a religion that was forged during enslavement in the fields of America in the in the fields at on plantations nations it was a religion that combined the ideals of American democracy with the theological typical sense of justice. It was a religion that focused on right relations and it was was a religion. Black folk religion was a counterculture. Religion stood over and against Empire Christianity or empire religion and it was a religion that said that people who were considered property and disposable were essential in in the eyes of God and even essential in a democracy. Although we were enslaved and so I was deeply impacted. It was a religion with the language and the symbols or accessible that the guy talk was accessible able to even seven-year-olds so although as a seven year as seven year old I could sing. Fifty do songs without missing a line and everybody in the community have access is to theological microphone so as a little black girl growing up in the South I was. I was in many ways. precocious I would go to black black churches at six seven years old with my grandmother and I was stand up in the church. Having learned these lines by hard and very good at repetition. I was so happy to be in the House of the Lord Giving praise to God and so this sense of being a part of something larger than myself. Being a part of a of a living spirituality living religion it was not a debatable religion it was in the applied religion where there was a connection between what you believed in how so you lived in the world and I was deeply influenced by by this black folk religion. You said something Vincent harding so you said religion from me growing up in Columbus Georgia was the ground that I stood on that position us to take that position us to stand against the wind. The winds yes sustained against the winds of southern apart tate sustained against the winds. How do I describe? I grew up in in the heart of southern party. And I'm not saying that I didn't realize that edited existed but our parents were spiritual geniuses who created a were world world language. where the notion that I was inadequate are inferior or less than never retouched my consciousness? I didn't grow up believing that about myself. I grew up believing that I was a a first class. Human being in the first class person and our parents were spiritual geniuses who were able to shape a counter culture of religion black folk religion that raise some disposability to being essential players in society. It also gave gave us the resilience to stand up against the assaults of southern party violence and also also tell us something serene about love. I love everybody. I love everybody. I love everybody in my heart and so oh hey was was not anything in vocabulary and so is seasoned us. Actually I I think about it when you think about black folk religion in this country. It offered a way out of the dungeons of Impera Christianity. So go ahead one thing just what you said about you.

southern party America Vincent harding tate Columbus Georgia
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm KRISTA Tippett up next my unedited conversation with civil rights. Legend Ruby sales. There is a shorter underproduced version of this. Wherever you found this podcast? Yeah Diane come come There's at least one place for one or two more people in the sofas which are our favorite places to spend the workday so one of the things about we we built out the space. We've been in here less than three two years. We were previously in a big media organization working in cubicle land. And you can see that we kind of went wild with with what we wanted to be different. And and it's been really exciting for us to be able to think about having a hospitable a public a physical space that can also in which we can do what we do. We kind of translate the values and virtues of our media space were Taliban big virtue for us and as a result that also means that we have all these ideas that we can do things we've never done before and this is one of them where we have. We've done plenty of public things. We'd never done anything quite like this. But somehow when we started talking to Jonathan I mean the word of this of this convening is this the public. The Theology reimagined work that we're doing with Henry Luce Foundation and when we wrote that grant after having the conversations with Jonathan. It just made sense to us that we could that you know we were so excited about not just about the work we wanted to do with this but the kind of ecosystem that Henry Luce Foundation is creating and wanting to make sure because because one of my frustrations with the world right now is not that there's not enough good initiative going on. We have such an abundance of good initiative but I want more dot connecting and cross pollination and so I thought maybe we can do that and we can even even maybe do that physically and we also just want to know more about what other people are up up to so that also so that we can serve this fear of public theology reimagined whatever that is having said that this is kind of experimental in terms of the form warm. I am not a facilitator. We will not have breakout sessions. There's not I don't have any of the usual structure and I have to say it probably just because of my personality type. I don't ever like the usual structure so it's kind of liberating but this may not work. What what I do know how to do and what we do every day is as we we? We are conversationalist. So we're going to try to conduct this in a in a conversational manner and we're GONNA start it with a big conversation in a minute with with Ruby sales. I thought I should say just a little bit before we start kind of some framing in terms of what this is about. Ah The vision we bring to it. The that will be informed by what happens here and I'd like before we start. Maybe for Jonathan Van. Doren just to say just to say a few words about this public theology initiative and I don't even know if you call it that but it essential that's how I see it that you've been starting as as a program officer at loose.

Henry Luce Foundation Jonathan Van KRISTA Tippett Ruby Taliban Diane Doren program officer
"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:22 min | 3 years ago

"krista tippett" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm Krista Tippett, and this is on beings. Unheard cuts up next my unedited conversation with Buddhist ecologist and Rilke translator Joanna Macy. There is a shorter produced version of this wherever podcasts are found. And Chris somewhere, it'd be able to get your. Hello. Hello. Hi, Joanna heights Krista Tippett high. I can't hear you very well. All right. When I say, we can turn up the volume turn, I'm late maybe a minute or two because of the parking confusion. No problem. Don't worry. Take your time catcher breath. Yeah. That'd be good. That good catch my breath. Let me tell you. Let me tell you what I have in mind. I don't I need more volume to hear you better. Oh, okay. I see that's going to happen. The your end. Can you are you is that any better? Or are you hearing me now as a little better? Okay. Sorry. What's the now? My voice is very lower to me. Right. So let's get it adjusted a little bit of that shouldn't. Are you are you working on that Chris? Or is that that's better. Okay. Good. Okay. Let me tell you what I have in mind while you catch your breath. Okay. I I own now, I'm hearing an echo. Let's see that's probably that's her headphones being a little bit loud day. Maybe if I. You know, it's not too bad. If I stay back from the Mike Nowak should get you where you're comfortable, Chris. If we can't get the headphones down just a little bit. I think I'll be okay, there's a that the thing that happens with headphone volume as if it's too high your end than I hear an echo and vice versa. So we need. We'll get a happy medium here. So can they if what's the engineer's name, Chris Harris, Kelly, Harris or Kelley should be able to hear us? Okay. Okay. Now, I think this is Kelly Kelly. Are you still hearing the go it turned on the headphones year? We're still hearing it. So I mean, it's it's tricky because do you have mixed that you can have her level be adjusted in comparison with Christos? Yes. Yeah. Working on that. Yeah. So, you know, it's probably more difficult because having a little hard of hearing. And I took off my hearing aids. Well, we'll we'll be able to work it out. But I'm sure you have is not the first time you've had to deal with that. The thing is with technology. It's amazing and something different is difficult. Every time. Kelly is your Mike open right now. Yes. My my guess here alternate off, and we'll see if that makes it different, okay? Testing testing. I'm not hearing myself now Joanna can you still hear me very well? Good. Okay. So so let me tell you what I have in mind. I am a lover of real like you. And I I I don't for your translations have Rilke good. I I spent most of the eighties in Germany, most of that in divided Berlin. And I speak German, and and real has German is, you know, one of the most beautiful things in the world to me. And I could never find translations that captured that.

Chris Harris Krista Tippett Kelly Kelly Joanna Macy Rilke Mike Nowak Berlin Germany Christos engineer Kelley