36 Burst results for "Krista"

Fresh update on "krista" discussed on The Lake Show with Henry Lake

The Lake Show with Henry Lake

00:54 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "krista" discussed on The Lake Show with Henry Lake

"C. C. Fool showed enough full show until 1 a.m. Entry like Krista Bs. You're only good neighbor. We got plenty of people that will talk to tonight because we've got a lot going on in the world of sports baton. Going on in the world of sports. Our first guest at 9 30 Matthew collar of the Purple Insider podcast and newsletter will talk to sort of liking football in some general NFL stuff with him. Coming up at 9 30 then at 10 o'clock, the Minnesota Lynx off to a great start for in one. That's the record Katie Davidson from the next hoop. She's going to join us at 10 PM tonight. Then at 10 30 we will talk in via With Trent Soccer. You guys know the name? Her doctor's going to join us at 10 30 to talk N Ba In the bubble down there the restart and then at 11 o'clock we would talk today. Mizutani from the Pioneer Press. About the Minnesota wild, Not a good day of your wild fans. It's not a good day of quite honestly, if you're Minnesota sports fan Because right now we'll get update on this here a little bit later, but We're in the midst ofthe Watching the Minnesota United squad. And there in the MLS is back tournament and they're in the semi finals and they're taking on Orlando right now. Orlando City, and it's not going well. We're trailing. To nothing or to deal. It just it's it's not a good A good day for Minnesota sports fans as the wild on the brink of elimination will talk to Damon's done E about that. And unfortunately, the loans are our struggle right now. It is officially at halftime, so hopefully they kanon Put a little pep in their step in the second half. And tie this thing up and maybe if we get into penalty kicks when that way, but whatever it is, we want to see the loans advance on this. We're looking for normalcy, right? I mean, Twins Lose wild Lose loons are losing. I mean, you're still about thunder. I didn't even mention it. The twins lost. I'm sorry. See this? This is that normalcy back to feeling like your every day so I guess. Here it is. But twins lose Game three of the year. I know So by the way, so so now that we've that you spilled the beans because the twins did lose today, here on the Three home from Minnesota Twins baseball 6 to 5 to the Pittsburgh Pirates who dominate all week and you should have one today two today falls into the category off. It falls into the category of You should've had that game OK that it goes into the column off you let a game slip away that you probably should have. Now, look, it's not to say that there won't be games were Taylor Raj Story? You know, the folks in the bullpen won't blow a save, like I understand. I get that you're not going to save every single game. Man, This is absolutely a missed opportunity. This was a missed opportunity. The Pittsburgh Pirates are not good. Okay, They're they're not good. I know that every their professional baseball players that have pride and all that, whatever, but they're not good. But did I anticipate that we would win every single game this week against Pittsburgh? Probably not. Okay, but you lose 6 to 5 today. And you get ready, Teo to face the Kansas City Royals starting tomorrow. When you look at today's game. Chris, you were you were talking last night about being turned into how do you feel about being tended Three right now? Not good Lake. Not good. I don't I don't feel so We're going to do the math on the record Now that we lost today and the press that we're not gonna do that anymore. Now we're we're not going to do that. After losses were only going to do that. We're going to do it. It's it was disappointing Toe Watch. Because early in that game, Kenta Maeda that shot that that Gregory Polanco head I mean, Yep, always just launched and I was thinking. Oh, man, You know, this is going to be my age as hiccup. But then he ended up settling down. You're gonna have games were once in a while, You're going to slip up, but I was thinking about it this afternoon. As long as you're winning two out of 33 out of four in your winning Siri's, You're gonna be in fine shape. So, Yeah, even though you haven't win Siri's That's what you want. Yeah. Yeah, They took three out of four from Pittsburgh. So I think, Okay. All things considered 10 and three. You're still really good, because you go out. You know, I know you got a three game lead over. You know the rest of the division. Nobody's complaining right now. All right, let's get to some of the highlights a little bit earlier today, this game started off on a really good note today. Okay, because in that first inning, a guy that that has struggled for the most part of the season, but his baddest, starting that Heat up a little bit. I feel like in the last week is, Miguel said No. He had a three run home run in the top of the first. And now the old want us. We're gonna drive to left down the line of the quarter that bull turning, and that's going to be a fair ball. And that is a home. Run A line drive rocket down the left field line. Just fair three..

Pittsburgh Pirates Minnesota Pittsburgh Minnesota Lynx Minnesota Twins Good Lake Baseball Katie Davidson Krista Bs Purple Insider C. C. Fool Pioneer Press NFL Orlando Soccer Miguel Minnesota United Squad Kenta Maeda Siri
Marilyn Nelson  Communal Pondering in a Noisy World

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:32 min | Last week

Marilyn Nelson Communal Pondering in a Noisy World

"Maryland Nelson is a storytelling poet. She gives winsome voice forgotten people from history and from her own family. She shines a light on the complicated ancestry. We have in common and can help us in the work we have to together. Now she's written for both adults and children. She's taught poetry and contemporary practice to West, point cadets, and alongside the gentle, but mighty steam. Maryland Nelson Commands in the communion of modern poets. She's a voice for all of us in the work in the privilege of what she calls communal pondering to sit with her is to gain a newly spacious perspective on what that might mean and on why people young and old are turning to poetry with urgency. Poetry consists of. Words and phrases and sentences that emerge like something coming out of water. They emerge before us and they call up something in us, but then they turn. US back into our own silence, and that's why reading poetry reading it. Alone silently. Takes us some place where we can't get ordinarily poetry. Opens us to this otherness that exists within us. Don't. You think we read a poem and you say. And you listen to what it brings out inside of you, and what it is, is not words, it's silence. I'm Krista Tippett, and this is on being. Maryland Nelson is professor emeritus of English at the University of Connecticut and a former Chancellor of the Academy of American poets. I interviewed her at the University of North Carolina Asheville in two, thousand sixteen. So, here we are and I'm just delighted to be here with Marilyn. Nelson. It's been such a treat to be reading your poetry these last few days. missed. You were born in Cleveland of a teacher mother. And a father who was a member of the last graduating class of the tyskie airman. I wonder any, we're moving around a lot a lot. Yeah. You and your sisters always imagined that when you left each place. Disappeared cease to exist. And you did. This book how I discovered poetry. It's a memoir in poems a and I just wondered. So I WANNA say I said to Maryland I have a few books here and I have some. We'll read some poetry throughout I'm going to ask her to read some things. We'll read some at the end, but I also said to her that if she just feels called to grab one of these books and read she can. But I wondered if you would just read the last poem in this in this collection how I discovered poetry. Yes. Okay. This one is called thirteen year old American Negro girl. On each of these poems has a little byline of choir. We were at the time. This we were on an air force base in Oklahoma in nineteen, fifty, nine, thirteen year, old American Negro girl. My face as foreign to me as a mask allows people to believe they know me. Thirteen year old American. Negro girl headlines would read if I was newsworthy. But that's just the top of the iceberg me. I could spend hours searching the mirror for clues to my truer identity. If someone didn't pound the bathroom door. You can't see what the mirror doesn't show. For instance, that after I closed my book and turn off my lamp, I, say to the dark, give me a message. I can give the world. Afraid. There's a poet behind my face. I beg until I've cried myself to sleep. Thank you. That's my sister banging on the bathroom. And I don't know what me to talk about it. I for me. The. The. Crux of this poem is the fact that I really did pray. Give me a message that I can give the world. If you give me a message that I can give the world I promise, I'll be true to it. I'll be honest to it. That was. That was my thirteen year old. Prayer. Let me be a poet. Give me something to share. So.

Maryland Nelson United States Maryland Krista Tippett Academy Of American Poets Cleveland University Of North Carolina A Oklahoma Marilyn Chancellor University Of Connecticut
Manfred says Miami Marlins' outbreak can be managed

Ben Maller

00:17 sec | Last week

Manfred says Miami Marlins' outbreak can be managed

"Major League Baseball League postpone the Marlins, Orioles and Billy's Yankees Games on Monday due to the crowd artist outbreak on the Marlins, with 11 players and coaches testing positive. Following their game Sunday in Philadelphia, Krista Rob Manfred said. This is not a nightmare situation for baseball on their confidence. Seas will be able to go forward on

Major League Baseball League Marlins Krista Rob Manfred Baseball Orioles Philadelphia Billy
Its really settling in now, the losses large and small

On Being with Krista Tippett

07:35 min | 2 weeks ago

Its really settling in now, the losses large and small

"So. I have not prepared my questions I just want to. Settle into talk with you for. Twenty thirty minutes. And you know we are putting the show that we did a few years ago. which really lays out the notion of ambiguous laws, the myth of closure? But, but what I wanna just reflect on with you. This morning very directly is. What does ambiguous loss mean. In a global pandemic. Well I. It means a essentially the same thing that it meant on the individual and family level, but suddenly it has this global meaning which I never intended until the phone started bringing so to speak the emails came in. With the pandemic saying isn't this ambiguous loss, so as irritation, I was delighted that people, journalists and ordinary people put it together That's that's a dream that an academic wants. Is that whatever you do is useful to the general public. but then I began thinking. Of course it's ambiguous loss but it's more abstract, and it's beyond the individual or family now it has been raised to a higher level. Right to help us make sense of this nonsensical thing. That's going on this invisible. Annemie. So so. We're kind of going through a a global civilizational. Moment of ambiguous loss at a societal level. Yes we we We have lost indeed. We have lost our freedom to go about our day. As we always have we have lost our freedom to visit with our loved ones or to have lunch with their friends and and I must say again because the school thing is coming up the young people have lost. Not only a year it may be two years. of what they usually do is go to school in the usual manner, make friends socialize, learn, learn and that generation will have to carry that the rest of their lives. I. I I'm finding personally and and picking up A in others. Obviously, this is not a you know scientific. Study I've done, but it feels to me and myself and in others that. We I've I've kind of hit this moment I don't know how many months we are on now from March but Yeah certainly, but certainly in March and April and May. There was a sense that you know this will. Right that this is something we have to do so that we can get through this. And even things that got canceled got rescheduled for I July and then September October. And I feel like. What's? It's really settling in now. The the losses and are large and small as you say I mean I mean people have lost loved ones, but there's also this loss of. Going to the office of certainty like your kids will go to school I mean on. My son didn't really graduate from College of. Some of these things. People will bounce back from you know I. I actually really trusted our kids. Who knows how this will affect them? It it. It might be just you know. transformative in in generative ways that we can't imagine. And yet they're all these losses large and small all at once. And were carrying them individually, but were also carrying them in the same at the same time. Yes I just wonder how for you. This stretches open. This note because this is ambiguous loss, but it's a form. You perhaps could never have imagined. It's happening to you, too. Personally it is, it is as you know. Caregiver. For my husband, although I have help, which is why I'm talking with you right now, and that that went quite well because I could get respite by going out for lunch with friends or going for a walk I mean the four the pandemic before the. Yeah! Yes, uh-huh, and then pandemic kid and Caregivers are finding that The can't they don't have their freedom. They had to take a break You're stuck inside, and and that makes it doubly stressful. I think for caregivers including myself. So. So I've heard you say that. It's one thing to write the book about this about ambiguous loss. And another thing to go through yourself. and. I wonder. What you might share what you might offer about how you have been wrestling with that and what there is. In this. You know I'd say ambiguous. Loss is a description of a human experience hadn't quite been described before. You didn't invent the experience you invented the language named. Right you named it and so here we are with this. A magnitude of you say it's been completely taken out of the individual level, or even sometimes it would happen to two distinct communities. So. What are you know from being in this field from being the person her name this to? This helping you walk through these days you might offer up to other people about walking through these days these months and these years ahead. I think I'm in it to everybody else. Struggling and I suspect I've spent forty years studying ambiguous loss because I don't like ambiguity. I remember when I first went to the University of Wisconsin in Madison in one class or another, we were describing each other, and somebody called me decisive. And I took that as a high compliment. I don't anymore I mean I've I've come to believe in both and thinking which I write about. I don't like binary thanking. You're working with your banker or some someone like that. And there's a middle ground. A middle way to go when you're dealing with people and when you're dealing with problems, we have huge problems right now and to see that someone was wrong when the pandemic began about what they thought about it a scientist. and now they think differently. That's binary. Thinking and I can't I can't. I can't take it anymore.

University Of Wisconsin Scientist. Madison
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

12:36 min | Last month

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Next might unedited conversation with Vincent harding the late magnificent civil rights elder. There is as always a shorter produced version of this wherever you found this podcast. And we'll get him. Set up here. Just second, thanks. Can you hear me Dr? Harding Hey all right. We need to pull that microphone just a little closer to you. Fairly close there you go. Tell us what you had for breakfast this morning. I. Am telling you what I wished. I had okay morning. That's fine. I'm going to need to sit up in the chair. Yeah, probably so so that we can hear you fine. So, how's the voice going? It sounds really good. Okay? Good all right I, believe ms tip. It is with us on the line. Hi Krista hello. Krista Tippett I. Want to tell you that I am be a fan Oh. Good that makes me happy. I'm one of yours to. We? We have many common friends at furniture all right. Yeah I've been reading your piece that you wrote yes. Are you Parker Palmer. Is He someone you? He's a dear friend. We worked together at a QUACO center right Pendle Hill Oh. Was He there when you were there? When he? Yeah okay. Yeah. He's a good friend to. He's the person. I'm kind of been in conversation with about. Join read it. When you talk to him again all right and she ladainian someone we have in Europe. Just on the phone with Sheila just a few days. Okay well I'm I just it was delightful to Delve into your thinking and writing and work and I hope we I think we should just plunge in. yeah, Chris all right. Okay, so where I want to start is where start with everyone which is to hear a little bit about their religious and spiritual background of your childhood of your earliest life. Were you raised Mennonite? No. No okay. Let me shall I start over? Say Yes. I had the. Marvelous Fortune Gift. Blessing of being raised by. A mother who, shortly after I, was born, became a single mother. and. who had just great hopes for me? I was born and raised in Harlem. And the South Bronx in New York. And one of the things that my mother wisely did. For this only child, and for this single mother on welfare. was that. She joined a fascinating. Little Church in Harlem called Victory Tabernacle Seventh Day Christian Church. It was no shoot from the seventh day adventist nomination it was one of those black groups that developed after the Garvey Movement has had its impact right one New York, and on the black churches which were part of white denominations, so by the time that my mother and I got there I was maybe. Six or seven years old? The church had just recently become an independent one. These were magnificent. Women and men are mixture of working class professional class, all kinds of class and They were people. who were very very serious about religion? Who like most seventh day adventist type folks. Choke the Bible. With great seriousness. And that was the context in which I grew up. By KRISTA for me. What was most important on the deepest spiritual levels. Was that these were all people. who expected great things of me? Right right and they love me held me. Recognize that I had possibilities that I didn't recognize myself at the outset, and they held me in guided me and nurtured me, so that's where I would mark my own best and deeply religious beginnings in the love of this small, maybe one hundred member church community that still exists I had to leave them after a while because I come to different conclusions, than they did, but even after I left what I found out over the years. Was that love? Trumps. Doctrine. Every time and I'm still deeply connected to some of the folks that I grew up with in that church sixty seventy years ago. So. You know I, WanNa spend most of our time talking about the present day and. And I want you to bring the fullness of you know what you of your moral imagination and spiritual imagination that emerged from all your experiences, including of course that and the civil rights movement. I wanted I want to bring the the lessons of the past into the present, which is so much of what you're about as it is, but I would like briefly just to hear a little bit about how you know. How did your life wind around from that upbringing in Harlem to becoming involved with that? That movement that of would you say that movement of human transformation in the nineteen sixties? KRISTA, How we travel this during the. Fitschen way yeah. I was drafted. Into, the army after attending the City College of new. York Columbia School of Journalism. And it was that military experience that began to open up the new directions for me. One of the things that happened during basic training was someone who love sports and Athletics I was deeply taken crazily enough by basic training and I enjoyed the movement, the activity and the outside nece and one of the things I enjoyed was learning how to shoot a rifle and learning how to be pretty good at it and one day at Fort. Dix. Doing basic training while I was down there on my belly getting my rifle into position to hit that. Target. Something? Just seem to say to me, so so, Vincent. You are enjoying this and you think that that's what the army is paying all this money for for you to be able to enjoy this. Vincent, you are being trained. To kill a man before he can even see. And what does Jesus have to do with that? And that was the beginning of another path for me, because the army was the first times that I really had an opportunity to take the time to do my own reading, my own studying my own seeking. And I came. To feel my so very deeply attracted to Jesus of Nazareth and especially to his call to find another way to be in the world than the way of attacking the enemy. So that was the beginning for me my idea and then I ended up out in Chicago at. The University of Chicago to study in the history department there and while I was there, I ran into these wonderfully strange people who I had never heard about I running into them in the texts that I was studying and then on the campus. Some folks call Mennonite I see okay so I see that connection now that. And it was clear that what I was wrestling with. They had been wrestling with for sanctuaries, and it turned out that at that particular time the Mennonites were experimenting with trying to develop an interracial congregation in shock ago. When are we talking here? What years probably talking about the mid fifties? I went to Chicago in one, thousand, nine, hundred, fifty, five, just in the midst of the Montgomery bus boycott, and The key thing here is like so many younger academics. I was in my late twenties when I went out. There we at would learn Mennonite. Church began talking about. What does it mean for us to believe in sisterhood and brotherhood? In the body of Christ as children of God, what does that mean? To do that in Chicago. Compared to what we would be experiencing if we in the south and we kept talking about them, what if we were in the south and trying to do this? And a group of US three whites to blacks finally said while we go and find out. And we got into a station wagon and pledged ourselves that we were going to drive as much through the south as we could, and promised ourselves and our community, and the spirit who was with us that we would not allow ourselves to be separated. Whatever happened because we were brothers? They were five guys, and it was in that context that we met Martin. Luther King Junior. In Alabama. We decided that we couldn't go through this date without trying to see king. None of us have imagine. Before, but. He would have been in his twenties then to right He. Yes, we will about the same age late twenties. This trip actually took place in one, thousand, nine, hundred, fifty eight, so he was just twenty nine years old, and I was twenty seven years old, so we. Went into his house at Karenin Scott's invitation when he was recuperating from that wound that he received in New York during a book tour, and he just welcome us into his bedroom. He was in, but Jama's and gown and said he wanted to just meet just and talk to us, and then he started kidding us as you may know. He was a great kidder, and he's never stopped kitting us about how happy he was that we had made through Mississippi. But at at the time that we were getting ready to leave, we stayed there for about two hours with them. He looked at me and the other black guy. George, Ed Riddick and said listen you. Guys are connected with these men nights. You know something about nonviolent action..

Krista Tippett Vincent harding Harlem Chicago New York army Parker Palmer Pendle Hill Oh Garvey Movement Europe University of Chicago Little Church Victory Tabernacle Seventh Day ladainian Sheila Chris Karenin Scott York Columbia School of Journa Jama
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

09:09 min | Last month

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"By a lot of things, but sparked very specifically by the killing of George Floyd here in Minneapolis and One of the things that's happening is. That these names. That names his name and other names. Are. Finally I would say I hope penetrating the American consciousness in any way. Brianna Ahmad Trayvon Eric Sandra Tamir Full Andro and on and on. And that there is this. Wider understanding that these deaths reflect. A visible extreme. And of threat of brutality that black Americans and particularly black young people have been living every day. Is there anything. You'd WanNa correct about what I just said. So far so good, Krista. So far everything seems like I mean that's. Spot on so-fi okay. So, just with that setting the scene of how the scene looks in part from where I set I. WanNa ask you like what are you drawing on? Where is your memory and your body memory going? As you move through and make sense of these days so. What what it was to be Jason growing up in a neighborhood called Oxen Hill in DC in the nineteen eighties and Nineteen Ninety S. that is really with you. As you walk through? Money. So so. So I let me say this. I said that there was nothing to correct and there really isn't anything to correct in what you said, but there is there is a. There is an addition to it. Because what happens, is we talk about and this is something that I i. Speak About often in my work in my when I'm speaking to audiences is. America has a tendency and this is also like a human thing. Right we. We love symbolism. Symbolism is an interesting thing that we. are able to attach ourselves to in a way that can convince says sometimes that half love is whole of. Right and so I wanted to ask you about that. Why are you explain what you mean by that so? You have love his whole life. So what I? What I mean is There are ways for us to use symbolism. As a way to absolve us, or at least sort of. Prison. It's all the lighter oneself to me, but to absolve of shaming guilt. So if I could stand behind if I can hashtag black lives, matter I can feel better about myself during the day and feel like I've actually done something right like that's a very real thing that happens and so the deaths of on black people at the hands of police officers or a vigilante. which is also historic in this country, are what we use to our what we use sort of totems right they become symbols that we lift up to then rally behind and figure out either how to push something forward or how to put something down in ourselves right and the one thing that I wanna make sure that we're clear about is. People who have been killed by police officers, the number of people of black people who have been killed by police officers is outrageous. But it pales in comparison to the number of people who have not died. But have suffered police, assault and brutality and violence and abuse, and because those people have not died, you don't hear about them, but they have to die a death every day. Right the fear in the so people always wonder like why the black community is so up in arms, or or while the black community is so afraid because we've been seeing it right, it isn't just it isn't just you know fifteen hundred deaths. It's one hundred fifty thousand people. It's a million black and Brown people in America who are terrified of police officers if If you want to know where true with the most common form of police violence affects black people I wish we could do body scans of what's happening sailor Lii in the fifteen seconds it takes a police officer walk to walk from a squad car to the car, a person with a black person to the cover black person right? What's happening in our bodies? Is violent right and it's coming from from experience from things that have been seen from from me all sorts of things and so I just WanNa. Make sure clear that just because a person That without dismissing these deaths, because these debts are important, obviously right these the you know I am I am forever going to be saying the names of as many people as possible I just WanNa, be clear though to the to the audience that. These deaths are are. The number of deaths compared to the number of people who are carrying abuse in their bodies because they'd been because they've been abused and survived. Different conversation to me. It's also I mean yeah, and also you. You're very astute about how our brains work I. Mean there's also a way in which a name and a story, right? Pennant can penetrate ally and make a larger story land. But also. I I want to be really clear. I don't think this is just about. The brutality of police officers. Brutality of our society absolutely I mean we could. We could take the. We're using the police force or the or the. Law Enforcement System in this country as as the particular archetype to dissect and critique, the truth of the matter is is that what's happening in the police forces happening in the educational system? It's happening in housing authorities happening in food bright where the food lies in certain communities is happening. It's way we structure. It's the way we've structured the country. Yeah Yeah Yeah so. So yeah, I guess so I I want to ask that question again. Like what was it like to be Jason? Yes, growing up Blake. How did this all manifest? What's with you as you think of as you walk through these days about how how you started walking in your body as a child? You think young Jason. Is always thinking of. My mother, I think I was raised by. By the most interesting woman in the world. As far as I'm concerned, and I'm sure most children you know, it's like it depending upon your relationship, all of us feel like our mothers are the greatest. People ever wondered in the way that mothers always thought all of us were geniuses and we were influenced. In most of his aren't. Better. But I I really. I was raised by a fascinating woman. And? There were certain things that we learned in the House that were very that sort of molded me. for instance my mom was my mom was obsessed with death. And because of her obsession with death, she because she wasn't getting the answers that she wanted in regards to death from what she was reading in traditional faith that she had grown up. In which is which is Christian faith because he was a southern black women in those days, you were Baptist and methodist right that that's sort of the way that worked and. And but she wasn't getting the answers that she wanted. And so when she moved to DC, she started studying eastern eastern philosophies in eastern religious and faith, systems, eastern religions and faith systems and so we were raised in this household that had a little bit of everything, and it opened up my ability. Children's ability to express themselves I never knew like. Sin Never heard it. It just wasn't a I didn't know it just wasn't thing right? Shame! Shame and guilt weren't sort of elements of our lives And and our voices, and our ability to express ourselves were of the utmost important, even if it meant disagreeing with the parent right, so if my mother said something that we disagreed with. I was totally able to say I disagree. I think you're wrong I think you're being mean I don't know I you know I don't know why I'm being punished for this. And as long as I was respectful and head, and can say with confidence, and had reasons the things that I felt my mother. We hear me out. And so when it came time to sort of as I grew and became whoever it is that I was becoming. There was never any fear of saying I disagree right. There was never any fear of challenging things because I had lived in the house had grown up in a home that challenged everything everything. My mother had no problem saying that if something did not make sense, even if it was an ancient belief system that she had no problem, saying doesn't make sense, so we don't have to have to believe that..

officer Jason WanNa America DC George Floyd Brianna Ahmad Eric Sandra Tamir Full Andro Minneapolis Krista assault Blake
Race and Healing: A Body Practice

On Being with Krista Tippett

04:31 min | 2 months ago

Race and Healing: A Body Practice

"In terms of a practice, this is a very simple practice. If you're listening to me right now, one of the things I want you to do is i. want you to just to sit for second. And I want you just to stare straight ahead just. Look straight ahead. And as you're looking straight ahead. Chest and notice. What is actually landed? In, what is actually still kind of in the air? All you're doing is just kinda noticing what's happening. Noticing how much you dislike my voice, noticing how much you dislike or you like some of the things. That Christie said not just not those peace. Now would I want you to do? Is? Look over your left shoulder and use your neck and your hips so turn and look over your shoulder. In in back to center and now look up. And look down. Come back to center. And now look over your right shoulder using your neck and your hips. Reason why you use your neck and your hips as I want you to engage that, so ask. Engaged of some parts of the vehicle. And then now come for. Now, just be quiet and notice. Different. Would you notice? Well I was I was kind of aware that it was half thinking about what it was gonna come next, but I don't know. I felt more settled more so I felt and there was also a feeling of There's kind of comfort yeah yeah. So one of the things about the animal part of the body is that even know mean you are in this room this nice place. There's a part of the body right that saying. Yeah But what else is going to happen? Right in the reason, why especially when I'm working with bodies of culture, one of the first things I do is orient just like like like orient to the room right not orient in a mystical way, but actually literally because many times the bodies of culture are waiting for danger. Even know you know nothing's behind you right letting the body. No, it actually helps some pieces now. If you get reps in with that, not just do a one time or just when I tell you to right, which you might, which you may notice is that you may have a little bit more room for other literally for other things to happen. That can't happen when the constriction is like that. You know that makes sense to in terms of how trauma is in the terminal presence. It's not you're not remembering. It is reliving itself and you're like getting. You know just for that minute. You're actually settling in the real presence. And in the body goes. Oh, you mean that's there to. And then your body starts to do this thing where you go. I don't WanNa do that no more and then if you can get another, there's a thing called the The ridiculous activation says right the RAZZ right. That is the thing. Where will you go buy a car? And you say managed beautiful car in. Nobody else got a car like the. There's this color, and then you drive off the lot you go down blocks you like damn. That's the same damn. That's a everybody got this car. Right is was always there, but now because your brain said, this is important, it makes it can't right see it everywhere. You see it everywhere. That's why the reps are so important because when you get the reps in it like if you get direction. Where that's right. Because if you get? The reps around racist important is that because as you get more reps in about it? All of a sudden other things start to become important. That weren't important. Because now your brain to say Oh i. need to read that. Oh, I need to pay attention to that. Oh, I need to track her body. Oh I need to understand or I need to ask questions about right. That, and now those things become attracted to you. which creates more angst, which forces you to

Christie
Living the Questions: When no question seems big enough

On Being with Krista Tippett

06:41 min | 2 months ago

Living the Questions: When no question seems big enough

"Well hello again. We started recording, and then we. But. Yeah? WE'RE LIVING IN A. Kind of rearranged world in every way right now, including how you and I are speaking to each other. I so you know this living the questions is about not. Being scripted and about honoring Questions? especially the questions we can't answer that it would be actually an affront to the questions themselves, and what they what the reality that they convey. To. Positive answer or an opinion? And And that and so we decided to Near. You are my my beloved and esteemed colleague. In! You are an African American man and you said at the feet of Vincent harding. And have learned from our great elders and In Warren Ferguson. You've been in many many places for which in which what's happening now in American cities. Is In in other American. Cities to is more familiar. And of course there's nothing new. That's part of the problem. There's nothing new there's there's a rebel. There's a revealing maybe an maybe maybe. a New Light Being Sean. That it's something coming to the surface again. That's been there so when we've been having. We've been having it at Oriel. Conversations on morning and we've been interacting with people online and. In our audience. Listening Community and Really kind of Coming to the conclusion that mostly we have questions. And deciding to be transparent about that I was just reading through. On social media. Siri put out a call to ask people how we can accompany them and. You know and it's it's questions. And and including the question of why like how how can this be happening? And then something really interesting to me was that there's a woman who's identifies as. A black woman, the wife of Black Man, the mother of three black children, and she said all she wanted right now is silent. It her favourite show of us is the Gordon Hampton show. So I guess. A question. kind of an anguish that rolls around for me is. It's not even it doesn't even, isn't it? It's not even enough question. It's like. The inadequacy of everything. That's been done and all of my best motivations and. Desires person. I guess maybe I thought maybe I'm thinking that what I'd like for you to do. It and the you know I think people feel helpless and they feel outraged. One of the things res- momentum said in the conversation that I. Had with him that that. Were just putting on the air is that? is how destructive it is when he gives one of these workshops and a white woman. Starts crying. Food that is so useless. So Okay I've just talked a lot, but I think I. Think the question. I guess I would like for you to help me. Think through. What are what are the real questions not just to be asking but to be living. WILL I. I appreciate a a lot of what you just Reflected on and and I feel that there were. A couple of questions there that. That had resonance with me. One is this notion of? You know I I was. This notion of what. What more can be said in a moment like this? I mean when when? You know when I I'm. Aubrey was killed in then George Floyd I mean I. You know there's. there. Are these calls for people to safe something and there's this. This impulse to say something and yet at the same time. I kept feeling like there is. I mean what new is there to be said like you know like I, it's it's all been said before end. And by people more eloquent than I end. and. People with. More capacity than I have to speak in an and I just. I think that's a part of the grief is the idea that? In I think about the. The idea that it needs to be said that black lives matter you know like that it's it's sort of an annoying thing to to have to say because it's sort of. It's such A. It's not a you know. For me if I'm going to reflect on. On on black life in the relationship to the United States. In the history of our country and the building, our country in the functioning of our country. We we much more than matter we. We are essential. We are. We are critical. We we don't just matter. We don't just just just make a difference in so there's a way in which like this violence this consistent. Dehumanisation is. Is So self destructive? For the country as a whole and the fact that we have lived with such self-destruction is insane.

Siri Vincent Harding Warren Ferguson Gordon Hampton United States George Floyd Aubrey
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:20 min | 2 months ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I do. That's my story of sticking. Okay thank you tackle in. This is so wonderful Chris. Thank you for the work you do. Thank you for the way I saw Seth Godin yesterday and he told me that He's done did he. Say seven thousand views life or books. There's no could be seven thousand life and there's one cents to everyone that you brought out parts of him that he didn't know he had and you talk about what it. What are you doing when you feel most beautiful your gift? Is You accompanied people in the minutes that you have them in the lifetime that you have and you make us all feel more beautiful so I am so honored to know you know that you're in the world's new to you too? Thank you and we will air this right when the book comes out. I know I saw his schedule. So but you'll hear more about that more details closer to the time. Okay thank you and could've talked many out. I know but we did it in ninety minutes. Pretty Awesome you did it. It is thank. You just did your first interview for this book to. You can cross that off the list you know. Can I just tell you I was like I just hired a wonderful new Communications director I am not prepared. I have not done any preparations Jacqueline. It's all in you. It is it is good so. I hope you just know that now just relaxing. That's why you don't need to worry about. I do accept that that I could be like you know you have this. You forget that you're supposed to talk about some things like because I can go deep deep deep into the poetry and but like you said this is the this is the work. Krista this our work. Yeah yeah identity. All the everybody wants to avoid and they WANNA cancel each other and push each other out this work and this is where you and I will work together and we are comrades. Yeah Okay Card. Have a beautiful rescue. Good Day okay bye bye..

Seth Godin Chris Jacqueline Krista director
Students and teachers struggle with remote education

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

10:57 min | 3 months ago

Students and teachers struggle with remote education

"That's Jimmy Fallon on the tonight show earlier this week. I think voicing the thoughts of so many families. The song was a nod to national teacher appreciation. Week which ends today. But you'd probably go on all year long like schools across the country. The week looked very different compared to years past instead of apples on their desks or gift cards from parents teachers might have received an Apple Emoji or some on then mo. You know why. It's because forty seven states and the district of Columbia have ordered or recommended school closures for the rest of the school year. Teachers across the country have taken their lessons online to try and weather this pandemic so today will some of these teachers struggles and successes in navigating remote learning. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction. We had really try to make everything work in the virtual world and that's challenging to do because most teachers like myself we don't sign up for that. We sign up for the interaction. We sign up for the collaboration and we sign up for those human moments that you can't really replicate online. That's Chris deer. Two Thousand Twenty Louisiana teacher of the year and a finalist for the two thousand twenty national teacher of the year. I teach at Shawmut High School in Louisiana right outside of New Orleans. Dear teaches world history to seniors and AP human geography to Freshman. I didn't know what that was. He said it's sort of like anthropology inspired to teach partly because of a formative personal experience. I was in high school when Hurricane Katrina hit. I was a senior. It was our second week. It disrupted the entire region down here. I was forced to Texas. I stayed in hotels in shelters in bounced around different schools. And I missed out on a lot of big events that a lot of people look forward to their senior year sound. Familiar deer has a pretty good idea of what is current students. Probably feel. It's a time when you're supposed to be celebrating all of your hard work your dedication. Your accomplishments When your family supposed to watch you walk across that stage cheer? So it's it's a time that you'll never get to Redo and you'll never get back and it's not just a loss for dear students. Some of them will be the first in their families to graduate from high school and the ceremony would have been meaningful to the relatives as well. Dear has students who are also dreamers undocumented immigrants who arrived in the United States as children Andy has students. They're working essential jobs while they also balance online classes. Learning Online. Might seem easy enough if you're a student with the computer or the Internet but deer also has students who didn't have the luxury of these tools so a lot of students that originally didn't have Internet when this happened. We were Distributed work in packets in just literally papers out when we were distributing food but my district personally has been a given chromebooks out to students who need them and trying to collaborate with local organizations to get hot spots to get kids connected so I think teachers all across the country are doing everything they can to get kids online and to keep that that learning going as Peron's a community school in Phoenix Arizona has also handed out chromebooks in Wi fi to some of its students. But that's not all the school is providing. I think a lot of US forget how schools are to our communities. Even if you're not a student there Hannah Wysong teaches science and English at Esperanza mostly to low income students. She has helped distribute food boxes and gift. Cards to grocery stores. But as this pandemic drags on why song in her colleagues are looking ahead. To long-term challenges families might face food is available and a lot of schools in food. Banks is. This has gone on for a couple of months and parents are not working or working less The next set that working right now is to build a fund for rental assistance. And that's just the creative problem solving. Why Song has been a part of outside the classroom after students have been set up with food and Wi fi is when her real job and the real connection begins and these teachers have come up with all kinds of new ways to do that as well something that we normally at our school? This House monthly family nights with movies are dinner or games or whatever it may be and we were really mourning the loss of family nights and we decided to do it. Virtual dance parties so we got a local Dj from a radio station. And then we invited all of the families to get on zoom there. Were I think between forty five and fifty people on between families and staff and pretty cute to see a bunch of little squares of third graders? Dancing Chris Wyckoff who teaches American history to eleventh graders? North Carolina has taken advantage of our reliance on the Internet to send his students. Some encouragement been sending out digital cards. To let them know that I still see you. I still see your work. I still see you're working hard. Wyckoff has been proud of how well his students at the Johnston County career and technical leadership academy have taken online classes after all they could easily just turned the video off and go do something else online learning you know it has its it has its good and its bad. Even depending on the type of learner you are in a lot of our students are capable of making the adjustment at home all of those the social and emotional atmosphere of home versus the social emotional atmosphere at school all of those things combined to either create atmosphere for success or failure for for the students. Chris dineen this is another. Chris said there were hiccups using video-conferencing at first we had zoom bomb the first or second date but his middle school students at Albuquerque Academy in New Mexico. Have come around. The students themselves had to adapt to a totally different style of teaching and they've actually had to become somewhat more accountable for their own behavior. Because of course we can't see them and monitor them in the ways that we normally do. Laurie Abrahams finds this challenging to. She's a special education teacher on Long Island and works with three to five year olds. Who have special needs during normal times? Work incredibly physical and requires personalized interactions with each student. These days she struggles to get her students to sit still in front of the camera. All kids do well with schedule. Especially the kids with special needs listening issues and attending issues. They really need that. They need that routine. And the you know it's very hard. It's very hard for them but like everyone else. Abrahams has come up with ways to make it work. In fact she borrowed one method of calming her students. Down from children's Yoga certification course. What I'm doing with my fingers touching my thumb to forefinger middle finger rain finger and pinkie and so you have them do that. So it's four touches and then you just say peace begins with me and they understand that peace means quiet and then we keep doing it at any time. You feel anxious or that. You need to calm down you can just you can. Just move your fingers like that. It's thoughtful it's innovative. It's what's necessary the teachers we spoke to said they've mostly worked out the kinks of remote learning and they feel optimistic about finishing the year apart from their students but in the long run. They're still not so sure. I think these kids are young enough. That if it's just four months in the scheme of along is this is not gonNa make the biggest difference because they didn't have four months of preschool. I think that in the fall if kids can't go back to school if they have to learn online. I think that's going to you know really impact this whole generation. This won't surprise you but Chris Dear Louisiana teacher whose own senior year was interrupted by Hurricane Katrina this pandemic once again highlights the need for more investment in education. I know a lot of times when the economy starts to Tank a bit. The first thing that gets cut is education and people might say well. Why do we need as much you know money for education budgets when they do things virtually and whatnot but at this time? I feel like we need more because we need more counselors. We need more. Social workers we need more therapists need smaller classes. And that's how we're going to get through this. These five teachers said the feedback. They've gotten from students and parents has mostly been positive but during the strange difficult national teacher appreciation. Week it's nice for them to hear that their efforts haven't gone unnoticed so since they can't hug their teachers in person this year we got some amazing shouts from students all over. Who want their teachers to know that their students are grateful? My Name is Dalton Davis. I am seven years old from flawless. Oregon. I want to say hi to my first grade teacher. Mrs and Mr Hello. My name is MIRA sing and I am in seventh grade. I would like to thank all of my amazing teachers. Hi My name is Leah. And I'm a fourth grader. I want to give a shot at to my awesome teacher Mr Festival. He is there every day with a smile. Hi My name is Cassie from Whittier California. And thank you to all the teachers especially my Fourth Grade Teacher Mrs Cutler and I'm Kassy's MOM Krista I also WanNa say on behalf of my fourteen year old David who has autism. We appreciate the Special Ed teachers like Mrs Gain. Thanks hi I'M AMELIA. Ham seven years old. I'm in second grade. I have the best teachers and I can't wait the virus to beautiful so I could go back to school.

Laurie Abrahams Hurricane Katrina Louisiana WI Chris Wyckoff Dr Sanjay Gupta Jimmy Fallon CNN Columbia Shawmut High School First Grade Teacher Chris Deer Thousand Twenty Louisiana Apple United States Long Island Texas Leah
How can we find connection in disconnection?

On Being with Krista Tippett

10:10 min | 3 months ago

How can we find connection in disconnection?

"Hey Krista my name is Vanessa. I'm calling from Melvin Australia. I'm I'm curious to hear your thoughts given the current situation. The world finds itself in how we can find connection in in disconnection. I think we'll have a judy. The health and being our world and the people that live in it to disconnect but in a timely connection has never been so important. How do we? How do we balance the two? How do we disconnect physically while remaining emotionally socially connected to others? Oh it's such an interesting question because So thank you Vanessa? It's such an interesting question in one way because I feel like What's coming to mind for me and my own experience of what you're describing Has EVOLVED A lot. In these weeks of lockdown corentin enforced disconnection him so Physical disconnection as you say And Yeah I mean I I I will try to see if I have anything anything Really practical to add in terms of advice but really what the question One makes me want to do is reflect on this week on some of the things I feel like I'm learning or some of the things that maybe this This strange experience is teaching me. Is Teaching US You know it's something that I've thought about across the years but now feels like the most present thing is just the primacy of our bodies and I've thought so much about how in the Western World In Madeira not. We've we've just structured so many sophisticated and inventive ways of pretending like everything doesn't always come back to our bodies that we you know it begins and ends in our bodies and in there's mess and frailty fair and limitation but also energy and life itself and so one of the things I've been thinking about is this you know what I'm calling zooms Austin. The technology is so miraculously but this experience of only connecting to each other by way of pixels is also really laying out some of the very severe Limitations of it. And so you know one thing I've become aware of is what I what I think that I've never thought about before but I think how much energy we actually draw from each other like raw energy at a primal animal level when we are in the room together and the that doesn't communicate through this green. You know the the view of someone's face And to some extent the The emotions that can be read in and responded to their the voice which I feel is so embodied but I think that the the way I feel and everybody talking to feel so completely worn out and depleted by the only connection being By way of technology has something to do with the fact that we were not were not Replenishing just

Vanessa Melvin Australia Austin
Krista Drobac Discusses Sweeping Changes in Federal Telehealth Policy In Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

08:25 min | 3 months ago

Krista Drobac Discusses Sweeping Changes in Federal Telehealth Policy In Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic

"Let me just for background asked why had the Congress or what's your understanding of why the congressman CMS head up into recent strictly limited Medicare telehealth. And I'll throw in of course we'll get to more patient monitoring or these benefits. The long term challenge has always been the congressional budget. Office really does not look favorably on telemedicine. They believed that. It increases costs overall rather than replacing in person visit their underlying. Thinking is that people use telemedicine and then also on top of that also go in person so Our challenge up until now has always been The cost and the perceived worries about fraud. The we find it very interesting that people at the Office of Inspector General or CMS Program Integrity Office. Think that it easier to commit fraud by telemedicine because really the fraud that takes place in Medicare's often making up fake patients and it's a lot harder to track that down than it is in telemedicine to see a trend quickly And also you have an actual. It addressed the IP address. And tell them so. It seems to us that. Be Easier to detect and root out fraud in the online environment than it would be in the In the in person environment. So we think we've got Good arguments on the fraud piece. And we're collecting data now on the Kospi's okay. The I heard it explained in part by the view. It's duplicative and not substitutive. That's one variation of ood acclimation. Yes thank you. So let's go to Let's go to were at so obviously The Congress house past four so called Kobe. Nineteen related Bills or sometimes referred to as supplemental bills The first The first supplemental and of course the third the Care Act had telehealth provisions in them and then of course in late March early April. Cms published in interim final rule and Proxima. I forty pages of that discussed Regulatory Waivers SMS would grant In relation to their health policy. Can you provide some more top of line? Where the Moore's substantive congressional legislative and regulatory changes to the policy yes. Congress started with authority in the first couple mental hugh allow for the waiver of the originating site in rural restrictions in Medicare and to see us followed through with that and lifted those restrictions The subsequent bills actually gave the authority to cms to lift the entirety of eighteen. Thirty four in any part of eighteen. Thirty four M so that they went ahead and also lifted the restrictions on Speech therapists physical therapists occupational therapists. So now pretty much All of the Practitioners who bill Medicare can practice telemedicine and the patient can be anywhere and the provider can be anywhere they clarified the use of technology. So you can use a art hall And when advocates asked for audio only cms did add some em codes. That are audio. Only there are some codes that you can use for Phone only telemedicine they also Added a a lot of new codes so Most of the primary care codes are now cover. Behavioral Health is covered They sort of assessed what you might need to do. During a a cove emergency and added those codes. So there's a lot more that he'd be reimbursed The Office of Civil Rights at HHS way the Hesse requirements in terms of what kind of platform? You can use the. You don't have to have a hippo compliant platform you can use facetime or skype The waved the Co pays on Telemedicine So that You know for both remote monitoring and telehealth which is really advantageous especially for by train because remote Copays has been a barrier or remote monitoring up They actually most Medicare advantage. Plans have now waved. The Co pays for both tele-medicine and remote monitoring On the state side there have been significant. Changes about forty nine states have weighed some part of their state. Licensure rules Medicaid has started covering things that weren't covered previously State medical boards have allowed for the waiver of existing relationship. Requirements face requirements There's been some scope of practice changes so that For example supervision of nurses can be done virtually Some some states that didn't specifically allow nurses and physical therapists and physicians assistant to practice telemedicine. are now allowing it so there have been changes at both the federal and the state level so quite a lot To say the Least Napoli let me ask as as follow up. There has been some Sweetie question realized relative to tell health as relates to a stark or Physician self referral a law What's what's the intersection there. You know the kinds that hit it has come up. The stark laws from me has been between the vendor and the providers so we weighed the telemedicine restrictions and medicare but most of the capacity in the marketplace telemedicine is through vendors because in the past medical offices haven't been reimbursed for them so they didn't invest in televised. So when you want it to go and get a visit visit your employer or insurer had generally Then did that out in order to make that happen. So you've got a lot of doctors in their homes Doing telemedicine visits all day long. But they're the they're the employee of an American well or an empty live. There are not a physician office. Therefore they're not an enrolled in Medicare so that means that those vendors can't actually provide telemedicine services directly to patient. 'cause they're not medicare enrolled providers so the way that it's happening in the marketplace. Now is that a lot of telemedicine. It'd being done through. Hospitals and other Medicare enrolled providers but they have vendors helping them under a white label. So one of the questions that we've had about dark kickback. Is Can a vendor Provide a referral to a hospital. So that if they get a patient that set you know obviously needs being. Can they refer that patient to the hospital? Who is there a quiet and right and the answer? Yes they can because it's not a self referral Those are the types of scenarios where this is coming up Just because of the strange way That telemedicine his grown up over time and mainly as a response to the regulatory challenges Medicare so in some sense to follow up. It's it it. Turns out to be convenient. That the vendor is not under the Medicare program thereby being able and that's an accident history. Meaning the Medicare provider wasn't doing the service themselves they farmed it out and as a result of that. This referral is now allowed. Is that correct correct? Okay sort of accident of history. I

Medicare Fraud Office Of Inspector General Or Congress Patient Monitoring Congressman Facetime Moore Office Of Civil Rights Sweetie Hugh HHS Hesse
[Unedited] Ellen Davis with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

06:08 min | 4 months ago

[Unedited] Ellen Davis with Krista Tippett

"I'm Krista Tippett up next Mike unedited conversation with theologian. Ellen Davis. There is a shorter produce version of this which includes poetry from Wendell. Berry that he read for this show. Find that wherever you get your podcasts. I'm just I'm looking. I'm sort in an enclosed blue booth looking at a black thing that I'm pretending as you. Okay very convincing. Just close your eyes. That's what I'll be doing okay. I'm hearing Chris. I think my microphone is pretty hot and I was but I'm not. I was hearing an echo at first but I'm okay now Illinois. Are you hearing me all right. And his any. I'm I'm hearing you fine. And you're without an echo all right Help just in one more second crystal all right just before we start are you well. Is dwayne wells. I'm well yes. Thank you dwayne Zvili. Well HE'S A. He's a year into recovery from hip surgery and it makes a huge difference so things are good. Thank you and and you and your children. Yeah every everything's good I just Have been doing way too much. Travelling at this new book come out the new. Yeah Einsteins God it's It's a it's A. It's it's drawn from my interviews with scientists and it's a lot of fun to be out there talking about but I'm I'm happy to be back in. My kids are happy to have me back. I bet well congratulations on the US. Send you a copy I should. I actually think I had put that down on a list somewhere. It's important for God so Chris. I'm still feeling kind of loud or it went up again. My volume went up again Okay well now. We're hearing an echo on the other end. What's that okay? I think I'm fine now. Did you hear that now? There's an Echo Ellen. I wonder if I wonder if her headphones are up. A little bit high. If we could have allenton her headphones down a little bit okay. Is there someone turn yes? Can someone turned my headphones down. We're not getting any response to okay. How is this Test is tax defense. I think it does yes. The echoes gone. Okay okay Christie and I have also just to let the engineer now. I've also lowered the microphone. Just a bit because it was above the level of my mouth and I was sort of reaching up toward. How does that work? That's fine? Thank you okay all right so Chris I think I could have even a little. Bit less volume. And then maybe why don't I let me ask you something mundane like What you had for breakfast. I had cereal and food doesn't give you much experience. What have you need a little more? Tell me about lunch that tell you what's in bloom and a guy. Yes Virginia Sweet. Spire and the irises Just peaking and going down. The ECHINACEA is coming up. It's actually a pretty time in North Carolina. I imagine it's tulip time in it is to the people don't think of Minnesota as as lush but it really is. Our neighborhood is just incredible. It was it was. It's it's a very special neighborhood and it was. It was kind of constructed to be harmonious with the natural world and creatures and we even have the occasional wild Turkey and Fox squirrels and birds and So I was travelling in April and I missed that period where the snow is gone. But there's nothing growing and I came back and it was all their everything in bloom feeling. I it's beautiful. It is beautiful. Yeah doing good about levels. I think we're great okay. So I- slightly daunted interviewing my teacher like this and I'm going to have a different role with you I think we can get okay and You know as I was thinking about the questions I might want to ask you some of which I always ask people. I realized that even though you and I have had conversations around these things. I've never quite skewed these questions. I don't know all the answers so so so one place. I always start with people. Whatever we're talking about is Was there a religious background to your childhood and actually. I'm not sure that I know the answer to that question. Yes I grew up. I'm a cradle Episcopalian. Okay I've there's never been a time in my life when I haven't gone to church but I would say that church means quite different thing to me over. Religion means quite a different thing to me. Then I think it did to my parents. Anyone almost anyone else in my family I did not grow up in a family that would have defined itself as particularly religious although we would church always when and how did you start heading towards a career in Biblical scholarship and theology. How did that happen consciously? I was an exceedingly late bloomer. I was in my third of four years of seminary before I decided that I was going to teach But if you look at my resume it looks as though when I was eighteen and I went to the Hebrew University in Jerusalem for Year. I decided I was going to be a biblical scholar So unconsciously what they say in Hebrew Elohim Finger of God. I think I sort of being pointed if not pushed in that direction at a much younger age

Chris Dwayne Wells Krista Tippett Ellen Davis Wendell Dwayne Zvili United States Illinois Berry Hebrew University Jerusalem Younger Age North Carolina Virginia Mike Christie Engineer Minnesota I
Wayfinding: Remember the True Self {Part 3 of 3}

The Mindful Minute

08:41 min | 4 months ago

Wayfinding: Remember the True Self {Part 3 of 3}

"You know every week Rather than record this podcast in my live Monday night class as I normally do now. I am sitting at home in my closet recording these episodes and as I do I try to picture the thousands of people across the world that are tuning in to this podcast and each of those little threads of connection keeps me going brings me truly joy in my days and lets me feel less lonely. I really hope as you listen. You feel those threads of connection to and if you're looking for more connection I'm really excited to share with you guys and offering That I am putting into the world alongside my business partner at our studios sacred chill West sacred show. West is a yoga and meditation studio here in Atlanta and as of now it is also a virtual studio. This is something we have been working on for the last few months. With the intention of launching in June of twenty twenty in the pandemic we find ourselves in now has asked demanded of us that we release the sooner and so we have. I'm really excited to share with you. Guys the series of videos that we've created this is Meditation with me. Of course there's Yoga classes with myself. And my partner Octavia Yin restorative flow. You'll gonNA drop every week. More videos are being added every month. We're doing a live virtual call to introduce the intention of the month the meditation series of the month to connect and talk and share with you. So if this feels like something that might bring you a little bit of joy and a little bit of connection in these days of being at home. I hope you will take a look visit. Sacred WEST DOT COM. Click on classes and look for the at home link. Take a look. We'd love to see you there. Be Sure you let us know if you're signing up from the mindful minute I would love to know where you are in the world when you sign up and I look forward to with you virtually. Thanks welcome I am so happy to Get to connect with you. So last week's episode. Which was the second installment of the way finding series that episode was recorded in my closet? Because you get really good sound quality in your closet However it was very lonely and so I'm really happy to get to record today's Podcast episode and offer this class zoom to our members at sacred. Shell and to record it out in the open. If you're listening to the podcast so this is our third installment this week. Three of the way finding series and this whole series was actually inspired by a quote. This is a quote that I heard in an episode of on being which is another podcast and the woman Krista Tippett. Who Does that? Podcast was interviewing a civil rights activist named Ruby sales and in this interview. One of the things that Ruby sales says is I think that one of the things that theologies must have is hindsight insight and foresight that is complete site and I think that fragmentation really shatters that site. It says that it's not an eyesight. It's a waste site and when I heard that something about that terminology and the structuring of complete site as all of these pieces hindsight insight foresight. Immediately I just knew that this directly relates to meditation practice. And as you've heard me say already in a way finding really it's hard is just a series of elements that come together to provide guidance in some way and our meditation practices offering these little forms of guidance. So we looked at hindsight right. We look to this idea of tracing our way backwards to look for those little hidden hints and whispers guidances as to our souls calling what we're here to do what we're here to feel and be in our supposed to move through the world and we looked at insight inside. Is the direct translation of mindfulness. Meditation when you translate the Pali Words. The original language that meditation came from when you translate those words it translates to incite this practice is directly turning us in words to see for ourselves. And today what we're GONNA do is. We're GONNA talk about foresight and foresight in my mind relates to what's called the Dharma and the Dharma is just another way of saying the teachings the teachings of Meditation What. I'm doing right now. This talk that. I do at the beginning of all of my meditation classes. This is called a Dharma. Talk Right so this is a talk that is designed to share teachings inspiration and insight for our journey really. What teachings are there like a map that people who are few steps ahead of us on this path have left for us? There little hints. And if you remember if you listened to last week's meditation class the way finding to episode I tell the story of Touching into this deep well of peace inside right and the short version of the story is is. I was meditating with a friend and about three minutes into the meditation. I realized that I have this. Tickle in my throat and all. I want is glass of water and a cough. Drop to sued this tickle but I don't WanNa get up because I don't want to disturb my friend I don't WanNa cough and I was kinda comfortable and so even though I was really feeling that discomfort of needing to get a glass of water. I was sort of equally in this place of wanting to stay in my meditation and see what happened and eventually where I landed in this meditation was what I call in. What many teachers called this deep well of peace inside meaning that no matter how much agitation was on the surface underneath it was really still. It was really calm and really quiet. I was able to stay. I didn't have to get up at the class of water and I wasn't suffering. It wasn't like I was choking back a cough and fighting to stay. I was really truly comfortable in the discomfort and so the idea that people who practice have experiences and then they share these experiences with others as little glimpses of what might happen if you keep practising and it's not to say that we have to buy into everything every teacher says or trust without question. It's not that at all but the teachings are really meant to be a hint at what's to come an invitation to see for yourself so you might hear me or somebody talk about this mythic deep well of peace or any of these teachings right any of the things that we say meditation does for us and you can just keep a beginner's mind and open curious mind. Is that true for me? What happens when I practice? That's the question that we ask ourselves and so I wanNA share an example of how this might unfold in terms of incorporating teachings into our practice. So what you're doing right now is incorporating teachings into your practice. You could really easily just sit down. Set A timer for ten minutes closure as a meditate but by carving out even once a week to sit with a teacher to listen to a talk and then practice. You're giving yourself that tool of foresight

Cough Partner Atlanta Krista Tippett Twenty Twenty Octavia Yin
Sciences leading role in the restoration of Notre Dame, and the surprising biology behind how our body develops its tough skin

Science Magazine Podcast

08:33 min | 5 months ago

Sciences leading role in the restoration of Notre Dame, and the surprising biology behind how our body develops its tough skin

"Up. This week I talked with freelance science writer Christa. La- stay Lazar about the role of scientists at the Notre Dame cathedral both in the restoration of the structure and for the investigation of its past. Then we have the researcher. Felipe make arose. He's GonNa talk about how our skin forms a tough area against the outside world and how this barriers formation depends on phase separation a very hot area of cell biology first up today. We have freelance science writer. Crystallised J. LO Sarah. She wrote a featured this week on the scientists leading. Notre Dame's restoration after the April twenty nineteen fire and their use of the fire to probe the mysteries of this Cathedral. Hi Krista for Sarah Okay. The way you describe the scientific works it's going on at the Cathedral after the fire. It can almost be broken down into these categories by material stone glass led and would each has experts. It has its own challenges in its own mysteries all the teams that are working together on the restoration on these different categories of materials are working together in the same organization. Can you tell us a little bit more about this group? They're all working out at the same laboratory. Which is part of the Ministry of Culture? A description of it in the story was pretty amazing. Oh Yeah it's it's really phenomenal. It's the front. They have a wing of a seventeenth century castle. You had these Austira Iron Gates that lead up to it and you just have no idea of the treasures that are hidden in that area. Let's take this material by material first stone obviously Notre Dame is made of Stone Wood and some other pieces and I was really surprised by how dangerous getting the stone out of the building after the fire was the researchers actually had to use robots to get the stones out they did. You've got this vault. That said teeter on collapse because they have no idea how much forces have changed. They've absorbed water but they've also been affected by heat. So there are some stones that have suffered some heat-damaged crumble. At the same time there are also some stones that are just dangling from the ceiling and they now they might just drop at any moment. Everything is really delicately balanced. And you've got a thirty meter drop. That's a hundred foot drop coming down. So many stones are actually taken back to this French chateau from his French castle. A lot of them ended up store outside the Cathedral waiting to be put back in it but they do take some back to the French castle right. Most of them are stored in these tents that are all in front of the cathedral and sorting them. It's just hit and miss about of work of of sorting these. Because they're not going to lose anything anything that's about more than five centimeters long is going to be put back into the Cathedral. The wants to take back to study what they're looking for is to see different signs of heat damage so that can be seen through for example oxidation which contains the color of the stones. But that's only guy but it's still a pretty good guide. According to helmet heated got. You can go from red to black and then kind of surprisingly than to white and when it gets to white then you know that it's really bad because it's just powder they also are doing some testing on the water. Absorption it's these stones absorbed quite a bit of water. They can gain up to thirty percent of their weight. The water came from trying to put the fire out yes. The water came from the firefighters. Hosing down the federal. And it's taking up very very long time for them to dry sue. The fire was April the fifteenth and as of today. It's still drawing. They're still losing weight to water Evaporation yes they're still losing weight. Oh that's amazing. So what can they do with this information about how the stones change color? How was it helpful to know that this color change corresponds to how much heating went on with the stones? What they really need to know is the detail of which stones are likely to be damaged enough to need to be changed. Because there's some that may may not have fallen but they may have been so damaged that they're not going to be able to hold up the structure correctly anymore and at this delicate balance of forces going to be upset they also need to know how long it's GonNa take everything to dry because there's no point in testing for example the mortar between the stones until everything's finished drying because the border is continued to be affected by the changing forces. Right another dangerous aspect of this work is led. Notre Dame had a lot of lead tons of lead in the roof and spire and it was melted by the fire was also thrown out into Aerosol particles a yellow cloud escaped and it coated everything inside the building and possibly some of the nearby neighborhoods. What do we know about the contamination and the surrounding city? We actually don't know that much about the lead contamination. In the city. There was a lot of fear at the beginning. Parisians were very worried and rightfully so because lead toxicity can be bad for children and there are a lot of children living in Paris but the scientists here at this laboratory have found out that the vast majority of that roof did not go up in to smoke or cloud. It melted the melting point. Nos three hundred degrees Celsius. The evaporation point is one thousand seven hundred degrees Celsius. We didn't get anywhere near that. After about six hundred degrees Celsius than it created these little micro nozzles that went up into the air. An Aerosol so really a small portion of the roof did go up quite a bit of it actually fell down into the cathedral itself some did go outside and it floated away. You can see it in the videos of this Yellow cloud that would along the Seine but the scientists think that probably much of it did not drop down onto the ground her into the Sun River but just kept going following the son of further downstream so it may not have ended up in Paris at all. We don't know where it is yet but the researchers are consort right. They're going to be testing different areas of the city trying to see if there's a signature of the Notre Dame leads. They're able been able to test the lead from the roof to be able to get to the isotopes. This has allowed them to have an isotopic signature so when they find lead and there's lead Oliver Paris. You can't just a sample say. Oh that Kim furniture dom you don't know but because of the isotopic signature then you can. So they're trying to test that find out if the lead ended up in those areas. What about the lead levels inside the CDL? Are they a big concern for the researchers working there now? Because of the high amounts of lead in the cathedral there is a great concern with the work agencies so they are requiring very very strict procedures on lead safety first of all access is extremely limited just the bare minimum people that are allowed to get in the only access in is to go through a shower. Cabin may have to take off all their clothes. They have to wear these paper clothing paper. Underrun paper socks. You're allowed to stay for a maximum two and a half hours in the whole time there. You have wear these masks. That are really heavy and uncomfortable and they have breathing assistance. And it's not just the people it's also any equipment they bring in anything they bring in has to be either destroyed or washed thoroughly on the way out. 'cause as they leave the Cathedral Matra two and a half hours. They take all of their clothing off and they go through the shower and anything they brought with them also has to go through the shower and wash with all this protective gear all this rigorous cleanliness routine. They have to go through. It shouldn't be surprising that most of the work that they're doing right now is to get this led out of there. The lead is not being rude yet because the initial step is finding how to get the lead off without destroying this eight hundred fifty year old monument and all of its Precious art inside and this is an extremely expensive project to begin with and they're trying to be cost efficient as possible. So cost is really an issue. They can't just go in with The most expensive kind of equipment either and they need something that is can be explained to the people that are going to be doing it because the people who are cleaning are not going to be the scientists is going to be a company. That's going to be brought in and they're gonNA be technicians. That are going to come

Notre Dame Researcher Notre Dame Cathedral Paris Writer Cathedral Matra Foot Drop Cathedral French Castle La- Stay Lazar J. Lo Sarah Felipe Christa Krista Austira Iron Gates Sarah Okay Teeter Ministry Of Culture Stone Wood
Gardening the Permaculture Way: How to Create an Abundant Perennial Garden

Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

08:12 min | 5 months ago

Gardening the Permaculture Way: How to Create an Abundant Perennial Garden

"Guest today is Morag Gamble. Founding Director of the PERMACULTURE Education Institute Morag is a permaculture teacher and designer based in Queensland Australia where she lives in a permaculture eco-village when Morag is in educating or designing. She can be found in her award. Winning Garden Morag has taught permaculture in twenty countries and is the host of the popular. Youtube Channel are permaculture life. Welcome to sustainable World Radio Morag Gamble. It's so wonderful to have you here with me today. Thank you Jill. It's lovely to be here to today. We'll be chatting a bit about your no did guard method. Which is really appealing to me. Is the Lazy Gardener. Then we'll be discussing some of your favorite permaculture plans to put into our new garden beds or into pre existing gardens fantastic. It's one of my favorite topics. I think the ninety got any something that has just ever. Since I started doing permaculture gardening ride in the early days when I helped to get the north St city farm going in Brisbane about twenty five years ago the neither method was something we started doing there. Because well you couldn't actually get anything into the into the ground OUGHTA shovel. I think you used a pick. It would bounce back. Army way was up and that time every almost saying. Let's do it this way. Let's do it that way. And so we tried all these different methods and over the years. I've evolved this particular way that I create the ninety gats and I always do my God C. Span. I've used this method around the world and is kind of a bit of a twist to the way that I do that. I think it's an interesting part of it to explore because I think it makes all the difference. The four we embark on that journey. I just wanted to ask you for your definition of permaculture in case we have listeners here thinking what the heck were they talking about? Wolf Ame- permaculture is essentially all about design and my simplest response would be designed for regeneration designed sustainable living. It's about reconnecting with nature and living a more simple low impact life and surrounding ourselves with Wonderful Food. Great community doing things in a way that a regenerating the US Amer generating communities regenerating ourselves to. Because it's it's we. We're in a process now. I think where we need people. Who have they kind of? Healing the planet so permaculture Regeneration as well seems like your life and work are all about permaculture and I did read online that you discovered permaculture as a teenager so permaculture has been a large part of your life for quite some I I was at I remember at when I was in high school. I was sorry passionate in as a as a peace activist. There's a lot of things happening at that time. There was the I think. This should notable incident Though at the same time cities. We're getting captured by massive dust storm so the landcare movement was studying. There was all these massive movements happening around me at that time and I spent a bit of time kind of being a peace activist and an environmental activist. And I. I still call myself that but I got to a point where I was feeling that was fighting against something all the time. And and a lot of babble on you see me coming and turn the other way. She's going to start talking about that again. I E to I you know what I may not and so I. I was really looking for something that was that was a positive solution art. If it's not that we don't want that world what will do we want. I remember my my parents. Kinda brought us up in a really natural and and You know a really low fleet locate life and my dad was always reading about coach and he kept handing me this book. Saying you've gotta you've gotta read this. This is this is where it's at and I think it was because of that I ended up going doing Landscape architecture and Environmental Planning Union. I always worked it through what I was doing. And yes so it's kind of being there guiding and and I guess driving in a way what what I have done with my because it made so much sense. It's just really good common sense and sometimes we we overlook the things that seem to be the most simple approach thinking that they simplistic will actually think it's not. It's they often the simpler approaches. Which can have the more profound impacts on a mock sensible to more people? Yes definitely and you know you took your skills as a landscape architect and you created this verdant using permaculture as well but created this verdant gorgeous oasis. I believe your garden has over two hundred plants. Can you tell us a bit about your garden? Your climate and where it's located. Well I'm I'm in subtropics. I'm in the Jaffe of of Australia Dole. I'm on the East Coast and about halfway up the coast of Australia. So about one and a half north of Brisbane and a place called Crista waters which is a permaculture village. And I've been living here for about twenty years this this place. It's an amazing place. Actually because we have six hundred forty acres. That is the Chris. Awards and within that we have one AK- that we have the tower owned freehold title so most of the land is common land for forests for the Rypien Zion's this kangaroos hopping around everywhere and wallabies and platypus. In the rerun. The other day almost bumped into an occasional wounding through the bushes and it's this beautiful natural oasis with surrounded by National National Park. And so this we have a group of about two hundred people who live here and and and work together in different ways. You know From little cow collectives to cafes to All different sorts of things. It's quite an ECLECTIC group of people. And all different ages and backgrounds at last count sixteen different nationalities so krista waters in itself is an interesting place and it has received a United Nations World Habitat Award for demonstrating low impact. Sustainable ways of living I think was there the tag back in the nineties. And so within that context. If it's kind of like a place where people look to come and see what does Pimco Timothy Look like? What does it mean to leave a culture life? Because I think and that's the reason why I'm here I. I came here in the nineties because I realized in e conscious be talking about. Penta cultural people need to see it feel. It tasted touch it experience. It see how it kind of looks what does it. What does it actually man and I wanted to explore that too. So that's what I've tried to create he and we built around hyme And we've created Dot Gardens in the whole way of life that we have here to do that and it's and it's turned out to be this beautiful thing. I didn't have a full plan when I started. I had those guiding behind it and so of being able to create we have a higher Menara Garden and I work with gotten a debt. It's just been an starting out from that point. I actually think the no debt thing has been a huge thing. That's been able to free up a lot of the possibilities for creating this so Gradually just saving up a bit of money and and building a little bit more building a little bit more finding local resources Engaging with my friends and my family to help us build and my house is almost finished. It's finished enough. You

Morag Gamble Permaculture Education Institu Brisbane Youtube Founding Director Jill United States Queensland Australia Wolf Ame Dot Gardens Pimco Army Australia Dole United Nations World Habitat A Environmental Planning Union Australia Subtropics Crista Waters AK East Coast
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:20 min | 5 months ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"The iron in the hemoglobin and our blood they were all cooked up in in A massive star that blew itself up billions of years ago. I mean we are literally in. Carl Sagan's where made of Stardust and it's quite literal and so to me being human is about appreciating the fact that we are so closely connected to this much bigger idea of an evolving universe. I mean I often say it takes. It takes a cosmos to make a human and I think you know I I have bad days and and I get upset with people and I think that some other individuals ideas are wrong or stupid even but I don't usually act out on them Because I really think that it's more important to Appreciate this Cosmos and and our connection to it then to fuss about trivial small concerns and so I spend my time trying to answer a big question and hopefully The team said are working on Seti searches will someday be able to share with humanity. All humanity a really important answer to a very old question. And if you're working on that how could you? How could you not be inspired? How could you not Find Satisfaction in being alive at the right time with the right technology to really probe something that's larger than we are When what what? What is that single question? What if you do you do it? Sounds like you do consent it to condense it to. What is what is the question. Well it's are we alone and that yeah that that has a range for by astro biology colleagues that means is there any out there right any microbial life any kind of biology and for me. I'm I'm more interested in the mathematicians than the microbes. So I want to know whether any of that life elsewhere has evolved into technological civilizations and it you know it's just it's really so stupendous to conceive of life evolving over billions of years from the reproducing biological molecule into the diversity of life that impacts this whole plan and somewhere. You said you call us. A primordial mixture of hydrogen and helium bit evolves for so long that it begins to ask where it came from. Yes it sounds right which which can sound like diminishing but actually it's just an extraordinary thought. I mean no other species on the planet today can use its senses and its tools to understand that long cosmic evolution and where we came from. And it's astonishing that life would eventually produce something that could study the Cosmos and wonder about where we came from no well. This is a beautiful extraordinary conversation. Thank you so much for what you do. Welcome KRISTA and I very much look forward to sharing this with are really diverse far-flung audiences thank you right. Well you're you're very welcome and I suspect that in your audiences there are people who are much better philosophers than I am. I simply have a question. We THAT'S IMPORTANT. It's been around throughout human history and I have the opportunity to try and use tools to answer that question so I'm I'm not very philosophical at heart. I enjoy the opportunity to try and move forward with this one overarching question. It's been fantastic and actually a very philosophically wise and I just thank you on behalf of all of us for pursuing that question. Well it's my pleasure really is okay. We'll let you know when this is going to be airing and Yeah thank you again. Thanks for making a deadline for this. Okay all right you have a good day you too bye-bye..

Carl Sagan KRISTA
Palm Springs, Boys State Set Sundance Sales Records

AP 24 Hour News

00:47 sec | 6 months ago

Palm Springs, Boys State Set Sundance Sales Records

"A new records been set at the Sundance Film Festival to acquire a film beating the old record by sixty nine cents the groundhog day as calmly palm springs by Andy Samberg on the lonely island was bought by into distributor neon am streaming service Hulu for exactly seventeen million five hundred thousand dollars and sixty nine cents the previous record was seventeen and a half million dollars fox searchlight paid that Ford may Parker's the birth of a nation back in twenty sixteen Samberg is lonely island partners Joe to the financial terms of the deal or unfavorable saying they spend eighty five million dollars of their own money that they're taking a bath and they have a lot of explaining to do their families palm springs a star Samberg and Krista Millea ideas a pair of wedding guests who are trapped living the same day over and over again in the southern California

Andy Samberg Hulu Fox Searchlight Ford Parker Krista Millea California
What Exactly Is a Sales Funnel?

The $100 MBA Show

07:46 min | 6 months ago

What Exactly Is a Sales Funnel?

"Concept of a sales funnel has been around for some time but they became very popular in the last five six years because of the Internet and how easy it is to build pages and websites for yourself a funnels basically a procedure to get someone who's interested in what you have to offer to the point where the our customer so if you can imagine or you can visualize a fun on your head right now. You know the type of funnel you'd use to change the oil oil in your car has a wide top and a narrow bottom so in sales and marketing terms. This basically means that you could put a lot of people inside the top but As they go through only a few come out the bottom. And that's just the nature of business you're gonNA attract a lot of people. A lot of people would be interested to walk into your physical store four but a fraction of them will buy your job is to try to increase that fraction rights. Increase that number. Try to get as many people buying from the top of the funnel. So what does this mean practically for you in your business. Well you may want to create a funnel to attract somebody to your entry level product addict so many is an example just to make simple. Let's say you're trying to sell your ten dollar e book so funnel foreign e Book would look something like a page on your website right that offers something for free in exchange for the name and email address. This is the top of the funnel. And let's say you're a book is all about snowboarding for beginners. Then on this page page where give their name and email address in exchange for asking them. Hey opt in and I'm going to give you the five most important steps in beginning to learn. Learn how to snowboard. So they're going to get something for free. You can watch video. That's going to show them the five steps in starting to snowboard learning how to snowboard. And that's GONNA attract a lot of people because a Lotta People Wanna learn something for free especially if they're interested in learning how so bored once they give their email address there in your funnel that means now now you can contact them you can email them and you could follow up with them to offer them. Something else in the next step would be like a paid. That has the video that you promised and then the next step the whole point of a funnel. Is You walk the customer by the hand and you never let them go until the actually actually by and in fact even after they buy there are other steps by other things right so let me walk through this funnel so you could see this example so the opt in give their name and email address in exchange to watch that lesson that video and on the video the end you say hey Krista below and download the first chapter of my book on how to be a proficient snowboarder for example and then you'd foul up with an email. Hey did you download my first chapter of my e book you could download it here if not the email another email. Maybe a couple of days later giving him a few more tips another email me a few days later saying hey. Here's a blockbuster you might find helpful. And then maybe the next email is a link to a page that explains to them why they want to by the holy book for Ten Dollars Video. Maybe says what the book includes in all the chapters basically a sales video for the e book and you tell them hey the next step go ahead and buy the book below the video and there's like a checkout area. They by the book and now they're accustomed right. But in most businesses there are levels to products so the books just the first step. Maybe the next step is your online course than is your mastermind group and then after that you have A live event and that continues the funnel holding customer by the hand showing him the next step so as you could see. This is a procedure to show your customers by the hand what to do next. It's like a personal sales person to for them to help them get get what they need from Your Business. So how do you actually do this. How do you actually billing for yourself? Well I actually think you should start with a paper and pen. It's much easier for you to visualize what you need to build what you need to do. I on paper and then you could just use it as a reference. This is what I do actually have a big like A three size paper and I draw out my funnels each page. What's the next step Laura emails? They get all that kind of stuff so for every funnel that I have inside my business. Yes so you can use the example. I gave with the book with your own products. What is the Freeman thing? You're going to give and then after that. What are they gonNA get as like a bonus like a free first chapter and then what kind of email fauves will you have? And then what's the offer high gonNA sell that offer with a video the sales page so even if you just literally right on a piece of paper my final has four steps here. The forceps use emails a fire. These are the subject lines of these e mails. And it's going to take you about an hour to write that all down into draw all now but then you have a plant. That's an actual plan for funnel. So how'd he actually make it real on the web so you have a few options you can can build it yourself if you have somebody that runs your website and can build pages for you. They can build the pages that you sketched on the paper and tell them what you want them to do and when the opt in they want them to join this email list on my email marketing software. You can actually do it yourself if you know a little bit about how the create websites even if you're using a tool like elementary or for wordpress which allows you to kind of drag and drop pages or you can use. WHO's a all in one? kind of tool like click funnels or lepage's click. Funnels actually made a whole business based on this concept and they're probably the ones Eh. Do this the most or probably the easiest way to create a funnel is strategic funnel so they have the whole funnel built out for you The templates for you. You could do with Lepage's as well but just be a little bit more step by step the only disadvantage to using a tool like a clique finals or Lepage's is that Eh. your templates are GonNa look similar to other people are using that tool My advice if you're GONNA use click funnels or early pages or something like that is to modify the templates and you could do that. Change a chain of fonts make a look your own and you could do this or you or you can actually buy a template from their marketplace to Frenchie it yourself. A little from the rest of the people are using these tools. And if you're using something like look funnels then it's pretty straightforward. It's actually very very easy. And you could pretty much build out The pages on your site in the funnels in about an hour or two. Maybe three if you're customizing things to make it look you. You look like you're on the thing that's going to take most of the time. Though is the content. The videos are gonNA shoot the emails that you're gonNA write the copy that you're gonNA write on the actual website. The content is gonNA take some time so make sure you a lots of time for that because I would say all in all the content for me of any given funnel take me about three. Today's about four or five hours on each day. If I'm doing it all myself Luckily I have a team and you know we have connor. WHO's or great content writer and he helps me out Tremendously in these types of things rights are emails. That helps you copy and all that kind of stuff. I should the videos. But it's GonNa take a chunk of time for the content because that's really what's going to sell your funnel or sell whatever you're trying to get them to opt in for the premium or even the actual product when you sell so this is what's going to take the time time you can't get around that no Safra's going to build your own video for you all software into right the emails for you to convert properly for your business and brand but you can save time with tools like like funnels and Lepage's When it comes to the page creation

Lepage Snowboarding Krista Writer Connor Laura Safra
Gender Bias Reveals Consequences For Female Artists

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:27 min | 6 months ago

Gender Bias Reveals Consequences For Female Artists

"Okay for music to art. How many feet famous female artists can you name? No not beyond say or Riana artists like Frida Kahlo and Mary Cassatt. If you're having trouble thinking of more than a handful you may be onto a major problem in the art world. We've been artists are routinely left out of museum exhibits and the work is on average valued much less less than that of their meal. Peers Selley herships and Cardiff Garcia from our daily economics. podcast the indicator from planet money. How that story there was this? This artist named Joan Mitchell. She was an abstract expressionist. She died in the nineteen nineties but she painted a lot. Joan Mitchell was hugely successful and to our world insiders. She's a big deal. But if you're thinking I've never heard of her you would not be alone. KRISTA LATCHFORD IS CEO of the Joan Mitchell Foundation. She's doing remarkably well at auction. The prices are very high but are they. High in relative to Jackson pollock no way are they high relative to Kooning nope paintings by the KOONING and pollock have gone for sixty to one hundred sixty million dollars. KRISTA says there is no record of Joan Mitchell getting. We're close to that kind of money for her work. which brings us to a big part of the reason that people have trouble naming famous women? Artists Artwork by women and men is just valued differently. Rene teaches finance at Oxford and she and some of her colleagues did an experiment. They picked paintings at random and they showed them to viewers. There's and ask them to guess if the artist was a man or a woman on average the Experiment subjects couldn't guess it was painted by man or woman. Renee says it is practically impossible to look at painting and figure out the gender of the artist but she says if the subjects guessed that the painting was painted by a woman they like the painting less renee looked millions of records from auction sales and she found out that on average work by women. Artists sells for forty percent less than work by male artists and because art by women is valued for less museums by less of it and that is how less artwork by women ends up on display in museums. Ziems at the Baltimore Museum of art only four percent of the collection is women artists. The problem is the same major museums around the country. Christopher Bedford heard the museum's director he says that's why next year any new artwork. The museum buys will be by women the various different filters that we put in place to consider acquisitions nations and have always had them. Placed considerable additions and that system comes together in various different forms specific to the museum to filter the history of art and to include or exclude. Unfortunately in the case of women artists often museums have been excluding. KRISTA says anyone who's buying art museums included has to be careful of what's called the superstar effect sales of female artists represent just the tiniest slice just two percent of the market but of the two percent. Forty forty percent is five women. That's what can happen with the superstar. Effect a tiny number of artists. Become like Tokens or symbols and art buyers or museums ziems or individuals. Feel like they've bought something by a lady and so they feel like they don't have to do anything else but then museums can essentially say okay. I've done my female show will move back to our normal Sally herships Cardiff Garcia N._p._R..

Joan Mitchell Krista Latchford Baltimore Museum Of Art Joan Mitchell Foundation Selley Herships Frida Kahlo Mary Cassatt Jackson Pollock Kooning Cardiff Garcia Renee Rene Christopher Bedford CEO Oxford Director
Paul Theroux's Mexico Journey

Travel with Rick Steves

06:47 min | 7 months ago

Paul Theroux's Mexico Journey

"More than fifty years of writing about his epic journeys in Travel Books and novels. Paul through has recently finished a series of road trips on the back roads of Mexico. He wanted to see for himself who lives there how they live and what's really behind the headlines about a migration crisis from south of the US border and by the way you'll have to pardon my weak voice at the time we recorded our interview. It's better now. Paul theroux welcome Doc Ricketts a pleasure to be with you. You know this is such an exciting adventure you went on and right at the beginning of the book you write the Mexican border in the edge of the known world only shadows and danger beyond it and working figures. Hungry criminal predatory fanged fanatical enemies an ungovernable rabble eager to pounce on the unwary traveller so you decided to travel. Tell us where you went on this trip. And why by the rest of that senators and a Tutti fruity of grizzled gringos accident. So why why. Because I noticed that people were stereotyping Korea Typing Mexicans Mexicans who come across the border why they come that illegal looking for welfare making trouble and I thought one of the reasons as we traveled your a great traveller. Rick is to destroy the stereotype to find out what people are really like. What's this story and we find the come from? All sorts of places is in Mexico they might be billion as they might be millionaires. That might have no money at all. Some people in Mexico have less than the average person in Kenya or Bangladesh Rush. So it's not a simple situation but to see it at its best or to see it most clearly. I thought I WANNA go alone. I want to go on my own car. I WANNA the drive up and down. The border. The border that everybody talks about but no one knows that firsthand as written about much and I want to see it drive along the aboard and then drive deep into Mexico and I thought I bought a car for this purpose secondhand car. That wasn't very notable and off. I went not very noticeable but it had Massachusetts license plates on it. That was a little unfortunate. The police said you know they. They looked at my plates. And then they pull you off the road and they say Whether or Saturday do you know what I can do to you and you say what exactly do you want. And then they say pay me some more Didi. Is that the open. This happens but people say how awful and I think. Yeah how awful but on the plane of snakes is travel book and travelers travel writers. Rav Paul Writers have the last word so I have the last word and that's a side of Mexico. The police are excited. Mexico that exists and as travelers were not looking in for la La land in Orlando. We're looking for the reality. Go south of the border. We're looking to see things as they are the good the bad the ugly the the fun that whatever it is the sunshine the rain you know I was the Peace Corps joined the Peace Corps nineteen sixty three and I went to Central Africa. I didn't know what I was GonNa find was into the wild blue yonder and what I found was not at all what I was expecting. Not at all our guest right now and travel with. Rick Steves is author Paul. He just published an account of his road. Trips from the back roads of Mexico his new book introduces us to the people he met and explains what he learned about life in Mexico far from the comforts of resorts in the safety. Excuse tollways the books called on the plane of snakes. Your book is about the wall and I'm fascinated by walls in my travels. The Berlin Wall the walls between the Protestant and Catholic neighborhoods in Belfast. The wall of between Palestine and Israel and in this wall I remember when I was in the Holy Land on one side. The Wall looked a certain way. And then the other from the other side that looked a lot different tell us about the actual wall standing there especially on the Mexican side looking at it. What's it like where the wall is a big piece of iron mongering That looks like it looks like a prison wall. I mean it looks ah fence it has slats in it. The first one that I saw was in Nogales may be eight years ago or possibly more and it wasn't a wall that you could see through. It was sexually big iron plates steel plates. I guess and there were there. Were Rusty thirty feet high. You couldn't see through. It looked like it didn't look like offense at all actually looked like a wall That's now slats. What is it looked like it? It looks like something that is surmountable. Looks like you could climb over and people do it. Looks like could tunnel under it and people do it also looks very beautiful. It looks like a piece of sculpture by the artist Christo it looks like Krista went to the border and said I'm going to show the world. What a border looks like in metal and so the the fence to steal border fence goes up and down through hill and Dale undulating up? As far as the I can see and you think how amazing but how primitive too because house obviously keep any vote. No when I go as a traveler to these walls the odd thing is I can pass them easily. I can go from Israel to Palestine I in the cold where I could go between East and West. You were south of the wall and you wrote about the women in the diners there that kind of saw you you as a maybe a ticket to the north. It must have been interesting for you to be in these hardscrabble. Little spots in the wall was so close and you could just waltz right back and forth. They couldn't not only that it's only yeah waltzing bank in Nogales Arizona. You visit door in the wall. The first time I saw it there was a turnstile where you're in a street in Arizona. You know with parked in the sunshine. POKKA walk down the end of the street. Go through the door in your in Mexico is your show you I mean I showed by. Id and just by walking through a door. That for travel is such an amazing experience to me. It was an experience of the kind that I'd I'd never had before I've cross borders. You've been through many borders but most borders that are memorable you walk across Kenya Ethiopia China China and Russia Kazakhstan Benetton wherever you know Canada and say but Mexico is it's the wall and also there's another language behind the wall is cuisine beyond the wall and the women that you mentioned some of whom want to go over the wall around it to work in a motel or a hotel in the states Have left children behind husband's behind and the going what I found. Is that coming to make a living

Mexico Wall Rav Paul Writers Kenya Ethiopia China China And Rick Steves Paul Theroux United States Doc Ricketts Peace Corps Korea Israel Arizona Massachusetts Kenya Nogales Nogales Arizona Berlin Dale Canada
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:41 min | 8 months ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"And friends I'm really Percy executive producer for on being studios when Krista and our Small Team First Formed a nonprofit organization twenty thirteen on being was the only show that we were producing and we were one department now in two thousand nineteen we have four teams. In over twenty staff members each of them create experiment and innovate in digital media. PODCASTS and the work of social healing and all this work is made possible abol through generous partnership with foundations and are listening community Lisa listens and supports our work from Edmonton Canada. I have been really enjoying on being for the inspiration of the spark of ideas that it's given me the insights it's also the pace of it and the kindness. Thank goodness of the conversations that are had and the wonder and the joy of it and sometimes the pain of it is well. I feel quite intimate listening to it. It has a podcast and I believe that if you like something you should tell them. And if somebody's doing important work you should help them. I like what on being put on the airwaves and I want to continue and that doesn't happen by accident. If on beings had an impact in your life please consider supporting us with a financial contribution in any amount. You can do that at on being dot org forward slash give and thank you for making taking our work possible and for being a part of our community. I'm KRISTA Tippett up next my unedited conversation with Father Greg Boyle of homeboy industries trees. There is a shorter produced version of this. Wherever you found this podcast.

KRISTA Tippett Lisa executive producer Greg Boyle Edmonton Canada
Wilson, Carson lift Seahawks past Panthers 30-24

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 8 months ago

Wilson, Carson lift Seahawks past Panthers 30-24

"Seattle scored touchdowns on their first three possessions and made them stand up for a thirty to twenty four win over Carolina Russell Wilson hit eight of his first ten passes for over one hundred and seventy yards he finished with two hundred and eighty six yards and two touchdowns Chris Carson rush for a hundred and thirty three yards and two touchdowns it's the sea hawks records seven road win of the season Krista McCaffrey the Panthers had a hundred and seventy five combined yards that puts you over two thousand yards for the year Brett McMillan Charlotte

Seattle Russell Wilson Krista Mccaffrey Panthers Brett Mcmillan Charlotte Carolina Chris Carson Thirty Three Yards Two Thousand Yards Eighty Six Yards Seventy Yards
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:11 min | 8 months ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm Krista Tippett the host of on being a love. This new piece of writing by David White in his new book essentials and I'm happy. He gave me permission to read it to view here. It's called close. Close is what we almost always are close to happiness close to another close to leaving close to tears close to God close to losing faith close to being done close to saying something or close to success and even even with the greatest sense of satisfaction close to giving the whole thing up our human essence lies not in a rival but in being almost there we are creatures are on the way our journey a series of impending anticipated arrivals we live by unconsciously measuring the inverse inverse distances of our proximity an intimacy calibrated by the vulnerability we feel in giving up our sense of separation to to go beyond our normal identities and become closer than close is to lose our sense of self in temporary joy a form of a rival that only opens opens us to deeper forms of intimacy that Blur are fixed. Controlling surface identities to consciously become close is a courageous form of unilateral disarmament. A chancing of our arm and our love a willingness to hazard our affections in an unconscious declaration that we might be equal to the inevitable loss that the vulnerability of being close. We'll bring human beings. Do not find their essence through fulfillment or eventual arrival. But by staying close to the way they like to travel to the way they hold the conversation between the ground on which they stand and and the horizon to which they go we are in effect always close always close to the ultimate secret that we are more real in Dr Simple wish to find a way than any destination. We could reach the step between not understanding that and understanding. That is as close close as we get to.

Krista Tippett David White
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:10 min | 8 months ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Folks. This is a great time to stand up happens stretch. We're going to take five minutes to let this storm pass giving you a little window into the magic of Radio Win television production and then we will continue with the conclusion of of your conversation. So let's let's practice the recreation creation in our pillar and stand up your offer. Peace to your neighbor okay. Folks thirty seconds finishes stretch reassemble. Please okay thank you for staying with us this through the break. We're going to continue with two more questions and then handed back to Krista to finish the conversation with what she promised us at the beginning. Dr Jones our audience would like you to say a little bit more about your journey after discovering the history of of your family in Oklahoma. And how your theology informs your participation in combating racism and white supremacy today okay. That's an answering. That question. Could take hours mm-hmm but I do feel that in this book. One of my important roles as a person who's benefited from the the legacy of white supremacy and who identifies is too theologically. Dan Socially Push White people to recognize this history.

Krista Dr Jones Oklahoma Dan
Celtics 121, Nets 110: Brooklyn's Winning Streak Halted in Boston

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 9 months ago

Celtics 121, Nets 110: Brooklyn's Winning Streak Halted in Boston

"Rough night for the nets in Boston called by Jared Taylor featuring two to three the third midway through the third boy there is plenty more game to play in plenty more points for Kemba Walker to drop Krista Reno the call the van Walker poured in a game high thirty nine for Boston which is now one two straight to remain a perfect seven oh at home this season the Celtics begin at the TD garden tonight one twenty one one ten Brooklyn's first loss in five games six nets reached double figures led by Garrett temples twenty two Joe Harris added twenty

Nets Boston Jared Taylor Kemba Walker Krista Reno Celtics Brooklyn Joe Harris Garrett
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:55 min | 9 months ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Once. Despite right Mike tons no word defines me like words. I read my footprints like my past. Erased by waves of circumstance might future uncertain as is wind like the wind. GOTO ICARIA SONGS. How does whisperers thunders growl like thunder? I'm a foreign born cloud that's drifted here. I'm like and the ball of Rain Cobo to our blood rains for the dirty thirst of this land like thirst like hunger. We ache with the need to save ourselves and our country Nutri itself it. And how are we ready. Are you ready. Just reminder that will have about fifteen minutes of Cuna and eleven seven fifty turn the program back to Krista first question you mentioned how the audiences you right to enforce shape. How much you right? Tony Morrison is heralded in Hartford clarifying possibilities. Ah civilities for Black American authors to write two and four GUAC American readers without being considered niche or less than. How is your own concept of your audience's evolved over time? Yeah I think that's that's questioned by the way I think involved or I should say it's. I've waded into it. I think it's it's a.

Rain Cobo Tony Morrison Cuna Mike Krista Hartford
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

14:39 min | 10 months ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Visiting Fetzer Dot Org I'm Krista Tippett up next my unedited conversation with artistic conflict transformer John Paul let Iraq and conflict Geo tag fourteen forty days seven high coups numbered one stop sit light wine bread tender sharbat shallowness braided as we are who proximate to pain experiential divides demand are fierce love three wild and unruly quiet enough to be held silence between words number four today wideawake America patients you America patience you spoke and blessed me fife when shards flying flea supple- hearts forests NC's hold space for babies.

Fetzer Dot Org Krista Tippett John Paul Iraq America NC fourteen forty days
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:31 min | 11 months ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Are so honored host her today on this return visit to Chautauqua. Please join me in offering a warm Chautauqua Michael Welcome to Amana Perry Imani Perry and Krista Tippett the morning. I'm so happy to bring Imani Perry back to Chautauqua. I brought her here. Once before. When we did a week of programmes on the stage of the hall the philosophy and it was a day of Biblical rains torrential we actually had to stop up the recording two or three times to stop the conversation two or three times a and because you know just the nature of that that's space and the rain just deafened it and so we were able to create a program from it but it was it was hard. The production was complicated and so so I'm delighted to bring her back and we will not be interrupted. Thank you so much for having me again. It was wonderful. Despite the rain you know and many things have changed. I was also we were sound is incredible in his amphitheater congratulations ratchet also there was no tweeting back then right.

Perry Imani Perry Krista Tippett
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Powerful love that helps us live in sacred relationship with ourselves others and the natural world learn more by visiting fetzer dot org. I'm krista tippett and this is my unedited conversation with acoustic ecologist gordon hampton and inventor of silence activism. There is always a shorter produced version of this. Wherever you found this podcast i think que- aright krista just getting set up here. Okay brought along some orange juice. I'm going to have a swig. Okay great <hes> so you're in minneapolis yes and and where are you well. I'm in a quiet place here in seattle okay yeah in fact <hes> by was <hes> couple of noisy hours just getting here. I i was hoping that i'd be able to sneak in this room early just to heal from that big bang and outside but any case i'm ready. We we actually have some construction going on here and we're wondering with the sensitivity of you're listening ability whether you might even hear here it across these thousands of miles well. I read wish but i'm fifty eight years old well. I'm really glad to have you at the other end it on microphone. Have you done one of these <hes> i._s._d._n. Interviews before i i find it very <hes> wonderful and intimate show to just have the the voice to work with so now i have a question for you. I <hes> santa link to nancy just this morning before i left with some audio files which since we have a ninety minute session today. Is that correct yeah. We'll we'll probably go seventy five or so but we like to give ourselves room in case so it it does give us an opportunity for me to refer to a particular sound file. Yes illustrate my point and let's listen to it together so i can get your impression yeah. No we definitely can and <hes> and if we want to listen together we can but you you can also assume that we can you know the the art and craft of radio <hes> will serve <hes> the fullness of what you do you and what you care about because we can talk about it and and we're also going to be able to bring it in for our listeners to hear so. That's really exciting about this. Yes well. We'll thank you. I'm really looking forward to this. This is the first time that so many minutes have been devoted to the subject and yeah guys islands especially. We need some breathing space. Yeah one thing people often say about our show is <hes> people in radio and they say it with a little bit of trepidation russian. There's a lot of silence in your show. Which in radio is measured in you know nanoseconds <hes> because it's it's kind of a it's forbidden being dead air right but you'll understand that dead air isn't bad oh yeah it's never never really dead but you know you wait longer than three seconds with silence and you know your listeners it probably pounding on top of their dashboard just trying to make sure other radio still looking yeah or the or the engineers in the building doing. It's a we'll get this good. Okay so let's let's start at the beginning and maybe we will circle back around to why it makes all of us nervous too much silence sure <hes>. Where did you grow up up. I didn't see that anywhere well. That's assuming that i did grow up. Okay well a whole child. Let's say it that way. Ask child. I was a member of a military family started out in southern california than went on to hawaii why then back to california before going to washington d._c. Seattle san francisco and then i can say about a dozen other places before i got out of high school so by the time it was my chance to go to college. That's when i decided fill the space in between seen by going to the mid west university of wisconsin so there wasn't really there's not really a place where you were which felt like like a center of gravity even even with all that moving. Oh there definitely is and that is hawaii. Okay yeah the place of of hawaii a place that i've recorded many times.

krista tippett hawaii Seattle nancy california gordon hampton minneapolis mid west university of wiscons san francisco washington fifty eight years ninety minute three seconds
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm Krista Tippett and this is on beings. Unheard cuts up next. My unedited conversation with lyric poet, Gregory. Or there is a shorter produced version of this wherever you found this podcast. We are thought about this because we were listening, very closely to the programming that Krista Tippett was doing with poets, and Astro physicists, and mathematicians and philosophers, and monks, and social activists, and she asks essential questions about what it means to be human being in the world and poetry is always asking those questions, and it seemed like a natural partnership. So we contacted her producer and here we are with Krista Tippett, and Gregory or with unbecoming and poetry. So happy to be sitting here again today with Gregory or. Let me say, I have some books and I will propose some poems read. And then if you feel just inspired to read some you can just tell me to throw one of these over to you at any time. Okay. Yeah. We are taping this to broadcast later. I don't know if we've said that which is exciting. So I think there's something really magical about. An experience that you have, like we're having a we are going to have an experience here in this room together for the next hour. And, and then you send it out and many, many more people are kind of are in the room, that's kind of the magic of the medium of audio and radio, which is now. Podcasting. And the experiences are different and yet communal. And so anyway, that's what we're pertaining of right now. Thinking as I was getting ready to speak with you. That about how human beings become wise, sometimes by discovering things. No one had ever known before. And sometimes we become wise by remembering and rediscovering things that people knew forever once, and then we forgot and I'm aware in the circles in which I move this really this really unexpected movement of our time often led by young people by millennials who are claiming grief and loss and death as human experiences. And there are things held death, cafes and the dinner party, which is a movement and is founded by people who had terrible loss in their early lives, and there was no place for them to talk about that in the world. And so that what they wanna do is claim grief and death as something that's not not to pathologies it. But as a part of life. That we reckon with and show and can asked and kind kinda company others in and be accompanied. In. Yes, it is. It's fascinating and bring the greed ver- person who's lost back into some form of human community. Sounds fascinating. I'd need to know more before. Well, I mean I thought about it, obviously, because an origin point and really enduring focus of your poetry. And of you becoming a poet was with this terrible, terrible death, and boss. Which was your younger brother's death, and you're on the cusp of adolescence. You're as you said, you're a kid participating in popular American ritual ritual hunting, firing a gun becoming a man. And actually, I'm not going to ask you to read the poem that ice in every interview, I've seen everybody hands, you this poem, right at the beginning, which begins I was twelve when I killed him. And I just I we're gonna talk about that. But I kind of just want to start someplace a little softer. I mean, I think small talk has a purpose, right? He's us into other conversations like this where did you grow up? Where yes I grew up in upstate New York rural Hudson valley. We had one stop light to drugstores, one jukebox in the dark drugstore and. Seven or eight churches..

Krista Tippett Gregory New York producer Hudson valley
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"And we can't despoil it as we're doing. So in a sense as a half of an answer Krista because that's what I'd say to an adult is leaving a retreat right to a parent. I say, you know, as a child is growing up inevitably they live in the world. And they'll hear about things if they live in a house, that's a relatively peaceful, and we have a certain amount of control is parents about how much the TV is on. And what's on TV and how much how much? They are confronted by the pain of the world. And you know, what I think since full myself really, I can't sometimes with the pain of the world seems incomprehensible and unbearable to make. But I think if there's anything that balances it, it's. The wonder at the world the amazingness of people how kind they are how resilient they are. How people will take care of people that they don't know. Visit somebody falls someone's in trouble in a public place. People take care of them people take care of people that they don't know that human beings have that ability. I don't think they have to learn enough to have lessons in too. I think we're companionable speechis and for the most part every once in a while, we meet armored type people, but for the most part with companionable and congenial, and we care about other people, and we take care of them. So to be able to look at human beings and say give given beings are amazing life is amazing. The sun came up in the exact right place this morning and celebrate seasons. I think that's a wonderful part of being part of a of a group of people who celebrate seasons and birthdays and holy days. So that here we are again at another time in another season and said, great cosmos to look at and imagine people going up into space and looking at the stars our ancestors looked at the same stars. I think that there's a way of if I if I keep myself a sense of amazement, I tell my grandchildren look at this moon. It's a three day moon. It's the best moon. It's better than today. Moon today day moon is kind of skimpy really can't see it and afford they moon. It's already like on its way to what moon, but a three day move is just beautiful. It's my favorite moon. And if I show that to them, then they'd be into think, oh, it's. Favorite moon three? But that just happens to be me. I like moons everybody will do in their own way. But I think that always balances it when when the Bitta Todd about needing to see the suffering in the world, so that we could respond with compassion. He also talked about the preciousness of life and the need to take care of it. And I think those two at the same time. I mean, that's also something I think our children give us new is, especially when they're very little see the world, actually, Trent my colleague was talking about taking a walk with his son energy. I remember those moments when you're a little, and it's like everything has been invented for them. And they name it and everything is fascinating. Right. Can look at one flower for a long time. It's amazing. He started to do that. I have a friend who at who ends all of her emails. You know, we have an automatic signature in you, push your marriage signature hierarchy Matic signatures, says stay amazed. And I love that. I was. This is also making me think about how we we need to be attentive to what our children can teach us as well as what we want to impart to them because some of this they know, and they actually know immediately than we do because we lose it. Remember watching something terrible in the news the other day, and my daughter said. So many beautiful lives in the world. And this is what they focus on. She's so right. But she knows that. And I've kind of lost it. In. I think the beautiful and wonderful lives in world. I certainly I'm not a sociologist of journalism aren't as compelling images. Right. As the headline. They don't make good headlands in a wonderful. I don't know if it would be commercially viable, if they were channel that had all of wonderful things..

Bitta Todd Krista Trent three day
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Visiting fetzer dot org. I'm Krista Tippett. And this is on beings. Unheard cuts up next my unedited conversation with Rebecca tracer and AVI Klein, there is a shorter produced version of this wherever podcasts are found. And so this is really fun because how often do you get to introduce one of your own journalistic heroes mentors and friends at it's very funny. Chris it because I cannot see you at all. So it's like I. Like. Like this. This woman probably requires no introduction, but Krista Tippett as a Peabody award winning broadcaster, national humanities medalists New York Times bestselling author. She founded and leads the on being project hosts, the globally, esteemed on being public radio show and podcast and curates the civil conversations project. She grew up in a small town in Oklahoma, attended Brown University and became a journalist and diplomat in Cold War Berlin and later received a master of divinity from Yale University, and she's working on a new book her last book was becoming wise an inquiry into the mystery art of living, which is a really beautiful book. I thought it'd be funny. If I told my meeting, you story, Krista, which I don't even know if you remember, but I we were at the same conference and I'd never met her. And I have this thing, right? Never really want to meet any of my heroes because I'm afraid that if I meet them, I will just babble it and say nothing that they haven't heard before and just inconvenience them. And I always talk myself out of it. It. So I was at a conference and Krista was there, and I was turned turned to my friend. And I said if I do meet Krista Tippett, unlike all these other times where I don't talk to the people who I like really look up to I'm going to tell her this gonna tell her that. And we'll toes other thing. And all of a sudden, I feel this like light touch on my elbow and Kris Jenner and she's like, hi Courtney. I'm Chris, and I was like oh God. Okay. Well, I've already told all the things so at least now I can just sort of slink away. But it was the banning of a very beautiful friendship, which I am. So deeply grateful for I'm going to let her introduce the other two brilliant humans up here. Both of which I also very much admire, but please take it away Krista. You courtney? Now, I don't know where you went. So I I wrote out some remarks to begin with because I wrote them out because I think we all agreed. It's this it feels it's hard to talk about all of this feels a little perilous. And I know you've all been together all day. And so it may not feel that way to anymore, and I don't want to say it goes without saying, but I still think it's worth saying again. And again that metoo is a moment and it didn't just start a year ago. And Rebecca tracer is one of the people who has been reminding us of that this year in Toronto Burke, who I gave rise to these worse in two thousand six spoke to the times just this past week of her concern that the movement that is now underway really the movement that are now under around this don't lose sight of the central mission, which was and still is to connect survivors of sexual assault to the resources they need in order to heal. Will. And I read and I thought that the h word he'll has not had much of a place in the journalistically driven public reckonings of the past year and that word can be employed to quickly in the face of trauma. But surely the complex of reckonings because that's what it is that we are societally naming and wrapping our arms around with the impetus of metoo is at best an opening to a long term cultural reckoning to grow up humanity to grow up our species to grow up our society. I think that a solutions lens on me too. And I just love the framing of this day would ask can journalism can journalists be among the culture, interrogators shapers who helped create and shine a light on the spaces the vocabulary. The imaginative muscle the processes and the pragmatic forms to support healing where it is possible now and in time. I believe that the that grappling with the me too movement through solutions lens, which show us ways to cover this and live this not as a liberal issue..

Krista Tippett Rebecca tracer Chris Courtney Burke Peabody award New York Times bestselling Kris Jenner Oklahoma AVI Klein Yale University Cold War Berlin Brown University Toronto assault
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm Krista Tippett. And this is on beings. Unheard cuts up next my unedited conversation with contemporary of teacher Mira by Bush. There is a shorter produced version of this at apple podcast, Google podcasts Spotify or wherever you like to listen. That was that wasn't. You was it. Yeah. That's what I thought. Hello. Hello. Hello. Hello. Does that Mary by it is mere by hi, Krista? I I'm so glad you made it safely. I did not want to have any any damage to you on my conscience. The roads were great. Okay. You know by the time I got on. There was I've been on texting in on Email. It's various friends that area who are all kind of freaked out about the weather. Yeah. It's been a lot. Yeah. We're weary. Yeah. Yeah. And it's a lot of shoveling and snowball somebody said grumpy grumpy. Yeah. So Chris are do you want us to just Chit chat for a minute. All right. Sure. So tell me something let's not want. I'm so happy. We're doing this first of all, but I don't want. I don't want to risk using I think profound until we're going so tell me something mundane like what you had for breakfast. I add. Granola yogurt and banana was very good. Okay. Although I wanted something warm, but I couldn't figure that out. So. I have for breakfast. Get a gold star for healthiness. Last week. I was out at canyon ranch. So you know, one has to be healthy for a while. After after that. That's. I though it was that your award for having that. Yeah. Well, I went there's one right near us and lenox mass. Yeah. I went there to work with some funds to set up a program, you know, for re strengthening, and I've actually had a fabulous recovery. I feel great. But I wanted to keep strengthening so and basically, of course, they told me everything I already know. But it was nice to hear from somebody else. I actually haven't been to canyon ranch. I mean, I've heard that. It's really wonderful. So it's one of my aspirants. Okay. Doing it. Okay. Chris few think, we're good. Oh, okay. All right. Okay. I do have what I do have water. Okay. And we don't do we have a hard stop or anything. Heart. Stop at two thirty our time three thirty your time. Okay. Is it? Okay. If I drink water during absolutely. And this is totally this is completely non linear. And you can you know, we can edit things out if you need join a stop or if you want to go back to something we'll edited for broadcast. Yeah. Just a real conversation. Nothing. I would rather do. Okay. Well, let's see. We can we begin. Okay. Terrific..

Chris Krista Tippett canyon ranch apple Mira Spotify Google Mary Bush
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm Krista Tippett and this is on being today with Francis Kissling. So I want to ask you also you have been struggling with kidney disease. Now I've things over the last few years. Do you have a donor? I've been reading about your. Did that happen? Well, my kid, my kidneys have have continued my kids as I call them how. How are your kids people ask me. My kids have been behaving well, and so I have not. I have. I have not yet had to even cross the threshold of, you know, getting a donor finally approved, you don't what? What I what occurs to me is I wondered how this experience yet has flowed into all the thinking you've done and all the patch put all these years towards thinking about our bodies as at once private and public. Yes. And the concept of donation, the concept. I mean, I'm fat. It really extended my consciousness around the notion that the whole idea of the gift of life. I have written a little bit about the relationship between someone giving a part of their body to me. And that it's, it's like, this is so terrible. It's sort of like communion. Okay, that a part of someone else's body is going to be in me. For the rest of my life and a foreign part that I am going to have to work through drugs for my body, not to reject it. These are very interesting philosophical reflections that I've made. Also, for example, when somebody gives a kidney. We applaud that person. As the most out truest dick of human beings. But women give their bodies every day to fetus to bring it into the world, and every pregnancy carries with it. The risk of death. Pregnancy is normal. Having babies, normal. It's not true. It's no big deal that women do this. It is a big deal that women give their bodies to bring new life into the world. I've always thought that if we were really talking about this theologically as opposed to politically, yeah, we would have to speak in terms of gifts rather than rights. I mean rights exact concept foreign to the bible, but gift, but choice and life, right? If it's right. What do you think you've learned about how social change happens? Like what? What would progress look like now in these years? Ahead of you with with your own kidneys or with other people..

kidney disease Krista Tippett Francis Kissling
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm krista tippett and this is on being today with the singular cellist and citizen artist yoyo ma we're kind of pieces of music or experiences of working with other musicians or particular concerts like they've been cathartic moments where you where you discovered this or started to be able to articulate it or even something going on now i'm just i'm just wondering if you could embed that in a piece of music or a story sure we'll give you too so one of the composers that wrote for cello alone six of these one wonderful sweets and they're different movements and i've moment of going between the moment the end of a movement to the beginning of the next movement so actually not necessarily coded a written by the composer if they just separate movements that i would member often playing loving the connection between the end of the sarra of the i the g major sweet going into the minuet than the next movement because there was something asadabad is like a slow dance and it goes into a minuet which is a slightly more lively dads and there's something about the incredible restfulness of the way the first movement and and suddenly the some like.

krista tippett