35 Burst results for "Krista"

A Series of Strange Situations Surround Christa Helm's Death

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:53 min | 2 d ago

A Series of Strange Situations Surround Christa Helm's Death

"Investigators had very little to go on at the scene, but they matched the keys to the car and the apartment that you shared with Stephanie. Stephanie Warsaw. When police went to the apartment step, they told him that a roommate Krista had the car last night. And this is where the story gets even weirder. Kristen's roommate Stephanie told investigators that sandy Smith was Chris's agent and was a mutual friend of both, and she said that Chris had called Sammy from the party earlier that he didn't try to get him to join the party. When asked about that night sandy Smith told investigators that she was sound asleep and never heard a thing. I mean, he was a he claimed that he had no idea that Chris had been stepping a mere feet Amir several feet from his house. That's weird to me. But according to witnesses, that statement is false because there were other people coming and going from sandy's house all evening and the person who found Chris body was on his way to sandy south. So that's the line. That's a first line. Why was sandy trying to hide this from the police? We don't know. In the recording from recessions at the disco studio, working on our album. Investigators found that they were littered with personal drama and tension. On those on those audios. Apparently your backup singer patty Collins was having a secret relationship with Krista, but Christa denied being a lesbian and that upset Collins, when they heard the recordings investigators went on the hunt for patty Collins, but she was never found. To this day, we don't know where she went. We don't want she left. Another weird thing. Christa was said to have been carrying a handbag that contained a diary. But again, like I said, the purse, the diary, never been accounted for. So after a few months, this case went cold. The police had too many leads, too many loose ends, too much on their hands. They passed things off and moved on to the next until there was nothing left to do.

Sandy Smith Stephanie Warsaw Stephanie Chris Krista Patty Collins Chris Body Sandy Kristen Sammy Amir Christa Collins
Christa Helm Was Playing With Fire Before Her Murder

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:57 min | 2 d ago

Christa Helm Was Playing With Fire Before Her Murder

"There was a thing back then, make yourself relevant, go to the right parties, you'll make it. And when she went to these parties, she made people like Warren Beatty. She met Mick Jagger. She met the Shah of Iran. And she made a man named Bernie cornfield. His name you'd never think stands out within Jagger Beatty and the Shah. Iran, but Bernie kleinfeld had at a time in LA. Now Chris the helm slept but he was a guy who was in money to finance here. But Krista slept with some of the men and women she met along the way. Word like that gets around. Her sex life probably would have been irrelevant except for the fact that she kept a not so secret love diary filled with the names of people she screwed, even a rating system. This is never a good idea. Writing shit down on paper may make the wrong guy nervous. So instead of keeping that information private, she would talk about her diary and the secret tape recording she made with many of her friends. And some of her friends warned her, you got to be careful. You know, people don't want to be in these recordings. They don't want to know about this, man. This is very dangerous. One of her friends was really adamant about it and she knew it was dangerous and she thought Christa was playing with fire, especially because people believed the famed seeking actress was getting ready to blackmail some of her lovers. That's desperation. At some point, Christie tells her friend that she'd gotten into something deep and she needed to stay off the radar for a while. This is February 12th, 1977, 5 days before she was killed before her dead body is found outside of her agent's home in West Hollywood. And given the fact that she had multiple stab wounds, authorities believed it was a crime of passion. That the murderer probably knew helm. Didn't make the case any easier though, as several people might have wanted to kill a due to her complicated life.

Bernie Cornfield Jagger Beatty Bernie Kleinfeld Warren Beatty Shah Of Iran Mick Jagger Krista Iran Chris LA Christa Christie West Hollywood
Dr. Irwin Redlener on Exactly How Many Boosters We Need

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

01:48 min | Last month

Dr. Irwin Redlener on Exactly How Many Boosters We Need

"Oh my God, here we are again. Your tweet, if you follow me, you're probably vaccinated good, but if you don't have the full four shots, you just aren't fully vexed in light of dangerous new variants here and more coming, and we still need masks and separation at times. Please be smart, get the four. I just, by the way, you have been kind enough to actually talk to personal friends of mine. So I have one more that's over 50 that only has one booster, and for some reason, thinks that she shouldn't get the second booster or needs to wait till I don't know they have the new variant specific one or something. Can you just read it? And also she has asthma and allergies and stuff that would, I would think make it more important that you get your second booster, correct? If you're over 50? Certainly yes. But get her on the phone right now. We'll talk to her. All right, Krista. Yeah. Billy, you know, I'm not even sure the four are going to be enough. I know people don't want to hear that. Nobody in my family wants to hear that that I know for sure, but the fact of the matter is that we still keep calling the first two shots quote unquote fully vaccinated. It just is not. Yeah. And you basically, you know, at this point, to the new variant, you won't have anything, really, that's going to help you that much. Yeah, you personally got another friend who was over 50 who didn't have any boosters. It was somehow it was double vax and somehow scared of the booster because of misinformation. So that misinformation barrier is very powerful. And we're going to have to keep plugging away here, but we still only have two thirds of people that are quote unquote fully facts with the two shots. And way less than half of the population actually has booster, even one. So it's a

Krista Asthma Billy
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:49 min | 2 months ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"And it seemed to me like some sort of a miracle. This ability of life to break through obstacles. And that in nature drive for full expression, if you will. Is in us all. Sometimes it may enable us to survive an illness. Sometimes it may enable us to grow beyond the limitations of an illness that we live with. But it's there and everybody. All right. And you're very, very aware of that in your own life. Is that what you're saying? I mean, I live with significant physical problems. I've lived with them for years. You know, when I travel on an airplane, my clothes and makeup are very small board of what I take with me. I have all sorts of equipment and medicine and all of this. And this is the conditions under which I live. I give it as much time as it needs, not one minute more and not one minute left. I wonder if there's another story you would like to tell that comes to mind. Just out of this conversation we've been having. Maybe something that's happened to you lately, I don't know. That kind of putting you on the spot what makes me think. I actually, before we go, I certainly want to express my appreciation to you, Krista. What a delight to speak with you both on the phone before you know when we spoke actually almost a month ago. At least. And today, I hate being interviewed. Are you doing? I am usually talking to someone who has no interest whatsoever in what we're talking about. And is simply trying to get the best, whatever, or who knows. It feels so dead that I can't connect to the thing in me to talk. And it's been a real pleasure to spend this time. Well, I believe in the power in the mystery of conversation. I really believe. And it's connected to a lot of the things we've been talking about. Oh gosh. What are you working on now? What are you writing these days? Actually, I'm mostly writing articles. Things of that sort, I think about writing another book. And that's a major commitment. It means moving your whole life around. What else can I tell you? Oh, let me share with you. A lovely poem, okay? Yeah. You know, the ways, well, let's step back. A curing is the work of experts. I mean, this is what we've been talking about here. Curing is the work of experts. Healing is the work of human beings. We heal ourselves. We heal one another. We enable each other to grow not only in spite of an illness, but because of it. So all of this. And the ways in which we help one another are very old and very powerful and they've lost none of their power over thousands of years. We get our students to rewrite a mission statement, a personal Hippocratic oath in this course. And they write about what it is that they want their medicine to be. They don't write about science. They often write about love and about being used well by life and by other people. It's very powerful. And this is one of these mission statements written by a young man, many years ago now, 5 or 6 in our course. And he wanted to be a surgeon, and he says, he dedicates this. To his future patients. And it goes like this. May you find in me the mother of the world. May my hands be a mother's hands, my heart be a mother's heart. May my response to your suffering be a mother's response to your suffering. May I sit with you in the dark like a mother sits in the dark? May you know through our relationship that there is something in this world that can be trusted. Very simple, very old, very powerful we are each enough to heal other people. Thank you so much. This is just such a privilege and a pleasure. I can't tell you. I feel exactly forward to it so much. I hope we meet some time. No, I'm sure we will. I have no doubt of that. If we don't just chance across each other, I will call you when I'm coming out. If you were ever in this area and I discover it and you haven't called me, I'm going to be made. I will be out in that area. One of these days, and I will try to come see you. I'd love to do that. Good. Okay. It's a deal. Thank you so much for making the time. Thank you. Have a good vacation..

Krista
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:41 min | 3 months ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I would want people to just bear in mind that the way you're feeling is anchored in your body. And so. A very practical place to start. If you're feeling bad and you can't place it, you know, sometimes you have a few days where you just feeling just not good. And you can end up running through your mind trying to blame work or your partner or your kids. You can run through your mind, trying to find this outside of you reason for it. And actually, and I've seen this in clinic, it can be something that's happening internally, literally to you on a physical level. You could be coming down with something. Maybe you're not eating very well. You've had a patch we've just been undernourished. Maybe you're hungry and you don't realize that you've been kind of under fueling for these particular demands. You're going through a stressful time and you haven't accommodated for your nutrition during that period. So a very practical place to start is what is happening in my body, how well slept am I am I hydrated? How have I been eating in the last couple of days? Can I attend to those things? And then see how I'm feeling. All right, well, thank you so much. And thank you for your work. I'm delighted to meet you. Pleasure. Thank you so, so much for having me. Oh, and I'm going to turn you back to Chris to make sure that we capture this. And I will continue to be listening. We'll let you know what's happening with this. Just thank you so much for making the time. Pleasure. Thank you, Krista. Thank you..

Chris Krista
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:00 min | 3 months ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I think in the passenger referring to, especially what I am listening for as I give my thanks to the earth, I really want to hear whether the earth is grateful for us as human people, that's really what I'm listening for is can we have, can we live in such a way that the earth is grateful for us? And things I suppose that I hear back or equal parts of affirmation of the beauty and the potential and the imagination and the creativity and love of human people. But I also have to say that I also feel these sense of what I would say of loneliness coming back from the earth beings that they feel forgotten that here they are bearing all these wonderful gifts for us and we don't even know their names and for the most part we bypass them as if they were just stuff. And this is what some philosophers have called species loneliness, and I think when that term was first coined, they meant that we as humans were lonely for the council and the companionship of other species, but what I feel is that the other species are lonely for us. For our regard. And our appreciation. This is wonderful, Robin, is there anything I even asked you or anything you'd like to add? You have asked such wonderful questions that have really gotten to the heart of it. I don't think so. Why don't think so. No. Okay, yeah. All right. Well, thank you so much for making the time for this and it's just been delightful to kind of delve into your way of being and seeing and your poetry, the poetry of your writing, which is so wonderful. So thank you. Well, thank you. And I so appreciate your bringing these ideas and all of the ideas that on bring on being bring forth. It's a, it's a wonderful conversation, so let me go for all that. And you know what? There is something I can see. As I quite naturally say, Miguel to you. I would say that one of the expressions that is useful to me is that I always include for all of the direction is young. Which is a thank you for everything that we have been given. All right, thank you so much. It's a wonderful last word. Great. Thank you so much. Thank you, Krista. Bye bye..

Robin Miguel Krista
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

06:57 min | 3 months ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Road as a fork in the road here. I could become indignant. I could flame up this flame of negativity, or I could say, recalculating. I'll just go back here. This is an example of technology and telling us what spirituality is. Well, I think it's fun so much. And no matter how many times I don't make that turn, it will continue to say recalculating. The tone of voice will stay the same. I think it's a good analogy. But you know, about the technology, a lot of people have said, as you said, when we began life is so much different now and so much speed it up. And I noticed that people I was watching the news in the airport and not only did I was watching the news of the demonstration in Cairo and which was so exciting but underneath that in the rolling tape that's underneath it was every 15 seconds. And other piece of information on top of all this information is so much stuff to process. And it's so stimulating. And it's very seductive to say in a life has become so whizzed up and so busy, how can people possibly pay attention long enough to fix the world, which really needs many levels to get fixed. And I've been saying for a long time and I think that because of this technology because I remember a journalist saying that the reason the Berlin Wall came down, the proximal cause of the fall of the wall was the fax machine. Especially if I wrote that recently. And I've been thinking since then that the proximal cause of the world stopping and saying, you know, we have to do things a different way is going to be people all over the world saying just a second we destroying the biosphere and everything else will stop and look and say everybody. I usually carry a poem by Pablo Neruda. I'm going to have you read that. You brought it. I brought it. Oh, good. I brought it. I brought it to Detroit, but it's in my hotel room. I carried it with me always. I work to read that. We're going to give that as a gift to everyone because you gave it as a gift to me. Here's our radio moment. I'm Krista tippett on being conversation about meaning, religion, ethics, and ideas. Today, in a public conversation, on raising children in complex times, I'm with Buddhist teacher and psychotherapist. Mother and grandmother, Sylvia borstein. Her books include happiness is an inside job practicing for a joyful life. Sylvia, I want to ask you to this question of raising children, human beings who are kind. Who have a heart for the world, in a world that's troubled. When you and I met on a panel in Southern California two years ago. You told a story about leading mindfulness teaching sessions. And you told a story about, I think it was a man who at the end of it said, I'm frightened to go back out into the world. I feel so vulnerable and in here I'm safe. But I don't know how I can be out in the world and be vulnerable. And that story came back to me as I was thinking about interviewing you on this subject because I think as a parent, there's a version of that that goes through my mind. How much do I expose my children to? How do I teach them to be kind and open to the world's pain? And vulnerable. And yet, I want them to be safe. And I actually want them to be tough out in that scary world at the same time. Talk to me about that. Well, I remember misses it's a two part answer. I remember that I don't remember exactly that moment, but I'm sure it happened because it comes up often. And people will come and spend a week at a retreat center or a weekend or however many days. And then they do say, here everyone is safe and it's quiet and to go out. I feel too vulnerable. And it gives me a chance to say, you know, really, I don't think we can become too vulnerable. I'm waiting for the time that the whole world is suddenly too vulnerable and looks around and says, wait a minute, we're making a very big mistake. We all have to stop. We have to share. We have to make sure there's enough to eat all over the world. We have to stop. We can teach each other our ways and tell each other our hopes and dreams. But we can't kill each other. That doesn't work. And we can't kill the earth. And we can't despoil it as we're doing. So in a sense, that's a half of an answer, but because that's what I'd say to an adult who's leaving a retreat to a parent, I say, you know, as a child is growing up, inevitably, they live in the world, and they'll hear about things. If they live in a house that's a relatively peaceful, and we have a certain amount of control as parents about how much the TV is on and what's on the TV and how much how much they are confronted by the pain of the world. And you know what, I think, since for myself, really, sometimes with the pain of the world seems incomprehensible. And unbearable to me. But I think if there's anything that balances it, it's the wonder at the world, the amazingness of people, how kind they are. How resilient they are, how people will take care of people that they don't know, somebody falls or someone's in trouble in a public place. People take care of them. People take care of people that they don't know that human beings have that ability. I don't think they have to learn it. They don't have to have lessons. I think we're a companionable species. And for the most part, every once in a while, we meet hermitage people, but for the most part, we're companionable. And congenial, and we care about other people, and we take care of them. So to be able to look at human beings and say, human beings are amazing, life is amazing. The sun came up in the exact right place this morning. And celebrates seasons. I think that's a wonderful part of being part of a group of people who celebrate seasons and birthdays and holy days. So that here.

Krista tippett Sylvia borstein Pablo Neruda Cairo Berlin Sylvia Detroit Southern California
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

07:04 min | 5 months ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"So that's what I'm hoping for. I wish I kept, I just bought this journal that asked about intention and expectation and that sort of thing. And I'm going to try it. To see where it takes me, but so much of this has been fortune and see to the pants and going and going with the flow that comes, again, braided streams, sometimes they flood so violently that it looks like one great sea. And you can't see where the streams were, and I think that sort of where we are right now. And so some days it's just important to be able to turn over on your back, float and keep your head and your nose up to breathe. And breathe and breathing, we can't take for granted. We know that. We know that, yeah. So we know that, again, I do love this feels, there are many, there have been many mission statements in what you've been saying. I liked I liked this thing you wrote, which has a lot of theological religious imagery, but as you've made that your own, you said, doing good things for and revering nature are just acts. There is righteousness in conserving things, staving off extinction and simply admiring the song of a bird. In my moments of confession in front of strangers, talking about my love of something greater than any of us, I become a freer me, I am reborn. Yeah. You know, as much as I ran from my grandmother's first Sunday God. You know, I worship every bird that I see and wildness is a but it's also worthy of adoration and worship. So each time I see in those things that are flying or that are wild and free, I see a bit of me in that. And then, that whole creation story, my grandmother used to tell me about, I become a part of that. You know. And I get to and I get to evolve through it. So my grandmother never mentioned that word evolve, but no. Part of what she taught me gave me the strength to do it. So that's sort of how I see things, Krista, that they are, that we're just part of this process. And that if we take our place in it, and. Sometimes go with the flow, then we'll find ourselves in some pretty fantastic places. Sometimes you gotta sometimes you gotta fly against the into headwinds. And we've seems like we're doing that now. But I'm hopeful that those wins turn and we're able to have warm winds at our back and get to where we need and want to be. Thank you. Isn't it? I feel like you were touching on what feels to me like just one of the strangest things about us as creatures that just becoming fully ourselves is the work of a lifetime. Oh, that's it. That is. That's the practice. That's the practice, but it seems it. Is. I just think it's profoundly strange. And interesting. I agree. You know, it's, again, you can go back and you can think about what you thought your life or life or the world would be like. And you get taught the lesson of the profoundly strange, right? Things that you could not have imagined that were improbable. And you're living in them. And then you hopefully get through them. And you're on the other side somehow. And you can't quite figure out how you did it. But then there was some joy that you held on to somehow. Yeah. And there you are. And then the next adventure presents itself. Yeah. Okay, so I, you know, the section I just read to you. I actually love to hear you read the passage that's from. This is your chapter called new religion and in the home place. Maybe starting at the bottom of one 75, if teaching is preaching, and then to the end of that chapter, such an incredible final paragraph, too. Okay. From new religion if teaching is preaching, I've become a warmer, gentler pastor. More like the clergy at my mother's church, maybe it's appropriate that these years have given me new spiritual release, too. I've settled into a comfortable place with the idea of nature and God being the same thing. Evolution, gravity, change, and the dynamic transformation of field into forest, move me. A warbler migrating over hundreds of miles of land and ocean to sing in the same tree once again, is as miraculous to me. As any dividing sea. Doing good things for and revering nature are just acts. There is righteousness in conserving things. Staving off extinction. And simply admiring the song of a bird. In my moments of confession in front of strangers, talking about my love of something much greater than any one of us. I become a freer me. Each time,.

Krista
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

07:48 min | 5 months ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"With others who would point out. Sometimes negatively to them who I was to them, you know, Bart owls never barked blackness to me and said, you know, we're discounting you because of who you are. So for all the labels that we can sort of hoard again to tell people who we are, what we do, who we love, all of those things, I think it's an important thing for people to understand the multifaceted. Nature of all of us. It also feels to me like your fascination with and the way you attend to and delight in and. Honor the. All the, I don't know, just the multifaceted colors and patterns and forms of the natural world. I mean, you kind of just you kind of just demonstrated this. Also, is reflected in a way you see human beings and you see human society. Well, you know, to me, there's so much that simple out there that appears simple. But that's really complex. That, I mean, it's sort of like the sparrow that appears brown from far away and hard to identify. But if you just take the time to get to know that sparrow, then you see all of these hues, you see 5, 6, 7 shades of brown on this bird, and you see little splashes of ochre or yellow, or gray and black. And all of these things on this bird that at first glance, just appeared to be brown. And so in taking that time to delve into not just what that bird is, but who that bird is and to understand to get from some egg and a nest to where it is to grace you with its presence, that it's taken for this bird trials and tribulations and escaping all of these hazards. And so I tend to think about I try to think about people as much as I can in that way that each of us has had these struggles from the nest to where we have flown now and the journeys that we are on. And so I think when you try to take that time to understand beings in that way, that there's a deeper relationship and if you're lucky, there is some opportunity to share a path to have some empathy and some experience, and though I can't be you and you can't be me, we can be at a point where we say, yeah, you know, we walked the same path at some point. Though we may not know one another, we can share some experience that gets us a little closer together. And I think that's important. You know, something that I'm ashamed to say, I hadn't hadn't thought about. Until I really deeply thought about it reading some of your writing is, I mean, you've done a lot of pondering about. How slavery and the aftermath of slavery created this alienation of people from the land. And I mean, there are many facets to this, right? Also, you know, that people were once forced into nature in places that environments that we now pass through and even take refuge in. Were once full of pain. That the, I don't know, there's a place where you're looking at. And I guess the bobble link is a bird that is very important in this story. That they're rich habitats that you delight in that exist now that you study. But they're partly that way. But the birds here's one who say the words we see now they are there because of what went black people did under compulsion then. This is, yeah. Well, you know, that's this constant tension. That we're living in now, this history of the land, again, and so, you know, whether there are trees growing over it that have grown out of soil that people toiled, or their rice fields that stretch as far as the eye can see that are only there because of black hands, and we're watching black ducks and black necks, stilts, and hopeful for black rails. In those places that were created by black human beings, not voluntarily, so enslavement is everywhere. I mean, it's not just here in my home place in the south, but I think about it in other places. And then I try to think in other landscapes about the history and what that means. So, Krista, to me, again, it's their inextricably linked. That culture and care. I mean, we have to understand where we've been, you know, I guess is the cliche, but when I see these landscapes, I can not in honoring what my ancestors endured. In that nest, really, to get me here to where I am, fledged, and flying, I can not in good conscience. Ignore the bitter for the beautiful. Right. And that, that is that is something that I try to teach my students when I take people out on bird walks. That, as we see all of this beauty, that we think about how it got there. That we consider these birds in the context of history and consider history in the context of of the birds so, so yeah, it sort of goes back to hoarding experiences. And in that, I think life becomes richer. There is a different depth to the stew of you. I mean, we're all just these amalgams of experiences and different people, and that cooks for a long time..

Bart owls brown Krista
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

06:43 min | 5 months ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"In the south Bronx or Calder wit. Do you know him? He's a wildlife biologist. I don't Wisconsin evangelical. I've been doing this on this for 30 years. The great northern is an expression of this. Starts with love with what we love and who we love and culture. Yes. Robin wall kimmerer is another example, right? It doesn't start with an abstraction. That's right. And. So there are two critical moments that I kind of discovered or at least that I'd like it again to you with that in terms of the development of what I would say has become your calling. And the first is the story you tell about two years after Katrina is seeing those flood maps. Seeing flood maps of this place you belong to for the first time. And would you just tell us what you saw? Yeah. You know, there are all of these researchers who are looking at south Louisiana before Katrina. Many people concerned about sea level rise and all of these things for a very long time. But it wasn't common knowledge. It wasn't information brought to the communities. The university knew it, but the communities didn't know. And there was a highly regarded professor who put the maps on the wall and they played a time lapse of land loss, and they had us all point where you are. And all of a sudden you see time lapse and you see your community is going to is going. And they tell you this is going to happen no matter what. So even if we are successful in whatever it is we want to do next, we will lose these places. We will lose this land. We will lose. They didn't say communities, but we were all several of us up at the map, just coming to that conclusion. I couldn't believe that what I saw was at this place that I hold so dear that I had such a long memory of not because I was old, but because all my life I had been told stories from a very long time ago. All of those stories are going to go. Yeah. All of the trees that we sat under are going to go. Everything that I knew to be like, you know, who I was, even describing just who I am and where I'm from was going to go. It's going to be lost. And that was a moment where, you know, you sort of have this, it's surreal. Who can believe your land won't be there anymore? Most people still can't conceptual conceptually understand that. Especially for you because you had such a long history on the land. And much more knowledge of that history than most of us. Yes, yes. And that land for people like me was tied to our freedom. You know, that land, the land and the right to be there was tied to, it was a difference between being enslaved and not. You know, it was a culture that has. Birthed a lot of people and to lose that it felt in that moment that we would lose everything. Nobody would even know who we are. And my mom is this my mom is an amazing woman who fought for French to get back into the Louisiana school. So, you know, just the culture has been a big part of our family life. So to think that people were fighting for these communities that nobody would ever really know about. It was hard to it is hard. And people ask me all the time if you know your land is going to go. Why are you still fighting, you know? My last name is battle now, Krista. You know what I'm saying? I don't know what they expected, you know? We going down swinging if we going. But yeah, no, it's, I still cry about it. I still think about it, you know? It's not something you understand one day and then move past. It's something you contemplate daily. I take drives now just to make sure I witness. It feels like this moment where you had survived and the people around you had survived Hurricane Katrina about you suddenly placed yourselves in this much larger existential struggle. That's right. That we will not survive. And then there was this meeting you were invited to at The White House. What year was that? It was in the Obama so many meetings at The White House. Yeah, okay. But with the fema with fema, and this is so stunning that at some point, this senior person, the head of fema. The head of fema, not apologizing, not. Really explaining. But in a moment of just leveling with you, said, because I guess I'm sure the question was partly, how do we make sure this doesn't happen again? And he said, the disaster process in this country is designed for the middle class. That's right. That's right. Which actually makes everything make sense. It makes sense. It was the most honest answer. As a matter of design. That's right. That's right. And this, you know, this gets us to structural racism, understanding structures, law, and policy. And it made me understand why I was placed here in this calling, right? I don't have this law degree for nothing. And the laws as they are written right now are not meant for me. And they're not meant for my community, and they're not meant to help people, and they're not meant to save people, and they're not meant to do those things with the utmost humanity and dignity. They are meant to preserve a middle class text base. Period, almost every law that we have, that, you know, how does this affect the taxpayer? It's the analysis that is used. What was happening was there was a conversation. It was a lot of people in that fema meeting, and it was like, this is what happened. This is what happened. It was terrible, terrible stories housing, education, healthcare, everything. And the response from the head of fema was, I believe you. Yeah. Right. I believe that all of that happened because.

Robin wall Katrina south Bronx fema south Louisiana Louisiana school Wisconsin White House Krista Hurricane Katrina Obama
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:32 min | 5 months ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Welcome. Welcome to this live podcast recording of on being featuring conversation between very special guests. Louisiana native, a climate activist and lawyer. And Krista tippett, the Peabody Award winning broadcaster, New York Times bestselling author, national humanities medalist, and our very own Minnesota treasure. I'm Kate Nordstrom. I'm the executive and artistic director of the great northern. And every year, our festival shares dozens of performances are installations. Outdoor activations and solutions focus climate talks over ten days in January and February. We hope that they enrich the mind and inspire the body and this conversation is our first in a series of climate talks. It is part of our climate solution series that runs through February 6th and you can find more information on our website, which is the great northern festival that come. So we are especially pleased that collette traveled from the warmth of the south. To experience our cold and hearty winter here in the north. So we are grateful that you're giving Minnesota winter a chance. And it's now my great honor to turn over the stage to Colette and Chris to share this very special live on being conversation..

Krista tippett Kate Nordstrom Peabody Award great northern Louisiana Minnesota New York Times collette Colette Chris
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:53 min | 7 months ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm Krista tippett, up next, my unedited conversation with the late sharing maples. I interviewed her around the edges of a retreat with tick knot Han in 2003. Parts of this interview, as well as my conversation with tick not Han, appear in our show, remembering tick not Han, brother tie. So we've been a monthly national program. We've just become a weekly national program on public radio stations and this will be an hour around taking that Han and sort of based at this retreat. And I interviewed him yesterday, which was wonderful. So that'll be sort of the interview. Yeah. Yeah, it was. So that'll be sort of the anchor of the program, but then we'll also have sounds from plum village and from this experience. And then a few voices from people who are here. Okay. So I just want to start by asking you how you first came in contact with this teaching in this man. Well, it was almost it depends on whether you believe in accidents or miracles or coincidences or miracles. I had read a book and was kind of curious. You don't think much about this stuff as a cop. I'd been a cop, I've been a cop for 19 years now at the time I'd been a cop for 7 years. And I found I was on this call where involving a stolen moped where I had to take the stolen moped somewhere. The short story is, as I hurt my back very badly pulling the moped out of the squad of the trunk. So I had a workers comp in tree that needed to be treated by a chiropractor. Decided to go to the chiropractor that was closest to the building that I started my shift at my patrol shift. Which was downtown at the time, so I went to this chiropractor who had a flyer. For retreat in Wonderland, Illinois in 1991, honor bulletin board. I had read a book as kind of curious, I thought, why not? So I went to this retreat. And kind of changed my life. Can you tell me some more about that? What happened? What changed your life? When you have a chance to deeply experience the practice, the idea of learning to stop doing and to start being and at that retreat, it was a little longer and there was much more silent time. We only talked really during the things that were together. We maintained noble silence, which was a very new concept for me. But I started to experience a lot of just the refreshing wonders sort of started to be able to taste the divinity of life at that retreat in a way that I had never ever experienced. I wouldn't have had words for it then. But it was what became very, very clear to me is that if you can live in the present moment, there are all kinds of wonders available to be able to nourish and refresh yourself with. Well, as a cop, what started to happen to me got very interesting because I don't know if you attended the 5 mindfulness trainings last night, but that was one of the things that happened at my first retreat and I just assumed well, I'd listen to this, but I can't do it. I'm a cop. You know, I mean, I might be in a position where I have to kill somebody at some point. I can't think about taking these. And sister chewing Kong, who is one of the probably the senior monastic here. Was that that retreat? And she pulled me aside, and she had this very wonderful conversation with me. The essence of it being who else would we want to carry a gun except somebody who will do it mindfully? Of course you can take these trainings. And I thought about it over the course of the week and it felt right to me. So I did. I took the 5 mindfulness trainings. And then when I came back and what happened to me is my heart started to soften and kind of break open for the first time I had gotten very mechanical about how he's doing my job. I had no idea that I had shut down that way. And I came home and. I go on probably especially that first week when it was so new and everything felt so fresh. I started to understand that in a very, very deep level that it's possible to bring this into your work as a cop because as my energy started to change the energy that I got back from other people started to change, even including the people that I had to arrest and take to jail, but probably the first example of that was. I was on a domestic violence call and it was one of these calls where I would have just arrested the guy. I would have just enough, you know? He was felt very strongly about the issue and mandatory arrest. As a female officer who's had a lot of contact with domestic violence victims and this was a scenario where breaking up is hard to do and they were exchanging. There was a little girl and they were exchanging custody and he was kind of holding a little girl hostage. Not wanting to give her back to mom. And there had been no violence that had taken place, but both mom and the little girl were very scared and intimidated. An ordinarily I would have said that's it throwing the hand slapped the handcuffs on him taking him to jail, but something stopped me. And I just come out of this retreat and I got the little girl, I got him to give me the little girl to care of her, got her and her mom said, told them just to leave went back. And I just talked to this guy from my heart and within 5 minutes, I got this big gun belt on. I'm about 5 three right in this guy's like 6, 6, and he's balling, you know?.

Han Krista tippett Wonderland Illinois Kong
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

04:09 min | 7 months ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Org. I'm Krista tippett, up next, my unedited conversation with the late venerable tick not Han. I had this rare intimate conversation with him around the edges of a retreat he led in 2003. He died in January 2022. You can find a produced, longer, remembrance of him, wherever you found this podcast. I think what intrigued me and I know since we don't have lots of time on your very tired. Is that you actually wrote the miracle of mindfulness in those years when you had somewhat withdrawn from that great political and social activism. Of the 1960s. And so I wondered if mindfulness that emphasis on mindfulness was really the core of the learning that you took away from those years of such turmoil and activism on your part. That was the practice that kept us alive, help us to survive. And the miracle of mindfulness was written for our social workers first in Vietnam because they were living in a situation where the danger of dying. Is I was there every day. So out of compassion, how to pregnancy help them to continue their work. Well, the back of my finance was written as a manual practice. And after that, many friends in the west, they think that it is helpful for them. So they allow it to be translated into English and so. And I know that the elements of mindfulness the way you describe it are in traditional Buddhism, the teachings of the Buddha, but you do seem to have placed a very special kind of emphasis and interpretation on breathing and also what is the word what is the Vietnamese word that you're translating is mindfulness? What are the connotations of that? I wonder. Call mindfulness. And your mind fully present in the hand and now. Okay. And mindfulness is the heart of Buddhism meditation. Because with muffins, you'll be concentrated. And mindfulness and concentration have you to see things and to touch things more deeply so that you might understand the true nature of what is there. And that kind of understanding you said you're free from your own perceptions and from the affliction that come from your grand perception. What have you done with this concept, though, that is different? I mean, how did you interpret it or apply it differently that it had such an impact mindfulness is a part of living. When you are mindful, you are fully alive, you are fully present. You can get in touch with the wonders of life that can nourish you and hear you. And you are stronger, you are more solid in order to handle the suffering inside of you and around you. When you are mindful, you can recognize embrace and handle the pain, nasara in you and around you. To bring relief and if you continue with concentration and insight, you'll be able to transform the suffering inside and help transform this happening around you..

Krista tippett Vietnam
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:36 min | 9 months ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm Krista tippett, up next, my unedited conversation with psychiatrist and trauma researcher bessel vendor kolk. And there is a shorter produced version of this wherever you found this podcast. Hello hello. Yeah, okay. There we go. Got it now. You hear me now? Hello? Yes hello. Oh, hi. It's Chris. Tell me a little louder if you can make it. I'm working on the headphone. Okay. Go ahead. Hello, it's Christopher. Hi, Krista. Hi. Would you say your name for me? I want to say it perfectly. Okay. Do you have any thank you, first of all, thank you for coming. I have so enjoyed steeping in your work. And I'm really looking forward to this conversation and I'm glad we could reschedule it for today. Do you have any questions for me before we start? No, I'll just plunge into the unknown. All right, that's good. Okay, let's talk about something mundane first so we can get levels of tell me what you had for breakfast. I had some yogurt and various breakfast. Okay, that's good. Yeah. There's some locks. Oh, you did. Good breakfast, yeah. Okay. How are we Chris? Can we start? All right, let's do this. Okay, I'm gonna step out of the booth. Okay. Oh,.

Krista tippett bessel vendor kolk Krista Chris Christopher
Pastor Mark Driscoll Discusses His New Book 'Christian Theology vs. Critical Theory'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:00 min | 10 months ago

Pastor Mark Driscoll Discusses His New Book 'Christian Theology vs. Critical Theory'

"Of you already know mark driscoll. If he don't let me see what it says. oh yes. He's the founding senior pastor of the trinity church in scottsdale arizona but he has debated deepak chopra on abc's nightline. He's discussed marriage with barbara. Walters on the view all kinds of ugly stuff. Like that mark driscoll. Welcome to the program. Good to have anybody good to see. Thanks for having me on. It's good to see you. It's good to see you always but honestly you've written a book. The reason you're here today is to talk about. I'm holding in my hand. It's called christian. Theology versus critical theory. A lot of people are at least confused about this new thing. You keep hearing about critical race there. You might theory my thesis. I should say is that anytime. Somebody comes up with a new thing like that. I'm deeply suspicious because they act as though everything you've heard up until now is wrong. Here take this and i think why. What are you saying to me so we were hoping we could get somebody on the program to discuss it. And we found you so mark driscoll thank you. Thanks for writing this. Is this brand new. Yeah and so. It's krista theology versus critical theory. It's free it real faith dot com. I've got a mountain a bible teaching there. I tend to teach through books of the bible. I've been a pastor for twenty five years. I didn't go through a publisher. 'cause i know it would get attacked and cancelled. I didn't put endorsements on it because then all they do is just shoot. Ariza your friends. So i'm just giving away. I think that the greatest threat to christian theology right now is critical theory. I believe it's the counterfeit i believe. It seeks to undo anything that looks like traditional western values. Marriage family sexuality critical race theory is a part of that but it's much much much bigger issue. Critical theory includes gender. Studies ribbon seeing it now with mask. No mask vaccine. No vaccine almost every single cultural collision that we're having is up against critical

Mark Driscoll Trinity Church Deepak Chopra Walters Scottsdale ABC Barbara Arizona Krista Ariza
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:21 min | 11 months ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Figure out how we want to now live Let me just ask you this Inclosing and i really want you to answer this question kind of this week today. What is making your despair. And where are you finding. Hope what is making me. Despair is the deep fracturing of our country and the venom that i see Between and across people what is giving me hope is the conversations that have been suppressed for centuries are being and the questions are being revealed and in many pockets where people who don't necessarily have to hold those questions are holding them and not letting them go and i think what your work Is drawing forth and and being creative with is that we have we all have the capacity To to pick up those conversations and the questions that are being raised In the fabric of our lives which is gathering with other people absolutely and and by first asking and looking and seeing. What is the need that i see. And is that the need that others see and it may not be and if it is not how do i listen and then how might we invent new ways and agreements and forms to come together because we choose to belong to each other. Yeah appreciate thank you so much. Thank you so much krista. It's such a. It's such a joy and a and a privilege to be in conversation with you about About these questions so thank you. Well it's been a long time coming. And the world has shifted onto access a few times since we first started talking about doing this and Yeah no this is fantastic. And there's so much in here. That i think it gets to the spirit of our conversation. People don't just need to hear about are longing to hear so. Thank you blessings..

krista
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"And chris he will learned arale and mauka fantasy now. Let's get to tonight's program in two thousand fourteen. President obama awarded. Krista tippett the national humanities medal at the white house for quote thoughtfully delving into the mysteries of human existence on the air and in print miss ms tippett avoids easy answers embracing complexity inviting people of every background to join her conversation about faith ethics and moral wisdom please join me in welcoming krista tippett and louise alberta good evening so happy to be here to venture out of across the border from minneapolis. Saint paul pasta water. You know people often don't know that on being is produced here. Does everybody know that. I'm happy to be getting out more and minnesota these days to to get that news out. I'm delighted to be here tonight. With luis alberto raya he has published in nearly every genre. He's written nonfiction memoir short stories and poetry his his. He's written historical novels historical novel. That hummingbird's daughter is based on the story of his father's aunt. Theresa is that correct. That's my book. My great great known as the mexican. Joan of arc a mexican mystic full healer and revolutionary and surgeon. And i have to say you have an inordinate number of characters like that on.

krista tippett arale mauka ms tippett louise alberta Saint paul pasta President obama luis alberto raya white house chris minneapolis minnesota hummingbird Theresa Joan
Author Luis Alberto Urrea on How He Discovered What God Meant to Him

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:11 min | 1 year ago

Author Luis Alberto Urrea on How He Discovered What God Meant to Him

"So how would you. How would you start to think about what what is the spiritual imprint on your perhaps the spiritual work that that left in you for the rest of your life. Straddling a border like that in your person from the very beginning of your life A couple of things i was. I don't know why. But i've always been good crazy. You know i have been drawn toward whatever the cosmic mysteries are from boyhood on and honestly back in those days. I'll reveal myself a little bit here. But back in those days in the early sixties. When i was there you know it was a different catholic church than now and there was a lot of grimness There were certainly no folk masses and it wasn't even in english yet when i was a kid and the nuns would terrorize us with these amazing stories. You know they'd say well. What are you going to do in the communists take over the country. We'd be like we're going to stand up for jesus she said are you. Are you so when they come to torture you. What are you going to do. We're going to renounce jason's she'd say when they're tearing flesh back with hooks. Then then we stand for jesus and we're like yeah and in the midst of that a franciscan friar came to my school full robes. Yeah and he was laughing and he was playing with the kids. And i think that was the moment when i thought. Oh that's what. Jesus is about that guy right. And so it was an instant in some way cutting of the court of all the traditional stuff and leaping into some childish mysticism. But i've always had that moment in my heart of seeing that guy and his laughter. And i thought oh. That's what i want to be right. And so god is always felt like my companion in

Jason
Meditation Teacher Sharon Salzberg Explains Her Saying, 'The Healing Is In The Return'

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:01 min | 1 year ago

Meditation Teacher Sharon Salzberg Explains Her Saying, 'The Healing Is In The Return'

"Of the things that i've heard you say across the years and i think have never taken it in so gratefully and it has never been so helpful before The healing is in the return. Not in not getting lost in the beginning but dances such a really fat is such liberation. I think it's powerful. Because i actually think it's true. You know like when. I started meditation like most of us. I had a different idea of success. And what it looked like in that you'd be very much about accumulation. Like if i could be with two breaths in the beginning with that my mind wandering then surely by today i should be with eight and then tomorrow should be with fifteen and then eventually my mind wandering. I found that the most unbelievable thing that that wasn't the point that learning how to let go more gracefully was the point learning how to start over with some compassion for yourself instead of judging yourself so harshly. That was the point. And it's so funny. 'cause it's like really you're like less than one on one for me and it's one in life too and it's the most precious thing i use it every day. You know. it's still the most significant thing i've ever learned from meditation and that i use it every single day because we do we have to start over and kind of do course correction or pick up if we fallen down like every day frustrating but this is true but there's something about accepting it and even accepting it as a gift That the kind of does what you also Are so clear is that we can't change Often the conditions or circumstances that are immediately in front of us but we can change our relationship to our experience of them and that that can change everything.

Rev. Jen Bailey: What We Inherit & What We Send Forth

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:36 min | 1 year ago

Rev. Jen Bailey: What We Inherit & What We Send Forth

"Reflecting a lot lately about what is it. Has it been about my life experience that has helped me see this long view. It a relatively hung aids and i think i think it's been my proximity to death Having lost my mom at twenty eight when she was sixty three years old having last three or four friends all women of color to suicide early twenties two weeks after i gave birth to my best friends from high school died unexpectedly and experienced walking with my mom. Her last few months On earth when she was after battling cancer for fourteen years in walking with her and alongside her and feeding her and changing her and carrying for her and loving for her and being in the room when she transitions think those experiences throughout the course of my life have allowed me an insight into just how precious and finite and short life can be and so the question then becomes our time on. Earth is not guaranteed. It's okay to just do what we can do over here and enjoy it all happen And i wonder how much that might be. Reflected generational with other folks In particular of of young black folks in the us who had grown up alongside and becoming behind me who have seen death literally become spectacle in front of our eyes. He's constant encounter with via social media whether it be police shootings where other things that are. Now just right in front of our eyes And given that we live in a culture in the us that is not well we like like to shut it down any any case yeah I wonder if emerging out of this twenty twenty moment. There might be a reintregation of how he sit with death and grief not as like something that is sad that dwelling

Aids Cancer United States
Abby Wambach on What It Means to Find Your True Self

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:19 min | 1 year ago

Abby Wambach on What It Means to Find Your True Self

"The book you wrote you. The chapters are all ways. People had seen you write and categories. You'd but sometimes walked into willingly and and sometimes is that had been an armor right so it was everything from you or how you seen yourself. We fraud tomboy rebel teammate. Lesbian manic depressive captain leader romantic hero addict failure and then the last chapter is human somewhere. You said i had created yourself. All these categories that were both generated from you generated externally helped create you but shut you off from becoming human fully. Human glennon has said this a lot. you know. We're all kinda like russian nesting dolls and as we get older. We kinda keep putting on all of these costumes. And that's what i thought for me growing up. That's what i thought. I had to do to mature to age to get. Wisdom is to put on all these different costumes and see which one fit. And i think that now having gone through a lot of my life granted i'm still fairly young thirty eight but i realized that the more you can actually take those costumes off and get down to that little small immobile russian nesting doll. That is like who you are your true self that is like the humanity of all of us and we all are in there. I visited very random. But i just wanna share it. Because it was reading thinking he ended with human which seems like the simplest most elemental thing of all but is really the work of a lifetime. Right i was thinking about this you. When i studied theology paul tillich wrote the courage to be and he's called an existentialist feel ogen. I read it when i was older. Because i was emphasized when i thought that to be that being but the current the book is actually about how the courage it takes right. The courage is the work.

Human Glennon Manic Depressive Paul Tillich
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"He jason as long as we're paused. Would you mind turning your headphones down just a little bit yesterday. See a krista that way is that the bottom one. Yeah all right. Can you hear me. I can tell you what can Krista comeback like through your headphones. Come back through. Sorry about that. Not so totally. Fine fine you gotta get. One of these microphones for all your appearances and to make an investment. Okay this is the reality of home studio so good. Okay so i have black friends. Yes so you know. There's this this thing about the black friends right. I'm not racist. Because i have black friends or i'm not racist because i have a black partner. I can't be racist. Because i have a black child in the way i always. I always try to explain it to people as i have. I have so many women friends who my heterosexual specifically my heterosexual women friends. Who say if you wanna know how a man is going to treat you. Just look at how he cheats his mother. And then you'll know whether or not he's good or not and my reply to that is that is ridiculous because that man sees his mother as exceptional. That's his mother. you're not his mother. And so. When i think about my daughter fast but think about it. But you're not his mom he he sees his mom as exceptional and that is the reason why he treats her the way he treats. And so we we think about this idea of the black friend. It's not that you're not racist. It's that you somehow have aligned yourself with who you believe is an exceptional black person and that is the problem the work these are black people who are convenient for you to love but the truth. Is that the kid on your black. The one that you're scared to walk past you gotta love him too right. You gotta love him to the ones. The ones who are locked in juvenile detention centers unfairly most of the time doing hard time because america has hard time for children. The one of the only countries they have maximum security youth prisons. You gotta love them to right. You gotta love them to the ones who blast them music coming down your block right and you can't understand why they gotta turn you gotta you gotta push back against everything in you. That wants to say something that wants to see something wrong with them and love them to if not then then. It doesn't matter. How many black friends you have. It's a specific kind of black person that you're okay with not black people in. That's the difference. Yeah i've been thinking a lot about rage me too and.

krista Krista jason america
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

08:34 min | 1 year ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I mean why would i read books honestly back. In those days. I think if we're being honest about with the contemporary canaan was in the nineteen ninety pertain to black kids. i can name a few people. But even their books were sort of rooted in the nineteen eighty s and nineteen seventies because that was their sweets. That's when they were young people right in the nineties. When you have you have you have these three major Three major sort of cultural elements converging. You have the the the maturing Like the maturation of hip hop music. Right now. this thing is growing legs. It's more than a fad. Now people are realizing that maybe this is gonna take root. That's happening in the early nineties. You have That the wave the height of the crack epidemic. That's happening in the early late eighties early. Nineties hip hop is hip hop is hip hop is being used as a way to actually fight against it right. It's it's in response to it so much of it and then you have because of you know the the other of that convergence. That triangulation was What we now know his hiv and aids all of. That's happening around me as a child. Right my my neighbor. My neighbor died of aids. My two of my neighbors died of aids I mean on my block right like we have family members who are addicted to crack cocaine during that time. Have another brother who all he was doing with us into rap music. All of this is happening. And there's a ten year old child in the middle of it and there are no books about any of it and so and so reading. Just wasn't my name it wasn't it wasn't for me so i study rap lyrics liner notes. i would open up cassette tapes and i would you know unfold. The liner notes would read with the rappers. Were rat what is poetry poetry. Thank you for saying reading. I was reading and it was an and that's all it took right. I didn't wanna be rapper. I wanted to be a poet. I wanted to write it down And that was sort of the beginning of of all this and so when you combine that with my mother's My mother's sort of pouring into us that like look you can say whatever you want to say it you can feel however you wanna feel you can research and study whatever you wanna research you can believe whatever you want to believe. This gave me the platform to put forth my my young curious ideas that the ten eleven to zero. It's interesting i was Canada kojo nnamdi and his such a great. He's awesome public. Radio hosts in dc interviewed. You actually not that long ago. Maybe what's it this month. Was it all the time. i'm sure he's interview he. Yeah he just did what last week on with kids with your readers and But i don't know if it was in this context or another but there was a librarian in dc. Maybe something written about you talking about how before your books came along. What she was doing with kids in. Her library was analyzing rap lyrics. Right then i just have to To listen to that show or kids called in to name their questions with you You know i'm scared of being a black. What should i do. Why do people still hurt black people. I'm nine years old. My question is i'm scared. How can kids help. Bring change in this country so we're all treated fairly and it doesn't matter what color your skin is. I just wanted to put questions out there and name that that's what you're writing into for you. Know krista it's been I wish i could tell you that. That was the first time. I've heard those questions with the truth. Is that have been doing this work a long time in the at this point i've spoken to probably a million kids around this country in parts of the world and those questions come he now that have had a little girl in philly so sweet and she made me been down so she can whisper in my ear. Do i ever wish that my skin was different. You know because of what she felt when she was dealing with or had young people tell me about their their brothers and sisters being killed by police officers or I mean this is very real In my job is to love them. And if i if i claim to love them because all of us claim to love our kids but i think sometimes we are. Love sometimes gets conflicted with with our fear. And that's okay right. I i understand that fear is real but for me my my own personal opinion that if i love them i have to tell them the truth. Have to figure out how to tell them the truth Because be one because a lot of these kids can handle it. I think we spent so much time trying to protect our children that we see it. They see they see it. They know it in his two of his altogether line on that peop- adults think they're shielding them from within that they know and so if they know and we're not helping them process now it's become more dangerous than you've ever imagined right so we have an opportunity to lean into the discomfort of having to talk to about this in order for them to find language around it And and honestly. I don't want you know always young people i. Racism is nothing to make sense of. That's the complicated part about it right. That's why it's such a strange conversation. It's nothing to make sense of But we do have to lean into having a discussion about how nonsensical it is. Yeah that i think that language of Helping kids process. I think that feels that really. That's the one place he said. You don't write pain for trauma porn and boy. We are addicted to that stuff in society like true crime but the stories you tell have a lot of pain in them and they have a lot of trauma in i just i wonder How would you talk about that line. Like what are the different ingredients that go into bet line between telling the hard true stories. I think for me the traumas. Real pain is real But but it is not omnipresent It isn't something that governs my life and it's it especially govern especially doesn't govern the lives of children right. I think it is disingenuous to write it. I think it's i think it's hack work Because the truth is that if you know children children who are the most human amongst us by the way children always find a way to laugh. Children always find a win right talking to a fourteen year old matter. What's going on a fourteen year. Old is trying to figure out where the joke is trying to figure out when the opportunity comes for the sad part to be over so that they can roast their their best friends so they can write it. This is it's a. I think that the this sort of fervent nature of of finding humor And lightness levity is is a is a remarkable gift of youth honest and so for me. I'm not interested. I write i write that which i believe is real and things that happened when i don't wanna shy away from things that are complicated and tough but i also wanna right whole stories about whole people i think. Sometimes we reduce children and young people to have formed things right and so we wrote. So you're right half formed stories about them. It's the same thing it all and even that ties to the way people talk about children's literature right people talk about children's literature as if it is a category that is full of half formed work. But that's because they too believe that children have formed right and so and so. I think those of us who acknowledge the humanity of young people those of us who acknowledged the complexity in the beauty and sophistication of childhood. Know that. when you're writing all those elements have to be present. It's interesting when you're talking about that. Thinking about that. writing about half formed. Humans can go both directions. I think about some of the books..

aids kojo nnamdi dc krista Canada
The Importance of Self-Awareness Within Self-Care With Alex Elle

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:38 min | 1 year ago

The Importance of Self-Awareness Within Self-Care With Alex Elle

"I so love the way that you complicate this idea of self care and the fact that you name self awareness has being such a key component. Because you're right about that in your book after the rain that like your flawed like we all are right and you're learning hard lessons that needed to be learned but a lot of it was from not being self aware of who you were and your actions at the time And using that as an excuse to not learn to do better right. So i talk about that. Aladdin after the rain in the first chapter called change. Which is everyone's favorite chapter. I talk about like transitioning from working a nine to five nine years ago now to being in my career to how much up. I was an awful employees at one point to how i stepped into like really being a great employee and then faced some really challenging issues with my then boss and it really shows the duality of self awareness from grown from and where i was going And i think change plays a big role in my life. Because i've had to change so much and i've gotten really comfortable with being more okay with change and with learning that i always have worked to do and i think that's part of being a student of life is knowing that we will continue to expand and hopefully learn and grow until you know the day we transition off this planet and i think that that's extremely valuable and important especially as a black woman in this work in this

Exploring the Worlds Beneath Our Feet With Robert Macfarlane

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:50 min | 1 year ago

Exploring the Worlds Beneath Our Feet With Robert Macfarlane

"Really want to focus on under land. Which is your your newest book And also i think a book that people are discovering in this country in in a big way which has been exciting to see That use that as kind of a focal point to also more expansively explore. How you're thinking accumulated way of seeing the world and experiencing it rolls around inside you. And i feel like that also does find expression in in the writing of land so And it's always. It's so interesting to see how. I think you said it this way some in another interview that your body of work. The gradient of your body of work has been tending down because she began writing about mountain mountains of the mind. And then there were the values in moore's in wild places and then there's traversing the world on foot in the old ways and now you have gone down to the world's beneath our feet and you said we know so little of the world's beneath our feet i think just naming that not something that we even think about how little we know of the world's beneath our feet they. They are dark places in in several senses. That a sometimes say to my children. We walk on this thin above this raging space of life and matter in an oil its vibrancy and and fury and we knew nothing of it. site stops at our toes. It's tops at ground. Level in sight is so bind up with with with with modern ways of of of knowing we. Can i say alien unless we can look up and see literally trillions of miles. We can see light coming from starr's across the universe across the galaxy but we looked at and we we can't see beyond the grass or the tomczak

Moore Starr
The Murder of Christa Leigh Steele-Knudslien

True Crime Fan Club Podcast

01:50 min | 1 year ago

The Murder of Christa Leigh Steele-Knudslien

"New year began with the murder of krista steel nuts. Lean by her husband. Mark steel nuts. Lean on january fourth. Two thousand eighteen on january fifth. Mark went to the atoms police department and reported that he had done something very bad and that he should be put in handcuffs holding out his hands to be cuffed. He went on to tell the interviewing officer that he had struck krista several times with a hammer and then stabbed her in the back with a stainless steel kitchen. Knife officers found christie's body in the basement of the couple's home wrapped in a tarp. Mark told officers. Krista often belittled him and called him names mark said he snapped at around five pm. On january fourth according to marx attorney he and krista had been arguing although his attorney would not reveal the nature of the argument he simply said that mark krista had been at one another verbally for some lengthy period of time afterwards. According to statements made to the police mark maintained his composure. Cleaning out taking a shower and then going to the liquor store. The autopsy report indicated that krista had suffered blunt force trauma. Some of which was consistent with defensive injuries. According to the medical examiner krista suffered from multiple base alert skull fractures caused by blunt force trauma the stab wound to her back east through the upper lobe of her right lung and punctured her heart which caused her death. By loss of blood

Krista Steel Mark Steel Atoms Police Department Krista Mark Mark Krista Christie Marx
$25M suit blames energy, boat companies in fatal capsizing

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

$25M suit blames energy, boat companies in fatal capsizing

"Hi Mike Rossi are reporting a pair of lawsuits blaming energy and boat companies for a fatal capsizing in the Gulf of Mexico the first lawsuits have been filed over last week's offshore oil industry vessel disaster in the Gulf of Mexico the two twenty five million dollar lawsuits were filed in Texas state court in Houston by an attorney representing Hannah desperate and Krista verger both of Louisiana despots husband ed virtues fiance are among seven people missing and presumed dead as of Friday six bodies had been recovered and identified six of the nineteen people who were on board when the vessel overturned in stormy weather were rescued both lawsuits faults Paulos energy and lift boat operator seacor marine LLC and its affiliates C. core lift boats LLC for the accident hi Mike Rossio

Mike Rossi Gulf Of Mexico Texas State Court Hannah Desperate Krista Verger Ed Virtues Houston Louisiana Paulos Energy Seacor Marine Llc Lift Boats Llc Mike Rossio
Bryan Doerries' 'Theater of War' Activates an Old Alchemy for Our Young Century

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:21 min | 1 year ago

Bryan Doerries' 'Theater of War' Activates an Old Alchemy for Our Young Century

"Remember brian. Dory's likes to say in both physical and virtual gatherings you are not alone in this room and you are not alone across time. He is activating an old alchemy. For our young century ancient stories and texts that have stood. The test of time can be portals to honest and dignified grappling with president wounds and longings and callings that we aren't able to muster in our official places now performance of his public health project theater of war have been some of the most generative and repeatedly surprisingly joyful experiences of my pandemic year. This adventure began in two thousand eight at first bringing. Greek tragedies into many modern amphitheatres were trauma is present military bases and hospitals prisons even guantanamo bay. It expanded out from their offering sophocles and shakespeare and the book of job as crucibles for details and moving forward with the particular dramas of our time from caregiving and addiction and partner violence to the hidden wounds of war and open political fracture. Great actors have joined this company from bill. Murray to moses. Ingram from francis mcdormand to jeffrey

Dory Brian Guantanamo Bay Shakespeare Murray Francis Mcdormand Ingram Moses Jeffrey
The relationship between creativity and therapist with Christa Butler

Creative Therapy Umbrella

02:24 min | 1 year ago

The relationship between creativity and therapist with Christa Butler

"All. Right krista welcome to the podcast thank you. Thanks for inviting me. I'm so happy to be here. Yes i am pumped that year here. We have so much in common of all the things we love talking about. And i think we could really do twenty episodes but i am pumped about so the topic for today's episode. So thank you for coming on and taking the time. Thank you i appreciate. I'm excited to be here. And i love to talk about. Creativity is so. I appreciate having a space where i can just share. You know part of who. I am as as an individual first of all and also as a therapist gas. Yes it so. It's nice to have that space. I think i haven't really thought about it that way but sometimes when we can share. I think that's what's so nice about listening to podcasts and people's experiences and who they are and what they bring to therapy is. It's really inspiring. So i'm i'm glad we have the space to this is going to be fun yes. I'm looking forward to it. Well for our listeners. How tell us a little bit about what you do currently in your practice okay. So i'll just start by just sharing a little bit about me as a person i is in. Yeah is krista. I'm i'm a hobbies photographer. I i'm a writer. I'm an indoor gartner. Probably going to talk more about. My love of plants is something that i just naturally like to share a to bring up in pop that in And i'm also a concert creator for instagram. I'm the owner and founder creative minds at play. I i work full time as a director of counseling programs at a nonprofit organization and part time and private practice at seven corners psychotherapy in northern virginia. I am a licensed professional counselor therapist. Supervisor i am naturally certified in cfc cbc. And i'm also a board approved licensure supervisor with the virginia. Born of counseling

Krista Gartner Instagram Northern Virginia CBC Virginia
Assistant Building Super In Brooklyn, New York Dies In Freak Accident While Retrieving Tenant's Cell Phone

KM Builders Remodeling Show

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

Assistant Building Super In Brooklyn, New York Dies In Freak Accident While Retrieving Tenant's Cell Phone

"Accident in a Brooklyn apartment building after a 10 and dropped the cell phone down an elevator shaft. Boxes. Krista Mayo says 64 year old Kenneth Lessee, who worked in the building was killed trying to retrieve the phone when the elevator was called to another floor less. He was caught between the moving hoist ropes and the device around which the ropes move. Police are investigating.

Krista Mayo Kenneth Lessee Brooklyn
Naomi Shihab Nye Shares Why Kindness Is The Deepest Thing Inside You

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:57 min | 1 year ago

Naomi Shihab Nye Shares Why Kindness Is The Deepest Thing Inside You

"Naomi. shehab nice. Childhood unfolded between ferguson missouri. Near where her mother grew up and her father's palestinian homeland. Our conversation in two thousand sixteen spoke to so much that he's even more alive in the world. Now i always start my interviews by inquiring about the religious or spiritual background of someone's tighted and i just wonder where you'd start reflecting on what that was in your life all. I felt very lucky as a child to have open minded parents. And i knew they were open minded because they were unlike any other parents. I met my friends parents I also knew that they didn't practice the religions of their upbringings. Either one of them so this fascinated me as even a little child. And i would ask a lot of questions. There was no sense of a taboo subject on. My father had not really had a difficult time telling his family that he didn't want to practice islam. He said i will respect it. But i don't want to practice it and they had accepted that my mother's family on the other hand had been more hard hearted about her rejection of their german lutheran missouri. Synod background but this was something. Both of my parents. Talk about with each other and with their children. You know that people are raised in all kinds of different ways. And if it doesn't feel a meaningful to you maybe you have to search more. You have to keep searching. And i was a religion major in college. Of course you work. Because of my appetite for this topic and i was fascinated to study more about zen buddhism which appealed to me very much from the beginning and it seems like hugh became a writer at a very young inch. You're like seven six. I was six. When i started writing my own poems and seven when i started sending them out and And just today Some students i was talking to a skype class in kuwait. How much. I love the modern world that we can do these things. I was with these students for two hours. And i feel like i'm going to think about them for the rest of my life but one young man asked me. How were you brave enough to do that. What gave you the confidence. he said. i've been trying to run a publication here at our university campus. And i can't get my friends to give me their writing. They're not brave enough. What gave you confidence. And i think just having you know that sense of voice while other people have done it. That's what we do if you know words if you compose wanna share them. Because they'll have a bigger life if you do that so you know. I certainly wasn't thinking about a career. Just thought of myself as having a practice you know if you have a practice of writing then you have a lot of pieces of paper on your desk and you can share the if you chose to. And it seemed more exciting or illuminating. Share them and see what happened next than just keep for myself. So i'm very interested in general in this question of you know what poetry works in us but i think even that question itself hasn't holds the implication that poetry is something separate something distinct but it seems that in your sensibility. You see it. As very organic i mean there's i think it was in in some of your writing for poems by children. He said i do think that all of us think in poems i do i do think that and i think that is very important enough feeling separate from text feeling sort of your thoughts as text or the world as it passes through you as a kind of text the story that you would be telling to yourself about the street even as you walk down or as you drive down as you look out the window the story you would be telling a. It always seemed very much to me as a child that i was living in a poem. The my life was the poem. In fact at this late date i have started putting that on the board of any room. I walk into. That has a board Came back from japan a month ago and every classroom. I would just write on the board. You are living in a poem. And then i would write other things just relating to whatever. We were doing that class. But i found the students very intrigued by discussing that you know. What do you mean. we're living in a poem or win all the time or just when someone talks about poetry and i'd say no when you think when you're in a very quiet place when you're remembering when you're savoring an image when you're allowing your mind calmly to leap from one thought to another. That's a poem. That's what a poem does and they liked that and grow in. Fact wrote me a note In yokohama on the day that i was leaving her school that has come to be like the most significant note. Any student has written me in years. She said well here. In japan we have a concept called you todi and it is spaciousness. It's a kind of living with spaciousness for example like it's leaving early enough to get somewhere so you know you're going to arrive early so when you get there you have time to look around. Or whether she gave all these different definitions of what you tori was to her but one of them was an after you read a poem just knowing you can hold it you could be in that space of the poem and it can hold you in its space and you don't have to explain it you don't have to paraphrase it. You just hold it and it allows you to see differently. And i just love that i mean. I think that's what i've been trying to say all these years.

Shehab Missouri Naomi Ferguson Hugh Kuwait Skype Japan Yokohama Tori
Flood Insurance changes are on the way

Clark Howard Show

04:36 min | 1 year ago

Flood Insurance changes are on the way

"So we have a home that is not in a flood plain but we have flood insurance and so you may think i'm out of my mind but the deal is we live by two minor. Creeks they come together on our property and they continue enduring heavy rains which can occur in the spring. The creek can start to look like a pretty menacing thing. Thank goodness more than ten years. Living where we do we've had not even close to a flood in our house and we had anything it would just hit our basement. But because we're not in a flood plain in our risk is so exceedingly low. The premium is extremely low. A few hundred dollars a year and now our premiums after a reset coming later this year or almost certainly going down for our flood insurance because our risk profile is extremely low but the coverage i get is up to two hundred and fifty thousand dollars in reality for any damage only occurred to our basement. Then the coverage is essentially twenty-five thousand but again the premium is so low that in the extremely unlikely event that it would happen it would still be worth it. Krista we talked years about what happened to you. There was such a devastating personal and financial experience. When you're home suffered a major flood in two thousand nine. Yeah attack in your area. Ten thousand homes were heavily damaged or destroyed by those floods. And were in a situation with your home where you were in a flood plain but you had a relatively minor creek behind your home and if i remember crummy where i'm wrong. There were twenty two inches of rain and fifteen hours. Is that and then. The sewer backed up into the creek which was really another bonus and your house became. It looked like literally looked like a houseboat. And i remember you and your husband. Mike where on your tenth anniversary tram came back landed and i'm with you at the curb looking at your house. Is tears rolling down your face and you see water just going through your home and that was a brutal experience. The power of water is amazing. But i'll say i. I'm glad that happened to us. Ultimately for me personally only because i found how lucky i was and i had people like you and other people my life who were so good to us and we didn't know what the finances we're going to be like after but we were we were totally fine and Thank goodness had the means to get back in and And take care of things and then what did for me. Was you know when you have a flood. They take all the stuff out and then it gets thrown into dumpsters and everything you have to tear it apart. If you have the kind of damage we had and just seeing all that material stuff It didn't mean anything to me. There were just a couple of sentimental things that matter and so it's really changed my perspective in a positive way. Well that's why you're you that you looked at what was a brutal experience at that time where you were having trouble even sleeping and you now look canada's a positive event most people don't look at a flood is a positive life event and there are because of development patterns in urban and suburban areas of we so overwhelmingly urbanize all across the major metros of the country. We lose a lot of vegetation a lot of areas of tree cover. It increases the flooding risk. Then you layer on top of that. The issues from climate change in so we are seeing increasing flooding activity. And that's why a lot of homes that that may be in a position where yeah they're not gonna flood plain but there's a good possibility the your home could see an invasion of water even though it's not on the flood maps. This would be something you should look at. And see what kind of premium you'd face at fled smart dot gov

Krista Mike Canada
A new way to invest that doesn't involve buying stocks hyped on Reddit

Clark Howard Show

06:18 min | 1 year ago

A new way to invest that doesn't involve buying stocks hyped on Reddit

"So lately. All the buzz his been about well. Bitcoin and other crypto currencies. Bitcoin recently fifty thousand dollars a bitcoin and people who've been buying the stocks that are being touted on read it and it was all that mess that went on with Game stop and other stocks. That went up like rockets and then like rockets can do crash back down to earth and my son is in this investing group at school. He's fifteen and they're investing not real money but they all have their stock portfolios and wanna read you to texts from him from this morning. They're really funny. Is said in the last nineteen minutes. My stock portfolio dropped by six sixty. Then he texts me eight minutes later and these eh. then it went up by eight hundred dollars. And i the other night. When he was trapped. In the car with me i started boring. I'm trying to talk about how my philosophies investing work very differently than matt worrying about day trading and options and all. That was going to happen up to the minute and if you thought a father could be more irrelevant to sun then i was that minute you you couldn't be no interest in anything i was saying because to him. This is sport and that's what investing has been of late call. Investing is really speculating. And that's not my thing. I mean i'm the dulles person alive and i invest in a dull way because the ideas i wanna make money over time and so. That's why i get excited about really accessible. Investing opportunities for small investors did allow you to build reasonable wealth over time instead of trying to get the quick score and my son's a sharp kid hill. Eventually get it and will not that. It matters what you're buying and selling minute by minute. And by the way he's asked me if he can have a real investing account. Will you know you'd have to have what's called a custodial said yeah yeah where where you were the pretend owner but i'm the one doing the investing and i don't know what to do you know. Give them a couple of hundred dollars and let him play. And maybe learn the value of term investing. But you know it fifteen. What is long term. That's like three days from now. It's hard to explain a concept where you build wealth over time well do you know goldman sachs is goldman sachs is for rich people like crista. People was massive amounts of money. Who work with a personal financial manager. Who handles their money for them. That's right krista. That's what you do with your millions. Yeah no no okay. So there are. There are very wealthy people. That's what they do and goldman sachs has been doing some stuff lately that doesn't fit at all their historical pedigree They're the ones that issue the apple card for people that have the apple credit card and they have Savings accounts and all that kind of thing with no minimums will now. They've launched some cold. Marcus invest which allows people to use goldman sachs incredible financial analysis investment analysis till build robo investing portfolios for you using very low cost funds. And this is something you would ask somebody. Ten years ago if goldman sachs would ever being looking to provide investments an investment advice to everyday ordinary. People they'd say you're crazy. That will never happen. Well they're not doing what fidelity investments does where a dollar is enough to open an account many cases schwab one hundred dollars. They're doing what vanguard. Does you have to have a thousand bucks to open an account but once you have that thousand you can get advice that is tailored to your personal financial goals and outlook. The money can be and a retirement account or an investment account use what are known is exchange traded funds. Etf's and typically for the advice and the investments you pay roughly a third of a percent per year for them to handle your money. So i guess ten thousand dollars be thirty five bucks a year. Is that right. I think that's about right. three dollars. Fifty cents on a thousand. I think that's right so this is an opportunity for you to do. Investing through the nation's big boys big money houses and their whole business plan is pretty similar to what you'd have if you were with Betterment or wealth front that really started this whole investing idea. And i'm sure neither of them are very happy the goldman sachs through. Marcus invest is playing in their ballpark.

Goldman Sachs Bitcoin Crista Matt Apple Krista Marcus Schwab
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

06:48 min | 2 years ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"High is at Arley. . Yes Hi Krista yes good to meet. . Thank you so much for doing this and I. . so apologize for the delay as we had in this totally unusual and I think it happened twice with you I. . Really Apologize. . No problem but but what we need to talk about has not. . diminished. . So here we are. . We have construction going on here in our in our studio and so like coming in. . itself is very quiet, but , there's just hammering as I walk in. . For an audio yeah program. . So good. . Are you? ? Are they going to I mean I don't hear it so. . Where where are you? ? Right now. . Are, , you talking to me? ? Yes. . Yeah. . I'm in North Gate Hall, , which is in. . The basement of the journalism department at UC Berkeley Okay Okay Yeah Berkeley. . Three blocks from our home. . Oh, , what a what a wonderful place to live. . <hes>. . I think we're pretty good here. . I. . Don't like to. . I. Don't . want to start talking about anything substantive until we're really doing it. So . yeah, , I. . Think we're fine. . Good and where you KRISTA. . Minneapolis. . Okay. . Yeah. . Yeah. . It's you'll. . You'll understand this <hes> I grew up in Oklahoma and kind of went far far far far far away and <hes>. . And that's become more important to me in these recent years that you know that he and <hes>, , and then our studios in Minneapolis has been for a long time and. . I've thought across the years about how the show might have been served by being on one of the coasts and. . And in these last few years since two thousand sixteen. . I'm I'm so glad we're in the middle of the country you know. . It's Really important in life giving. . So. . Good Yeah So, , you were the child of a Foreign Service officer. . So you sound like you grew up all over the world. . Well. . Yes to to some degree. . Yeah. . Starting at age twelve. . Yeah it was pivotal. . Father was ambassador us. . Ambassador to New Zealand. . Ghana and Tunisia. . Yeah we don't need to go into his rank spread. . Yeah. . But did you live where those places you lived in I <hes> lived in Israel? ? And from aged twelve to fourteen, , very pivotal experience. . And <hes> then <hes>. . New Zealand Wellington New Zealand. . The university. . <hes> there <hes> Victoria University so <hes> in New Zealand and then <hes> my folks <hes> were in Ghana and I spent a summer. . Ana But by then I was in college and then they weren't Tunisia and I. . Actually spent <hes> five months a doing a study on the emancipation of Tunisia and girls so. . These French questionnaires. . Second Year of Grad School at Berkeley. . So. . <hes> yes. . So I was very. . Fortunate, , really to <hes>, , get to experience all that. . Yeah. . Yeah was there <hes> a religious or spiritual background to your childhood <hes> in your family or in those places? ? Yeah. . Yeah. . I would say there there was <hes>. . And <hes>. . So. . Are we starting your going? ? Yeah. . All right okay. . <hes> yeah <hes> my parents were very religious, , unitarian? ? And <hes>. . So religious in the sense of it being a very important thing to go to church on Sunday and. . My brother and I would. . Kind of. . Wrestle with each other and tickle. . In the back seat of her whole sudden Hudson in Silver Spring Maryland and <hes>. . <hes>. . And Go. . Drive to all souls UNITARIAN church in Washington DC very important to my father especially and I didn't feel particularly religious. . At that point and. . But if I look back on it what. . <hes> the influence of that was is that. . There's <hes>. . An important part of one's self to express and <hes> to learn to develop and that. . For. . UNITARIAN inside the message I took away is that it's very big world and we have to learn to. . <hes> get to know and. . Empathize with. . People in radically different cultures and that that's a good thing to live in a big world. . I think by the time I was. . Sixteen. . I had that message, , but I felt something missing. . And <hes> I got interested in quakers who? ? Be Much. . More. . Okay Gang. . So what are we going to do about it? ? You know view terriers were very talky. . Talkers talk talk of the thinkers looked like they were kind of. . <hes> interesting. . They were doers, , and so I would say. . That that. . Connection for me. . <hes> when I was in high school <hes>, , very informal I didn't become a former quaker anything. . But <hes>. . It led me to <hes> volunteer on weekends when I was in high school <hes>. . At something we called Neighbourhood House on tenth and L.. . Street. . was in the middle of the. . <hes> the back area of Washington

Tunisia Krista Tippett New Zealand New Zealand Wellington New Zea Berkeley Arley Minneapolis Ghana Oklahoma North Gate Hall Silver Spring Maryland Israel Mike Victoria University Grad School Foreign Service officer
"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

11:28 min | 2 years ago

"krista" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Let's say you're you're young APPALACHIA. You're very geology nap alleged. I think I agree with you. And so I'm going to say caught thank you. I'M GONNA say card at the same time however I'm going to say that is really important important if that is the case that that has to be accessible to people and I but but I think that black theology is is accessible to black people. I'm pushing back on imperialistic notion that just because it's not coming out of the white public spaces. It doesn't mean that it's not happening any. I'm also pushing back on the notion of people you said. People and people are very diverse in this country and things happen in different public basis. But I do not believe that you can push back on. I have not heard in all the places that I've traveled is almost like poor white. I people are essential in this country. Nobody wants to deal with their spiritual displacement and I think we're sitting being on the power keg less public theologies are accessible that that you're talking about what it means to be fully human when be fully white because there's nothing wrong with being European American. That's not the problem is how actualize history and how you the actual reality and I've traveled in these communities where people are dealing shooting drugs where people addicted to heroin and I have talked with the alot jains and rarely have I heard old people wax and wane about black theologies and and other kinds is with the allergies. But I haven't is almost like white. People don't believe the other white people are worthy of being redeemed. And I don't quite understand that it must be more sexy to deal with black folk than it is to deal with white folk if you're white person so as a black person. I wanted theology theology that gives hope in meaning to people who are struggling to have meaning in a world where they no longer longer are as essential to whiteness as they once were. I mean let me also just Thank you for for what you've heard a shared with us. Even if some of US have heard a couple of these stories before it's something entirely different to hear it come in the voice of and from the experience of someone the has lived with them and look through them. I want to ask a question. That is not a cute question. This is something I genuinely grapple apple with every day those most going to be cute. And I'm I'm I would love to learn from how you have grappled apple with it hoping I can learn something from it and when you speak about this love that has been in your bones. This love that you've been raised with of the black folk tradition in the hymns the love that Krista talks about is messy and muscular and the love that serene talks about this revolutionary love. I'm I'm all with you and all of us WanNa see love at the center of the beloved community at the very same time. When then I sit with and I listened to black folks in the country right now to Palestinians to queer folk to undocumented folk to native Americans Americans to that twenty percent of our babies living in poverty forty percent of black and brown babies living in poverty? There's also a arrange an outrage and if not an outrage a profound sense of suffering and this willingness S. to say before you want me to love everybody I need you to also hear my pain and the suffering of my community and I'm just trying to learn from you. How do you walk simultaneously to set the time of simultaneous? Not at the expense of one another but how do we with one breath and in one heart that is trying to be whole all acknowledged this rage and outrage and suffering which is real amongst so many people out on on the margins of the power structures and this desire for a healing transformative love that can lead to a beloved community. Well first of all as you just pointed out. It's it's not. Love is not anthony ICAL to being outraged. Let's be very clear about that. And love is not antithetical. Anthony Anger two kinds of anger. There's redemptive anger and there's none redemptive anger as redemptive. Bangor is the anger that says that that moves you to transformation and human building none. redemptive anger is anger that white supremacy roots itself in so we have to make a distinction so people think that anger in itself is a bad emotion. But and it's where you begin your conversation soon. I became involved in the Southern Freedom Movement. Not Merely because I was angry about injustice assis but because I love the idea of justice. So it's where you begin your conversation. So most people begin their conversation station with. I hate this but they never talk about what it is they love and so I think that we have to begin to have have a conversation that talks about that incorporates. A vision of love with a vision of outrage and I don't also those things as being over and against each other I actually see them. You can't talk about injustice without talking about suffering but the reason why I want to have justice is because I love everybody in my hard in if I didn't have that feeling that since there will be no there would be no struggle and so I think we have to really begin to think about it in the larger and more expensive way where love and outrage are not at war with each other and that we're not thinking that the anger Bangor that we see as a part of white supremacy is the ultimate expression of any kind of anger. One more question. I have a question about how you you've alluded to this difference difference between black folk religion and the Black Church. I'm a son of the Black Church. Not currently a part of the Black Church. I'm going to fiscal Google priest and which is basically the opposite. It's a ninety one percent white church right and and I have kind of in theology and I'm doing theology differently as a result of the black lives matter movement and I've heard within myself you know hearing ring my grandparents hearing my parents hearing people like yourself. We have first hand experience of that era in American history. And you were able to name something that I've heard for a couple of years but haven't been able to articulate and that's the difference between black folk religion engine and Black Church. Can you say more about that and really name that for me. Thank you and I think also where now where is it you know where. Where does that distinction manifest in the world? Now so in this twenty first century you mean the world. Are you saying in the black community the larger the culture. Because it's different I mean it's it's all so different from fifty years ago. Well first of all is very obvious when I say black folk religion I'm talking about religion Asian that came out of ordinary folk and I'm also talking about religion that began during enslavement. In the in the fields of America it was a religion that offered an alternative view of God from the view God that empire gave us it was a it was a black religion that talked about that in many ways translated Isaiah about the people living in houses that they plant eating food that they that they I mean houses that they bill booze that they planned it. No one it was that a kind of beloved community vision it was a vision of justice and it was also a vision that predicated itself on a very strong sense of a copy eh that even was able as Martin Luther King would say was able to find the humanity in people who were slave owners and there was also a theology of resistance of theology a reaffirmation African nation. I might be a slave but I'm somebody. It was a theology of hope. It was a theology that different very much from empire theology black folk religion because empire theology when the slave owner would go to bed and pray they would pray that slavery went on forever and Black Folk Theology prayed for the day of liberation. So the starting points. We're very different in.

Black Church Black Folk Theology Anthony Anger apple APPALACHIA US Martin Luther King Bangor heroin Krista Google America Southern Freedom Movement Isaiah