35 Burst results for "Krill"

"krill" Discussed on Voices of Hope’s Cardinal Cafe

Voices of Hope’s Cardinal Cafe

07:11 min | 3 weeks ago

"krill" Discussed on Voices of Hope’s Cardinal Cafe

"Of the carbon cafe. One episode with actor jon allen krill in this episode sean talks about the reopening broadway and a little bit of insider knowledge of jagged. Little pill along with some other fun stuff that we got into. I hope you enjoy one of the things. I did here today. And maybe you can give us a wink wink. We heard that September might e looking good for broadway. Well yeah. The mayor announced yesterday that they're setting up vaccine site possibly sites for the broadway community specifically of acid so that they can get the theaters back open sooner than later. I don't really know you know. I haven't heard anything definitive from anyone. All i know. Is that the fact that you know the the president of the broadway league and the fact that the mayor have both now said in public statements that we need to get broadway reopened. Its priority is only a good thing for us. So i mean it's you know because it's just All these all these people working in the arts in yorker. Just you know young. It's just people who aren't a part of data shows. I don't think realize how many people besides the actors it takes the theater right. Oh my god and then it just and then it just domino's down you know the. The industry affects so many other indices. The restaurant industry the hotel industry. The tourism inched. I mean all of it is so interconnected in in new york if there are no shows than you know. That's one of the main reasons that people come here. It must be really strange. We lived there for few years. We lived up on a fifty six broadway next to the letterman letterman. The colbert Letterman what i live there right ryan. We would just walk stroll through times square because it was beautifully lytton crazy and i came. Imagine what it is. Now i just. I can't wait to get still lit. I mean they've never turned it off which is nice because that would be really strange. Dad son is also very strange to see it lit. You know in the early days of the pandemic. I did harry and i walked over and that was very odd. I i think it was about two weeks three weeks in and there was no one in times square and it was all still lit up so it just it just seemed like a scene. From you. know a post apocalyptic. Yeah not even the almost there were no elmo's out there. no nothing. No there was there was maybe one or two people you know scrambling to get somewhere. But it's not like that now. I mean there are. There's still people coming to visit now. I can tell there are more people coming to new york just to come here now and you know it's still hard to know whether or not that's good or bad but we're on we're on the right track right. I mean thank god for the vaccine and thank god that we know we're getting closer and closer to having everybody to a point where we can all just be in a big room together and enjoy. Something passed the spring break surge. Exactly but you just better be ready shawn because when things open up you're gonna have. I bet we're going to have. At least fifty to seventy five of our members have gone up on the bus on the trains. Whatever wig i show where coming to see is jagged little pill. I can't wait you. I mean you're going to let me know there. We'll let you know. I don't know that we're probably won't have a line for a while and we probably won't be able to bring anybody back but i can definitely come out and say hello at least you know. It sounds crazy to even talk about it now. It just seems so. I know it's not impossible but at this point a year in it does it does sort of feel like wow. Is that ever really going to happen again. I just that sounds that sounds like a nice thing. Let's plan that. let's do that. You guys after the show. I've got a really good picture with your wife in the show. I we came in january just before you guys closed later on tonight with had to be fifty below zero god but you all came out and took photos but you only came down a couple people and went back in your picture. I couldn't get your pick. I wonder why. Why would i do that on. There must have been fifty fifty zero zero. Somebody a surprise visitor backstage or something. I don't know why i would be. So how how. Very jeremy seed in boston. Which was just absolutely you did. Yeah it was. It was the most amazing production. So i really want to see how they workshop. Didn't how they how a change from the boston production if the story line changed drastically just a little bit because i know i know things. Do change. Mostly little changes. Some i mean you know it's Greg said you saw it right. You're saying i can't believe nobody gets killed by those giant movie. Shell whatever those things are not. We believe me. We had to work very hard and there were definitely some feat that were rolled over and it was it was a it was a thing for a while we ferreted out. I think it's but it was a safety issue there for a while but there there were some some pretty significant changes For stephen mj. But no great giant structural changes. I know they moved derek song. If i remember correctly they moved eric song from act to act one which he loved and that was a big move that he was all four and not to speak for him but he was a no. He was very happy about that kind of became a song about nick as opposed to him responding to all that stuff that happens to him and then singing perfect it was really just sort of a it was setting up. His character by daughter was actually at your very last show but some lows and she texted me in the beginning and goes it says knicks. Not here tonight before she do. You guys are disclosed. She was like it's the kid who was tearing up catherine's character. He was a he was the rapist. Or whatever i was. Logan logan yeah and she was like knicks. Not in it and it'll be. She loved nick. We were all sick as a dog. The last i mean there was so much i mean. I liked to pretend that. I don't know what it was but i think we were all just spreading it around you know Unfortunately now elizabeth was out. Celio was out derek. I was out there. Were a lot of people. There was one point where we had all the swings on that week. It was just it was february was rough. Yeah i can imagine. And i was out three days because i had no voice couldn't couldn't make sound so it was. It was a rough time. And derek was really really bad and i think that that last show I know i can say 'cause he's said as much. But i mean that last showy the show closed that close broadway and he got tested the next day and he had it. Yeah yeah we were going through. We're in the midst of anything goes rehearsals because we were gonna go up in may all of a sudden it's like oh you can't come tonight you can't come to all of a sudden it's same thing it just it just exploded because nobody knew at the time but right and i remember i remember doing those shows. I remember standing here looking hair and going. I'm so tired. I can't believe i have to go to a broadway show like you don't wanna you don't wanna be bad in the show but i don't want to not do it but i just remember being like why am i so exhausted all the time now. We know i think.

january yorker new york Greg Celio today boston jon allen krill Logan logan September yesterday colbert Letterman sean nick fifty fifty three days One episode two people three weeks elizabeth
A Conversation With Britney and Caleb of Almond landscaping

Landscape Disruptors

05:10 min | 2 months ago

A Conversation With Britney and Caleb of Almond landscaping

"Caleb and brittany from almond landscaping. This is husband and wife team in. They just got done doing something that i think is one of those foundational kind of experiences on voting. They spent of. Was it a weaker a weekend. At a networking event and we're going to cover the importance of networking and mentoring. How are you guys doing. Thanks for having us good goodwill thanks for coming back on the air with us now. Can you just briefly. Explain to me what you guys were doing. My understanding is you. Went to a place called the hype house. What was that about it. It was an idea formulated a little while ago. But the the quick upfront of it is. It's the green industry. Hi house element was a gracious sponsor of the house and it was a collaborative event for a handful of influencers in the social media. Space in the green industry and a good chance for everybody to For a handful of I'd say well known Influencers come together create content network and You collaborate which is the theme of the day now from tiktok right. Which which credit. Paul jameson with With paul there because he came up with he kind of had the idea of these tiktok. Were doing these Like collaborative events or somewhat similar out on the west coast and he had floated the idea at one point a while ago of Doing a green industry version of it. Where a handful of people get together create content and do collaborative videos and podcasts and all sorts of stuff and And we're like well. Let's do it in the green industry. I reached out to to paul. Kinda push him on it and then it actually ended up happening mostly because of brittany on here in elizabeth fullerton. They kind of made. They're the ones that kind of made Made the gears made actually gears turn. I think so so now a lot of times when these guys get together to do these collaborations you guys. They'd benefit themselves right. I mean it's like oh you know i'm gonna borrow from this guy's audience get to see me. They i get but how does this feedback to help the industry as a whole. That's really the most important thing. Because if you're not one of the influencers that gets the benefit of of being there. What is the benefit to the audience What kind of content were you guys able to produce to help the guys guys that didn't get to be on the shortlist an invite to the event. Well it was in was i. I really consider myself Honored and privileged to be able to be involved in in the in the green issue hype house there and i would say what the main thing was. There was obviously a lot of You know collaboration between you know all the the influencers there and that was obviously beneficial for them but the audience one of the things. At least i can say for my audience. I was able to do things that i would normally do like through my instagram stories. And even our youtube channel and all that stuff is like. I went around with your sean spencer and brian fullerton a couple of days and britain a handful of people and we went and we would just go around. We're on anna. Maria island in florida for the week and we would just find local job sites and just go and tour the job sites and everybody would kinda report on it doing their own. Doing you know their own story. The way they do and bringing value to their audience that way just from a different location on different sites and mowing crews and just and so it was. It was a benefit i think to the audience of seeing you know some things in different regions Being reported by there. I say reported but really kinda was by their favorite Influencers wherever the right word is that. I know it was cool because like you were able to talk. Pavers on shawn spencer's channel right. And he doesn't normally provide that content his followers and jason krill who does fertilization and stuff. He was able to talk to people about that vice versa. Right jason creoles able we talked about fertilizing and stuff. I got on my channel so we took a tour around the neighborhood and just looked at zoysia grass bermuda grass and other stuff. I don't have in ohio. And i got a lot of questions for ten. How you care for it and so it was. It was a neat A conglomeration of information. I think the other thing we did is every night. We went live on a different person's channel and we made it to where people could ask questions And we filtered people in and out of the out of the spotlight so people could literally ask any question they wanted to any of the people and we were talking everything from favorite mowers too. You know how to buy or sell a business to how to grow or how best market and so really an event where you could get to you know for example. On like sean spencer shallower brian photons channel. You know we live on there. But they would see sean on there and they would ask sean about how they run a certain piece of equipment or how what their thoughts were on the best marketing practices or i would be on. Brian's channel or appeals and they would ask them paver heart scape related questions some stuff they may not normally have access to You know that kind of thing. So i think it was a really cool opportunity for for for the audience to to to get some in different information across a wide array of genres. Let's say

Hype House Paul Jameson Tiktok Elizabeth Fullerton Sean Spencer Caleb Brittany Paul Brian Fullerton West Coast Shawn Spencer Jason Krill Maria Island Anna Youtube Britain Florida Brian Photons Jason Ohio
Suspect arrested New York City subway stabbings that killed 2, injured 2 others

Classic Escapes

00:48 sec | 3 months ago

Suspect arrested New York City subway stabbings that killed 2, injured 2 others

"Train as we're that getting left a little two older people 50 dead. plus NYPD maybe mid Deputy forties, chief certainly Brian sixties Magee describes and seventies. how the attacks It's seem decision random. time. We I know mean, you that know, one of your the victims body is was not sleeping working the when way it the did other when person you were in came your approached thirties. him. Energy Everything is might unprovoked not be there. in You those need two incidents to make a decision that was definitely or you unprovoked. gonna take Cops it laying say. The down first and attack just let happened yourself before noon get old on Friday, or leaving a 67 are you gonna year do old man something stabbed about it? at You're the gonna 181st stay physically active. Street If station you're gonna do the about things 12. you need Hours to later, stay a healthy 40 Your old and man was getting found these dead Omega in Far Rockaway. threes that krill Nearly oil. two hours The vitamin after that. D. A 44 year The old antioxidants woman was found dead makes with such multiple a stab difference. wounds at the This Inwood is station, a game and minutes changer later, for a 43 anybody year old And was that stabbed. 50 plus He's in stable age group. condition This at the is hospital, absolutely NYPD great information. Commissioner I know Dermot that Omega Shea threes said an extra are Best 500 known for officers their cardiovascular are patrolling benefits. the subway And as there's a result certainly of also the bloody known attacks. is brain Authorities food. Now believe we've discussed all of this the in victims some are homeless. of the past shows A show if Kabbalah you would WR touch on NEWS the brain Well, benefits the Corona virus for our listeners vaccine listening is becoming out there available today and to tell millions us why you say of that Maurin, supplementing New Yorkers. with Omega

Brian Sixties Magee Nypd Far Rockaway Omega Shea Dermot Maurin Omega
"krill" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

04:20 min | 4 months ago

"krill" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"That's 1 805 118 42. Don. I've seen these ads where they say that krill oil is 48 times stronger than fish oil Is that true? Doesn't make any sense. Well, you know, obviously, these were the cruel guys talking right? Right, right. But you could look at it both ways. Let's get into cruel in just a moment. But first, let's have official guys on the shoulder because you know, you could say that the official oil is better and stronger. But we're talking about the concentrated high omega three fish oil here because it's higher than the omega three e p A and D H A. That are so important. The heart, the brain, the memory mood, your eyes, your skin, your hair, your nails. So in one sense, you could say, well, the fish oils better. But in another sense, I have to hand it to the krill guys. Because in terms of antioxidant power krill oil is extraordinary. And it's because there's a molecule and krill oil that's naturally occurring. Called asked his Hampton and asked his anthem, Steve, This is one of the most powerful antioxidants we've ever discovered Steve by one measure of antioxidant activity at 6000 times, strong Hunger in vitamin C so amazing antioxidant power in the krill. And now as we're getting older 50 Plus hers like myself on 52 we don't make as many antioxidants naturally are antioxidants systems are kind of slowing down. And at the same time we're producing more free radicals. Naturally, this is why we call it cruel Omega 50, plus extra antioxidant power and extra Kroll Remember 500 mg of cruel instead of 367% more plus the vitamin D so important for us, and this is just incredible value. I have folks. They were going out. They were getting the krill separately in a fish oil separately, the antioxidant you could spend 75 bucks doing that. You're getting it all for free. Today. This is the best of both worlds. This combination product with the cruel and official It's not one being better than the other. They're both great. And this is the best of both worlds. You know? Thank God for purity products. I'm serious seriously, because when you think about where our food supply is gone and where we are today, Have to have something that allows us to feel better as we age to age gracefully. It's amazing to me. Was we talking? That's why I love the way the purity gives away the free bottles because you know people could be skeptical. Should be skeptical. But now they could be skeptical. And they say, Okay, you know what? This sounds pretty important. I'm gonna give this a go. It's only gonna cost me 6 95. And they get it. They try it out and what they start to see because it doesn't take long. Remember that joint study heaven days 28% more comfortable what they start to seize. Hey, I'm more comfortable. I feel better. They noticed their energy is better. And they realize Hey, you know what? This is important and they tell their friends and they tell their relatives and they tell their loved ones and purity has been doing business this way for I don't know, 20 years now and you know this is a great testimonial by Gracie five Out of five stars, she writes. It works. I feel a difference in my joints after only one week also You have the nicest staff. That's what that's what great that you have The nicest if people are gonna appreciate working with purity, they're fantastic Company. They put their money where their mouth is. They give out free bottles and you try and you're like, Wow, This is great stuff. Thank God for purity. Let's talk about the heart health for a moment. It's probably the single greatest concern that people faces they age. So anything that we could do to boost heart health becomes really a top priority. You know this? I know this and those folks out there. No, this is well and I know you mentioned earlier that omega threes literally lower. Risk of coronary heart disease. Do I have that correct? Does that's a big statement? You know? Absolutely. I mean protecting the heart. This is what put Omega three's on the math. Back in the seventies, Dr Dyrberg discovered you know how protective they were for the Eskimos. The bottom line is omega threes. Protect your heart in so many ways they promoted smooth, rhythmical heartbeat important for the body's normal inflammatory response in the heart muscle. Inside the arteries and veins. They promote those youthful, flexible arteries. So important for circulation. They promote healthy blood platelet activity. Healthy red blood cell activity. They support healthy blood pressure. That's very important. Tryg Lyssarides. So they do so much for the heart. So simply amazing, Hardy. Oh, vascular protection with these Omega threes. I've got to remind our listeners out there about this free bottle deal that's going on the krill, Omega Plus and the B 12. It is a part of this special radio offered today You just pay the shipping and you're tried for free and that number for those listening out there..

official krill Steve Omega Plus Gracie Don Kroll Tryg Lyssarides Hardy Hunger Hampton Dr Dyrberg
"krill" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

04:54 min | 5 months ago

"krill" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"That's 1 805 118 40 to 1 more time slowly for two free bottles today. Write it down. 1 805 118 42 Now, Doc, I've seen these ads where they say that krill oil is 48 times stronger than fish oil. Is that true? Doesn't make any sense. Well, you know, obviously, these were the cruel guys talking right? Right, right. But you could look at it both ways. Let's get into cru in just a moment, but first, let's have official. Guys on the shoulder because you know, you could say that the fish oil is better and stronger. But we're talking about the concentrated high omega three fish oil here because it's higher and the omega three e p A and d H A. That are so important for the heart, the brain the memory mood, your eyes, your skin, your hair, your nails. So in one sense, you could say, Well, the fish oils better. But in another sense, I have to hand it to the krill guys. Because in terms of antioxidant power krill oil is extraordinary. And it's because There's a molecule and krill oil that's naturally occurring. Called asked his Hampton and asked his anthem, Steve, This is one of the most powerful antioxidants we've ever discovered Steve by one measure of antioxidant activity, 6000 times stronger. In vitamin C So amazing the antioxidant power in the krill. And now as we're getting older 50 Plus hers like myself on 52 we don't make is many antioxidants naturally, are antioxidants systems are kind of slowing down. And at the same time we're producing more free radicals. Naturally, this is why we call it cruel Omega 50, plus extra antioxidant power. And extra cruel. Remember 500 mg of cruel instead of 367% more plus the vitamin D so important for us, and this is just incredible value proposition. I have folks. They were going out. They were getting the krill separately in the fish oil separately, the antioxidants about it. You could spend 75 bucks doing that. You're getting it all for free. Today. This is the best of both worlds. This combination product with the cruel and official. It's not one being better than the other. They're both great. And this is the best of both worlds, You know, Thank God for purity products. I'm serious seriously, because when you think about where our food supply is gone, and where we are today, we have to have something that allows us to feel better as we age to age gracefully. It's amazing to me was we talked? That's why I love the way the purity gives away the free bottles because you know people could be skeptical. Should be skeptical. But now they could be skeptical. And they say, Okay, you know what this sounds? Pretty important. I'm going to give this a go. It's only gonna cost me 6 95, and they get it. They try it out and what they start to see because it doesn't take long. Remember that joint studies heaven days 28% more comfortable. What they start to see is Hey, I'm more comfortable. I feel better. They noticed their energy is better. And they realize Hey, you know what? This is important and they tell their friends and they tell their relatives and they tell their loved ones and purity has been doing business this way for I don't know. 20 years Now let's look at one more. You know, this is a great testimonial by Gracie five. Star, she writes. It works. I feel a difference in my joints after only one week. Also, you have the nicest staff. That's what that's what great that you have The nicest if people are gonna appreciate working with purity, there are fantastic company. They put their money where their mouth is. They give out free bottles and you try and you're like, Wow, This is great stuff. Thank God for purity. Let's talk about the heart health. For a moment. It's probably the single greatest concern that people faces they age. So anything that we can do to boost heart health becomes really a top priority. You know this? I know this and those folks out there. No, this is well. And I know you mentioned earlier that omega threes literally lower our risk of coronary heart disease. Do I have that correct? Does? That's a big statement? You know? Absolutely. I mean, protecting the heart. This is what put Omega three's on the map. Back in the seventies, Dr Dyrberg discovered you know how protective they were for the Eskimos, By the way, is a wonderful guy had Lunch with him a year or two ago. Great conversation. But bottom line is omega threes, protect our hearts in so many ways they promoted smooth, rhythmical heartbeat important for the body's normal inflammatory response in the heart muscle inside the arteries and veins. They promote those youthful, flexible arteries so important for circulation. They promote healthy blood platelet activity. Healthy red blood cell activity who support healthy blood pressure. That's very important. Tryg Lyssarides. So they do so much for the heart. So simply amazing cardiovascular protection with these Omega threes. It just keeps getting better than that. You know, I've got to remind us when people I have patients come in here all the time. I'm like, Are you taking your Omega threes? I hope you're still taking your Omega threes. You know, they're afraid to say no, I don't like the Omega three. Not there. Take your Omega threes. In fact, if there was only one nutrient that I could take Steve Honest to God. If there was only one nutrient that I could take hands down. It's Omega three's. That's the first most important nutrient. You could take this cruel making 50. Plus, I love the way they combined the crude.

Steve krill official Hampton Gracie Tryg Lyssarides Dr Dyrberg
Astronauts to celebrate Thanksgiving on the International Space Station

Innovation Now

00:56 sec | 6 months ago

Astronauts to celebrate Thanksgiving on the International Space Station

"The arrival of nasr's first commercial krill. Seven astronauts will be spending thanksgiving together in space this year during their light schedule for the day crew members will make time for a few video calls to family and maybe even watch a football game or two then the crew will gather for a special holiday meal vaguely recognisable by color. The feast will require reconstituting but after adding a bit of water the packets of green beans potatoes mac and cheese and of course smoked turkey. A remarkably delicious crew members often get creative with their food stuffing a few cookie. Bits into a pouch of candied. Yams makes a tasty mock pumpkin pie. You can share in the astronauts meal by making nasr's recipe for corn bread pudding yourself but you probably won't have the biggest challenge the astronauts face on thanksgiving day making sure not to let the turkey float away

Football
"krill" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

04:49 min | 6 months ago

"krill" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"One more time slowly for two free bottles today. Write it down. 1 805 118 42 Now, Doc, I've seen these ads where they say that krill oil is 48 times stronger than fish oil Is that true? Doesn't make any sense. Well, obviously, these are the cruel guys talking right? Right, right. But you could look at it both ways. Let's get into cru in just a moment. But first, let's have official guys on the shoulder because you know you could say that the fish oil is better and stronger. But we're talking about the Concentrated high omega three fish oil here because it's higher and the omega three c e p A and D Asia that are so important for the heart, the brain the memory mood, your eyes, your skin, your hair, your nail. So in one sense, you could say, well, the fish oils better. But in another sense, I have to hand it to the krill guys. Because in terms of antioxidant power krill oil is extraordinary. And it's because there's a molecule and krill oil that's naturally occurring. Called asked his Hampton and asked his anthem, Steve. This is one of the most powerful antioxidants we've ever discovered Steve by one measure of antioxidant activity, it 6000 times stronger than vitamin C So amazing that antioxidant power in the krill and now as we're getting older 50, plus hers like myself on 52. We don't make is many antioxidants naturally, are antioxidants systems are kind of slowing down. And at the same time we're producing more free radicals. Naturally, this is why we call it cruel Omega 50, plus extra antioxidant power and extra Kroll. Remember 500 mg of cruel instead of 300 that 67% more plus The vitamin D so important for us, and this is just incredible value proposition. I have folks. They were going out. They were getting the krill separately in a fish oil separately, the antioxidants about it. You could spend 75 bucks doing that. No kidding. You're getting it all for free. Today. This is the best of both worlds. This combination product with the crew and official. It's not one being better than the other. They're both great. And this is the best of both worlds, You know, Thank God for purity products. I'm serious seriously, because when you think about where our food supply is gone, and where we are today, we have to have something that allows us to feel better as we age to age gracefully. It's amazing to me was we talked about why I love the way the purity gives away the free bottles because you know, people could be skeptical. Be skeptical, But now they could be skeptical. And they say, Okay, you know what this sounds? Pretty important. I'm gonna give this a go. It's only gonna cost me 6 95, and they get it. They try it out and what they start to see, because it doesn't take long. Remember that joint studies seven days 28% more comfortable. What they start to see is Hey, I'm more comfortable. I feel better. They noticed their energy is better. And they realize Hey, you know what? This is important and they tell their friends and they tell their relatives and they tell their loved ones and purity has been doing business this way for I don't know, 20 years Now let's look at one more. You know, this is a great testimonial by Gracie five. Star, she writes. It works. I feel a difference in my joints after only one week. Also, you have the nicest staff. That's what that's what great that you have The nicest if people are gonna appreciate working with purity, there are fantastic company. They put their money where their mouth is. They give out free bottles and you try and you're like, Wow, This is great stuff. Thank God for purity. Let's talk about the heart health. For a moment. It's probably the single greatest concern that people faces they age. So anything that we can do to boost heart health becomes really a top priority. You know this? I know this and those folks out there. No, this is well. And I know you mentioned earlier that omega threes literally lower our risk of coronary heart disease. Do I have that correct? Does that's a big statement? You know? Absolutely. I mean protecting the heart. This is what put Omega three's on the map. Back in the seventies, Dr Dyrberg discovered you know how protective they were for the Eskimos. By the way, he's a wonderful guy had Lunch with him a year or two ago. Great conversation. But bottom line is, I'll make it three to protect your heart in so many ways. They promoted smooth, rhythmical heartbeat important for the body's normal inflammatory response in the heart muscle inside the arteries and veins. They promote those youthful, flexible arteries so important for circulation. They promote healthy blood platelet activity. Healthy red blood cell activity who support healthy blood pressure. That's very important. Tryg Lyssarides. So they do so much for the heart. So simply amazing Hardy. Oh, vascular protection with these Omega threes. It just keeps getting better done that. You know, I've got to remind us when people I have patients come in here all the time. I'm like, Are you taking your Omega threes? I hope you're still taking your Omega threes. You know, they're afraid to say no, I don't like the Omega $3 There. Take your omega threes. In fact, if there was only one nutrient that I could take Steve Honest to God. If there was only one nutrient that I could take hands down its Omega's race. That's the first most important nutrient you could take this cruel making 50..

Steve krill official Kroll D Asia Hampton Gracie Tryg Lyssarides Dr Dyrberg
"krill" Discussed on But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

05:58 min | 7 months ago

"krill" Discussed on But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

"All that happens in less than a minute and it's kind of amazing process of filter feeding and so. Humpbacks and blue whales are actually feeding on different kinds of food. The prey items are different. Humpback whale tends to feed on fish and Krill can do a lot of different things. It's mid sized wail if that makes any sense and so has the flexibility of eating different kinds of food items whereas blue els at the very, very large end and They are specialists on Krill tiny. Tiny little shrimp like animals that live in the ocean, but they live in very large concentrations. So blue whales are eating a lot of Krill. Almost like a big animal taking a bite out of cloud accepted that cloud was made out of Krill and they travel very far distances to get to the place. The right time under the right conditions were Krill is in the kinds of concentrations make. Make the return on that trip. Worth doing. You mentioned that they push they take a big gulp of water and there's Krill in the water and then they can push the water through their baleen which kind of looks like It's kind of like just a filter right so that the water can go through but the Krill get stuck inside but not all whales have baleen right? So so not all whales eat that way. That's right. So When I look at Today's Wales, the whales that are alive today I talk about the living in two houses there's the house of the bailing whales, the ones that filter feed, and then there's another house of the toothed whales. Now, not all the toothed whales have teeth in some of them have really funky teeth. How can they be toothed whales if they don't have teeth or their ancestors had teeth and. So in some cases, they've lost teeth, but they don't have bailing and all toothed whales hunt using echo location using sound that's emitted from their forehead. It's another crazy thing that whales do and people might know this from bats to right. So with echo-location, you send a sound out and the sound then comes back to them and based on what that sound is like the way it sounds they can tell how far away. Officials rate. They can sort of that because of that sound bounces back differently if it's a big fish that's far away or a bunch of small fish that are closer right. It's the same way that a submarine can navigate underwater. It's a principle that different animals have evolved. The ability to do in Wales are toothed whales are the only animals that have evolved the ability to do this under water. And they do it to depths that really blow I think anybody's mind miles deep for over an hour. They'll take a deep breath, hold it and go dive deep look for squid or fish..

Krill Krill tiny Wales
Blue Whale Song Timing Reveals Time to Go

60-Second Science

03:07 min | 7 months ago

Blue Whale Song Timing Reveals Time to Go

"During the summer wheels in the northeastern Pacific spend their days feeding on massive amounts of tiny plankton called Krill. In fact, Krill is all they eat. It really is remarkable that such a small animal is able to sustain the largest life-form that's ever existed on this planet. Stanford. University marine ecologist will a strike and to maintain themselves at that body size. They have pretty extreme feeding habits. A blue whale consumes many tons of Krill. Every day eating keeps the ocean giants occupied during daylight hours when they dive hundreds of feet below the surface where krill congregate in dense swarms. But at night when their prey disperse the whales start to sing. You. Say for ten twelve hours straight. The song you just heard was sped up ten times which brings the sound up more into human hearing range speeding up the song enables researchers to more easily study whales deep and resonant songs which can be heard by other whales across vast distances in the ocean. It's very likely that song influenzas related to some sort of reproductive function whether that's attracting a mate or warding off other males since two thousand, fifteen, the Monterey Bay Aquarium? Research Institute. Has Been Recording. The songs of Blue Whales with an underwater microphone attached to the sea floor twenty, four, seven, three, hundred, sixty, five days a year giving an audio feed of all of the sounds being produced in around Monterey. Bay when a strike and his team analyze the blue whales singing behavior across seasons. They noticed an unusual pattern as summer gave way to fall and winter. The whales changed when they sang the song during the daytime than during the nighttime to learn more. The scientists tagged individual whales to keep tabs on both their feeding and singing behavior as summer krill concentrations wayne the whales begin a long southward by gration to their breeding grounds off the coast of Mexico in Central America once they start migrating feeding at death isn't really a part of the equation anymore. So they switch their primary time song production to the daytime knowing when to leave is crucial. It's really critical that the timing of this transition from feeding to migration e sinked. With other things happening in their habitats, the researchers think the seasonal change in singing patterns signals the start of migration, which means we're now able to determine when the population has switched from viewing migration. The study is in the journal current biology. The Blue L. Song Recording is courtesy of John Ryan and the Monterey. Bay. Aquarium Research Institute. Blue Whales are endangered but being able to monitor what they're up to in real time could be boon to conservation efforts if we're willing to listen.

Krill Monterey Monterey Bay Aquarium Aquarium Research Institute Stanford Research Institute John Ryan Mexico Central America
Black Lives Matter In Belize

Latino Rebels Radio

07:03 min | 8 months ago

Black Lives Matter In Belize

"Once again, this is Oscar Fernandez today on the show we put the spotlight on Belize and how the black lives matter movement shines a light on how believes is history has been excluded from Central American history, and so we're joined today by Nicole Ramsey who's a Candidate in a Department of African. American and African Diaspora studies at UC Berkeley she has an article that came out last month in medium entitled as Remind Central America to think outside the box she joins us today over the phone. Welcome to show Nicole Ramsey. Thank you for having me. Excited to be here is good to have you with us. I couldn't my introduction brief because actually pulled it from your article regards to Belize Central America. Once again, the Arctic was entitled Belise Remind Central America to think outside the box and when the central arguments you make in your article is that the black lives matter movement and I took this directly from your article shines a light on how belise history has been excluded from Central America. So, with that in mind, let me just go right there to the beginning and ask if you could elaborate and state your argument by what you mean by the black lives matter as pertains to beliefs which in turn pertains to Central America. Yeah for sure. So what envisioning what I was in? When I came up with the article title you know those with everything that's going on. There's been a lot of discussion and in terms of black lives matter and what that means for black population living outside the US I find a lot of conversations especially. I'm really interested in like conversations that happen online. I was really I guess interested in how people were conceptualizing black lives matter as mostly an African American movement which you know there's a particular history and reasoning of why how black lives matter came in to being. particularly in the US. but it was it was just very interesting to see how mostly folks from Latin America. Caribbean. Europe other places. Outside saw that as distance from what was going on in their particular countries. So. In the case, of Central, America you know black lives have always mattered. There's always been struggles of On, the ground with black people fighting again, know the colonial administration and anti-black midst especially what's going on with Garifuna communities across central? America. So that's what I was thinking about. That's what I had in mind when I, came up with this article and it was just kind of talk about it later too because it's kind of like this long history of exclusion in the region and the region and how people conceptualize Central America so I thought in order for us to. Even. Delve into what You, know black lives. Matter Movement Looks Central America certainly have to acknowledge. Black Communities and black histories in the region I. so that's kind of where I was getting at and I'm a fan of history off it's kind of like a title things together. Absolutely we just had a show last week on the Gutty Funez on Duras and in a large way they play a central role. Belize as well. So we'll get to them once again during the course of the conversation. But with that said, there are other groups that make Belize very complex as far as this community is concerned, there's some other groups that need to be recognized. So I wonder if you could also explain the complexity of the Afro Belizian community in believes because not every black person in Belize is necessarily a Gutty Fuda, their other complexities and needs to be addressed here. Correct. Yes for sure. And that's even including myself I'm not guarantee now I'm what you would consider creole. So depending on. The vantage point, but you look at central. America play believes etc. Gua. Even think accent complaints with endurance creole just like black. Identity of black population mixture of blackness feeding back to the enslavement of large populations in the business. So thinking about that identity in believes to historic. Black Group are black creoles. And the Afrin Vision is getting food and I say black correal's because it's. It's common to meet somebody blond-haired blue-eyed of like, who visually looks why to also call themselves. And it's also the language that they also speak in believe. So there's a lot of complexity there and fusion So I really like to say black creoles because also like the history of creoles and believe ties back to kind of that enslavement period. And of course. When I was there last full for feel work you have legal whole bunch of other. black groups that are that have been in believe for quite some time you have like a very Pan Caribbean. migration and group within believe. So you can meet somebody from Jamaica. You can meet somebody from Barbados Trinidad. So that's also present there. and then recently you have a lot of immigrants from. The continent diamond a few people from Nigeria I. Think someone someone from Ghana, and then of course, from Haiti as well. considering migration Haitians to central. So there's like different levels of that. But in terms of like historic, it's black KRILL and offering digits Garifuna and I do like to. Talk about them within the compass of affable believers because there has been like a mixture between two. It's not unusual to meet somebody with a creole mother and A. Father vice versa So it kind of intertwined throughout but the cultures are very distinct and that's important to note they have a different history different time line of you know. Experience within the country which kind of work to conceptualize how they're viewed within beliefs but I think that's very important to also considering language racial formations. So yeah.

America Central America Belize Belize Central America Black Group Nicole Ramsey Latin America United States Uc Berkeley Department Of African Oscar Fernandez Caribbean Europe Gutty Funez Duras A. Father Haiti Ghana Jamaica
Brit Bennett: The Vanishing Half

Bookworm

06:37 min | 11 months ago

Brit Bennett: The Vanishing Half

"And Silver Bland, and this is bookworm. My guest today Brit Bennett is the talk of the literary world her book. The vanishing half made its debut at number one on the New York Times. Bestseller list now like me. You may not think much of bestseller was but my big surprise when I picked it up is that it's a wonderful book? It's very enjoyable to read, and it's only Brit. Bennett's second book won't was the originating idea for the vanishing half. Well thanks for having me The book actually began a conversation I had with my mother where she was telling me about this town. She remembered hearing about from her childhood, growing up in rural Louisiana and it was a town. Where was a community of light skinned black people that continued to intermarry within that community in hopes that their children would progressively lighter from generation to generation, so it really struck me as I'm very strange, disturbing idea, also place, and of course as a novelist that immediately makes you think. Oh, this is the setting for a novel. We? Get a very. Dramatic sense of that sending early in the book and I'm going to ask Brooke Bennett to read. The section that describes the town. It has a great name. The name of the town is Mallard and it's named after a duck. Go It was a strange town. Mallard named after the ring necked ducks, living in the rice fields and marshes, a town that like any other was more idea than place. The idea arrived to Alphonse to soar in eighteen, forty eight, as he stood in the sugar cane fields. He'd inherited from the father who'd once owned him. The father now dead, the now freed son wished to build something on those acres of land that would last for centuries to come. A town for men like him who never be accepted as white, but refused to be treated like Negroes a third-place his mother rest. Her soul had hated his lightness when he was a boy, she'd shopped him under the sun, begging him to darken. Maybe that's what made him I dream of the town. Lightness like anything inherited at great cost was lonely gift. He'd married him lotto even lighter than himself. She was pregnant with their first child, and he imagined children's Children's children lighter still like a cup of coffee steadily done rooted with cream, a more perfect Negro, each generation lighter than the one before. Soon others came. Soon idea in place became inseparable in Mallard carried throughout the rest of Saint Landry parish colored. People whispered about it wondered about it. White people couldn't believe even existed. When Saint Catherine's was built in nineteen, thirty eight, the diocese set over a young priest from Dublin who arrived certain that he was lost, didn't the bishop tally that Mallard was a colored town? who were these people walking about? Fair and Blonde and red headed the darkest ones nose year than a Greek was this accounted for colored in America who whites wanted to keep separate. How could they tell the difference? By the time, the being twins were born Afonso store was dead long gone. But his great great great granddaughters inherited his legacy whether they wanted to or not. Even desharnais complained before every founder's day picnic. Who rolled her eyes? When the founder was mentioned in school, as if none of that business had anything to do with her. This would stick after the twins disappeared. How desert never wanted to be part of a town that was her birth rate how she felt that you could flick away history like shrugging a hand off your shoulder. Can escape a town. You cannot escape blood. Somehow the twins believe themselves capable both. And yet if Alphonse to store could have stroll through the town. He'd imagined he would have been thrilled by the side of his great great great granddaughters, twin girls, creamy skin, Hazel Eyes wavy hair. He would marveled at them for the child to be a little more perfect in the parents. What could be more wonderful than that? The Breath Bennett reading. The section from the opening, ten pages of her novel, the vanishing half. Now. Tell me. This idea, the idea of the town that is designed to get wider and wider and to exile or expel those people who are violations of its aspiration toward whiteness. This is a horrifying idea just as in. Edward P. Jones's novel, the known world, a town where freed black people on black slaves themselves. Tell me how to we get ideas as dangerous and strange as these. Long I started so when I started thinking about the book I I read about similar communities to the stat existed of Louisiana, these krill communities of fair skin, black people who believed very deeply that it was better to be light, who were suspicious of darker skinned black people in wanted to kind of insulate their community against who they perceived as being outsiders to me. Book was taking. This idea of color is on just pushing it to extremes by locating the physical town in sort of pushing the. The extremes of that ideology to think about what it would look like. If color is not just a you know something that's abstract, if it's not just something that you think of as a preference or sort of personal opinion about light skin, being better than dark skin, what is it like if this is something that is actually kind of instituted in place and to the degree that the population is almost almost kind of genetically engineering at so that their children can can become lighter and

Mallard Brit Bennett Alphonse Brooke Bennett New York Times Silver Bland Founder Louisiana Edward P. Jones Bennett Hazel Eyes Saint Landry Afonso America Saint Catherine Desharnais Dublin
Why Is Plankton Our Tiniest Unsung Hero?

BrainStuff

05:25 min | 1 year ago

Why Is Plankton Our Tiniest Unsung Hero?

"One of Earth's unsung heroes is also among its tiniest plankton. A single celled algae. It's barely visible to the eye. But it contributes to some of the world's most important resources it's essential to the food chain. It's a main supplier of oxygen and it's the fuel that keeps our cars running and our homes heated these organisms. No bigger than a human hair float. The sunny upper parts of the Ocean. The two main types of plankton phytoplankton and zooplankton support one another phytoplankton and organism so small. The millions can fit in one drop of water produces its own energy through photosynthesis accounts for nearly half of all photosynthesis on the planet zooplankton which are tiny animals in. Crustaceans like Copa Pods. Along with other small fish and marine creatures eat phytoplankton. Then become food for bigger fish and so on up the food chain from seals dolphins virtually every creature in the Ocean. Each either plankton or an organism. That depends on plancton in a David versus Goliath. Battle filter feeding baleen whales like the humpback rely on tiny organisms. Such as plankton and Krill. A filter these whales take huge gulfs of water than use their tongues to push out liquid. So foods like Krill. Plankton remain right. Whales also swim up and mouthed through plankton filled waters. They trapped the plankton and third tongue. That pushes the organisms down their throat but plankton role in the food doesn't stop in the ocean polar bears and seabirds rely on Plankton. Fueled meals like seals and fish. Even humans. Count on fish and therefore plankton to survive Americans loan eat around fifteen and a half pounds or about seven kilos of fish and shellfish per person per year. That's a whole lot of plankton. Plankton itself is making. Its way toward dinner tables. It's not common in restaurants yet. But on Angelina and Nuno Mendez. Both shafts of Michelin starred restaurants in Britain added Plankton to a special event menu in two thousand thirteen. This included delicacies. Like a plankton cocktail and plankton risotto. Leon told the UK newspaper Metro. It's velvety dry. Before mixing it with liquid silky ones mixed oily an elegant pungent on the nose yet subtle and leaves a long finish in the mouth while it's still wearing restaurants. Plankton is slowly catching on. According to fine. Dining lovers plankton producers Spanish agriculture company Phytoplankton Marino are growing microalgae for human consumption and one chef even tried his hand at Phytoplankton bread. Plantains earthly contributions go beyond the food chain. Marine plants like FIDO PLANKTON KELP and the plankton. Pretty seventy percent of Earth's oxygen in fact pro chloro- caucus type of phytoplankton produces the oxygen for one out of every five breaths a human takes and IDA plankton superpowers. Don't stop there. Not ONLY DO THEY HELP. Produce Oxygen through photosynthesis phytoplankton take carbon from the atmosphere during the process of living and store it in the ocean. They die which ultimately helps curb climate. Change this is similar to the process. Trees used to store carbon in leaves since photosynthesis consumes carbon dioxide. The carbon is basically stored in each plankton. A one group of scientists found that FIDO plankton incorporate up to forty five to fifty billion tons of inorganic carbon into their cells and that petroleum. We used to fuel our cars. It's made reprocess. The dates back to ancient seas and also involves that tiny superhero of an organism plankton when plankton die they sink to the bottom of the oceans. Here debris settles on top of them and chemical reactions transform the materials into waxy kerogen and Bittermann a black tar. That's one of the main ingredients of petroleum the carriage and also undergoes further changes as it heats and it becomes what's known as crude oil or if temperatures are even hotter natural gas plankton may be essential but the small organism is also a little bit trixie scientists too long struggle to accurately predict fido plank to numbers and growth rates. But that changed in two thousand five thanks to Nasr's satellite observations and thus reported that scientists can figure out phytoplankton numbers based on how green water is when phytoplankton get stressed by cold water. They become less green phytoplankton. Rich waters become greener as conditions and growth rates improve. Oh and by night. Plankton filled water conglo through the organisms bioluminescence electric blue green red or orange researchers estimate phytoplankton makes one percent of all of Earth's biomass. That's the total mass of organisms. But that number is dwindling study published in the journal Nature in July of twenty ten showed that gradually warming ocean waters have destroyed some forty percent of earth's phytoplankton since nineteen fifty whether we know it or not all. Humans rely on this micro algae. That's why a forty percent decrease or more is worrisome.

Ocean Phytoplankton Marino Copa Pods Fido David Michelin UK Leon Nasr Angelina Britain Nuno Mendez Bittermann
'Sushi parasites' have increased 283-fold in past 40 years

60-Second Science

02:19 min | 1 year ago

'Sushi parasites' have increased 283-fold in past 40 years

"A big fan of Sushi and severe J. so I was alarmed to see the headline on a recent news release from the University of Washington stating that. Sushi parasites have increased two hundred eighty three. Fold in the past forty years but after digging into the research which came out of marine ecology lab run by Chelsea would at uw Seattle campus. I learned that the rising abundance of marine worms known as Anna sockets is actually less of a problem for people than it is for whales and dolphins which are the natural hosts infected by those parasites. Woods team did what's known as a Meta analysis. They collected data from one hundred. Twenty three papers published over the past half century that estimated parasite abundance and various species at sites all over the world between nineteen sixty seven and twenty seventeen. They're analysis published last month in the Journal. Global Change Biology found that since nineteen seventy eight when less than one worm was seen. In every one hundred host animals on average the prevalence of Anna Sackett parasite infection has skyrocketed. To the point. That more than one worm is now typically seen in every host animal examined in Twenty Fifteen Anna Sackett worms grow in the guts of Wales spread to Krill through the whales poop. And then move up the food chain to squid and small fish like anchovies then. Two big fish like salmon tuna and halibut and finally to humans in the US and most parts of Europe. Fishes squid served raw must first be frozen to kill the. Nematodes and their larvae. Which are big enough to see with the naked eye and even if you're unlucky enough to eat live Anna Sackett larvae in your Sushi. Sivy J. or blocks you'll probably be fine. The worms rarely survive long enough in the human gut to cause and assess which typically involves abdominal pain vomiting. The condition seems to be most common in Spain due to Spaniards fondness for Roy anchovies estimate. There are roughly eight thousand cases a year in Spain that works out to about one illness for every ten thousand meals of raw fish. Eaten Chelsea Woods says the findings haven't put her off eating Sushi her concern that the rising abundance of Anna sack heads might be harming the dolphins and whales that these parasites evolved to in fact and grow inside for years. She notes that there are millions of species of parasites in the ocean. And we know very little about which ones are becoming more common. The epidemiology of the oceans is still in its infancy.

Anna Sackett Chelsea Woods Anna Anna Sack Uw Seattle Campus University Of Washington Spain Abdominal Pain Global Change Biology United States Europe Sivy J. Wales ROY The Journal
Omega-3 Fish Oil For Brain Health

The Ultimate Health Podcast

02:43 min | 1 year ago

Omega-3 Fish Oil For Brain Health

"Nicotine use among teenagers. Went up thirty six percent horrify and it's the the whole vaping craze is completely out of control and both nicotine and caffeine constrict blood blood flow to the brain and shrink your seahorse so you have to do three things. Basically brain health is three things brain envy. The you got to care about it. Avoid anything that hurts at no the lest I mean. We've talked about a couple of things like caffeine and nicotine and then do things that help it. Exercise grows. Your seahorses. Volunteering has been shown to grow your seahorses making sure your mega. Three fatty acid sit intake. Grows your seahorses. I published a big study on that in so starts with love. I do the right thing not because I should but because 'cause I love myself and then know what to avoid and what to do when it comes to Omega threes what are your thoughts on the ideal supplement because there's just so many different things things out there. These days such as Krill oil fish oil different kinds of fish oil cod liver oil and now. There's a whole branch of plant based Omega Three. So how are those sufficient enough for. What are your thoughts on all of this? So most of the studies have been done on fish oil and fish oil. That has a high content of two. Do a mega three components. EPA and Dha because they have been shown to help with mood and memory anxiety and overall cognitive performance I developed a supplement company called Brennan. MD and we make something called Omega three power. Where two of those capsules capsules has fourteen hundred and forty milligrams of EPA and Dha in the right ratio? If you went to one of the big box stores you you probably have to take six or eight of their to get the same level for Vegetarians and Vegans algae-based Omega threes are a good alternative addictive. Although you have to take so much of them and mostly they have. Dha Omega Threes Very few of them have EPA and DPA's been found actually to be the most important for mood and add to help people with focus. I think Krill is a lot of marketing mm-hmm but most of the research has actually been done on high quality fish oil. It's the most readily available. And if you get the right dosage it dramatically changes virtually all of your medical risk

Omega Three Nicotine EPA Caffeine MD DPA Brennan
"krill" Discussed on The South Jersey Beer Scene Podcast

The South Jersey Beer Scene Podcast

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"krill" Discussed on The South Jersey Beer Scene Podcast

"It's just so fresh so clean you get that and it's not an overwhelming. It's not an overwhelming smoke. It and in clean beer it just just bounce. He's also I love smoked beers. Yeah Yeah Some Walker pills ner we use the row small and INA pills near like the smoke has nowhere to hide. It's delicious. It's just it's forward it's clean and like there there was. I think it was like there was a barbecue joint that for the summer. Like that's all they wanted. And it's like we're just GONNA put this on top. This is perfect pairing and it really is. It's clean it's refreshing and has has the good writing flavor. You know but you also did a few other experiments in work at us as well as you might want to try to brew with the stones. I know you couldn't quite get the the temperature up enough. Well we call that a Stein beer and that's A little trial and error. That's bringing those hot granite stones up to a high enough temperature to dip into the beer dropping it in and but you have to keep it going to keep the boy the boy and a nice raw in bigger heating a scam and yeah it worked real good but it just didn't. It didn't last long enough. We didn't get along enough. Boil out of it and it kind of it. Just didn't turn out the way I go. You need a bigger operation for you need like a little. You know little blast furnace or something Maybe I just WANNA say. There is a caramel ization. That comes with that. I really enjoyed because I actually dry rocked it. I took the Q I took the stones because they were all had caramel stuck to them at the end after cemented the beer dry rocks stones and it that's where I picked up a lot of that earthy like dirt flames but Uh Hey if you wanted not a bad thing dirty smokeybear steinbrenner's the way to go try Try Try BAGEL place. I worked I work for installing way back. They have a they have eight hundred degree prepping ovens that like you take the frozen Bagel legal out of the fridge and to get the dough ready to bake it goes in and oven for eight hundred degrees for a couple of minutes. I remember is going to be a place to grow William Roll your stones in their eight hundred degrees. WE'LL GET THEM SCREAMING HOT ROLM OUT DUMP THEM IN. And it's you know possible. I had like Stafford Township Bonfire size. Just bring up a whole bagels. And that's a whole different story for me because I'm thinking of making a boss. You know what that is is just taking aching Old Bread right taking bread and just using that as your main ingredient and basically making a year out of right just bread beer traditional old. Dan I I try to go for some traditional things. I mean Albert and resurrect some old old stuff. So it'd be careful. What kind of mm Gross you get on there. You might be brewing something else entirely. If you use the right right. Don't don't it's Oh. Oh it's what's underneath could bring something beautiful. What's on top? You know. These are things George Clinton about. Thanks for talking about your group Process Etcetera always in.

Stafford Township steinbrenner George Clinton Albert Dan
"krill" Discussed on The South Jersey Beer Scene Podcast

The South Jersey Beer Scene Podcast

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"krill" Discussed on The South Jersey Beer Scene Podcast

"GONNA I'M GONNA try to tweak it just a little bit and I'm thinking about entering it into the The national homebrew competition petition. homebrew association I I. I've used my scalp longtime. It's very simple scale. It's a drink this every day. I would drink if you bought ready for me or return this will. I could drink this every day. That's a wonderful compliment that yeah yeah this is really good. What's what's about the awesome window and it's only three ingredients? which is it seems like most of the best beers just simple ingredients? Yeah what was your good good right With this Geek Geek Geek Alert Geek alert. I'm asking Bush to base. What was the base of this? Oh go ahead. Let me see Bruce little bit of it was about sixty eight percents to row Twenty Percents Victory Malt and ten percents crystal one twenty. That's what you get some of that. Nice Little Carmelina look to very nice. Thank you now. Butch is our experimental. We actually actually talked. I think on the last show about the The Brew Dogs Selling Their Twenty Thousand Dollars. Beer which actually was a stake in a company and you get it inside a stuffed squirrel. Attacks dummied squirrel and think we discussed on that did have some kind of effect that that Bush would actually brew in Scarlett Squirrel Leather. So we had these conversations we can do and what you can I think the whole letter. Thank him up because you know where can I get an abundance of leather and squirrels. Just run around your property easily. Get a lot of world now but I mean think about it. What can you hold liquid? What type of vessel? What type of a container later I mean we we? I've fermented inside of a watermelon. Okay but I'm thinking what else can I put beer in it. Naturally fermented story and I'm thinking okay. Well what about about those old on those border skins you know when the wild west. That's why you know but that's gross. I mean who wants to drink beer. That's made out of that's made out of what goat skin or something like that the earthy him maybe. I imagined it happened in some traditions. I speaking you can traditions. I have this other thing. You know the those ships in Oregon vessel yeah sure I wanNA be your nose. I WANNA make one out of clay. I WANNA make make it hold Egyptian beerman. Oh I think we're to clear human out and then just put one of these pots and I wanna I wanna get all ancient liquidated because because you're out of here because you know they're speaking of beer news you know the guy The inventor of the xbox okay was shaming shameless something or other he went and had a couple of pots taken out of the Smithsonian and he had the yeast extracted from it. Yeah just so he could brew beer. Okay instagram message. Can I get to please. I WANNA make it right. I want to make an actual authentic. Thank Egypt's beer. I WanNa put an vessel and everything for mentioning Dogfish me that might is bigger talking about that. That midas touch where they made the recipe of encryption be or what does it mean. Yes that's brilliant thousand-year-old Malt.

Bush Egypt Smithsonian Butch Oregon Bruce
First-Ever Measurement of a Blue Whale's Heartbeat Reveals Surprising Extremes

Fresh Air

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

First-Ever Measurement of a Blue Whale's Heartbeat Reveals Surprising Extremes

"Researchers researchers have have attached attached a heart monitor to a blue whale Paul Rogers managing editor of KQED science and environment writer at the mercury news explains the researchers failed alongside a seventy foot long blue whale in Monterey Bay using a long pole they attached a heart monitor roughly the size of a lunchbox underneath the animals left flipper with some suction cups he stayed on for eight hours as the animal deeply swim in the ocean to find krill it could slow its heart rate down to two beats per minute and as it surfaced you could raise its heart rate again to thirty seven beats a minute this allowed the blue whale to conserve oxygen and stay down longer so it could feed more efficiently

Managing Editor Kqed Writer Monterey Bay Paul Rogers Seventy Foot Eight Hours
"krill" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"krill" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Welcome, Dr eleventh, so great to have you back on the show today. This is a big. Story, isn't it? Oh, absolutely Steve. And let's cut right to the chase here. That discovery you talked about it to top there it's krill oil because krill oil is simply amazing for us. It's great for the heart. Great for the joints, fantastic for the brain for the is. I mean, I have people coming into my clinic every single day, and they wanna feel better. I mean, they wanna feel physically better stronger. They want their choice to feel comfortable, but they wanna stay mentally sharp. They want to keep that brain thinking, like it did when they were younger they want to protect themselves from Karner heart disease, and maintain those flexible, healthy youthful arteries for wonderful circulation. They want to boost their energy. Why not? I mean, we deserve it. And that's what we're going to be talking about here today with this krill omega fifty plus which is the cutting edge combination Steve of krill oil, which is so fabulous for us. But we infused the Crowell important, we've been fused, the krill oil with the high omega three concentrated visual you need to do that. You're dealing with krill. Krill? Just isn't high enough. You know, make it three so many other important parameters in virtues. But you gotta get that high omega three fish oil in there. And we've done that. So this is now the best of both worlds, but we didn't stop there for the fifty plus years. We've added from vitamin d we doubled the power and Steve, we actually increased by sixty seven percent. So this now becomes the finest omega three nutrient in the world as far as I'm concerned. This is very, very exciting. This krill oil sensation. It is all over the news, Dr. Neil eleven great studies are out there. Many experts are declaring that krill oil is better than fish oil. So give us this low down on this krill, omega fifty plus formula. Right. Right, right, Steve. You know, if I told you we did talk about this before the show that this is one tiny pill that benefits the joints and the brain and memory mood, coronary heart disease. Wonderful for the arteries makes your hair. Great for the skin. I mean, what would you say that? Hey, where is it? Where can I get? Right. And we have it. It's krill, omega fifty plus and we're going to give it to everybody for free today, and that's really cool. Because purity wants everybody to try to because they know they're going to see huge difference. But get this on top of that, for the first, Dow's in people that call today, we're giving away a second gift because I just demanded this, you know what we're dealing with the fifty pluses. And hey, you know if you're forty and you feel like your energy is low. This is for you all, so but for people fifty and over there also giving away free beat twelve energy melts, I demanded this because as we're getting a little older. We don't absorb that beat twelve as well. And I want you to feel the benefits from this krill omega fifty plus on winter Jack up those b twelve levels for you today as well. You know, value proposition, you know, when it comes to your health, it really is a win win. This is amazing. I heard you say that this can actually reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. I mean when you hear that whose ears perk up after that how exactly does that work? Anyway. Right. Right. Well, krill, omega fifty plus I remember this is the combination. Nation of krill oil with the high omega three highly concentrated fish oil so much higher than most krill oil formulas would be..

Krill Steve Karner Crowell Dow Dr. Neil sixty seven percent
"krill" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

05:02 min | 2 years ago

"krill" Discussed on Science for the People

"Of criminals out there. They August preventive so cost. Yeah. My suction as a concern as well. It's a concern, obviously. Because we don't want the curl to to be overfished. But also since they form a foundational or sort of more low level base layer of food resource in ecosystem that are real a hurting the krill population will have potentially quite large impacts on other types of animals who use who either eat krill directly or who eat something that eats grow. Yes, am I hate to say this? But most people that actually care much about krill. They care about the seals in the payment in Wales. And so most of the concern about the grill fisheries are bad taking food away from the the the animals, so but they're artists who do care about the criminals. Well, so you have what you have to do is to make sure that the needs of those animals are taking accounting entry stamp. And that's the way the fisheries managed at the moment. And as I say. The fishery for the left well since the early nineteen eighties when the union officials current with regular take about half a billion tons of krill year. It's it's dropped down for most of the period between cracked up about three hundred thousand tons a year. And that sounds like a law. But it's actually when you think we're thinking that possibly three hundred million tons of krill. It's not actually a large portion of the of the crew population. So what we're actually talking and making sure that that catch. There's no concentrated in areas. It's going through a Saint he the adults are dependent on krill aid that we take it at the time of year. Wading those atoms. So it's not just about how much it's also how much from precisely where when so that we're not impacting kind of known, for example, whale feeding grounds yet exactly yet. All Awale feeding graduate a bit tricky. It's people much more concern too. Because the way it was a big and mobile Dave got a lot more leeway as to where they can feed more things like penguins. And so you don't want to take all Ukraine. Offshore the paying wouldn't call it. Either totally dependent or the time of year. When those those penguins are desperately dependent on crow's feet. They young. So so you take those things into account and the management system is getting much more sophisticated as time goes on. So it starts off with just quotas on rigging large areas added. It's going down now scale and incorporating time as well. And it was that. Because the the the fishery hasn't expanded rapidly people feared there's been time to do this sort of more sophisticated management. We have some idea how krill might be affected by the ongoing climate change. Because when we think about oceans in particular, m I know that there's a lot of concern about the changing environments in the ocean. Obviously temperature changes peach balance changes those kinds of things I'm assuming that's concern for. Hilas while and do we have any idea at present whether or not they're they're feeling some impact from the climate change or experiencing currently? So yes, we expect the will be or use an are major changes that are affecting critical, but not in tardy show, how how much happening at the moment. So I mentioned earlier the fact that the the sea ice has retreated winter from large areas of the anti. And that obviously affects the krill and didn't affect in love because that's their habitat because she needs whether the you can spy with ties, and we don't quite know that yet. But. In theory. It should be catastrophic in practice doesn't seem to be yet. And there are you know, the balances here as well. But can thrive e need the is. But the adults prefer the open ocean. So so the annals by really well, only, isolated the lobby my know. So we'll be some some ups and downs of this. We know things like the krill actually live, you know, fairly narrow temperature range between my minus one point eight five degrees. And so it's the water starts getting Mormon.

Wales Ukraine crow Dave three hundred thousand tons three hundred million tons eight five degrees billion tons
"krill" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

05:12 min | 2 years ago

"krill" Discussed on Science for the People

"Was this commissioned Kona mission for the sedation that green missile which was established to manage the fisheries in the region because in the late nineteen seventies management of fisheries going on that and the fisheries getting bigger and send the whole idea was to try and ensure that over exploitation of marine resources that didn't occur. To the because of the effects that ceiling wailing that had some in the century full. So people were really worried when faces fishing started because that's food of seals whales and everything else down. So they wanted to make sure that this wasn't going to DEA disaster like previous exploitation and Anton. And so this very it a treaty was set up for the reasons indicated because of the krill because fishing for crew bench, you have a different approach to manage. But you couldn't just say you can take a proportion of of krill population in that that you have to take into account the needs at the rest of the organism to them there as well. So they developed what became notice 'cause it's approach to management, and it was about the first. Resource management treaty that took that approach. Also was about. I saw responded retreating took took wants to know. Now as precautionary approach in way, where you have to make a decision you are on the side of caution on the side of exploitation. And so that made it really innovative, and so that's been operating nineteen ninety one and it manages fisheries, some of some of them are successfully managed others, not quite so successful. That is but the Pearl fishery has up until now being successfully managed, and it's largely nothing to do with the mission. It's because it's just not economically. A fact it's to fish krill. But what that means is that the commission has been able to thirteen place a whole range of measures. That regulate the fisheries at the time when the most. Pressure on have been this really objective. So if the fishery did start to grow they would have this. He's measures that could control the expansion of the fishery control where occurs and how much it takes so on. So it's it's actually being very good. Till they know economically. But that's not to say they will be at some point in the future. So at the moment, we aren't doing sort of enough as far as we're aware. We're not doing enough kind of commercial fishing of krill. I definitely don't generally here of krill being kind of popular commercial item. I'm definitely is not something that we eat a lot of I think we use krill as food for other animals were trying to raise in some situations. Is that correct? Yeah. So so the main uses crew are agriculture feed. It has the attractive property that is raid the fishes like salmon, and so on need red coloration this food so good sa- that and it's it's a it's a really good, you're still soul, stole boast of fish species. So it has actually a good thing to feed them, but it's just really expensive. If you go to talk to the catch it. So the other thing that is the. That really is the most valuable thing for the Fisher moment, and by taking all his Criollo Ella, which is Magus three oil, and that's human health supplement. And but as I say only a small proportion of the Tachiki for that. So those are the main products of fishery, but there's been lots of experiments you try to make products for Cuban consumption from krill. But they know, but again, it's really experiencing team to to catch the krill, and it's actually much cheaper to get your marine protein. Elsewhere. That's the Jarasa seemed your call his, well, there's a even more complicated -partment catching krill in that once they've died. There's an enzyme that starts to kick in which causes a lot of problems as well. So you have to try to prevent that enzyme from. I think it did changes into a different color or something like that. There's all sorts of little problems like that. So. Yeah. So the so there is the there is the Reedzans. Yes. They got the most powerful protein two games on demand. And so that's that's that beings..

Pearl fishery DEA Reedzans Fisher Tachiki
"krill" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"krill" Discussed on Science for the People

"Yeah. Absolutely. And so you do have. And when you said, you got experiment. It's important that you set of experiments at. Largely robust to that food of issue because he doesn't want to have your work challenged because it was just down there. It was done in the lab as opposed to. But having said that, you know, people who don't believe a word of what comes out of bar trae. And and then, you know, some you have to try and do your best job knowing that the environment every he's very different from what they would be in Norway. So I also wanna talk a little bit about fisheries regulation because this was a little bit of a surprising. Find for me in this book end up because I am such a super nerd, it was really fascinating section to hear a little bit more about in particular. How Antarctic fisheries are managed in the complexities involved in that secure. Tell me a little bit about the commission and the fisheries for krill the regulation there because I I'm a super nerd, and I found this really interesting. Good because that's chapter the most at the difficulty with. So it's it's a very complex issue because he knows Dan to how the antibiotics governed international law and all sorts of things. So. The the talk itself is run by I think will the Antarctic Treaty. Rich has I think. Catcher to have any members. But the spin off of the Antar treaty..

Antarctic Norway Rich Dan
"krill" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"krill" Discussed on Science for the People

"Can get bigger when is abundant and actually shrink in size when not so some of the ideas on being able to tell how old occur was which was all more or less downsized for quite some time. That's now seen as much more complicated. Oh, absolutely. So that's yeah. That that I started. When people were looking at the the how I have long could crow that fund. And this was a study that was done here in Australia, and the it's really particular work because people I thought clearly credibly difficult alive in Barra tree and it took a while. To learn the tricks that you need to keep going and once he know those tricks, you can actually keep going for a long time. So once the the secrets of keeping them alive where discovered we started asking questions about how long ago that food because in the end to Arctic winter, the at the time, the logic was that there isn't much food that they how did they do it and says thought starving them for two hundred days proves that they they just they just hope they don't have a problem with it. But as you say, they get smaller that wasn't that was not the expected results, and what happens is frill multitude every month. They get rid of. The old shell you know, so much like lobsters do, but they do it very regularly, and when foods abundant they grow and would suit isn't about the they drink. And so this means that at the start of the two hundred day experiment. The crew were like they saw my size quill at the end. They were really small. And in fact, they looked exactly like do not krill and they'd lost all the secondary sex characteristics. Couldn't actually tell them apart from from krill were much younger and which had been through of sexual development. So I'm not complete the computers because it means that your whole life cycle work works because based largely on studying preserve krill was wrong. And then when we started keeping a log for long times when you they were very lonely. And we started asking well how come we didn't notice before? And as you said, it's because the way that we measured the age of krill is just to the link, and obviously if they go through many winters at streaking and growing and so on then that's not a very good way to measure age. And so that's being a major thrust of research for the last thirty years of trying to find a better way to age krill. So in a lab space, obviously, one of the things you do have is size restriction. And it's one of the interesting things about this creature as that you get these massive swarms. Are we able to see on a smaller scale swarms in a in a laboratory environment yet you can? So you can make krill school in in the in the lab if you have big enough pinks, and we have tanks here in the the started in Antarctic division. That are big enough. We can actually use. Schooling behavior sort of mad. You know, Hoffa meter in diameter, and it's really neat to see it. Because it just you look at it. And you got wow, look at that. These are these are. Bona fide animal doing things animal do so. So that's and it also means that because we know that they do in the field. It means the reality have conditions in the lab that are that are good enough. Then they'll do complex behavior, which is means that we can begin to trust the sorts of results, we get into some artery experiment. Yeah. I guess that's always the challenge when you take an animal out of its natural environment and try to recreate an environment. And a lab there's always something that's going to be deficient about that. And so you get in the same way that when you put an animal in a zoo, the behaviors we see sometimes in two animals is very different than the behaviors in the wild. So I suppose as a as a scientist studying krill in the lab that you kind of have to keep top of mind does that is this an authentic behavior that we would see in the wild or is this potentially an artifact of an artificial environment..

Barra tree Arctic Hoffa scientist Australia two hundred days two hundred day thirty years
"krill" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"krill" Discussed on Science for the People

"So there there's lots of around, but at the same time it turns out we they're still at mysteries about them. We don't actually know as much about krill as I think the average person would suspect we would kind of think of krill is like a known. Entity. But actually, there's some there's some difficult things that we don't know yet about them. Yeah. Well, they're actually fairly difficult to study. I mean, I don't concentrate here talking about the Antarctic, which is the one that really most abundance theses of criminals occurs. Iran might rent the antibiotic, and that's obviously kind of difficult for gay tat. No, there is a long way from almost everywhere and but half of the year their habitats covered by ice. So just go getting in there. Trying to study studied them in natural habitat is kind of tricky. We also don't really have a particularly good tools to studying them what the traditional way of studying krill has been you go them sat in a boat, and you Chuck a NATO aside, and you pull up a whole lot of krill, and you pick a room, and you take the Becky labar tree and study them, and that, you know, to my mind is not really the best way to find out about, you know, living breathing animals. It's better to have. If you could observe the behaving in the wild. Or did you can actually have them alive in the Barra trees, you can start to learn an awful lot mortgage. Just by measuring them in in the lavar artery when they did. Yeah. There's not much you can tell about a dead crawl. I guess you can dissect one, and you can learn a bit about it sort of physical biology, but that's only a very small part of creature's existence in the world, you really get nothing about its behavior in that in kind of study now. No. And, you know, even at the earliest days what people were studying krill back in the nineteen thirties. There's some absolutely beautiful descriptions of the behavior of krill taken from the ships that they had then and also also from sure based operations and the absolute lyrical descriptions, and they haven't been bantered since because. A in those days. People took a bit more time to observe the animals. They would try to deal with and they we go too much for automated sampling and much more rigid something regimes and more recent than us echo. Sounders. Lot study Krell, and what that means is you just sit and look at a computer screen and look at the the ACA, San return on the computer. So you don't actually get a great deal of feeling for the animals and selves. So it wasn't really until we started keeping krill alive in the bar the began to piece together something mistreatments the knife who, but it's we're still a long way from completely understanding them not parking can't. That as you said, they they live in these boss forms recant dream visualize, those fools doing most of the time. And it's just. You know, we can only be down for such a short period of time that we only get through incomplete picture. There's this interesting dichotomy with krill where you get this very small creature. You kind of have to get up close to them to see how individual krill are interacting. But also, you have this kind of colony swarm structure where you really need to zoom quite far out to be able to understand what the greater swarm is doing because there's broader social behavior in that large group has well, and I can see how trying to do both especially in the same trip. Must be basically impossible. You must sort of have to if you're doing research research on krill. You must have to kind of either look at them as a swarm or really focusing in in the lab and look at them as a kind of smaller group of individuals. Yeah. And that's that's the resolutely truth and the so we're starting to actually have much electronics to look at how the swarms themselves behave, and we had a voyage just come back last week from Antarctica new using the most up to date. Xander electrician, they could actually make three dimensional pictures of what this fall look like they changed with them with time..

Sounders Becky labar tree Antarctic Iran Xander Chuck Antarctica Krell San ACA
"krill" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"krill" Discussed on Science for the People

"Enter tick research and management. He's also the author of the new book, the curious life of krill a conservation story from the bottom of the world, which he's here to talk to us about today. Stephen lovely to have you. It's lovely to be here. So how did you come to krill as a scientific research topic of interest? Well, let's where the Canadian conviction comes in. Because I started I I did a degree in Oceano graffiti in UK, and then moved over to Canada to do by the Dow highly and I was looking for a project that I won't that that would attract my attention. And I wanted to work on something that was. Somewhat visualize about it. So I was told that in the bay of Fundy the area where the there were krill that came to the surface, and we're fade on by the way does and birds and also about the rag Amal's ended really spectacular thing to say, and that nobody know why new white happened. So I I got interested in that. It went down to have a look at it. And it was indeed credibly interesting. So I that became on PHD project to try and work a why they were forming at the seriousness of in this really dynamic area. And did you end up solving that problem? So yes, the the. The obvious solution seemed to be that they were the is the largely females that they were his leg narratives. And so the water was two leagues and the females per up there. And the that seemed to be the basic issue, but they would also doing all sorts of other things about which was kind of interesting. So from that point on did you do you just kind of keep going with krill because you had an initial start there or did something about krill kind of capture you in that first project you did on them. Well, I agree with quite like crew for for the stock when I first saw them. And I then I was extremely lucky most trying to have to chop and change as they go through their careers. I was very lucky. I actually got a job down here in Tasmania working with the intelligent relation to run the crew research per man, I just stayed. So I kept working one group of animals right through my professional career. It's interesting. The one of the things you talk quite a bit about in this book is how kind of everyone knows about krill. But nobody not a lot of people actually know very much about krill. And we have some fairly common misconceptions and just it it really kind of a delighted me a little bit as you as you got into some of this because I found this book kind of in that way. I was having a conversation with someone and they were asking me, do you think you'll ever run out of podcast, topics? And I said, no absolutely not because the things that you think are incredibly boring, and that no one could ever right at entire book about them because they'd be too boring. Tried to book about turn out to be quite interesting and someone has written a book about it. And the example that I use to prove the point was I'm like a bunch of someone's written a book about krill, and I did a search, and I was like, hey, someone's written a book about krill. It looks really good. I'm gonna get this book. And that's how I found your book. Horrified. Did you feel boring just don't with and I hope you don't take anymore? It wasn't that. I thought they were blowing. But they definitely have a PR problem of being boring. Yeah. Well, that was executive motivation for writing the book, I go set up with all this notices being written the krill and people trotting at the same middle Fraser's about grill, krill, tiny, rip like crustaceans and krill plank. Tony can only sort of stuff, and I just I was out. But it didn't. I thought someone's going to set the record straight. And I'd written quite a bit of popular is before we ensured articles and so on. But I thought the way to do it was to actually write the book and set the record straight. And so that's what I tried to do when I found quite interesting is from the perspective of krill there, so abundance, we get these massive massive swarms of them, you know, the food of Wales..

Stephen Oceano Amal Tony Tasmania Canada UK Wales executive Fraser two leagues
 Coaches accused in bribery scandal wielded outsize authority

Joe Pags

05:32 min | 2 years ago

Coaches accused in bribery scandal wielded outsize authority

"It'd be it'd be nutso to not start with this college admission scandal because I really don't get it. I know Laurie Laughlin is some say Laughlin, I say Laughlin who knows who Felicity Huffman is I didn't even know they had daughters to be honest with you. And I know that the the full house was the one lady in the other lady was like a desperate housewife. And then suddenly you're going to prison like the FBI arresting them. What what the hell happened and how brought his this thing. The FBI has recently uncovered accused bribery scandal that's been happening with universities across the United States. It's not just one college. It's it's a variety of different schools. And basically these celebrities we've heard Laurie Lockwood Hoffman. Sam in the news, just because they are the most famous, but other hundreds of people who have bought into this bribery scheme who are paying university coaches to accept their students under the guise that they're an athlete when the student is really not an athlete. They've never played a sport in their life. Parents are paying hundreds of thousands of dollars to help someone take the SAT or the ACT for their child. So that they can get a good enough sports to get into these schools. They're paying for test proctors to change the results after the fact and really just pay millions of dollars to get into a college that they would not have otherwise been accepted into based off of their merits now. You know that I'm not as smart as pretend and I'm watching this unfold. And if your child isn't smart enough or has studied hard enough or whatever to pass the tests and get the scores and have the GPA and do the community service where the hell it takes to get into these universities. If you pay to get them in aren't the invariably gonna fail aren't they is it just about prestigious it just about. Hey, look, it goes to Harvard or Berkeley or USC is that really what it is. I think the problem is that in our culture college has become so much of an assassination in order to get a job that students think once they get into the college. They don't have to work anymore there, then entitled to a certain job title, a certain income level and everything once they get into the university. But that's not the case on your completely. Right. That not only as an embarrassing that parents are buying their children's way into college. But they're really doing their kids a huge disservice. Only are they teaching them that hard work doesn't matter. But they're not going to be setting their child up for failure because their emission standards at any college for a reason if you can. Can't get a certain score on your SAT. You probably won't be able to keep up with the academic rigor at some of these universities. It's a very important point reform dot org. Make sure you go there. So the way that it it specifically allegedly reportedly worked is like Lori Lafon her family. Her husband is a family would contact the coach and say, hey, my daughter doesn't do crew. But how can you accept her on crew? Now would the coach didn't have to give a scholarship to or just say I want this person. Don't worry about her scores. She's important to my teams. I mean, what what am I what are we talking about here? So the way I understood it mean, I've heard it reported in the news is that there was a middleman consultant involved. So the people bribing their way into college probably weren't talking specifically to the university officials are employee's. They would go to this middleman. And he would he would help them facilitate that I'm not completely sure if they were scholarships involved, I, sir. Hope not really be pouring salt in taking it away from deserving students right in regards to Laurie Laughlin specifically I did hear that their family had submitted pictures of their daughters on indoor rowing machines to show that they were training or krill had really never done crew in their entire life, which is embarrassing. It's pathetic. There's so much wrong with that picture. I couldn't agree with you more. Now, what is your daughter's name Jade is that what it is a Libya is her daughter is been getting watercress. Her name is Olivia. She is a social media star as you would say. The part that really bothers me about hurry Baldwin in. It is she posted a video maybe a month or two before she went to college saying that she did not want to go to swallow her parents wanted her to go to school. And the only reason she wanted to go to college was to get the quote traditional college experience. I'd go to parties. There you go. Not only did your parents bribe away into school, but she took a spot from another student who might have wanted to go to participate in the academic part of college. And all she wants to do is go party. And let's get real about this. She has about a million and a half follow or something like that. She has monetize her channel Sephora or Seth Rodman how to pronounce it has just. Right. Just dropped her because of the scandal. So the parents in the attempt to get prestige. So they could say a Libya goes to the school or that schoolers or whatever have now honestly taken away the living that she was already making. She didn't need college. She was already, you know, somebody who was doing something that didn't require that degree or didn't require a doctorate. So they honestly only hurt her the first way by by pretending she's smarter than she is had better grades than she did and getting into a school taking a slot from somebody. They've now taken away her living. How stupid another question, but I'd love to hear your opinion as a young person seeing this unfold this girl would have been so much better. Not being involved in this at all. Yeah. I completely agree with you. And the problem is that every single person thinks they absolutely need to go. Get a college degree to be successful. Which is it should not be the case. There are plenty of jobs. Whether you want to go into a specific trade or whether you want to be an entrepreneur that allows you to succeed without college. But because we as society how this idea that a college degree entitled. To something we see parents forcing their children to go to school. And in the case of this scandal hurting, their children in the process by one teaching a terrible terrible lesson to really hurting this girl's career in all of these students futures because whether these children you about it or not, you know, maybe their parents told them their parents didn't tell them to reflect poorly on a student and haunt them for the

Laurie Laughlin Bribery FBI Libya Laurie Lockwood Hoffman United States Felicity Huffman Harvard Lori Lafon USC SAM Consultant Sephora Olivia Baldwin Jade Berkeley Seth Rodman
Different Humpback Whale Groups Meet To Jam

60-Second Science

03:30 min | 2 years ago

Different Humpback Whale Groups Meet To Jam

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Jason Goldman. Male humpback whales are the concert singers of the marine world these ocean giants belt out tunes that can be heard perhaps hundreds of miles away the songs attract, friends and lovers and maybe keep rivals at bay. And now we learned that humpbacks in different ocean basins, the south Atlantic and the Indian on opposite sides of the African continent. Share melodies that song that my lunch between individuals folk today, the best example of cars onto cultural transition from peer to peer rather than from parent offering Melinda rectal marine conservation, scientists with the wildlife. Conservation society's ocean giants program. The International Whaling Commission has identified seven distinct humpback whale breeding populations in the southern hemisphere. These are whales that meet up in the same warm tropical waters each year to mate and give birth. But when mating season is over. Whales migrate to Chile polar regions to gorge on krill using genetics and photographic surveys of migrating humpbacks, researchers know that males in these colder feeding areas interact with other males from different breeding populations. But scientists did not know this meet up provides the whales with the opportunity to have vocal jam sessions where they trade melodies and the amount of song overlap between the whales that breed off 'gabon in the Atlantic. And those that breed near Madagascar in the Indian Ocean varies year to year. That's according to a study of more than fifteen hundred individual sounds that were recorded between two thousand one and two thousand five the results are in the journal, Royal Society opened science that might sense that in some years that may be different Asian graphic conditions. Patchily distributed pry that my name populations individuals have to move the to find food and that might bring them into classic context with neighboring populations and Philip song exchange. The fundings present researchers with new opportunities to understand how culture is transmitted among animals, but it also allows even greater insight into the workings of populations of humpback whales it shines the connectivity potentially on the times go, which is what genetic information doesn't genetic data can show the different populations had historical interactions but songs can reveal how to populations interact on a much faster time scale. But combine. Ending song information from these populations with Wales. That breed off the Atlantic coast of Brazil rectal, says researchers can gain more comprehensive understanding the dynamics of global humpback whale culture back while it's an incredibly in a complex display. It quite amazing. How complex it is. And how it that shooting? Amazing example of culture in in animals. Thanks for listening for scientific Americans. Sixty seconds science. I'm Jason Goldman.

Jason Goldman Atlantic Indian Ocean International Whaling Commissi Gabon Royal Society Chile Melinda Brazil Madagascar Patchily Wales Philip Sixty Seconds
Why Are Whales Big (But Not Bigger)?

BrainStuff

04:15 min | 2 years ago

Why Are Whales Big (But Not Bigger)?

"Today's episode was brought to you by the new Capital One saver card with which you can earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. That means four percent on checking out that new restaurant everyone's talking about and four percent on watching your team win at home. You'll also earn two percent cashback at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet? Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren bulk bomb here, if you've ever been whale watching visited a large barium or even seeing the skeleton of a whale in a museum of natural history. You know, the majestic massive Bassus of these aquatic mammals, the largest mammal ever lived on earth in the history of the planet is not some prehistoric monstrosity. It's actually the blue whale and is alive right now swimming around in our oceans whales range in size from the massive blue whales, which can grow to more than ninety feet. That's twenty seven meters in length to the relatively tiny pygmy sperm whales, which measure a measly ten feet or three meters in length, but with all that ocean swim around in why aren't Wales even bigger it's not like they have to support their big bodies on legs and walk around for that matter, though, why aren't they smaller? Both answers have to do with food and heat at least that's what researchers at Stanford University found when they compiled the body mass data for nearly four thousand living whales. And three thousand fossilized species there now asus determined that aquatic mammals actually face more size constraints than their counterparts on land. The study authors determined that. There are two main factors. Why Wales are big, but not bigger heat loss and metabolism oceans can be pretty cold places to live and Wales while very intelligent don't really have the aquatic equivalent to thermal underwear, so because they're warm blooded mammals. They have to be large enough to keep from losing too much body heat to these rounding water Thermo regulation than it keeps Wales from being the size of say dogs study co author Jonathan pain eight professor of geological sciences at Stanford school of earth, energy and environmental sciences explained. In a press statement when you're very small you lose heat back into the water so fast. There's no way to eat enough food to keep up and speaking of eating whales have to do it a lot like all mammals, they convert that food into energy for swimming, growing and doing other wail like things that's the metabolic system at work. But the researchers suggest. That the metabolism of Wales only gets faster as they get bigger. And so they can only get so large another study co author Craig MacLean of the Louisiana, universities marine, consortium, explained it. This way, basically animals are machines that require energy to operate this need for energy places hard limits on what animals can do and how big they can be. So it boils down to how much Wales can eat versus their metabolic rate that keeps Wales from getting infinitely large. But how do those massive blue whales get so massive they have baleen instead of teeth and strain their food a little shrimp like creatures called krill instead of chewing it krill are only a few centimeters long, but they really add up every day. A blue whale eats about eight thousand pounds that's over three thousand six hundred kilos of krill. So blue whales are not only the largest whales in the ocean. They're also the most efficient eaters of all. This episode was written by Kristen hall, guys lawyer and produced by Tyler clang for iheartmedia, and how stuff works for more on this and lots of other huge topics. Visit our home planet. Testif- works dot com. Today's episode is brought to you by smart water. Twenty years ago sparked water reimagined, what water could be from thoughtful bottle designed to supporting smart people who are changing our world through fresh thinking. Like, you smart water has added electrolytes for taste and great tasting water helps you stay hydrated, feeling refreshed and ready to take on your day. Refresh yourself with smart water.

Wales Capital One Stanford University Asus Craig Maclean Kristen Hall Testif Stanford School Of Earth Louisiana Professor Tyler Clang Jonathan Four Percent Three Thousand Six Hundred Kil Eight Thousand Pounds Twenty Seven Meters Twenty Years Three Meters
Russia and Japan at odds over seven-decade-old Kuril Islands dispute

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:46 min | 2 years ago

Russia and Japan at odds over seven-decade-old Kuril Islands dispute

"The leaders of Russia and Japan are in high stakes Tokes in most today as tensions rise of series of disputed islands. The diplomatic row has worsened in recent weeks of the Russia furiously accused Japan of refusing to accept the consequences Lovie, second world, warm in a moment. The Russia analyst Stephen DL will share his insides, but first Monaco's Asia editor at large Kenji whole joins us on the line from Tokyo bureau Kenji this row was partly renewed of Shinzo Abe's New Year's Eve address. What was it that ignited the tensions? Yeah. You're absolutely right about that office spoke in his new year speech about the need to help Russian residents on these four disputed islands. Accept and understand that the sovereignty of their homes will change obviously that didn't go well down don't down well in Russia Moscow, summoned the Japanese ambassador's protests and Russia has also complained about a Japan's official maps which show the four krill islands inside Japan's borders, the Russian side seems unwilling to part with any of the islands. What's the what's the end goal here? As far as Japan is concerned yet. So Japan says that the at the time the Soviet Union illegally seized the four islands in nineteen forty five. And then kicked out the seventeen thousand Japanese residents there since the nineteen fifties took his position has been that it wants all four islands returned. And until there's progress on that agreement. Tokyo will not sign a peace treaty, which would. Formerly end World War Two hostilities with Russia. The biggest problem with these discussions is that both sides think of the islands as their own sovereign territory. And Russia doesn't really think of it as a territorial dispute at all. So you can't really have constructive constructive talks here about a compromise. When two signs of very different views about the most basic assumptions that said there are a couple of things that have raised hopes in Japan about a possible breakthrough. First of all, it was that Japan. Russia cooperated on joint economic development projects for the islands since two sixteen. They've even set up a billion dollar investment fund. And the second thing was just the meeting between Ave and Putin last November in Singapore. That's when the two leaders talked about what's called, the nineteen fifty-six joint declaration, and in that the Soviet Union agreed to hand over two of the four disputed islands that would be tan and Hubbell my Japanese. Knees to Japan after the two sides sign a peace treaty. Now. Just the fact that the nineteen fifty-six joint declaration came up suggests that abyss position is flexible that he might ask for two islands and hold osc. Hold off asking for the remaining two until later. But you know, it's not really clear what is clear is that are they really wants to break the deadlock and he wants to do. So by the time Japan hosts, the G twenty summit in all soccer in June. There's a parliamentary elections scheduled for the summer. So that's a factor as well. Kenji hole in Tokyo. Thanks for joining us. Now, Stephen yellow bring you in now here in the studio foreign policy adviser for the Russian president admitted that the meeting would not be easy clearly spirits have been high going into this from the outset they haven't in many ways, the last five years, we say in Russian politics have made this even more complicated issue than than it was as can you suggesting there have been times when better but curiously going to run to the other side Russia, and I've actually brought in shown to brought him my MAC because it's just recommend anyone who's interested in this store.

Japan Russia Tokyo Soviet Union Kenji Shinzo Abe Stephen Dl Asia Lovie Monaco Analyst Editor Stephen Yellow Putin Singapore Soccer
Warm-Blooded Opahs

A Moment of Science

02:00 min | 2 years ago

Warm-Blooded Opahs

"Hey, did you hear that scientists have found the first warm blooded fish species Oba's live up to a thousand feet beneath the ocean surface in very cold dimly lit waters, reddish orange with white speckles and some species can grow as large as six feet in length and six hundred pounds Zeus a fish story. I, oh, I suppose it sounds like one done very little is known about Oprah's because they live so deep in the ocean and are rarely caught. Scientists did. No, they were predators that eight squid krill and small fish. They wondered how otas could catch such fast moving prey, but they didn't expect that warm blooded metabolism would be the reason for their hunting success or other warm blooded fish, some sharks and tuna have what's known as regional endothermic or limited warm blooded nece. It allows them to stay active in colder depths. But Oprah's are unlike all other. Fish. We've studied or scientists sure they're warm-blooded Noah fisheries biologist discovered that Oprah's had unusual guilty issue. The blood vessels carrying warm blood into the fish's gills wind around those carrying cold blood back to the body core. Engineers call this a counter current heat exchange silver. I don't lose as much buddy heat into the cold water from their gills, exactly. They also found that Oprah's constantly flap their fins which generates body heat temperature measurements found that they were able to stay about forty one degrees Fahrenheit warmer than the surrounding. Chilly waters. Not very warm compared to humans ninety eight degrees. No. But it gives them a competitive edge as hunters, which is all that matters moment of science comes from Indiana University. There are thousands more moments of science on our website at a moment of science dot org. I'm ya'll Cassandra again dog Wes.

Oprah Indiana University WES Forty One Degrees Fahrenheit Ninety Eight Degrees Six Hundred Pounds Thousand Feet Six Feet
Red Lobster employee in Arkansas tests positive for hepatitis A, health department confirms

Dr. Daliah

01:39 min | 3 years ago

Red Lobster employee in Arkansas tests positive for hepatitis A, health department confirms

"A, Red Lobster employees in Arkansas has positive for. Hepatitis a. courts have health department, Red Lobster Relapse the leather new anyway they say anyone who ate at a Red Lobster in Fort Smith July nineteen dollars for should, seek vaccination Immediately And if they've never been vaccinated against hepatitis a. or unsure other vaccination status Apparently the case appears to be related to travel outside of the state at is. Not thought to be part of the current hepatitis a outbreak in northeast Kansas So you could have fever fatigue loss of appetite nausea vomiting Janis Not everyone though who gets hepatitis will exhibit. Symptoms so department has set up a couple of accidents and eight. Clinics there's even a Little Caesars and gold that had an a plea that tested positive for hepatitis a Is pretty damn. Contagious you gotta buy oral fecal route where you. Ingest contaminated fecal that or you ingest fecal matter that's contaminant with. Hepatitis a. either by eating food handled by someone with the virus did not wash their hands beforehand Or you could get up from. Raw shellfish for polluted waters if you have sex with someone that has the virus you'll get eight from from sex And they say vaccinations vape protect anyone exposed to have a within two weeks of contact. Now there's a couple of accidents you got the globulin which which will bind to protect you and you're a vaccine will protect you from future. Attacks so anybody in the health food industry is supposed, to be vaccinated against

Symptoms British Association Hepatitis NFL Red Lobster Las Vegas Hand Swelling Europe UK Dr David Orton Krill Lake Reese Cancer Fort Smith Kansas Arkansas Janis Fever
"krill" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"krill" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Where they say that. Krill oil is forty eight times stronger than fish oil is that true make. Any sense well obviously these are the. Krill guys talking right right right but you could look at it both. Ways let's get into. Krill in just. A moment but first let's. Path fish oil guys on the shoulder because you know you could say that the fish oil is better. And stronger but we're talking about, the concentrated high omega three fish oil, here because it's higher and. You'll make a threes the EPA and DHA that are so important for the heart the, brain the memory mood your. Is your skin your hair your now so in one sense you could say well the fish oils better but in. Another sense I have to hand it to the krill guys because in terms of anti Oxygen power krill oil is. Extraordinarily and it's because there's a, molecule and krill oil it's. Naturally occurring called Astor's Hampton and asked his Anthon Steve this is one, of the most powerful antioxidants we've. Ever discovered Steve? By one measure. Of, antioxidant activity at six thousand times stronger, and, vitamin, c.. Amazing day at the Austin power in the. Krill and now as we're getting older fifty. Plus like myself I'm fifty two and we don't make as many antioxidants naturally our systems are kind of slowing down and at the, same time we're producing more free radicals naturally this is why we call it krill omega fifty plus extra antioxidant power an extra Kroll remember five hundred milligrams of krill instead, of three, hundred sixty seven, percent more plus the, vitamin d so important..

Krill Steve EPA Austin Astor Kroll
"krill" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"krill" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"Fish oil you need. To do that when you're, dealing with? Krill, krill Just isn't high? Enough you don't make it? Free so many other important crammers and virtues but you. Gotta get that high omega three fish oil on there and we've done that so this is. Now the best of both. Worlds but we didn't. Stop there for the fifty plus years. We've added, vitamin d we've doubled the antioxidant power and Steve we actually increase the amount of. Crow by, sixty seven percent so this now. Becomes the finest omega three nutrient in, the world as far as I'm. Concerned this is very very exciting this krill oil sensation I mean it, is all over the news Dr Neil Levin great studies are out there many experts are declaring the krill, oil, is, better than fish oil so give. Us this? Low down, on this krill omega fifty plus formula right right right see you know if I told you and we did talk about this before the show that this. Is one tiny pill, that benefits the joints and the, brain and memory mood coronary heart disease. Wonderful for. The arteries makes your hair shine great for the skin I mean what would. You say that hey where is it where can I get And, we have it it's krill omega? Fifty. Plus. And, we're going to give it to everybody for. Free today and that's really. Cool because purity wants everybody to try, this because they know they're gonna see a huge difference but get, this on top of. That for the first thousand people that call today, we're giving away a second gift because I just demanded. This you know we're, dealing with the fifty plus and hey, you know if you're forty and you feel like your energy. Is low this is for you also but for people fifty and over we're also giving away..

Krill Dr Neil Levin Crow Steve sixty seven percent
Football, London and Oakwood discussed on Today

Today

02:29 min | 3 years ago

Football, London and Oakwood discussed on Today

"Group which represents rail companies said reliability for customers must come first however the leader of leeds city council said it was yes another decision made without consulting leaders in the north of england or passengers divers have begun an operation to rescue the last group of four boys and the football coach from a cave in northern thailand h of the boys who went into the cave more than two weeks ago have been brought out over the past two days this morning a senior thai health officials said they will well but we're being kept in quarantine to avoid the risk of infection now south east asia correspondent jonathan head reports from near the cave entrance heavy rain all morning here makes this third day of an audacious rescue operation more urgent the team of thai and foreign diva's has gone back in to try to bring out the last four boys and their coach in what one person involved in the operation described as a race against time the rain is likely to increase water levels in the cave system senior official from thailand's health ministry describes the health of the eight boys who've already been evacuated as good saying they were eating soft food was sitting up and alert they've been kept in quarantine and monitored for possible infections the parents of the first four have now been allowed to see them through a window reports from china say the widow of the nobel peace prize winner leo shaw has been allowed to leave beijing and is on board a flight to berlin she's been under house arrest since her husband was awarded the nobel peace prize in two thousand ten yoshiko bowl was jailed a year earlier for inciting subversion he died of liver cancer last year twice as many publicly run prisons in england and wales to provide phones in cells so that inmates can call their families calls will be allowed only to an approved list of numbers the initiative will cost seven million pounds over the next two years the director of oakwood person nibble the hampton john mclaughlin says that it will help lower tensions in jail anything that enhances the contact between the a prisoner and his family always loved ones bite i've worked in prisons were telephony has been available on the london secretes a queuing system turn kept in contact with the little ones at the appropriate time to win it's in so and they have the ability to have linked to conversations and make decisions comedy decisions and feel part of the most of the companies that fish for krill the tiny shrimp like creatures crucial.

Football London Oakwood Wales Berlin Beijing Jonathan Head East Asia Thailand Leeds City Council John Mclaughlin Director Leo Shaw China Official England Seven Million Pounds Two Weeks Two Years
Study on omega-3 fatty acids & your brain

Ed Bousman

01:45 min | 3 years ago

Study on omega-3 fatty acids & your brain

"Doc this study you sent me on this omega threes and the memory is amazing it seems that the participants taking omega threes had some pretty incredible benefits here when you talk about memory that is something that kind of slips as we get older tell us more about this would you write this was a great study important study because what they did he was very interesting this out of the journal neurology and what they did is they check theo mega three level in the red blood cells of women a thousand women older women that this is a big study thousand women but then again eight years later and the women were on average seventy eight years old at this point they did an mri scans of the women's brains and what they found steve this is so amazing they found at the brain volume for the women that had higher mega three indexes and other words they had more omega threes in their red blood cells the women that had more omega threes in their red blood cells they had higher brain volume they were actually maintaining more of the youthful size of the brain their brains were bigger you could see plainly in the mri measurements that's really cool but not only that is a very important part of the brain noticed hippo campus very important part of the brain that facilitates learning to silicates memory and was greater brain volume in hippo campus for people that had more omega threes in their red blood cells that's how you can really measure how much and make it three someone's taking into if you take omega three she will raise your omega three index we know this it's a fact you take mega threes you raise it up to you wanna have more omega threes in your bloodstream very important that's infused into all the cell membranes into the joints into the brain etc so take the krill omega fifty plus you.

Steve Theo Seventy Eight Years Eight Years
"krill" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

WVNJ 1160 AM

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"krill" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

"And then in this is something that you know once again is very wording for me is when they're struggling with triglycerides and with elevation in triglycerides will come in and talk to me about it what kind so first and foremost we always have to start making those dietary changes we have to really eliminate as much as possible all of those wheatbased products any sugar sweetened added sugar because these are two areas that will drive those triglycerides up so those who are carbolic says they call them that's one area that we have to work on if we wanna make an impact on trying to bring those triglycerides levels down but then we can start looking at the omega intake and for me this is the one area that really surprises most people will say well i've been using you know i use one fish oil a day i've been using them to krill's a day the they go and they do their blood work and maybe they don't see enough of an impact well this is what it comes down to it comes down tina where's your current starting level on your triglycerides and how is it that we can get you on the right amount that's actually going to make an impact as i always say the same shoe does not fit every single person in in his true when you're looking at supplements as well so what may work for one person to keep say triglycerides and a healthy normal range may not work for someone else so this is one of those things that i always tell people unita need to talk to someone if you're not sure because you do want to make sure that you're getting the best out of the products that you're taking so now that we're talking about cholesterol let's talk about some of the things you can do in the invite help wine so we have many different things that are very very supportive for healthy cholesterol so we can look of course at fish oil we can look at krill oil we can look at flaxseed the flaxseed powder why i did i mention those three because those are those.

carbolic krill