35 Burst results for "Kremlin"

"kremlin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:42 min | 5 d ago

"kremlin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Accuse of supporting Russian president Vladimir Putin, or benefiting from ties to the Kremlin. They frozen their bank accounts, they have gone after their homes and private jets, and most dramatically they've seized the opulent prize super yachts of these billionaires. But now comes the question. What do you do with a confiscated yacht that's the size of a small cruise ship? To answer that question, Stephanie baker joins me from London. She's a senior investigative reporter for Bloomberg. What is it about buying giant boats that appeals to them? It's a really great question. I mean, many people ask, why do you need a super yacht? No one needs a super yacht. You might need a house, and you could have a grand house. But I think it became a status symbol. And it became another venue for wealthy Russians to park their wealth in a zone that is outside the reach of Putin, who was viewed as potentially a threat to their assets. If they fell foul of the government. So they could go after their accounts, but a physical thing like yacht, it could be, you know, at the ends of the earth and harder to track down and take away. Exactly. And it's the ultimate mobile asset, right? And we've seen that since the war started. Right after the invasion began, many Russian owned superyachts began racing across the ocean in search of safe waters, in jurisdictions that were not enforcing sanctions. And many of them got away, but some of them did not. And some of them were seized. As long as we're defining our terms here, what exactly is a superyacht? How is it different from a yacht or a really, really big yacht? Right. So this is a really interesting conversation I had with many in the industry. Some people define a superyacht as above 40 meters, others say it's above 80 meters. That's a sort of mega yacht or a Giga yacht. A gig of yard. Is that an actual term? It's a term and I asked a lot of people and most people said there's no precise definition for that. But I think many in the industry view anything over 80 meters as, well, of another class. So 80 meters, by the way, for those of us in the U.S., that's 262 feet. So we're talking just absolutely enormous. Enormous enormous. And in that category, 80 meters and above, Russians are the biggest single owners. They own about there are about a 153 super yachts in

Stephanie baker Vladimir Putin Kremlin Bloomberg Putin London U.S.
Zelenskyy says Ukrainian special military units in Kherson

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 2 weeks ago

Zelenskyy says Ukrainian special military units in Kherson

"Ukraine's president says special military units have entered cursing Russian forces captured curse in early in the war now that Ukraine is back in control A Ukrainian flag flew over a monument in the city's central square people waving Ukrainian flags like popova Lydia were in the streets celebrating She said we are grateful to the Ukrainian armed forces our boys are amazing Video showed villagers embracing troops and route to the city It says we love Ukraine We love cursing We are all Ukraine and we are waiting for Ukrainian armed forces We wait for the war to end by Russia's defeat The Kremlin remains defiant insisting the withdrawal in no way represents an embarrassment for president Vladimir Putin and the entire curse region is still part of Russia I'm Ed Donahue

Ukraine Popova Lydia Russia Vladimir Putin Ed Donahue
Russia Says Retreat From Kherson City Is Complete

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 2 weeks ago

Russia Says Retreat From Kherson City Is Complete

"Russia's military says the majority of troops from the West Bank of the river the divides Ukraine's cousin region is now complete The Russian defense ministry says it's finished pulling troops out of the curzon side of the dnieper river in a statement carried by Russia's state news agencies the ministry says that withdrawal was completed at 5 a.m. on Friday and not a single unit of military equipment was left behind The retreat that was announced earlier this week marks another setback for Moscow's war in Ukraine However a Kremlin spokesman has refused to acknowledge the retreat as humiliating for

West Bank Of The River Russian Defense Ministry Russia Dnieper River Ukraine Moscow
UN nuclear agency starts probe of Russian dirty bomb claim

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last month

UN nuclear agency starts probe of Russian dirty bomb claim

"Experts from the International Atomic Energy Agency A conducting inspections of two sites in Ukraine where Russia alleges dirty bombs are being manufactured So it's inspectors have begun and would soon complete verification of the two sites the inspectors have been requested by Kyiv senior officials the Kremlin's made unfounded accusations that Ukraine is preparing to use a so called dirty bomb an explosive laden with radioactive materials western nations however have rejected as transparently false the Kremlin claim Ukrainian authorities dismissed it as an attempt to distract attention from Moscow's own alleged plans to detonate a dirty bomb I'm Charles De Ledesma

Ukraine International Atomic Energy Ag Kyiv Moscow Charles De Ledesma
Russians said to be clearing Ukrainian region's hospitals

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | Last month

Russians said to be clearing Ukrainian region's hospitals

"Russians are said to be clearing hospitals in croissant region ahead of an expected advance by Ukraine's forces According to Ukrainian military officials Russian troops are moving large numbers of sick and wounded soldiers from hospitals in croissant a southern region that Ukraine is fighting to retake after it was invaded by Russia following recent reports of Kremlin appointed authorities urging people to leave affected areas Ukrainian armed forces spokesperson Alexander Stubbs says evacuations of Russia held areas continue including hospitals adding that all medical equipment and medicines are being removed too I'm Mimi Montgomery

Ukraine Alexander Stubbs Kremlin Mimi Montgomery
 Kremlin: Putin monitors drills of Russia's nuclear forces

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | Last month

Kremlin: Putin monitors drills of Russia's nuclear forces

"President Vladimir Putin has overseen drills of Russia's nuclear forces Putin's monitor the country's multiple practice launches of ballistic and cruise missiles into show of force amid the heightened tensions with the west over the conflict in Ukraine Russian defense minister Sergei shoigu says the drills are intended to simulate a massive nuclear strike by Russia in retaliation for a nuclear attack on Russia the maneuvers followed Putin's warning about his readiness to use all means available to fend off attacks on Russia's territory in a clear reference to the country's nuclear arsenal As a part of the exercise TU 95 bombers also

President Vladimir Putin Russia Putin Sergei Shoigu Ukraine
Russia's chaotic draft leaves some out in cold, without gear

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | Last month

Russia's chaotic draft leaves some out in cold, without gear

"The mobilized reservists Russian president Vladimir Putin visited last week at a firing range southeast of Moscow looked picture perfect according to Russian publicity Kremlin video of the young men heading for the war in Ukraine shows them in mint condition uniforms equipped with all the gear needed for combat helmets bulletproof vests and sleeping bags when Putin asked if they had any problems they shook their heads that stands in stark contrast with the complaints circulating widely on Russian news outlets and social media of equipment shortages poor living conditions and scant training for the new recruits I'm Charles De Ledesma

Vladimir Putin Moscow Ukraine Putin Charles De Ledesma
Russian-installed authorities order evacuation of Kherson

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last month

Russian-installed authorities order evacuation of Kherson

"Russian installed authorities have ordered all residents of the southern Ukrainian city curzon to leave immediately ahead of an expected advance by Ukrainian troops In a telegram post the regional pro Kremlin administration calls on civilians who use boat crossings over the NEPA river to move deeper into Russian held territory citing a tense situation on the front and alleged terror attacks by Keith Ukrainian units are waging a counter offensive to recapture the occupied area Kirsten has been in Russian hands since the early days of the invasion in February the city is the capital of a region of the same name one of four Russian president Vladimir Putin illegally annexed last month I'm Charles De Ledesma

Regional Pro Kremlin Administr Nepa River Curzon Keith Ukrainian Kirsten Vladimir Putin Charles De Ledesma
Russian official on negotiations with Ukraine

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last month

Russian official on negotiations with Ukraine

"The Kremlin says talks on Ukraine can happen Spokesman Dmitry peskov says president Vladimir Putin has been open for negotiations with Ukraine from the very beginning and nothing has changed in that respect Peskov was commenting on remarks made by Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan who said the Putin appeared to be more open to negotiations than in the past Russian officials have repeatedly said they were not negotiate the return of the four Ukrainian regions must go illegally annexed last month Ukraine president volodymyr zelensky last month ruled out any talks with Moscow as long as Putin remains president I'm Charles De Ledesma

Spokesman Dmitry Peskov Ukraine Peskov Turkish President Recep Tayyip Vladimir Putin Putin Volodymyr Zelensky Moscow Charles De Ledesma
 EU awards top human rights prize to the people of Ukraine

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | Last month

EU awards top human rights prize to the people of Ukraine

"The European Union has awarded a top human rights prize to the people of Ukraine The sakharov award named after Soviet dissident Andre sacrosanct was created in 1988 to honor individuals or groups who defend human rights and fundamental freedoms It's the second straight year EU lawmakers have used the prize to send a message to the Kremlin imprisoned Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny won it last year Ukrainians have demonstrated resilience in the nearly 8 month old war despite an uptick in Russian attacks in recent weeks I'm Charles

Sakharov Award Andre Sacrosanct European Union Ukraine Alexei Navalny Kremlin Charles
Russia evacuates occupied Ukrainian city, orders martial law

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last month

Russia evacuates occupied Ukrainian city, orders martial law

"That fears Russian president Vladimir Putin's martial law clampdown could be felt in Russia In a signal the Russian leaders move could have broad restrictions for people living in Russia his decree states that the types of messieurs envisage by martial law could be introduced there Putin also ordered the establishment of a coordination committee to increase interactions between government agencies in dealing with the fighting in Ukraine that he continues to call a special military operation Russian state media has reported Kremlin spokesman Dmitry peskov saying Putin's order doesn't anticipate the closure of Russia's borders I'm Charles De Ledesma

Russia Vladimir Putin Putin Dmitry Peskov Ukraine Charles De Ledesma
Russian President Vladimir Putin declares martial law in annexed regions of Ukraine, giving Kremlin tighter control

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | Last month

Russian President Vladimir Putin declares martial law in annexed regions of Ukraine, giving Kremlin tighter control

"Russian president Vladimir Putin is imposing martial law in the four regions that Moscow recently annexed from Ukraine Putin didn't immediately spell out the measures that would be taken under the martial law but the Russian legislation envisages it may involve restrictions on travel and public gatherings and tighter censorship as well as giving broader powers to law enforcement agencies Putin two has granted emergency powers to the heads of other Russian regions The moves are the latest sign fighting in Ukraine isn't going Putin's way I'm Charles De Ledesma

Putin Vladimir Putin Ukraine Moscow Charles De Ledesma
"kremlin" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

07:18 min | Last month

"kremlin" Discussed on Real Dictators

"Stop further bloodshed, that we got to pull out of the war. Back at home, Russia begins to slide into a Civil War. On the one side, stand the communist reds. On the other, the so called whites, a loose confederation of opposition groups that have been gathering since Lenin took office. The provisional government which has been overthrown begins to amass force to counter what the board cubes have done with the Soviets have done. Military generals begin to gather and army in the south of Russia. So they very soon there's a Civil War. From abroad, several of Russia's former allies offer financial and practical support to the whites. Their hope is that by degrading communism in Russia, they might help to reestablish the eastern front against Germany. Britain alone gives some 100 million pounds. To add to the picture, there are also the so called green armies. They are opposed to the reds, the whites and the foreign interventionists. For a while, the outcome is genuinely up for grabs. It would have been quite realistic to think that white armies of some sort would have taken parts of the old Russian Empire. Poland left the Russian Empire in 1917. It was quite realistic to think that parts of Siberia might be held permanently by anti Bolshevik forces at various points in the early part of the war. Ukraine changed hands endlessly during the Civil War, Kyiv changed hands 5 times in a year, so you're seeing a war that is not predictable. A firm hand on the Russian military is more important than ever. In 1918, the Red Army is formally established. With Leon Trotsky at its head. It's a force that will acquire an almost mythological status through the Cold War and beyond. It takes time for this reconfigured army to gain the ascendancy, but in the end, through 1919, red unity begins to triumph. The Bolsheviks had a number of advantages, they held the center. That is, they held Petrograd and then they held Moscow and Moscow was right at the heart of the landmass of European Russia. And the other thing that Bolsheviks had on balance, but it was a very fine balance. They had more support from the population. Generally speaking, than the whites did, because they were saying to the peasants you can keep the land you've taken. The threat posed by invading armies both foreign and domestic has spooked Lenin. It prompts a major decision. With its preferable strategic location, Moscow shall replace Petrograd as the capital city. Petrograd, St. Petersburg, retained its feeling of being really the best city. The city that has the window on the west, the most beautiful city. But it was also highly exposed to some armies of whites coming from the north, and at that point the decision was taken to move the government in particular Lenin, to Moscow, to the Kremlin, which was a defensible objective. You had walls around it, and it was a fortress, and it was in the middle, physical middle of the nation. Lenin and Nadia adopt a characteristically humble lifestyle in their new hometown. They arrived carrying the same Tati bags, rolled up bedding and suitcases full of books that they had during their years in exile. Lenin's office is basic. He makes do with an old clock that doesn't keep time properly. When the sheepskin rug under his desk is replaced by a sumptuous polar bear fur. He demands the old one back. I have no need for such luxuries as. His one indulgence is his dasha is holiday mansion and gorky. The bolt hole boasts a staff of 7, including a cook called spirit on Putin. His grandson, another Vladimir, will make his own mark on Russian history. The final years of the Tsar had seen chronic food shortages across the land. With the communists in power, there is no letter. In the 18 months following the revolution, there was an exodus from the starving cities out into the countryside. Petrograd loses an astonishing two thirds of its population. Those left behind take to eating horseflesh. Politically, it's imperative that Lenin finds someone to blame. He alights on the kulaks. They are a class of the peasantry. The wealthiest sort. The kulaks have been profiteering, he declares. They are responsible for the country's woes. He demands they sell their grain to the government at reduced prices. They have a sociology a way of thinking and understanding society. And they have a hierarchy. At the top of that hierarchy are the industrial proletariat, the workers, skilled workers, and then it sort of goes down from there. Peasants occupy an interesting position. At one point, Lennon described the peasants as having two souls. On the one hand, peasants were inclined towards the workers and the proletariat, because peasants had experienced being exploited and downtrodden, and the other hand peasants also think about the land as theirs. And they think about what is good and useful for them. They don't necessarily think about the connective. In the same way that the workers do because workers are concentrated in a factory. The peasants, in other words, are somewhere between the proletariat and the bourgeoisie. So this becomes a sort of an excuse for the Bolsheviks to say that we're not nakedly acting forcefully against the peasantry were waging class struggle. The government creates requisition brigades. These bands of armed men go out to some 20,000 villages to extract grain by force. In just a year, at least 3700 peasants are killed with whole villages raised to the ground. The brigades even take the seeds needed for next year's planting. With their methods ineffective as well as cruel. From a potential harvest yield of 50 million tons. They only managed to secure around 1% for the state. Meanwhile in the cities, the proletariat does not rally against the country folk as Lenin had hoped. As early as June 1918, there was a socialist revolutionary insurrection in Petrograd. Swiftly followed by another in Moscow. Trotsky crushes the attempted coups, some 200 rebels are executed by the Red Army, with another 600 imprisoned. Lenin is punching down at the peasantry. He

Russia Lenin Moscow Petrograd army Leon Trotsky Kyiv Red Army Siberia reds Ukraine Britain Germany Kremlin St. Petersburg Nadia Putin Vladimir Lennon
"kremlin" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

07:43 min | Last month

"kremlin" Discussed on Real Dictators

"Be consolidated as the USSR. In the Russian capital Petrograd, Lenin and his Bolsheviks take power. Professor Catherine marydale the first thing that happened after the revolution was a feeling of euphoria and a belief that now things could possibly get better. Since the storming of the winter palace, power has come to reside with the newly instituted Soviet or council of people's commissars. Popularly known as the subname, this is in effect the Bolshevik cabinet. The sapna meets in a cramped dingy office on the third floor of the small institute. In these inauspicious surrounds, Lenin will start the giant tusk of reconfiguring the nation. We have to destroy everything, he says, to create the new. It's not as if they're taking a functioning state and then just using it. There is no state in October 1970. There's nothing virtually except a printing press or two, and suddenly they've got to build a state that is defensible at a time of international war. It's incredibly difficult. Doctor James Ryan, what they soon discovered is that when you take power in a country where power has become very disparate, it's very, very difficult to rule the country. And also Bolsheviks realized that they hadn't given a huge amount of thought to how to rule the country. They know what revolution should look like, they know what they want to achieve. They don't necessarily know how you run a state. I mean, what do you do? Do you take over the ministries? Do you rename them? Do you create new ministries? What happens to the banks? What happens to the civil servants? What happens if the civil serpents say we don't want to work for you? What do you do then? In 1917, they are drunk on revolutionary enthusiasm. And they quickly realized we need to sober up and learn how to run a state. The most fundamental question that Lenin faces is how far to embrace democracy. He talked up the prospect of free and fair elections when the Tsar was in power. But he knows that the Bolsheviks mandate could be undermined in an instant at the ballot box the Duma, the Tsar's parliament had been dissolved by the old provisional government in early October, a new constitutional body, the Russian constituent assembly has taken its place. Elections to this assembly are planned and then delayed. Lenin wants to postpone them indefinitely. Other senior Bolsheviks persuade him that the people will not stand for that. The promised public vote finally takes place in mid November 1917. It goes about as badly as Lenin feared. The Bolsheviks come away with less than a quarter of the ballots cast. This is at least more than the mensheviks miserly 3%. But another group of leftists, the socialist revolutionaries, has taken around 40% of the vote. The cadet party comprised of centrist liberals as garnered 5%. Together, these factions might pose a real threat to Bolshevik authority. The assembly is due to sit on November 27th. Instead, Lenin announces a ban on the cadet party, and has several of its leaders arrested. By the time the assembly eventually convened on December 5th, Lenin has imposed martial law. Petrograd is a wash with soldiers. In a show of defiance, 40,000 civilians take to the streets to march and support of the assembly. The red guards fire on them from the rooftops. Killing ten people and seriously injuring 70 others. At 4 p.m. with the assembly finally in session. The Bolsheviks enter emotion. It states that the assembly should automatically ratify all of decrees. In other words, it should rubber stamp their policies, just as the doomer had done for the Tsar. When the motion is voted down, the Bolsheviks walk out in protest. The next morning, drunken red guards are deployed to empty the chamber. Fingers on triggers, they osher out all of the delegates. They then turn off the lights and lock the doors. From Lennon's point of view, sharing power with other parties is fine so long as those other parties are on the same page as the Bolsheviks. Problem becomes when those other parties are not in the same page. And Lennon's page has quite a lot of detail on that. Lenin's new democratic Russia has lasted about 12 hours. There will not be a democratically elected chamber for another 75 years. Instead, Lenin will rule largely by decree. He will issue dozens of directives. On the press, workers rights, land regulation, women's rights. The nationalization of banks and industry. As a personal enthusiast, there's even a decree on libraries. Giving commands on adequate staffing levels and opening hours. His tendency and the tendency of the party is to become more dictatorial. It's to centralise power as much as possible. It is to be disciplinarian. Lenin's mission to remake society is made even harder by the fact that some of his critical assumptions have not come to pass. Revolution is very different in practice than in theory. Who knew? Everything Lennon did was predicated on the idea that was going to be a world revolution. Everything. He really believed it he went on saying it and writing it. Right up until the end of his life. And so what he thought he was doing was holding on to Russia until the world revolution happened. So as soon as that can be a world revolution, things in Russia would prove because the proletariat of the world will help to rebuild the world's economy. And of course, the bourgeoisie will be pushed out. So all the things the bourgeoisie and the nobility have had will be shared on a fair and equal basis amongst the population that inherits the planet. And things will be fine. Utopian you're highly utopian view and because it is a shock that the world revolution doesn't follow and that what he has to do instead is maintain what is essentially a state under siege, which has very little in the way of state apparatus. With communist Russia somewhat out on a limb, the gains made in the revolution must be closely guarded. Those who attempt to obstruct linen are playing a dangerous game. Victor Sebastian after the 25th of October after the revolution, Lenin hadn't slept two or three days at all and he did some rest. He left an underling car to be in charge of one of the first things coming at it was to abolish capital punishment at the front. When Lenin woke up, he went into an absence of storm of rage. And said, almost word for word, what on earth are you doing? Do you not understand that it can only happen at the point of the gun that you

Lenin cadet party Catherine marydale council of people's commissars Bolshevik cabinet assembly Tsar's parliament Russian constituent assembly James Ryan Bolshevik authority USSR Lennon Duma red guards Petrograd Russia Victor Sebastian
Paul Goodman: A Huge Blow to Liz Truss' Authority

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:13 min | Last month

Paul Goodman: A Huge Blow to Liz Truss' Authority

"Goodman was asked about this was asked about this issue. He is an English journalist with the Conservative Party, cut number four, please. Never forget that tomorrow looks different from today. So I'm going to enter the proviso at the start that if Vladimir Putin explodes a tactical nuclear weapon in Ukraine before Christmas, the entire domestic political conversation will change. So having laid that marker down, let's try to look at the facts as we know them today. The facts as we know them today is a huge blow has been struck to Liz truss's authority. We don't know whether or not she can recover it. And we will find out whether she can, not at what is left of this conference, but when parliament resumes next week. Now, Russia is on the record just a few moments ago. Kremlin spokesman comes out and says, hey, look, we're not bluffing here. I mean, if you guys are going to come after us, we do have the right to use those nukes, but we're committed to avoiding nuclear war. Most of the war talk is coming from Ukraine and the Biden administration.

Liz Truss Conservative Party Goodman Vladimir Putin Ukraine Kremlin Parliament Russia Biden Administration
 Putin signs annexation of Ukrainian regions as losses mount

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 2 months ago

Putin signs annexation of Ukrainian regions as losses mount

"Russia's leader has signed off on Ukraine annexations President Vladimir Putin has signed laws absorbing for Ukrainian regions into Russia a move that finalizes the annexation carried out in defiance of international law earlier this week both houses of the Russian parliament ratified treaties making the the next lunch person and zapper is a region's part of Russia The formalities followed Kremlin orchestrated referendums in the four regions that Ukraine and the west have rejected as a sham I'm Charles De

President Vladimir Putin Russia Russian Parliament Ukraine Charles De
You Can Be Tough on Enemies Without Supporting a Proxy War

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:04 min | 2 months ago

You Can Be Tough on Enemies Without Supporting a Proxy War

"Be very clear. You can be very tough on terror and tough on China and tough on our enemies while also thinking and believing that a proxy war against Russia and Ukraine is madness. That it is not in America's best interest that in fact we should be using Russia as a temporary ally in the fight against the Chinese Communist Party. Churchill understood the need and the significance of Russia. It was Churchill, who brokered Stalin to come together with FDR in America against the Nazis. Russia right now could be a trading partner could be an ally, this entire war in Ukraine could have been prevented. It wasn't for Lindsey Graham saying we're going to play offense against the Kremlin. All I should have been on Beijing, we could have used Russia as an energy partner understanding that they are thugs, but guess what? I'm going to say something very controversial here. Vladimir Putin is a lot more, let's just say he's a better person than Joseph Stalin. Vladimir Putin is not a good person, but he's a lot better than Joseph Stalin.

Russia Chinese Communist Party Churchill Ukraine America China Stalin Lindsey Graham Beijing Vladimir Putin Joseph Stalin
Ukrainian tank unit holds line inside the Donbas

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 2 months ago

Ukrainian tank unit holds line inside the Donbas

"Ukrainian tank units fighting Russian forces in the Donbass a holding their line despite the Kremlin's attempts to illegally annex the territory around them Ukrainian T 64 Soviet made tank fires while camouflaged in trees units have kept up patrols in their Russian built tanks some of which they say are captured from a Russian unit The city of bakhmut lies within the Ukrainian control area in the Don X region very close to the border with Luhansk which remains entirely occupied by Moscow an overwhelming majority of battle civilian population have left the city that has come under regular shelling since June Kyiv's forces have made recent gains around Lyman some 40 miles further north on the back of a successful counter offensive in recent weeks I'm Charles De Ledesma

Donbass Bakhmut Luhansk Moscow Kyiv Lyman Charles De Ledesma
Illegal annexation of territory by Russia doesn't halt Ukraine forces

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 2 months ago

Illegal annexation of territory by Russia doesn't halt Ukraine forces

"Russia has attacked the Ukrainian president's hometown and other targets with suicide drones and Ukraine took back full control of a strategic eastern city in a counteroffensive that has reshaped the war Russia's loss of the eastern city of Lyman which it had been using as a transport and logistics hub is a new blow to the Kremlin as it seeks to escalate the war by illegally annexing four regions of Ukraine and heightening threats to use nuclear force Russian president Vladimir Putin's land grab has threatened to push the conflict to a dangerous new level He also prompted Ukraine to formally apply for NATO membership a bid that one backing from 9 central and Eastern European NATO members fearful that Russia's aggression could eventually target them too

Ukraine Russia Lyman Kremlin Vladimir Putin Nato
Russia's Putin opens signing event to annex parts of Ukraine

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 2 months ago

Russia's Putin opens signing event to annex parts of Ukraine

"Russian president Vladimir Putin has opened up a signing event to a next parts of Ukraine Putin's ceremony starts at the process of absorbing parts of Ukraine into Russia defying international law the annexation event in the Kremlin's saint George's hall features Putin and the heads of the four regions of Ukraine signing treaties for them to join Russia in a sharp escalation of the 7 month conflict Putin and his lieutenants have bluntly warned Ukraine against pressing an offensive to reclaim the regions saying Russia would view it as an act of aggression against its sovereign territory and wouldn't hesitate to use all means available in retaliation I'm Charles De Ledesma

Ukraine Putin Kremlin's Saint George's Hall Russia Vladimir Putin Charles De Ledesma
Russian strike kills 25 as Kremlin to annex Ukraine regions

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 2 months ago

Russian strike kills 25 as Kremlin to annex Ukraine regions

"A Russian strike in Ukraine has killed at least 25 people as the Kremlin is about to annex Ukraine regions In the city of zaporizhia anti aircraft missiles the Russia repurposed as ground attack weapons rained down on people who were waiting in cars to cross into Russian occupied territory so they could bring family members back across the front lines leaving dozens killed and wounded the strike left deep impact craters and sent shrapnel tearing through the humanitarian converts lined up vehicles and nearby buildings were demolished trash bags blankets and for one victim a blood soaked towel have had to be used to cover bodies Russian installed officials in zapor Asia blamed Ukrainian forces for the strike but had provided no evidence I'm Charles De Ledesma

Zaporizhia Ukraine Kremlin Russia Zapor Asia Charles De Ledesma
"kremlin" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:36 min | 4 months ago

"kremlin" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"This point, apart from the fact that they've already got nuclear technology and violated everything we've agreed to with them. Why are we negotiating with the Iranians who put a hit out on a former Secretary of State and a former national security adviser? What kind of a country does that? That to me is shocking. This is an act of war. Ladies and gentlemen, this is an act of government, their military, that is attempting to assassinate a former American Secretary of State and national security adviser, that is an act of war. Why are we sitting down at a table and negotiating still with this regime? Ask yourselves that question. My God. There's no deterrence from them doing anything. And by the way, the communist Chinese here about this, the fascistic regime in Kremlin, they hear about this. All the goons and genocidal maniacs all over the world. They hear about this. Why are we negotiating with the Iranians when they put an assassination hit out on the former Secretary of State and former national security adviser? Why? Somebody answer that.

Kremlin
"kremlin" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

06:37 min | 4 months ago

"kremlin" Discussed on On The Media

"This weekend marks 5 months since Russia invaded Ukraine, with no end in sight. And in Russia, support for the wars remained high. 77% approve of Putin's actions in Ukraine, according to a survey conducted in late May by the levada center, Russia's only remaining independent pollster. The war, at least in its neatly repackaged Kremlin approved form, is somewhat popular amongst the Russians. This is the Russian media's version of atrocities committed by Russian forces in Ukraine. They've labeled videos of slaughtered civilians faked. And even claimed the massacre in the town of butcher was perpetrated by Ukrainian forces. The Kremlin has continued its attack on any and all forms of independent press. Last week, Putin signed a law that effectively criminalizes accurate reporting about the war. Even the word war itself is banned. This fake news loss signed in March of this year threatens imprisonment for any journalist who deviates from the Kremlin's depiction of the war, effectively shielding the operation of its efficient and enduring propaganda machine. Independent journalists Anastasia carrier was born and raised in yoshkar Allah in what she says is a poor province in western Russia. She spent the last few years in the U.S. working as a reporter and actively wrenching herself away from the propaganda she'd imbibed all her life about Russia's unequaled prominence probity and purity that she took on as articles of faith and fact. For most of her childhood though, news and politics were just faint voices in the background from adult conversations overheard or brief flickers on her grandma's TV tuned to the evening news. Her grandma, a Professor of German, was an avid news consumer. She was a very easygoing cheerful person who loved and loved some of his union. And her grandma was nostalgic about Soviet days of yore. When she said people were kinder to each other and job security was guaranteed, she was often found humming Soviet songs. And in 1999, carriers grandma finally found a new leader in which to instill her trust. A young rising star named Vladimir Putin. Carrier was still in kindergarten then, but she remembers the catastrophe that rocked her world in September of 99, over 300 people died in three separate bombings of apartment buildings. Carrier avoided tall apartment buildings on the way to school for weeks afterwards and fear. That was when Putin then director of the KGB spoke out to the people. Putin showed up as this confident and young person who said that he's going to hold Chechen people accountable and he blamed it in Chechen. In 2000, riding a wave of popularity after the bombings, Putin ran for president, much to the delight of carrier's family, on election day, she and her grandma stood in line outside the voting booths, a few blocks from their home. I remember with students in the line and then she took me in the booth with a curtain and she lifted me up and showed me where to mark for Putin. And I was so excited. I was talking about it for a while, and I think I even was displeased with other kids whose parents didn't vote for Putin. So were the chechens ultimately two blame for those apartment bombings, or is it still sort of shrouded a bit? Later I learned and this was after I realized that all my beliefs were a lot. Later I learned that there is a group of historians and journalists who blame Putin directly or indirectly for orchestrating those bombings. Is there proof of that? Yes, they caught some of the KGB agents and Putin around this time was the director of KGB or he just stepped down. They caught some of this agents, I think, delivering the bombs in the buildings. I remember this was too young I was working on when he was poisoned. Ah, litvinenko, who was poisoned by people associated with Putin. Yes. And another reporter Anna pollett cup guy? Yes, so she was also working on that. And she was killed as well. Right. They say bye chechens. And that's what Russia would say. Yes. These revelations about Putin's possible involvement in those bombings as a way to get elected, that came much later. You started having doubts about Putin, mostly during the years of Dmitri Medvedev, who became Russia's president in 2008, Putin had hit his term limits. It seemed clear as you wrote that Medvedev was keeping Putin's seat warm, then there was a new constitutional amendment. It lengthened the four year presidential term to 6 years and in September 2011, Putin announced he'd run for the presidency again, that's sort of did it for you and a lot of your friends, right? It was around the time when I was in high school, one midday became a president and people around me just got so excited about him because he was fun and modern. It felt like something good is going to happen under his rule and at the same time we started to understand that Putin is not great for Russia, we started to understand that he's corrupt. Another thing that was going on around the time that you and your friends really got disillusioned with Putin. Was that a lot of other people were too, right? It was around that time that the biggest anti government protests since the 1990s broke out across the country in response to the accusation that Putin and his party had rigged the parliamentary elections. Yes, there were some changes down to constitution that ultimately allowed Putin to come back to power and come back to power for longer. And when this was happening, we all strongly suspected this was done to allow Putin to come

Putin Russia Ukraine levada center Anastasia carrier KGB Kremlin Vladimir Putin kinder Anna pollett Chechen grandma Dmitri Medvedev U.S. litvinenko Medvedev
"kremlin" Discussed on NPR's Story of the Day

NPR's Story of the Day

02:33 min | 8 months ago

"kremlin" Discussed on NPR's Story of the Day

"And <Speech_Male> when we act <Speech_Male> together with this set <Speech_Male> of allies and partners, <Speech_Male> the United <Speech_Male> States and <Speech_Male> this constellation of <Speech_Male> countries, we <Speech_Male> constitute more than <Speech_Male> 50% of <Speech_Male> global GDP. <Speech_Male> No <Speech_Male> other <Speech_Male> collection of <Speech_Male> countries <Speech_Male> that is <Speech_Male> that is shown any degree <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> real cooperation <Speech_Male> can come close <Speech_Male> to that. So <Speech_Male> yes, absolutely <Speech_Male> our measures <Speech_Male> can have fight. <Speech_Male> And I think what you've <Speech_Male> seen in the past <Speech_Male> couple days <Speech_Male> as the scale <Speech_Male> of atrocities <Speech_Male> has become <Speech_Male> clear, you have <Speech_Male> seen countries <Speech_Male> like India <Speech_Male> condemn <Speech_Male> in no uncertain <Speech_Male> terms with Russia <Speech_Male> is doing. <Speech_Male> So Russia <Speech_Male> in its own horrifying <Speech_Male> ways in <Speech_Male> some manner, <Speech_Male> doing our job for us, <Speech_Male> sending a <Speech_Male> very clear signal <Speech_Male> to the world <Speech_Male> that <SpeakerChange> countries <Speech_Female> have to stand up. <Speech_Female> You talked <Speech_Female> about the diplomatic <Speech_Female> solution that it doesn't <Speech_Female> look like it's soon. <Speech_Female> The U.S. <Speech_Female> and NATO allies have affirmed <Speech_Female> that president zelensky's <Speech_Female> right to negotiate <Speech_Female> and end to this <Speech_Female> war. It has the <Speech_Female> right to negotiate it to this <Speech_Female> war on terms acceptable <Speech_Female> to Ukraine. And <Speech_Female> among those terms for zelensky <Speech_Female> are security guarantees <Speech_Female> from NATO <Speech_Female> allies should Russia <Speech_Female> attack again. <Speech_Female> If Ukraine <Speech_Female> gives up its NATO <Speech_Female> aspirations <Speech_Female> among those zelensky <Speech_Female> wants guarantees <Speech_Female> from is the U.S. <Speech_Female> is the U.S. willing <Speech_Female> to provide <SpeakerChange> these <Speech_Male> security guarantees. <Speech_Male> Well, we are <Speech_Male> in constant dialog <Speech_Male> with our Ukrainian <Speech_Male> partners, secretary blinken <Speech_Male> speaks to his <Speech_Male> counterpart foreign minister <Speech_Male> kuleba regularly, <Speech_Male> as you know, President <Speech_Male> Biden speaks to president <Speech_Male> zelensky <Speech_Male> regularly our <Speech_Male> national security adviser <Speech_Male> speaks to his <Speech_Male> counterpart. So <Speech_Male> we're having these discussions. <Speech_Male> And we can't get <Speech_Male> into <Speech_Male> details, as I said before. <Speech_Male> It's a hypothetical. <Speech_Male> There is <Speech_Male> no agreement. There's <Speech_Male> very little indication <Speech_Male> at this point that <Speech_Male> the Russians <Speech_Male> are serious <Speech_Male> about finding a diplomatic <Speech_Male> solution <Speech_Male> at this very moment. <Speech_Male> But we are <Speech_Male> prepared to do our part, <Speech_Male> including <Speech_Male> by ensuring <Speech_Male> that, however, <Speech_Male> and whenever <Speech_Male> this ends, it will <Speech_Male> be a strategic <Speech_Male> defeat for <Speech_Male> Moscow <Speech_Male> that Moscow will <Speech_Male> be weaker. It <Speech_Male> will be isolated <Speech_Male> and importantly, <Speech_Male> Moscow <Speech_Male> won't be able to <Speech_Male> undertake <Speech_Male> this kind of aggression <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> in the coming <Speech_Female> months or the coming <Speech_Music_Female> years. U.S. <Speech_Female> State Department spokesman <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Ned price <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> speaking to <SpeakerChange> us from Brussels. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Thank you for taking <Speech_Male> the time. Thanks for <Music> having me. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Hi, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> I'm Jen white from <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> NPR's one a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> podcast where we get <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to the heart of news <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> politics and culture. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We recently <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> covered subjects you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> wish you'd taken in school <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> like civics and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> personal finance. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Our in case <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you missed it series <Speech_Music_Male> is part one O one, <Speech_Music_Male> part discussion <Speech_Music_Female> about why certain <Speech_Music_Female> subjects are often left <Speech_Music_Female> out of curriculums. Listen now on the one a podcast from NPR.

NATO Russia president zelensky U.S. secretary blinken Moscow India Biden State Department Brussels NPR
"kremlin" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

07:22 min | 9 months ago

"kremlin" Discussed on On The Media

"And they'd still, before an agents, right? They sort of carry that designation with them. Last month, Sonia grisman went to a protest with a small group of journalists outside the headquarters of the FSB. That's like Russia's main security agency. They took turns holding signs, rotating one by one. It is prohibited to protest in front of FSB building, but one person approaches are not prohibited. When it was Christmas turned to picket, she took the opportunity to perform some political theater. I just came there with the sign on which year I had written nothing more than the full text of these 24 word disclaimer. The disclaimer, you know, the chunk of legally is I just read you a moment ago, and she was only there holding that sign for a few minutes before she was approached by men in uniform. What happens next is all captured on tape by Grossman. They grab her, take her to a police station and sit her down in a large assembly room. A portrait of Putin hangs on the wall. An officer starts to copy down the text on Grossman's sign to include in her arrest papers. The police officer complains that the text on her posters too long, and the language so burdensome. He asks Christmas if it would be okay if he just takes a picture of it with his phone. Instead of having to write it all out, grisman tells him that she's required to put it in front of anything she publishes. And I was like, that's the law. And you are a policeman, you know? It would be great if you read it. The entire exchange is documented in a podcast that Grossman started with her former colleague, Olga churra kova, whose name was also added to the foreign agent list in July. We started recording a podcast called again, which means in English high URL for an agent. About what life is like for us in these new reality, in the second episode of the podcast, which, like every episode, starts with the disclaimer, there's a scene in which churro Cova tries to get a job at a fast food chain that makes blini. The delicious Russian pancakes. And asked if they have any open positions. The woman on the phone says, yes. They're looking for cooks and cashiers. Asks if it's possible to get a job as a cook without any prior experience. Yes. It's possible. But then explains that she's a journalist. And she's been designated as a foreign agent. The woman on the phone says she's never heard of this before. But asked her COVID to write to her supervisors and explain the situation. Does not get the job. It is like the sign that you are holding on which there is a text don't work with him and don't talk to him. Is the editor in chief of TV rain or dozed in Russian. He told me about how it's the stigma of this foreign agent label that's been so painful for him. For example, when you were designated as foreign agent, almost 100% that people from the government would deny talking to you. These are 24 words. It's not the worst part, but this stupidest part. The worst part, he says, is the idea that their traders to their country. We think of ourselves as a patriots. And everything what we're doing here at this stabilization over 11 years of its existence, we are doing for the best of our country. We just want our country to be better. I want my kids to live in a better place than the place where I grew up. For Thiago because he's Russian and he works for a Russian organization and above all, he does this journalism because he really cares about Russia. That's what's made this foreign agent label. So weird and confusing. But they'd been anticipating some kind of pressure from the government because of what they were broadcasting last winter. If we want to isolate the most recent catalyst in this long story of increasing pressure and repression. Joshua yaffa. It would be fair to talk about the poisoning and then return of Alexei Navalny. Alexei Navalny, the leader of the opposition and official thorn in Putin's side. He was poisoned in August 2020, taken to Germany for medical treatment, then he returned to Russia and was immediately arrested. Which led to protests. Not just in Moscow, but in dozens, if not a hundred cities around Russia, I think the Kremlin was certainly spooked. Said 10 million people watched their coverage on YouTube. And this is, I think, one of the most important parts of this whole story. Putin claims that Russia's foreign agent law was actually inspired by a law in the U.S.. The foreign agents registration act of 1938. Which put a label on outlets like Russia today. Media that our Department of Justice considers foreign propaganda. But Joshua yafa of The New Yorker isn't buying it. I think it's a ridiculous and absurd comparison, as far as I understand the fara registration, essentially, ends there. In other words, your added to the registry, you're not required to add some cumbersome disclaimer to everything you publish. Being a journalist in Russia is kind of like a dance, perhaps the tropic, the classics, Slavic folk jig that you might know from the nutcracker. The dancers do these complicated whirls and squats and kicks, as the music speeds up to a frenetic pace. Leaving all parties panting for breath as the curtain falls. Russian journalists too are jumping and twirling, quick on their feet, just trying to stay a few steps ahead of the Kremlin and still perform the essential parts of their job. And despite what you might think, they are doing their jobs. Independent journalism in Russia is perpetually under threat and under pressure, but it's not completely gone. And I think that oftentimes in the American conversation, we don't acknowledge the fact that there are these journalists who are still managing, despite all the difficulties thrown at them, do work that is extraordinary and worthy of our admiration. We can to you report things and we can earn money, we can be in the profession for Grossman's relatives who grew up in the Soviet Union, however, the fear is a little more ingrained. My parents think that I have to stop it, you know, just to be silent. Someone on the top will forgive you and then exclude you from this list. But we have you to you. We have Instagram. We have telegram. We can distribute the information all the ways. Yes, it would be harder and harder to work as a journalist. But all the.

Grossman Russia FSB Sonia grisman grisman Alexei Navalny Olga churra kova Putin churro Cova Joshua yaffa Thiago Joshua yafa patriots Moscow government The New Yorker Department of Justice Germany YouTube
"kremlin" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

07:49 min | 9 months ago

"kremlin" Discussed on On The Media

"Listener supported WNYC studios. On this week's on the media midweek podcast where re airing a piece we ran in September. It's reported by OTM producer Molly Schwartz, who until the war in Ukraine started was a fellow on a journalism program in Moscow. The situation on the ground for independent journalism in Russia is dire and getting worse daily. Echo mosque be and TV rain went dark last week and this week, some international news outlets announced that they're pulling their journalists out of the country in fear for their safety. The current crackdowns are severe, but silencing dissenting voices isn't a new thing for the Kremlin, and the months leading up to the Duma elections, the Russian government came down hard on news outlets and other organizations. In this story, Mali explains how death by bureaucracy is the Kremlin's MO. On July 15th, Sonia Grossman lost her job. Age wasn't the best day of my life. I can tell you, Grossman is a 27 year old Russian journalist who used to work at an investigative news outlet called Priya. I did a podcast which told the stories of Russian doctors who were on the front lines against coronavirus. Which was based on doctor's diaries. And it was the only podcast that can be a realistic picture of what was happening in Russia's hospitals. But back in July, the Russian government went after prior act, calling it a quote undesirable organization in basically banning it from the country. And desirable organization means that all the projects, all the things we did became illegal. Practice was releasing one high profile fascinating and impactful investigation after another. This is Joshua, Moscow correspondent for The New Yorker. It specialized in the kind of brave, unflinching, hard hitting investigations that were hard to find and weren't being done by outlets based in Russia. In Russia, there are certain people like Putin's allies who you can't touch. But pray act went there. Russia's interior minister, people from the so called sylla V key, the very powerful top officials from the country's security services. They even wrote an investigation that appeared to suggest Putin might have a 17 year old daughter from an extramarital affair and both this young woman and her mother seemed to benefit financially from certain ties to Kremlin linked institutions and banks. This is the kind of reporting that got the outlet shut down. Putting Sonya Grossman out of a job with her new free time, she took a trip to Sochi, a vacation town in the south of Russia. Just to think what's next to what should I do now on July 23rd, she was sitting on the coast of the Black Sea, just watching the waves. These day was stormy. It was rainy, and it was looking at the waves and the thought is like my life, you know? But then her reverie was cut short when her phone started buzzing like crazy. 20 messages in a minute, I started getting. She opened one and clicked the link. And the link to this list where my surname was 31 on this list. Sonia grisman's name had been added to the ministry of justice's list of foreign agents. I realized that my life is going to change right now. Since 2012, the Russian government has used this foreign agent label to shut down organizations at seas as antagonistic. The wave of police raids against a non governmental organization's foreign cultural organizations and human rights groups continues in Russia with the latest targets the Helsinki group and memorial Russia's oldest human rights organization. We are seeing a downright hunt for human rights groups. They want to force us to declare that we have foreign agents. They are hunting us down. They went after transparency international, the Macarthur foundation. The election monitoring group golos. This foreign agent legislation was continually expanded by the Kremlin to cover more and more groups and more and more segments of society. But in 2017, the law was expanded to specifically target the media and in the last few months they've been on a kind of spree. So this all began in April. First with the targeting of Medusa, an online publication that had been founded by journalists who had found themselves homeless during previous waves of media crackdown. A media startup called V times was named a foreign agent, then the trickle became a stream, and then a river. Then came prior, then came an outlet called the insider, which specializes in data driven investigations and often cooperates with bellingcat after that we saw TV rain, television, channel, which was the largest media outlet name to the foreign agent registry. One of the most surprising things that happened in this time, the authorities started adding the names of individual journalists to the list. That's what happened to Sonya graceman. To become a foreign agent in Russia, you have to publish something on social media or in a media publications and receive a financial transfer from abroad. That's all. Even if your I don't know, American grandma will send you $20 and you post something on social media, yes. You are a potential foreign agent. The Russian foreign agent law was specifically designed to destroy your drive you out of business. Alexa kovalev is an investigations editor at the news outlet Medusa. Brooke spoke to him when Medusa was first targeted. But not in one fell swoop like the government raids your offices and confiscates your electronics and the rest of the journalists. No, it's not like that. It's the bureaucratic hoops you're forced to jump through. That can be fatal for a news outlet. We have to put a massive ugly legal disclaimer on top of everything we publish. And that includes all ads and promotional materials. The disclaimer reads like a big scarlet letter of legalese. It says, quote, done this. This news media slash material was created and or disseminated by a foreign mass media. Performing the functions of a foreign agent and or a Russian legal entity performing the functions of a foreign agent. The same rules apply to Sonia graceman. Even if I post, I don't know, flowers or my cat, I have to pull this disclaimer. I checked out Grossman's social media, and that block of text, all caps is in every post, every Instagram story, every comment, every response to a friend's comment. Every time I post something, I feel that I'm taking a risk. She'll be fine if she doesn't comply. First, 10,000 rubles, which is around a 140 U.S. dollars, then 50,000 rubles, which is around $685. And on the third time, there is the prospect of a criminal case, up to two years of prison. Just 6 months ago, Russian journalists would jump from news outlet to news outlet, as some were shut down and others started up. But now, even that option is disappearing. They could become professional breakdance buskers who work in the Moscow metro or they could go gather mushrooms in the Siberian taiga forest.

Russian government Russia WNYC studios Molly Schwartz Echo mosque Sonia Grossman sylla Moscow Putin Sonya Grossman OTM Sonia grisman Duma Helsinki group Grossman Priya Kremlin golos Mali Ukraine
"kremlin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:06 min | 10 months ago

"kremlin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Eyes are on The White House and the Kremlin Saturday morning President Biden is planning to speak with Russian president Vladimir Putin on Saturday as tensions mount between Russia and Ukraine The phone conversation is scheduled for 11 a.m. Eastern Time according to the Kremlin It'll be the first time the two have spoken since the end of December White House national security adviser Jake Sullivan said a Russian invasion of Ukraine could be imminent Biden has worn Putin there will be swift and harsh economic sanctions if he orders an invasion of Ukraine The U.S. is sending 3000 more troops to Poland as tensions continue to grow The announcement of the additional troops comes as top White House officials urge U.S. citizens in Ukraine to leave within the next 24 to 48 hours These troops will join the nearly 2000 troops sent earlier this week to support U.S. troops already in that region and NATO allies The U.S. is also issuing a broad national warning of a potential Russian cyberattack against American computer networks The shields up advisory comes as White House officials announced the Russian invasion of Ukraine could be imminent agency officials say they are not currently responding to any specific threats as of Friday night but taking precautions of potential escalating threats The warning is being issued by the cybersecurity and infrastructure security agency And more bad news concerning the economy as consumer sentiment is hitting its lowest level in a decade Has the latest The University of Michigan's early reading for this month fell more than 8% from January largely due to inflation The survey noted the stunning decline reflects less confidence in the government's economic policies with nearly half of all consumers expecting less income this year Chief survey economist Richard Curtin noted households with incomes of $100,000 or more accounted for the sharp decline in sentiment I met mattson and I'm Jim Forbes Researchers say people should exercise after they get their COVID-19 vaccine A new study out of Iowa state university shows those who exercise for 90 minutes after getting vaccinated with Pfizer shot had a higher antibody response opposed to those who don't The same thing happened to those who exercised after getting a seasonal flu vaccine and an H one N one vaccine California is set to debate a COVID-19 vaccine mandate at all workplaces nica mahis has the latest Assembly member Buffy wicks introducing legislation that would require workers and independent contractors to show proof of vaccination to both public and private employers Ultimately this bill is about workplace safety to ensure that when our workers are going to work many of whom don't have jobs where they can work inside the home but they feel safe there Companies who don't comply could face a hefty fine which anticipates pushback from anti vaccine groups but is more concerned on creating discussions driven by public health and worker safety and based on science If passed AB 1993 would likely take effect next year The Supreme Court is rejecting a request from a group of New York City public school teachers NBC News reports they asked the court to block the city's vaccine mandate after not receiving a religious exemption Justice Sonia Sotomayor rejected the request with no explanation However she also rejected an earlier challenge to the mandate The appeal had claimed the vaccine mandate violated their religious freedom And the jury and Sarah Palin's lawsuit against The New York Times has done deliberating for the day 9 jurors deliberated for about two hours on Friday afternoon before deciding to call it a night They are set to resume their discussion on Monday morning Palin's lawyers say The New York Times libeled her in a 2017 editorial linking her to a shooting in Arizona because of a conservative vendetta and that's the very latest I'm Jim Forbes Now this Bloomberg sports update inflation is affecting the dollar amount you need to spend to get to the Super Bowl Mike Bauer reports Did.

Ukraine President Biden White House Jake Sullivan U.S. cybersecurity and infrastructu Jim Forbes Richard Curtin Vladimir Putin Kremlin Putin Biden nica mahis Buffy wicks Poland Russia NATO
"kremlin" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:06 min | 10 months ago

"kremlin" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

"So you're a former weapons guy, fort Bragg, green beret. Can you just put into context for those who've never worn the cloth or republic, haven't hung out with the brotherhood at Vietnam? Can you explain what is the strategic weight of 9000 people in uniform? It's a road bump in Eastern Europe. I mean, come on. That's not going to stop it. It's a trip wire. And we've done that before. And I understand wiring works if you back it up. You gotta have explosives tied to that trip. Why are they gonna blow up? And Putin knows we got nothing behind that, but woke we got Jen Psaki who last time I checked was wearing a pink kami hat. You know, they took her before the game. Guys, let's dig it up Eric while we're talking. This is the chief propagandist of The White House Jen Psaki, who was Obama's chief propagandist in the State Department. I guess when Hillary was there, so she was Hillary's the chief propagandist. There is a photograph out there when she went to meet with Lavrov, Lavrov, who just eats these people for lunch. Gets people out, Jen Psaki caught in his teeth. Standing next to the Lavrov and she's wearing a pink or shanka. She's wearing a pink Soviet era officers winter hat with with the hammer and sickle red star emblem on the front of the hat, and she's grinning, jam. You know, to me, that should be as shameful as wearing a KKK hood. Right. I mean, if you want to think about who the only person the only people who killed more is the Chinese communists, who are emboldened now that they're just probably licking their lips, sitting there Z's loading ships. You know, Putin's going to roll tanks. Z is going to likely roll boats across the street. And is it for most of the time? Which one's more compressed them off worse? That's right for me. But the problem is, we just have no juice. Nobody believes we're a credible deterrent to anyone. NATO's not the UN's not

Afghanistan Kurtz lifter Tom Spence Washington, D.C. colonel Kay Biden Jekyll Donald Trump Deborah patriots town hall Massachusetts America gee McDonald
"kremlin" Discussed on Aria Code

Aria Code

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"kremlin" Discussed on Aria Code

"All school artist. Who those are here off on. Your own house gone More audible off pads a report. Aloe off johnny. Larger job image off the hook won't cartoon auditor reports say a. Oh o.'neil a by. Who knows it's off on. Boris got enough has all the feelings in his monologue. Dusty governor shave lawsti and you can hear every last one of them in that wonderful performance by rene papa. Lots of feelings next time to when we're back with the famous mad scene from lucia dilemma. More are you. Code is a co production.

"kremlin" Discussed on Aria Code

Aria Code

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"kremlin" Discussed on Aria Code

"Museum. Professor simon morrison russia historian shoshana. Keller and based rene papa decoding busted shave lawsti from boris godunov. By modell's smoother scheme rene will be back to sing it for you with a much. Better russian accent than i have after the break. Aria code is produced in partnership with the metropolitan opera ahead of the highly anticipated. Twenty twenty one. Twenty two met season catch a summer. Encore screening from the company's award winning live in hd series of cinema presentations in select movie theaters. Nationwide the summer lineup includes three fan favourite productions the gershwin's porgy and bess bees as carmen and puccini's tosca visit met opera dot org slash hd. For more information. Boris got off is in his chambers. At the kremlin. He's been rolling for six years and even though he has all the power he could ever dream of. He's miserable he spills out everything. That's keeping him awake at night in the monologue though. Stig vishay blah st. Here's base rene papa onstage at the metropolitan opera Us off.

rene papa Professor simon morrison boris godunov shoshana modell Keller rene bess bees russia puccini carmen Boris kremlin Stig vishay
"kremlin" Discussed on Aria Code

Aria Code

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"kremlin" Discussed on Aria Code

"And you sing a role for the first time you read a london. Turner about to sign about this specific person. You make a lot of research and when you play like we did it in new york in this kind of historic costumes. It gives you of course another feeling you. You don't know how people lived in that time you have no idea but you can just imagine..

"kremlin" Discussed on The Moth

The Moth

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"kremlin" Discussed on The Moth

"Loud bellowing sound. I couldn't figure out what it was. And she came back and she picked up the phone. And i said tanya what was that and she said now they know that night we were outside the building talking to all the other people who were there the rest of the intelligence and everyone else who gathered and we heard the barricade being pulled apart and we thought. Oh no the barricade is being destroyed and women running to see what was happening but it wasn't that the whole barricade was being destroyed. Boris yeltsin was writing in on his tank to give his historic speech about democracy and about the future of russia and he came in and he was applauded and everyone was thrilled and he stood on the parliament steps and began. Saying i speak to you today. Under the banner of russia and coast an russia nudged each other and said it's our banner our flag the third day the third day we got up and we decided to go up to smolensk near the american embassy. Because that was the place where three people had been killed the night before the only casualties of this unfolding drama and when we got there it was such a russian scene. There were flower strewn on the ground. There were old women crying. There were people talking about the nature of tragedy and we were all standing around and suddenly a young man came running up. He had a tweet cap clutched in his hand. And why rimmed glasses. And he looked like one thousand nine hundred nineteen revolutionary or like the student in checkoff play and he said. Hurry up at once their tanks approaching the outer barricade. We have to go and defend the outer barricade. Well there had been tanks endlessly approaching and they hit always just parked across the street and we walked up to the outer barricade quite far away in fact parliament building and we range ourselves in front of it holding hands and two minutes later. A column of tanks rolled up and they stopped about three feet away from us and it was still the cold war and i had grown up thinking that there was nothing more frightening in the world than a soviet tank coming up to you and the soldier.

russia Boris yeltsin tanya american embassy
"kremlin" Discussed on The Moth

The Moth

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"kremlin" Discussed on The Moth

"There was a woman a rather elegant woman in high heels who is standing. Just near the edge of the barricade and asking. Excuse me but to unocal to operate a bulldozer. We helped with the building of the barricades. There was someone who had managed to jump. Start a crane who had clearly never. Before used a crane he would pick things up and get them up into the air and they would teeter there and then they would go down someplace else. There was a woman a big sylvia russian woman who was standing there and trying to direct behold pointing where the crane should go and telling people where to drag things and yelling at the top of her lungs and at that time in the soviet union it was quite trendy to have clothing with western writing on it and people often had didn't know what their closed said and she was wearing a t shirt that said. I'd rather be playing tennis. We decided to go back down to the parliament that night with a whole group. We'd call it all our friends. There were thirty or maybe forty of us and someone said but there are so many people down there. What if we get separated and cost you and on russia said we'll take the big flag bedspread. We'll nail it to a poll and we'll have it and if we get separated we can meet at the flag which we all thought it was a good idea so we went down there and we helped a little more with building the barricades and just as we were getting ready to go back home. A woman came up to us and she said we have giant helium balloon where blowing it up right. Now we're blowing it up because we wanna show where we are and we want to wave the flag so that everyone knows we're here and you have the biggest russian flag i have ever seen. She said will you give us your flag so that we can fly it over the parliament building and under she said cost ya costa said okay so we left the flag day two. We went down again by now. The barricades we're fully built there were people milling around across the street from the barricades where the tanks that had pulled up during the night and in the early part of the morning and there were soldiers very young soldiers on the tanks and we went over to talk to them. We asked the where they came from and whether they'd been to moscow before and long they'd been in the military and then the artists would say if you need to fire tonight if you're told to fire on the demonstration it's us that's who you'd be shooting at its us and if you decide not to do it and you want to come over we'll find you a place to live and we'll protect you and we gave them bread and chocolate and sausages and then we went back to our. Everyone was milling around outside. the parliament. demonstrating no one knew quite what it was. They were demonstrating for someone. Had to use the lou and someone pointed out that a musicologist i knew tanya de janko had an apartment which looked right over the russian parliament building and which was in fact inside the barricades and we went up to tanya's apartment and she said i did not imagine that my apartment would become the toilet of the resistance. But if this is i can help. I'm all for it. Someone pointed out that. I had a western passport. And i could check into.

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"kremlin" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"kremlin" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Violent protest today across Russia by demonstrators demanding the release of Russian opposition activist Alexey Navalny. Those protests came nearly a week after Navalny was arrested upon his return to Moscow. These nations. Felisha Boulton joins us in the newsroom with the latest and how the U. S is responding. Felisha remained a cold. These protests happened in several parts of the country not confined to just one city. But they all shared a common goal to free Kremlin critic Alexey Navalny, however, was police got involved. The clashes started Yeah, This is just some of the video from the process that took place. Police clashed with protesters in several cities, including ST Petersburg, Moscow and other major cities, officers could be seen dragging protesters through the streets to police Busses. Some people were also beaten with batons and one video You see officers kicking a woman to the ground in Moscow. One protester we heard from through translator says he's fed up with the regime and his country. Devices yet I'm 26. I've lived under Putin almost all my life. I keep hearing the same old promises every year. What have I got? Ah, war in Ukraine and Georgia, a tax hike. New taxes raised retirement age. That's why I'm here today. Earlier today, police arrested Alexey Navalny's lawyer, You can see her speaking to the press and public and Moscow moments later, she's grabbed by an officer and forced into a crowd of police is still not clear. Why she was arrested. The volley, was sentenced to 30 days in jail after he returned to Russia a week ago. He spent the last four months in Germany recovering from nerve gas poisoning. You can officials say it was the same nerve agent that was used to poison a former Russian spy. Both Russian President Vladimir Putin and the Kremlin have denied any involvement. Besides being a Russian opposition activist. The volley is also accused of violating parole terms from a suspended sentence related to an embezzlement conviction. So far around 3000 people have been arrested in the protests. The U. S State Department released a statement today condemning the violence used by Russian police. It's calling for all people who have been detained. To be released. Nickel. Alright, Felicia. Thank you still had a news nation. A deer hunter finds a message and a bottle, which led him to a.

Alexey Navalny Moscow Vladimir Putin officer Russia Felisha Boulton nerve agent ST Petersburg Felicia Kremlin embezzlement Ukraine Felisha Georgia U. S State Department President Germany
"kremlin" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"kremlin" Discussed on KCRW

"Said to have told a friend. When has come. When comes his time to pass. When he dies, he said Dublin Problem we've written on my heart. Well. Excuse the emotion. What When I die. Delaware, Britain on my heart Biden spoke of the National Guard sent her name for his late son, Beau Biden, who served in the Delaware National Guard and was a state attorney general by and said while choking back tears that his only regret was that his son wasn't there to introduce him as president. Beau Biden died of brain cancer a few years ago. He was 46 years old. This is NPR. Kremlin is dismissing calls by the U. S and European Union to release Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny, who was arrested Sunday to Moscow airport. NPR's Lucian Kim reports from Moscow. The Kremlin says Navalny's imprisonment is a domestic matter and it will not allow outside interference. Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov defended Alexei Navalny's arrest on a supposed parole violation, saying authorities were only following the law. Has called said it was complete nonsense to conclude Navalny's jailing shows just how afraid President Vladimir Putin is of him. Volunteers blamed Putin for trying to poison him and on Sunday defiantly returned to Russia from Germany, where he'd been receiving medical treatment. Even from his jail cell. Navalny continues to attack the Kremlin. His team has released an investigation, claiming Putin built himself a $1.4 billion seaside residents in southern Russia. Lucian Kim. NPR NEWS Moscow Attorneys for the former governor of Michigan charge for his role in the Flint water contamination scandal or now, arguing the case should be dismissed because they say their client was charged in the wrong county. Former governor Rick Snyder was charged last week with two misdemeanor counts. The Republican is among nine people charged in connection with the Flint crisis. At last check on Wall Street, The Dow Jones industrial average was up 139 points. Nearly half a percent of 30,952. The NASDAQ rose more than 200 points.

President Vladimir Putin Kremlin Alexei Navalny Beau Biden NPR Lucian Kim Moscow Russia Delaware National Guard Moscow airport Dmitry Peskov Delaware brain cancer Rick Snyder National Guard president Flint