29 Burst results for "Krantz"

"krantz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

16:03 min | 3 weeks ago

"krantz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Shinier Blumen. Krantz plays bass and the Arab food couple of others that we've heard before and because Hemingway spent some time in Spain covering the Spanish civil war. Some of the music has that flavor to it like in this first excerpt, written by Cheon Riley called El Torito Then we'll hear the Garden of Eden that was written by Shin Ear Blumen Krantz and goes to the near East musically, and finally, a piece called Love Plenitude that sounds like it might be drawing on Japanese music that was a group composition. All three pieces come from the soundtrack to the documentary Syriza called Hemingway. Uh oh. Mm hmm. No. Yeah. Yeah. Oh, Oh, Mm. Oh, It's.

Cheon Riley Hemingway Shinier Blumen Krantz Shin Ear Blumen Krantz Spain Love Plenitude Arab Garden of Eden Japanese Spanish civil war three pieces first excerpt El Torito couple Syriza
Vaughan Shanks Pitches the Cydarm Soc Incident Management Platform

Risky Business

05:03 min | 6 months ago

Vaughan Shanks Pitches the Cydarm Soc Incident Management Platform

"So it is a case management platform it's a web APP. It's typically deployed into a security operation center and it just helps you keep track of all of the activities that people working on. So this is like highs management software essentially for specifically for talk is that right? Exactly, it's case management for security operations. Okay. What sort of things do you use the software to do like about doing real deep deep dives on incidents because a lot of the time when we think of like response software, we think forensic. So whatever this isn't really that isn't no this is. An ailing people to collaborate better and a K pot of that. We noticed that often the way the white people do security operations using generic ticketing systems, and there are pine to us. They require extensive customization to do anything close to. What we would be regarded as best practice and You know the the data entry is often a complaint pine I'm so we've aimed to make an experience that's really easy to use and is already set up to security operations. I can sorry this is really designed to replace like Jira in the sock. Yes. We we do often generic atheist platforms and yet this is a big step up from that. Okay. In what sense right? So if I upgrade from a generic ticketing platform and I get myself side on what is getting me that those platforms I'm can't give me so. We have a built in workflow that is based off the computer security incident handling God from this. In fact, we steal all of our best moves from the computer security instant handling God. It's the best advice. We could find a way not to tell people how to do their job we just by us, but best practice as out as out benchmark Yep. So you steal the workflows and create some yeah krantz. Can Software? I haven't spoken to anyone about this but I think you know imitation is the sincerest form of flattery and I think would probably be glad to know that someone out there is hitting their advice. Yeah. Well, I mean I think they put out this advice so that people like you will do things like this. Can you give us an example of like A typical sort of incident that's commonly handled through this platform and what the collaboration component looks like. Right? Because I'm thinking what sort of collaboration do you really need outside the Salk? Why? Why do you need a you know an actual platform to handle that So what we've is that many of our customers not only have internal tailfin if it's small internal team, I'm thinking they might have managed service provider that that gives them out of our support and depending on the nitrogen incident if something escalates and and there's people involved and there's conjecture about insider threats or other sensitive data coming out of the system, you don't necessarily want all of that data to be available to everyone who's who's collaborating, but you still need to have a tight look you need to be able to collaborate without much hassle so. We've we've used I access control to enable collaboration. Okay. So this is this allows for the discussion of sensitive incidence because quite often. In the case of a major incident, people will spin up their own slack. That's sort of the way that the. Slack specific to that incident but this is more for the work. Day. Incidence. The incidents of all shapes and sizes and can I say I very careful using slack for incident response it does still local copies of your information on every device that is logging into that channel. So that is why to make sure your sensitive response dieters scattered around many many. It's a good way to make sure your sensitive daughter is in as many places as humanly. Possible. Exactly, and certainly, those baynes among some instances of wears slack has slack as a useful vector for an attacker if you WANNA move laterally. Maybe. Having a rummage through someone's slack files is probably a good way to start getting ideas about. Passwords or other things you could connect to yeah. Yeah. Yes I think slack for incident response is you know it's a default it's a default option people use because it's it's easy and it's got a nice user experience. So the question we ask you what if you could take over the rig of a case management platform which sounds very serious. But make it as easy to use as something like slack. Do you actually have a chat function in the in the platform? Not really a chat function. It looks a little more like like using a conversation in twitter old Lincoln it's more like a threat in that sense. Yeah. That makes a Lotta sense right? So it's Malaysia DMZ but everything would be cataloged logged and it's it's it's sort of like sounds a little bit more serious than slack but a little less serious than. Help me out. Then what? Out To. Throw too many vandals under the bus. But there there is some some shockers out there just just stuff like. Why are you recording notes in notepad? All will case management system is is kind of awful. I only use it once a day from force to.

Lincoln Salk Twitter Baynes Malaysia
"krantz" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

Mysterious Universe

07:34 min | 7 months ago

"krantz" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

"But of course, you'll find everything in our show notes at mysterious universe dot org it was it was fun chatting to lower wasn't an iron amazing stuff that came up I think favorite episode she said was that the stuff on zips laws and the language will the mathematical relationship in languages how it applies to virtually well, I think it's all cultures on our planet or human cultures. All they languages have zips slow it'll fall. I. Didn't want to approach in the interview they I. Think we'll talk about later on because it's a little bit more abstract. But as we were talking about this idea that you know and she says is in her in her podcast board costs that everything once again comes back to mathematics. Again I find myself going is oldest dissimulation. Again, we're coming back to these mathematical formulae. The control everything like everything can be digitized and I'm thinking there's something about about this. It's a little simulation hypothesis. Make sense that if you were going to try and communicate with an extraterrestrial life form you would use. You would basically examine their communication and festival make sure it follows if slow, then he could use that to I. Guess. Understand, it may be decoded, maybe learn the language, but just the the whitest spreads through nightshirt is what really fascinated me. So after the interview, I did some searching of new scientific breakthroughs, the new discoveries of zips law, and the first thing that came up was penguin speech. There's a journal article from this year that's being published on House Penguins speech follows zips law. So they actually have a language or implying a do have a form of communication. I think Laura mentioned in the series, the old buds older ornament high level communication yeah. Follows local this squeaks and squawks falls zips Loyd has syntax and also those one from twenty nineteen on mile. Gibbons when they`re Hollering. Yeah. When the hollering in the morning, the hall is full of Zips Law isn't a bizarre. End. This made me think back to a segment I covered. It might have been a couple years ago now in our old studio and I'm not sure if it's a free shower or you might remember it was on the the freckles that's what I was thinking. Yeah. Well, that's why I went into the simulation idea again, this same F- rectal, which can be seen in and what was the link there it was almost like could find it in. The bill first thing that really blew our minds and the work was from Ben Wa Mandal brought. That's it. Yeah. He had this book, the misbehavior of Markets, a fractional view of financial turbulence. This guy a polymath he's he's the guy that discovered I. Guess this this fractional mathematical relationship that existed in financial markets and across. Countless things in nature. So whenever you see those crazy fractional images, that's all because of this guy essentially yeah. He coined the term practical but he the the way it started was. He noticed that there was something odd with cotton prices before I go into that the thing that you're thinking of in terms of art was the Jackson pollock paintings that was the Blue Paul wasn't it the remember the pollock paintings he's just splatters everywhere. It just looks like crazy random chaos. Yeah. But when they examined the relationship, the mathematical relationship between these splotches, it's rocktile. Yeah it's FRY has this practical mathematical relationship it's not Chaotic chaotic but it has the same relationship that you will see from looking at a tree. A window into nature, it's the same mathematical relationship will mandal brought he. He tells this great story and his book of is working at IBM in labs I think this was the nineteen fifties I believe maybe bit lighter and he tells the story of going into these professors labs. And there was a a a graph on the wall and it had this v-shaped diagram on it like v-shape plot of data and he looked at and he said to his professor, he's like. What what on Earth, is this I'm about to give a presentation on ECON. Economic I think it was wealth distribution. And he said that exact same graph is in my economic studies. Why do you have it on your wall and professor said what the Hell? You told me what are you talking about? I've got no idea what you're working on this the cotton prices in America of the lost I. Think it was nearly two hundred. Years. Cotton prices are incredible. They've had records for over one hundred years from the New York cotton market would averts cold. So cotton prices are a great way to study market fluctuations over a long period of time. So. This was a real clue fx Amanda brought. He was so interested in this he said to his professor because he's professors like I can't figure it out the that they had some theorem on markets that I were trying to prove was real by applying to cotton prices because again, cutting prices, you've got so much data and this professor was just pulling his hair out because he couldn't find it. He's like the markets go everything goes down and I can't figure it out everything changes. There's no constant there's no patent it's just a mess. And men wrought set to his professor can I take your data and run it through the supercomputers at IBM? He's professor said Fon take it. I'm done with the idea that you so basically He took this data and he started to run it through the IBM computers and All of this traces back to Zeus laws because he's big breakthrough, he attributes it to three major clues. Now, the first clue was when he was really young, he's uncle came out to him and gave him a book by George Kingsley zips. Z.. IPF. Oh, we connection in. This is who the Zip Paulo comes from George Kingly Ziff and he's uncle said, you know this is his this book it's called Human Behavior on the principle of least effort. It's all on on Paulos in nature. and. He's uncle said, this is the would stuff that you like. So he started reading it, and if basically claim that Paolo's daren't only occur in physical sciences but I a rule in all manner of human behavior, any kind of organization anatomy even the size of sexual organs follows the distribution of Zits law. Like you can plot it out and it's exactly the same as what Laura was talking about in the podcast, the distribution that modest. WanNa know what? The distribution is the same and. He got this and and you know he tells the story of that. Laura was explaining how's it for students to count the Woods and Ulysses League around measuring payments I don't know if they. They probably have done that at some stage but you know the amazing thing that it was found in other languages and across cultures. Man Abroad was spellbound when he read this stuff and it actually gave him the idea for his doctoral thesis which was on economic markets and winning investigated further, he said by playing around with the equation, you could build this powerful tool of social measurement. He said an improvement on zits formula could quantified the richness of someone's vocabulary and give it a numerical grade high grade, Larry, low, grade, poor vocabulary. It could measured differences from the text from speaker to Speaker. Now, What's interesting about this and where he took his research is that he's professes and his colleagues..

professor IBM Laura Ben Wa Mandal Loyd Gibbons George Kingly Ziff Ulysses League America New York Larry Wan George Kingsley Jackson Amanda Paulos Paul Paolo
"krantz" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

Mysterious Universe

04:02 min | 7 months ago

"krantz" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

"The vastness what we tackling. Yeah. You know when we're talking about space especially in alien life being out there I mean this is a theme that kept on coming up when you talking to everyday people and scientists alike the the underlying. Voss nece the topic I think you were talking to I can't remember his name, but he was a lecturer and he says he likes to show in Hanes presentations a snapshot from Hobble I. Think It was where it's like a tiny. thumbprint on that on the on the screen, and then you zoom in and he asks people in the audience to count the number of stars that they see and they just say well, this this is so many stars they how can we possibly count them and he says the not stars the galaxies. Yeah. Is that something you would tackling with? You know just the office of at all Oh. Completely I, mean you know For a few of these episodes, I and went ended up going camping and tried to go to places where there was like really clear dark skies since you could just look up and see the stars and that's all you can see with the naked eye, and then you have to think about what else is beyond that similarly seeing these photos seeing the stuff that Hubble sends back in some of these other big telescopes it's just Aw Inspiring. But it makes you feel very. Insignificant. Which I guess is okay that doesn't actually bother me you sort of realize that you're just one tiny part of something that is immense and will never quite able to grasp it. It's almost comforting in some ways because it's almost we go about their lives with what we think to be these struggles and these difficulties, and then you look up into the sky just realized how infants small off humbling. Yeah you just. Thought that bad. Yeah. Right. Exactly and it also sort of changes your relationship with time to some degree because you just think about you know what you live the the seventy eighty ninety years that you live is such just a blink really is just a blink of an eye. One critique out have, and this isn't more at the people you interviewed rather than you. Yourself is that you a lot of the kind of really hardcore scientists he spoke to the astrophysicist and the planetary scientists whenever the topic of alien life came up. There was usually some comment along the lines of all. You know there's there's alien life out there but the odds of them you know coming to to reach us is virtually impossible because of the distances involved in the traveling is you know it's even traveling at the speed of light is just it's just A very slim chance of being possible. and. Then at the same time, those same scientists will say, well, when we think about life, we can't think about life in terms of the way we have life on planet earth. It is. They say you've got to have this open minded about the possibilities of what kind of life is out there but al human science that is the you know that is the the arbiter of truth in in terms of traveling amongst the galaxy of the universe. So I found this weird kind of contradiction. D sense the they've got their blonde zone in the of. Aliens, actually coming or having the capabilities that we don't understand I. Don't know that they have blinders on or maybe they do. They're human same as the rest of us in there will maybe they're alien I don't, and they're trying to throw a wrench into the whole thing but. I. Think there's an element there. It is hard to wrap your head around I. Think to. There's some critique when when people are talking about aliens coming to Earth, there may be some. Assumptions that we're talking about something like ancient aliens here which I think for a lot of scientists they have problem accepting that because you know it goes to pretty much everything in science. These. Extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof and they haven't seen that kind of proof. You know I even I even watched the first episode of Ancient Aliens recently just for Education A-. We'll go..

lecturer
"krantz" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

Mysterious Universe

07:29 min | 7 months ago

"krantz" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

"And it it's fun for us because I'll scientific before the episode we have so much baggage. We've been doing this for so long. I was just thinking about Komo yesterday for no reason. Oh God like when we go into anything that's on Xtra life where just thinking well, is this the the Sutton type of grace species that did this? Faction destroy everyone is this the faction that was snatching faces in nine, hundred, seventy, nine that was overtaken by the we'd Reptilians we have all these crazy baggage Amman's Bu- Laura goes in just with this kind of blank slight. very inquisitive incredible investigative work, and there's some fantastic interviews in the series. So he wanted to get back on. We're GONNA. Be Talking about the secret Pentagon. UFO program that's that's been in the news lately she's. She interviews a former Senate majority leader Harry Reid's we're gonNA hear about that. We're GONNA be talking about zips zips Palo's, which is this incredible mathematical law that Spain discovered in language, but is now being applied to nature and to the search for extraterrestrial life or But it's better to say the future of contacting extraterrestrial had had effectively talk to them. We're going to be talking about you afo towers, all sorts of fun stuff coming up on this show, and of course, more coming up in our plus extension Aaron you've been working on this segment which kind of ties into some of the stuff we're going to be talking about today it doesn't roundabout way. Actually, we're going to be going into some of the the strange number stations. That have been heard around the world and these are strange signals that seem to come from unknown locations. People have tried to her on the con- now done exactly where they are, but there's been hundreds of them. You mean, UV seventy-six is one of those well known by many people that look at this topic but there are hundreds of these signals picked up over the years and they may have a couple of scientists have discovered and wash scientists but people that are involved. In the military industrial complex after the Second World War that they may be tied into actual radio transmission of telepathy POWs so this Six people just moved to their parents without old boy. Was that bad but does tie in? Yes. It does time with this idea that the Soviets were looking at ways of trying to find a carry a wave four ESPN telepathy, and then weaponize it to utilize it for propaganda and potentially assassinations looking forward to that unstoppable, not fun stuff but interesting stuff aerialist big stuff coming up. But let's go into our interview. With Laura. You can find the series at wild thing podcast dot com but of course, link to everything in the show notes, we hope you enjoy this Laura Krantz. We welcome you back to the Laura Krantz to speak about her brand new podcast, wild thing space invaders. This season to of all things welcome back to the show Lawrence great to have you. Thank you so much for having me. Again, I'm really looking forward to this. We loved the season on bigfoot and this is quite a big shift few. Why move into the area of A again, why you stealing out bread and butter? What are you guys have clearly made so much money millionaire lifestyle I'm just trying to hone in on it. Is it is a big money game when you get into UFO's with the bentleys at the front, it really is Well, you know obviously big foot's alien. So that seems like a natural connection between the two of those wouldn't you agree? When you dig into the phenomenon, do find a link but I, guess for normies I suppose yes ceiling degree. But why did you make them? I do not agree I did hear that from a few people but honestly. I kind of finished up bigfoot and I was like, what am I gonNA do next and there had been a couple of events that really struck me as I was doing the research for bigfoot and as I was thinking about it and one of them was the appearance of this interstellar object. The first one that we had ever knowingly seen it was called Moua and it showed up in October of two thousand seventeen, and then like three weeks later, there's these screaming headlines all over major newspapers talking about the Pentagon's it secret. UFO. Program and both of those. Were just kind of lingering in the back of my head and part of that was because the response to them was so enormous like in both cases, there were stories everywhere people were talking about it. It was showing up both on tabloids and in the front page of major newspapers. So it clearly had wide appeal. So those that's really kind of what hooked me on those I did try to find a relative who had been an alien seeker, but I couldn't find one. Of course that's in reference to your. Long lost relative. That was connected to bigfoot from the first season. What was his name again? Grover Grover krantz. That's right. That's right. Well, this talk of a Momoa was interesting because we've never really dug into it on the show. It was very mainstream immediately with this suggestion of. It being an artificial object where did this come from? who was the first respectable person to suggest this could be a possibility. So the first person that I had heard about saying that it could have been extraterrestrial technology was a gentleman by the name of Avi Low of He's a professor of strategy at Harvard. In fact, I think he's the head of the Astronomy Department there and he is involved with a group. Called break the breakthrough initiative switch are founded by Yuri Milner millions if not billions of dollars being mike put into these programs I'm sure you guys have probably talked about this before but one of those initiatives is coming something called breakthrough star shot, which is this idea of sending probes out into space using light sales. So pushing these super thin sales with lasers and getting them to go like twenty percent of the. Speed of light and getting way out into the university we can like check out what else is out there without having to deal with like really heavy spacecraft credible. Yeah. You had some great interviews on that and the idea of sending something to Alpha Centauri and getting a message back. You know twenty years later exactly I mean it's amazing technology it sounds totally science fiction but Avi Loeb is involved in the. Process of figuring out how we're going to do this. so He's already kind of thinking about light sails, but in seeing a Ma-ma come into our solar system and watching how it moved, which was kind of erratic, it wouldn't follow the trajectory that they kept plotting for it but they couldn't see any sort of way in which it was moving. There wasn't like off gassing that was obvious near his feeling was you know? Maybe this is something technological in origin, and why shouldn't we consider that as a possibility given what we know about the galaxy and the universe and how big and huge it is and how many things might be out there that we're not aware of, and for those that don't know it's will we consider it an asteroid? Is that what is technically comet I think was what most? Scientists were saying and even Ati Loeb was opinion. Oh, it could be a comet, but he wanted people to consider the other possibilities as well..

Laura Krantz bigfoot Pentagon Avi Loeb Grover Grover krantz Komo Amman Senate Spain Palo Harry Reid Yuri Milner Aaron Alpha Centauri Lawrence Moua Avi Low
Kim Cattrall, actress and producer: I have self worth. And Im expensive.

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:11 min | 7 months ago

Kim Cattrall, actress and producer: I have self worth. And Im expensive.

"CAM drawl joins us on skimmed from the couch. She needs no introduction we are geeking out, but we will introduce her anyway she is a Golden Globe winning actress and producer you know her from her role as Samantha Jones on sex in the city and. She's The star and producer of the new series filthy rich on Fox which premieres on September twenty. First, we are so excited because we need some new shows in this Cogan, Environment Kim. Thank you so much for joining us today. welcomed the skimmed from the couch. Thank you for inviting man. It's good to be here. I will just say I'm geeking out 'cause I've loved you since Mannequin. So this is just So we're going to start the first question. We ask every guest, which is skim your resume for us. Oh my gosh. You know when I first started as an actress I was desperate to get credits and now I'm trying to eliminate. Oh well, you know they say don't have any regrets and I don't because even from jobs that I didn't particularly feel good about in retrospect I learned something it starts off with, of course, theater credits and commercial credits I remember getting a job on a lob laws commercial this Toronto. Before I came to the United States studied in the United States but then I went back up to Canada. And I had a clerk in a grocery store and William Shatner, he was sort of the MC selling the product and years. Later when I did a star trek movie with him, I said I. I, know you definitely don't recognize me I was shocked in. Clerk. Needless to say that's not on my resume anymore but. At the time I was doing a lunch hour theatre Gig you know and was making about one, hundred, fifty dollars every two weeks. So those those little jobs meant so much because I could I could keep in the theater I keep working as an actress and I was very grateful and when I brought it up, he simply smiled and said I don't remember. At least he was on. Yeah. So walk us through what was your big break? How did you go from the shopping clerk to being able to pick and choose what credits you have I did a show called scruples. First of all, I did a Columbo episode, which was kind of it was the hot hot show to to watch never mind beyond and they were waiting for another actress who just had dates and I was there I was told later on I was the first choice but they wanted to have some unknown entity is as an actor as one of the guest stars. And it was a really fun little role on this sort of passionate young girl who was in love with his older man. In a she was kind of nympheas but was very soulful. I got that job and Dan they were auditioning for this movie called scruples and that was really got everybody excited. It was based on a judith krantz novel was very soapy and fun and passionate. Packed with all kinds of wonderful personalities and actors and it was about Beverly Hills and it was we shot in nineteen seventy nine even before the glove, the eighties and more is more I played this kind of trouble Starlit who is bisexual and not that they really touched on that. You know very gingerly of course at the time, but it introduced me to a different level of just struggling and making due to being brought in the room because I had done that and and people like what I've done. So that was a marked difference, and then shortly after that, I did have a film called tribute and ticket to heaven and a lot of sort of films. What's one thing that we can't Google about you there's so much out there. But like what's the one thing that people would be surprised to know I think one of the things that people are surprised to know very recently is that I I am now an American citizen I think a lot of people associate associate me with being American and being a New Yorker of course, but I have just taken the plunge. So I can vote

William Shatner Samantha Jones Producer Cogan United States Judith Krantz Google Toronto Beverly Hills Canada DAN
"krantz" Discussed on The Essential Oil Revolution

The Essential Oil Revolution

04:16 min | 8 months ago

"krantz" Discussed on The Essential Oil Revolution

"Hey everyone. . I am here with David Krantz David thank you so much for being with us here today it's good to have you back on the show. . To push back, , really appreciate you reaching out and setting this up. . Yeah. . Well, , for those who don't know you, , you've been on the show. . But you are a sought after certified EPA genetic coach. . Last time you're on the PODCAST, , we talk specifically about epigenetics. . Specialize in personalized nutrition, , genetic testing optimal. . You are the two thousand Nineteen International Forum on Healthcare Advancement, , top one, , hundred health innovator nominee, , and your best known for creating the appear on genomics indicate cab annoyed panel. . So you know a lot about the economic system, , CBD EPA genetics all these sort of Geeky side things that I love to just like dive down deep into especially when we sent her that around. . Because there's so much there. . So I'm excited and let's dive in last time you talked about certified your work is a certified. . Coach can you briefly share your journey a little bit of background for those that may be missed that episode WanNa know a little more about who you are and how you got here? ? Absolutely. . So I like a lot of people who find themselves in the healing world had to really kill myself and figure out my own stuff I, , and that's really what led me into the path. . And My background is actually in music and electric music production performance, , and in my early twenties I was touring musician and Meyde lifestyle and all the stressors not taking care of my body really just 'cause my health to crash and I started having these weird symptoms I was passing out randomly, , which was not fun like wake up and realizing that I was just unconscious for a little bit. . I saw a number of the mainstream doctors and they're basically like well, , you're like a healthy young guy in his twenties like you're not. . GonNa. . Die of a heart attack. . We can tell you that you're not gonNa you know. . You don't have diabetes. We . can tell you that right and beyond that there wasn't a lot of actual useful actionable information, , and so it really forced me to do my own research and figure out what's going on. . I've been listening to this podcast with the Guy Dr Dan Stickler, , who is a world renowned expert in genetics and epigenetics sand I listening to all of his podcast episodes that he had out. . And there wasn't anyone really talking about this stuff in this angle and I took a walk on my lunch break one day at work and realize the logo of this podcast that I've been listening to was literally on the building next door. . Like one hundred yards from whereas working and the doctor had an office next door to me that I didn't know about. . So wild. . And so I immediately booked a time I wanNA blood work done with them. . I wanted to work with them and it turned out they're actually looking to hire someone with an audio background to help them develop meditation programs and stress relief programs for this experimental sound chamber. . They've built in this clinic and I turned out I had the perfect background you know immediately want to. . Start working with them and right around the same time. . This Guy Dr Dance declare who's he's a consultant to Google lectures at Stanford. . He started a training program for teaching genetics teaching epigenetics and I haven't the replaced at the right time basically, , and he was like, , Hey, , you should you know be a Beta tester refer this program like you kind of have a basis for it. . Me Can pass his knowledge on to you actually said no at first I was still in the I`Ma musician. . Kind of mindset and sure enough I actually ended up being the first coach that he trained. . He's trained about three or four hundred worldwide now, , and so that's really kind of what launched me into what I'm doing now, , and since then I've gone on to develop a genetic test for economic function like you mentioned with Dr. . Stickler and so it's really been a battle one eighty Cana journey for me in terms of going from someone who? ? Really needed help to kind of being on the other

Salt Lake City David Krantz Livy EPA Barak Heiferman Lauren Spencer Sheffield England emmett
The Scoop on CBD With David Krantz

The Essential Oil Revolution

04:16 min | 8 months ago

The Scoop on CBD With David Krantz

"Hey everyone. I am here with David Krantz David thank you so much for being with us here today it's good to have you back on the show. To push back, really appreciate you reaching out and setting this up. Yeah. Well, for those who don't know you, you've been on the show. But you are a sought after certified EPA genetic coach. Last time you're on the PODCAST, we talk specifically about epigenetics. Specialize in personalized nutrition, genetic testing optimal. You are the two thousand Nineteen International Forum on Healthcare Advancement, top one, hundred health innovator nominee, and your best known for creating the appear on genomics indicate cab annoyed panel. So you know a lot about the economic system, CBD EPA genetics all these sort of Geeky side things that I love to just like dive down deep into especially when we sent her that around. Because there's so much there. So I'm excited and let's dive in last time you talked about certified your work is a certified. Coach can you briefly share your journey a little bit of background for those that may be missed that episode WanNa know a little more about who you are and how you got here? Absolutely. So I like a lot of people who find themselves in the healing world had to really kill myself and figure out my own stuff I, and that's really what led me into the path. And My background is actually in music and electric music production performance, and in my early twenties I was touring musician and Meyde lifestyle and all the stressors not taking care of my body really just 'cause my health to crash and I started having these weird symptoms I was passing out randomly, which was not fun like wake up and realizing that I was just unconscious for a little bit. I saw a number of the mainstream doctors and they're basically like well, you're like a healthy young guy in his twenties like you're not. GonNa. Die of a heart attack. We can tell you that you're not gonNa you know. You don't have diabetes. We can tell you that right and beyond that there wasn't a lot of actual useful actionable information, and so it really forced me to do my own research and figure out what's going on. I've been listening to this podcast with the Guy Dr Dan Stickler, who is a world renowned expert in genetics and epigenetics sand I listening to all of his podcast episodes that he had out. And there wasn't anyone really talking about this stuff in this angle and I took a walk on my lunch break one day at work and realize the logo of this podcast that I've been listening to was literally on the building next door. Like one hundred yards from whereas working and the doctor had an office next door to me that I didn't know about. So wild. And so I immediately booked a time I wanNA blood work done with them. I wanted to work with them and it turned out they're actually looking to hire someone with an audio background to help them develop meditation programs and stress relief programs for this experimental sound chamber. They've built in this clinic and I turned out I had the perfect background you know immediately want to. Start working with them and right around the same time. This Guy Dr Dance declare who's he's a consultant to Google lectures at Stanford. He started a training program for teaching genetics teaching epigenetics and I haven't the replaced at the right time basically, and he was like, Hey, you should you know be a Beta tester refer this program like you kind of have a basis for it. Me Can pass his knowledge on to you actually said no at first I was still in the I`Ma musician. Kind of mindset and sure enough I actually ended up being the first coach that he trained. He's trained about three or four hundred worldwide now, and so that's really kind of what launched me into what I'm doing now, and since then I've gone on to develop a genetic test for economic function like you mentioned with Dr. Stickler and so it's really been a battle one eighty Cana journey for me in terms of going from someone who? Really needed help to kind of being on the other

Wanna Dr Dan Stickler EPA Consultant David Krantz David Nineteen International Forum Diabetes Meyde Google Cana Stanford
"krantz" Discussed on The Essential Oil Revolution

The Essential Oil Revolution

03:15 min | 8 months ago

"krantz" Discussed on The Essential Oil Revolution

"Today's episode is a great combination of many different topics. We have returning a guest David Krantz, who is a world expert on EPA. And CBD, and he knows a ton about essential oil. So I had him on the show to talk about the intersection of all of those things, essential oils, CBD, and epigenetics. Now, this is the part of the show where I normally share may favorite oil from the past week. But in light of today's topic, all about CD I WANNA share an old story. This was from twenty nineteen when I was actually at the young living convention. So a year ago in Salt Lake City at the little rentable scooters really just hit the city, and so I was just scooting around all over the place having so much fun. Definitely using a lot of core muscles that I wasn't. Used to, and at the same time, the most vicious period cramps hit me. So I'm walking around I'm scooting around and I was in so much pain leg hardly make it to any of the talks. So someone by goodness this angel lint me her CBD Muscle Rub that young Livy makes in partnership with nature's ultra, which is the company that runs the aspect of their products. They was aid the three hundred milligram nature's ultra muscle rub and I read it on my lower abdomen and my stomach and found immediate relief emmett saved my entire trip to convention I was. So grateful the base is made up of Beeswax Shave Butter SAF lower and Jojoba oil so really creamy lecture. And then it has the three hundred milligrams of CBD, and then it also has essential oils like camp for Barak Heiferman clove, it's got a little wormwood in it. Some vitamin E. IN IT Winter Green hilliker SOM- nick flowers. So all sorts of wonderful herbs and tools that are built to help your muscles. So I swear by this stuff it's a miracle here for me so. If you're needing a real good goto muscle rub you have to try out the new ultra CBD Muscle Rub which you can buy through young living. So used to have to make a separate account to buy any of the CD products. But now all young living members who have a young living account can now finally, by those CBD products right in their virtual office, which is Great. Now. Let's pull the recipe out of our DIY dugout. This comes from Lauren Spencer who lives in Sheffield England and the recipe is called orange sleepy balls I love the name of the recipe. To meet you make the orange balls take one cup of ground almonds. Quarter Cup chopped almonds half a cup almond butter and a quarter cup could cow powder six manual dates and then two tablespoons orange.

Salt Lake City David Krantz Livy EPA Barak Heiferman Lauren Spencer Sheffield England emmett
Stella Jean Asks Do Black Lives Matter in Italian Fashion?

The Business of Fashion Podcast

05:15 min | 8 months ago

Stella Jean Asks Do Black Lives Matter in Italian Fashion?

"Hello everyone. This is Tim, Ron Ahmed founder, and CEO of the business of fashion. Welcome to the latest episode of B. O. F. Live today I'm here with the designer Stella Zhong who is joining us from. and. We're here to talk about a very important topic of his see that we have been discussing at length here on the OH F- Few months much of the discussion around the black lives matter movement in fashion has been focused on conversations in the US and to a certain extent here in the UK where I'm based but Stella has been playing a leading role in driving the conversation around black lives matter in Italy, and so we're delighted to have her with us today to help paint a picture about how this conversation is very important. Conversation has a very unique tone and history and contacts that differentiates it. From some of the other countries, of course, the core conversation is rooted in the same goals around achieving better racial equity for black professionals in fashion. But initially, there's some specific contexts and situations that make the conversation. They're a really important one to consider outside some of the other conversations that we've been having. So I'm delighted to have Stella with us here today and Stella. Before we dive into the topic at hand I want to start with you and your personal background and history just for those listeners and viewers who don't. Already aren't already familiar with your work. So could you just you know in the first instance take a moment to you tell us your personal story How did you grow up? Where did you grow up explain a little bit about your background. And then we can get into a little bit about how you got into the fashion industry. Okay Imran. Hi Hello. Thank you for having me. So I'll will tell a bit about my story. Fashion come for me from two different personnel seed I. He has begun as a personal necessity born in Italy of the early eighties and struggling be being so So diverse from my fellow citizen as motivated me to find a way to show people not to be afraid of different cultures and color by instead to see them as them as a chance to grow better and together I know that it might may sound dock sequel but I don't use shown with an esthetic proposals by as a tool to fight again, any cultural agregation, the passionate snowboarder. So you can accept you the beauty without prejudice is a low made to talk to fashion without preconceived opinion just beauty. That's why my work reflects might make you Saggio repeal every page in ways in which to. Culture I white. Republican onside. Probably in the Italy than together. So this marriage are opposite creates a new I bridge, which I've always considered red during my child took. Advantage, and it took me a long time to change my mind. But thanks to many krantz mentor role model and fashion obsolete, which has been my terrapin escape. I've discovered the precious uniqueness of being diverse convene, conveying a new concept of multiculturalism applied to fashion, which promotes cultural sober without ever compromising once on identity, and then there is the second. Reason is the need to put forward and and preserve the multiculturalism which comes from the fact that I've I've always had to actually my mother comes from eighty and my father from Italy. I was born in Rome I spent you years in. And I was March tied at such a great country was known just for some wrong reasons or its way extreme poverty charity yet. Believe me after immediate emergency cases else should come in a totally different form in order to a- long-term action considering that this population of so many cultural resources which would allow them to rise up again on without the need charity action while they need is a someone who decide to believe in their capacity give them the opportunity to work for the Indian plays, their own skill this should be. The the power of fashion. This is a knowledgeable of fashions potential as cultural activity to provide significant opportunities for doesn't work for man and woman around the word. That's why I created my lab founded the laboratory will. Not Show any.

Stella Zhong Italy Stella United States B. O. UK TIM Ron Ahmed Founder CEO Krantz Rome
Amazon Thinks It Will Need More — Not Fewer — Offices In Big Cities

Financial Exchange with Barry Armstrong

02:03 min | 8 months ago

Amazon Thinks It Will Need More — Not Fewer — Offices In Big Cities

"Big story about offices this year has been all of the companies that are telling their employees that they never need to come back, apparently, and they'll be working remotely currently. But as they often do, Amazon swimming against the tide here and making a pretty big bet. On in person work. I like this, Mike. I like it a lot. Um, I I think that this is an industry move. We become prisoners of the moment often times where it does look bleak for the next year or two with with the virus and then this idea of not wanting to be in major cities. However, they were able to purchase a $1 billion building in New York on Fifth Avenue from we work. Amazon was And we work. Obviously an extremely distressed company at the moment, would you know, prided themselves on basically offering office space for some of these smaller companies out there? You're a small companies very quickly to pivot to working from home from an off mentally office space. Well, the best part of this story. Did you read who occupied that building prior Tio Pride Amazon buying it was it? Ah, Lauren Taylor Krantz. Is there anything better than just like putting a company out of business and then just, you know, throw in a little fuel on the fire by taking over their their office based their main defining View of the Lord and Taylor. There's fifth have building the mecca of real estate. You are? Yeah, just, you know, just trying to think of the comparison. Just, you know, spitting on somebody's grave here taking over that realestate and look Yeah, I don't know how this is gonna go. I don't know if they really need these employers employees in downtown Manhattan. But Tell you what when everybody is talking about, you know, selling their real estate. And you, Khun Khun Promise you that Amazon went in here and got one hell of a deal. That's what I'm thinking was north a year ago. I like It wasn't cash to do it. I like it. I like the idea that the American City is going to rebound. At some point. I don't know what in New York is going to look like 12 months from now, but There are deals to be had right now, and good frame is on for buying up now,

Amazon Lauren Taylor Krantz Tio Pride Amazon New York Manhattan Mike
"krantz" Discussed on Kannaboomers | Cannabis for Wellness

Kannaboomers | Cannabis for Wellness

04:14 min | 8 months ago

"krantz" Discussed on Kannaboomers | Cannabis for Wellness

"The genetic information you have and then borrow information from other disciplines that might help you in targeting this individual in in a way that would be safe efficacious for them. I guess right exactly and you know. A lot of chirping recommendations and profiles are going to be based more on symptoms that are presenting or certain goals. You know whether your goal is to relax or to be more focused and that doesn't change so much with the genetics. Ideally, in the future, we could have a test that predicts that stuff perfectly but still it can give you some indications. Say you know some people are more prone to paranoia or anxiety with THC? Look at that from genetic perspective and look at trapeze like Beta. Qarafa lean as a way to help mitigate that. So you can. Pair, certain terrapins with features traits that show up in the genetics in way that's pretty helpful for people. I'm probably going to over generalize this but in genetics itself I, mean there's sort of the nature nurture argument what elements that are manifest are due to your destiny or due to the Environment Mum and certainly with cannabis people are aware of setting setting definitely can affect your experience do you. Consider that at all. Oh, absolutely. I think that I don't Wanna come across as a genetic essential list. I'm probably as far away from that as you can get for someone who's in the field of genetics and nutrigenomics I really see just as a spoke on the on the wheel right? Just a piece of all the other factors, and of course, setting are huge set and setting if you're. Not. In. The right mindset you're doing, you're using cannabis in space that is overwhelming. That's GONNA trump connectix. Cases But then there are other cases where genetic might kind of trump that and setting for other people and you know I think that we really got to kind of look at the whole picture. and. The area that I want to bring in you know is this sort of innate biological response that for some people might more extreme and for other people might be more responsive to the environment and that's what the most current understanding of genetics in general really emphasizing is that it's the combination of environment and genetics genetics on their own. Don't give you that great of predictive power. But when you can understand the environment and those factors in combination with the genetic, it gets really powerful and certain jeans what they really do functionally, and a lot of ways is make you more sensitive to certain environmental inputs so. For example you know certain genes are gonNA, make you more sensitive to to THC, or influence that sensitivity and knowing those kind of factors can allow you to match yourself up with the right environment and match yourself say up with being more sensitive or more conscientious of setting setting or strain or method of ingestion and seeing how PC KINDA fit together. You may have a predilection for a certain cultivars strain and producing a certain result but there's other factors besides besides your genes I'm hearing you say. Yeah absolutely I. I don't want to make it seem like this is the only factor but if you're someone that wants a little bit more objective understanding to tie into your subjective experience. The DOTS really well for people that you know, understand their response, a certain strains and their experiences say with edibles inhaled cannabis. It's it gives more of a a platform and structure to fit your experience and your understanding of your body into which can lead to some cool outcomes sure from a consumer perspective, how can I approach this in a smart way? Do I? Have to really educate myself on genetics am I going to be looking at a at a spreadsheet or or what sort of process would be involved in me looking at my genetics around canvas? Yes..

cannabis connectix
"krantz" Discussed on Kannaboomers | Cannabis for Wellness

Kannaboomers | Cannabis for Wellness

03:20 min | 8 months ago

"krantz" Discussed on Kannaboomers | Cannabis for Wellness

"Welcome back to the Cancun podcast city. We have David Krantz. How are You David? I'm doing great Tom thanks for having me on in. Where are you today? I am in Asheville north. Carolina in the mountains here I hear Ashville is. Pretty civilized craft brew scene there and stuff with a very large craft brucie actually think it's out of proportion to the the size of the city, but does welfare tourism. So that's fun. We're here to talk about your training in your expertise in genetics in the tabloid system. Can you tell us about that? Yeah, absolutely. So my background is in nutrigenomics. Which is the study of how different genetic variants create different responses to food and nutrients, and vitamins, and all that and a couple of years ago I started looking into the research around cannabis and I realized there was actually a lot of research around how different genetic variants influence people's response to cannabis and different cabinets and there just wasn't a lot of. The available out there for people. For practitioners for cannabis users about how this information applies to them. So I started developing content and articles and actually a genetic test that I developed with genomics company that can help people understand how this affects them, and how they can optimize their cannabis use, and so I've developed a training course for practitioners. You know it's geared for practitioners but anyone who's enthusiast or an activist that really wants to be on the cutting edge would be it'd be a great fit for them and of developed this course that you how to use genetics to better understand your response or. Your clients response cannabis that sounds super interesting because I've had a few doctors and chemists and pharmacists on the show, and we've all talked about the complexity of our genetics and then the complexity of the plant and wouldn't it be great if we could match those two up so it sounds like you're beginning to make progress on that. Yes. You know it's not a perfect science like you can't take a genetic test and have tell you exactly what strain and exactly what dosage will be perfect for your body but it can give you some good guidance around certain dynamics. Likely to say be more or less sensitive THC or more or less sensitive to see. Or say respond in cognitive. More beneficial the THC or if you're more likely to kind of fit that classic stone or stereotype of kind of having a poor memory after smoking that type of thing there's some there's some pretty strong correlations you can unearth through this information and yeah I'm kind of on a mission to spread this into the cannabis world because I think it would benefit a lot of people and people that I've done. Genetic reeds for their feedback is generally well I. Just understand how I relate to cannabis better. I'm able to modify and modulate my usage relationship to the plant in a way. That feels healthier and feels more grounded in the way that my biology is wired. What we end up talking about often as well..

cannabis David Krantz Cancun Carolina Ashville nutrigenomics Asheville north Tom
Yurok Tribe and seven tribal governments file lawsuit over COVID-19 aid

Native America Calling

03:53 min | 1 year ago

Yurok Tribe and seven tribal governments file lawsuit over COVID-19 aid

"This is National Native News Antonio Gonzales the LEMME nation in Washington state has extended a shelter in place mandate through may thirtieth which also includes a nightly curfew on Friday. The LemMe Public Health Department reported sixteen New Positive Cases of cove nineteen between Wednesday and Friday and on Saturday reported two more cases bringing the total to forty in the community. Tribal and health officials are urging people to stay home and follow social distancing orders as the cluster is traced to families visiting other households public health memos to the community from the health department at age demographics to show infection rate for people under forty. The most state families and children are not following shelter in place or social distancing. LemMe Business Council Chair Lawrence. Solomon in a video message. Friday said he's deeply concerned. The measures were changing. Turn you and your once. I understand that it's against their culture to stay away from our sisters brothers. Mothers fathers grandparents ran shoulder aunties uncles and cousins. Birth in the same household refrained from visiting shorter period of time. The LemMe Public Health Department had not reported new positive cases in weeks. The Euro tribe and seven other tribal governments have filed a federal lawsuit against the US Treasury Department to Release Covert Nineteen Relief Aid to tribes and the cares act. The Billion Dollars set aside for tribes was to be distributed by April twenty six according to the tribe a separate lawsuit involving the inclusion of Alaska native corporations held up funding but tribal leaders are calling for the quick release of the money to help respond to the corona virus. Your Chairman Joseph James and a statement said the Treasury needs to honor its obligation to tribes adding the health and Wellness of native citizens depend on it tribal plaintiffs in California Arizona. Wyoming Oklahoma and Washington state filed the lawsuit last week seeking disbursement of funds new interactive series features. Native artists combining creativity and company to help promote wellness during the pandemic China. Lock it house. More about a dozen people from across the state tune into a video. Chat as Michael Gives instructions grabbed objects from their house. It could be anything salt Shaker. An apple asks everyone to draw object with whatever medium? They have pencil pen krantz and he joins in after fifteen minutes to both sets down his tools and asks her. This prompt is what makes the class unique. It's not about learning to draw. It's about bringing people together and doing something fun. And during the pandemic goal Nassau. Xiaoli facilitates the class. She reads off some answers from participants as feeling accomplished thank you. That was a very chill fifteen minutes. Thankyou says I shake all you works with the Racing Magpie Art Gallery. She also works with South Dakota's branch of the National Alliance on mental health or Nami. It's an organization that provides education and support to people with mental illness. Both organizations are teaming up for the virtual wellness workshop. Creating whether it's writing or drawing or painting like is an opportunity to tap into oneself and to be able to do that safely because you have control like you have your foot on the gas and the brake and you can decide how deep you go when you need to pull back. How you want to engage. Especially if workshops are being facilitated safely unconsciously the wellness workshops are open to the public. Three more artists are scheduled through me. I'm trying to lock it in rapid city and demand. Tony Gonzalez

Lemme Public Health Department Xiaoli Us Treasury Department Washington Solomon Antonio Gonzales Me Business Council Alaska Treasury Tony Gonzalez Racing Magpie Art Gallery Nassau Apple Chairman Wyoming Michael South Dakota Joseph James California
"krantz" Discussed on Unpack The Pursuit

Unpack The Pursuit

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"krantz" Discussed on Unpack The Pursuit

"Welcome to impact the pursue a podcast where we have real talk about change unpacked the pursuit is dedicated to helping us think differently about change in how we get to the places we so desperately want to go. You're ready for empowering tips and tools, lots of storytelling and inspiring interviews. We are your hosts nod lean molly. Let's unpack this. Hey everyone. Welcome.

Patent reveals new Nintendo Switch Joy-Con add-on with built-in stylus

Nintendo Voice Chat

05:24 min | 1 year ago

Patent reveals new Nintendo Switch Joy-Con add-on with built-in stylus

"There's not a whole a lot of news but I think the most interesting thing that I read about this week was Nintendo switch. Patent has been revealed and it's a touch pen attachment for joy cots and this patent was is filed in June and we just now learned of it and it detaches the joy con kind of like where you attach the wrist hose. I don't know I lost my. I don't even know what they're called. They just like don't exist wrist bits. Bits ropes yeah. There's a a nub on the end that acts as a stylist it list and it will interact when you're pressing a button or somewhat so they show a picture and you're using the stylus if you press the button the line that you're drawing we'll get thicker and it also has rumble functionality. I kinda dig that. Yeah I did see a picture of that and it seems like an obnoxiously. Large thing the US on a small touch screen. Yeah because you have to hold the entire on holding it like a child holds a Crayon Shin. Yeah that's how I will make Krantz normally find for me. I think grip on it. I'm drowning this I could this mean. Ds Ports Maybe DS support. Sounds like you wouldn't. You wouldn't need like that. You wouldn't need the button functionality. If you're talking to the sports I need a stylus. Yes sorta thing this. Maybe they're cooking up something different but couldn't sell you a new thing if they did that true. That's true that's fair. Some people are saying that it might be to. It might come out with the switch pro. I personally don't think they would be. It's just appropriate right. It's just come out for it. Also I mean who's who's using the switch to do art. You know what I mean like I. I guess you're doing a lot. More recently are using an IPAD. Do that are you just using. I switch off between his sketchbook an an ipod with a pencil. Yeah which is an equally pen wants to do. It's an equally stupidly cumbersome design like to sink it at first you have to plug it into your bottom of your ipad that looks like caveman nonsense. Yeah there's definitely good ways to do it. I mean I didn't controller like you plug it into the back of your switch rich. I've never done that before so I have no idea what I've seen you do that. And to be fair maybe maybe more people will do art with their switch if ah I love the drying mechanisms on the DS. I used to play with that a ton when I was a kid. It's so maybe they would just come up with a few like APPs just tross tough and share very quickly quickly become become R. R. rated and seen not even tired of like Jack box on like awful or awesome the bring back you draw the Pearl tanked t h q Completely cut. Yeah touched I. Yeah Yeah Yeah I mean that. That's the biggest like that's the biggest thing right. It's like give me all those warrior games that need a stylus. Yeah I'd I'd love to see any of those on switch I think Brian hit the nail on the head when he said Ds sports but like Thomas saying like while the extra functionality. I mean I guess just because you can. There's like an A. R. Art Censor in one of the joy con that never gets used either right like Nintendo likes making these things that are really technically cool and then just kind of. Don't get used a lot when they used. They're used in very interesting ways. Right we'll censor is really nice for take a look at what they did with cardboard. Yeah I was GONNA say like last year alone loan they did ring fit and they did. VR and everything with law before that it was sort of just like I had no idea that the controls could even do that. They're like put tape on cardboard and all of a sudden. You're you're a wizard and I'm like on Earth. Yeah they figure out someone's never read a Harry Potter. Thank God I think the biggest takeaway. Hey from that at least from kind of what has been talking about is like probably. This isn't the thing we can totally figure out just from a patent they're going to if this is does have as much functionality as we think it is they're probably GONNA announce it the game something that kind of goes hand in hand with it because you patent something doesn't necessarily mean you put it into production or use you know what I mean like. They might secure that patent just to beat somebody else to the punch writing just like to corner that market like hey. We're we might do something with this thing down the line and we want to have this on board just in case we ever think I use for something like they have a long Nintendo has a long history of like two strong's weird alien boys sitting in front of like bizarre televisions interacting with controllers controllers in ways that never actually material. And they're like hey working on this thing that cuts your TV in half using your hands and you're like what does that drawing and we spent like a whole NBC episode being like. What what is it? That never happens. Sort of like that weird over that that finger pulse sensor thing that they showed it on year Vitality sense by speaking of deep cuts. No I mean I know but you know I it was. It was like a thing that they check your pulse. Dr Yeah Yeah. An antenna was going to at the IRS sensor can do that yeah which is weird because they have implemented that in ring fit. Yeah at one point during also take your temperature once John Sean. No wait seriously you have to use it so anyway. Switch might beginning stylist. Maybe we'll get. That's not a

Nintendo Crayon Shin United States Krantz IRS John Sean Jack Harry Potter Brian NBC Thomas
UN confronts anti-Semitism as a human rights problem with historic report

People of the Pod

13:01 min | 1 year ago

UN confronts anti-Semitism as a human rights problem with historic report

"Shaheed is the United Nations special rapid tour on freedom of religion in or belief last month he released a historic report to the UN General Assembly the first UN report of its kind to be wholly dedicated to Anti Semitism Doctor Shaheed is a consummate diplomat of former foreign minister of the Maldives and a lifelong human rights crusader he joins us now in studio to discuss his momentous report often thanks so much for taking the time to sit down with us before presenting a AJC's Jacob Blaustein Institute for Human Rights Later Today SA- pleasure to be here thank you let me now this is the first ever UN human rights report dedicated solely to Anti Semitism if I understand correctly you were appointed Special Rapporteur on free religion or belief and then you got to pick your topic so why did you pick antisemitism well you know when I began my work on this mandate three years ago I observed how disengaged engaged the UN was with the topic of Antisemitism we hadn't actually served energy at all and sometime I was observing oh how violent way attacks on the Jewish it's disproportionately high in terms of numbers and in the time I noticed this scene of huge optic in antisemitic incidents head crimes really is long overdue report just before we go any further we should probably help people understand a little what about what's in the report so can you share with us two or three of the of the top level findings of of your of your work well the first thing of course for me to dance right that that my mandate on freedom of belief should address this subject and I make a case for that than I look at the of my work because important to know how the report now look at the different forms in which antisemitism manifest itself in the past and today because it's evolving and changing phenomenon and then I looked chart trends what in terms of the incidents and the violent incidents as well that I look at the online dimension which is quite significant forum as as so to speak in terms of how manifested that look at St responses there's good practice that also bad practices then finally of course I make recommendations ends of the report is focused on the important to define antisemitism as a way to understand what the phenomenon is there for the the definition by the Hell costumers alliance is given a full coverage in the report along with concerns I'm have risen about it but I offer clear guidelines on how and burn it might be used to document and to raise awareness it Anti Semitism my other recommendations of course include are calling upon states to ensure they have proper laws in place to to address antisemitism to support victims if such a crimes and to use education as a very important tool to address this phenomenon and of course for the UN to play in a high they will and boy justice issue at at a global level you mentioned the International Holocaust remembrance alliances working definition of antisemitism this is a first from the UN ED recommend by your report for all states to adopt that definition what are the merits of that particular definition which AJC is proud to have helped author well what is important is that we should know what we're talking about what this definition does is give us titans on winter sport enter Semitism is not comprehensive because some aspects that the tunnel covered bite but nice talking point and also gives examples of when it might be anti Semitic so what I'm saying is the purpose of this definition was to monitor and to some indicate crimes and incidents and then it's a very good tool to raise awareness about when this happens but it's also going to be used as a non nego what I'm saying is if you use as a non legal educational rule to monitor document and respond krantz is a very useful tool and therefore states must ensure they use this for this in this in this fashion to make sure that they're prepared to understand and a splinter antisemitic hate crimes right as as an American organization J. C. where concerned at times when the report is used for kind of enforcement action ends because hate speeches is problematic but it's also problematic from the American perspective to cut down on on someone's freedom of expression so the working definition can sometimes CBS toe the line on some of those issues is that what you meant about the non legal educational perspective indeed I think which understand that expression is vital even to deal with antisemitism so whenever someone tries to censor speech one it's very careful that the lines are drawn not standards and that's time that is inciting violence discrimination and hostage against the else where that line is not crossed then of course we should use other means you must have caused denounced antisemitism and all that forms of recall I call on government leaders to respond to US such incidents by denouncing them but they want to criminalize speech than they should have very high threshold which follows international standards are on ensuring that they're on the criminal his speech that is inciting violence and discrimination against indio communities Jewish leaders have spoken to my mind convincingly about the what a in which Israel is kind of scene today as the Jew among the nation's right that a lot of the kind of mutating shifting anti Semitic perspectives that were anti Semitic Canard's tropes et cetera that were projected onto Jews in the nineteenth and first half of the twentieth century is are now projected onto Israel so Israel has become kind of a prime target for underlying anti Semitism cloaked in this kind of thin veil of political discourse that's something that the working definition helps to tackle I suspect I know your answer to this question but I'll ask that molest can criticism of Israel Anti Semitism well I think one has care for the new the definition by the customer so that alliance there said that example list which includes demonizing Israel can be antisemitic but tomato context assessment because context husband and they're very clear criticizing Israel like you would any other democratic state does not concern Semitism so there is enough scope in the definition to ensure that that both the use of Israel critism two separate entity trump's is defined as well as ensuring that these limits to criticize his actions as a government actor Ofman your report documents rising anti Semitic violence and hate speech around the world and identifies it as a threat to Jews but not only a threat to Jews is quote unquote toxic to democratic societies we talk a lot here at AJC about what we see as the three primary sources of antisemitism the far right the her laughed and certain radical segments of the Muslim community does that blueprint fit your findings yes I do point out that antisemitism comes in a variety of forms and almost all across the spectrum of politics society to the jets and other groups in society and and I give examples of how these two different perspectives are presented and What I of what I'm offering is a human rights based approach to this subject because such wide phenomenon and I point out that antisemitism is essentially about Jews it it is as a manifestation of dysfunctioning facilities it's about almost everybody else how the becomes in a four big have become intolerant how how how we are big attorney Harvey Racist so it's up it's a global phenomenon it causes everybody and you're right to point talk as a note that the into music sentiment and discordant messages coming from the far left there is a far right into the crimes pop up Edward quite frequently and also radical Muslims to do this and of course beyond this hate crimes are as widespread antisemitic prejudice across all societies and I note that in Muslim societies in some examples the days widespread prejudice amongst call those among students I know textbook switch convey antisemitic content as I do you got some political parties which period as champions of the left often when national altea national bodies like the UN talk about antisemitism they pair it with Islamaphobia Or with other forms of discrimination right you just talked about some hard left folks who define themselves constitutionally as anti-racism yet as we've seen with some of those examples some of those people who think of themselves as anti-racism Crusade others are in fact themselves occasionally perpetuating antisemitism so the result is that these bodies that will talk about antisemitism and Islam phobia or antisemitism and racism they very rarely have the opportunity to speak specifically about Antisemitism and in the meantime I'm as you note hatred of Jews and violent attacks on Jews have kept going up so why is it important to tackle anti Semitism as its own problem and not only as anti Semitism and first of all I think we should look intolerance in all its forms because they really a single phenomenon but antisemitism as you just said you know Z. oldest hatred and is often the canary in the coal mine of Autumn's of hatred has in the past see into that how how does it came communities I think the important thing is to look at something as widespread as antisemitism as something that's enough concerned too many communities of time as a good starting point to address offers hatred but beyond that every hatred requires a specified focus on its specificities we need to look at everything in a broad general framework but each each form of hatred requires a focus on its specificity so antisemitism given given it's it's it's you know Bite spread occurrence is almost endemic everywhere requires an urgent attention also because we have neglected and like I said I'm very concerned deeply concerned about the very violent forms in which these manifested often in societies which have very strongly role of traditions become into a week from the Pittsburgh one ear of week from Pittsburgh attack and six months later we had the poet attack in the phone and then just last week in Holland and Germany and throughout you find very violent forms off attacks on Jewish communities I think we have to focus on this subject and get to the bottom of it and find recipes and I would argue that if we can address antisemitism effectively than behind the tool to other forms of hatred as well You know I think we here at AJC certainly agree with that you know it's it's very important to us to fight all types of hatred and bigotry and at the same time we know that there is a time when it's entirely appropriate to speak about just antisemitism or just anti black racism I Islam phobia without kind of dragging other things into it as you mentioned ofmeat before we close I have to ask one question about the UN because a lot of our listeners American Jews in general are deeply skeptical of the United Nations now I know the UN does a lot consists of a lot there are a lot of different arms and bodies in committees and figures and special tours like yourself that fall under the UN umbrella but this is an organization that Jews are deeply suspicious of why the Jews today beat glad to see this report your report on antisemitism coming from an organization that they are so suspicious of well I'm not saying that we Ford is out I think he's a good starting point my attempt is to start working on this subject to let the UN also start focusing on this I call for a joined-up approach by different Duran bodies on this subject that many working on this UNESCO U. N. scientific educational body has just late last year a policy guide organization in dealing with any in schools the following up with another look this year on pedagogical aspects of pending antisemitism classrooms today you in bodies being on this I think it's important that the global reach of the UN is used to address this issue I think we should find ways to work together to address this issue I was going back to earlier point while I agree with you that we should all focus on specific elements of each type of a hatred what should avoid is what I call victim competition off that happening as well and I'm not saying it's happening here but we can all work together to address all forms of intolerance and if we are doing well on one we would necessarily between invasion others as well I certainly agree with you there I think our philosophy at AJC has long been that you know specifically in America but really around the world as well our patchwork of communities and societies can work to uplift one another rather than focusing on on who's been holding each other down op and thank you so much for taking the time to ns for your diligent work on this report for all the great work that I know is yet to come thank you it's been a pleasure to be on Avocado thank you

United Nations Un General Assembly Doctor Shaheed UN Three Years Six Months
Houston, NASA And Director discussed on Rush Limbaugh

Rush Limbaugh

00:16 sec | 1 year ago

Houston, NASA And Director discussed on Rush Limbaugh

"Monday you can step back in time at NASA headquarters near Houston to mark next month's fiftieth anniversary of the moon landing legendary flight director gene Krantz raised five million dollars to restore mission control to the way it looked on July twentieth nineteen sixty nine when he guided Apollo eleven onto the surface of

Houston Nasa Director Gene Krantz Five Million Dollars
"krantz" Discussed on MMA Junkie Radio

MMA Junkie Radio

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"krantz" Discussed on MMA Junkie Radio

"Kevin Lee, your boys will be back on the sports caster. By the way, we'll talk more about that in a bit on today's show. We got two guests headed your way. Derrick Krantz from PF L. He's fighting next Thursday a week from today, actually and we also have Steven Siler excuse me. I got the records Stephen Silas fights a week from Thursday, dare Krantz fights on Senate. He's got slipping in for Neil Magny, who was flagged by potential anti-doping violation, you're going through the modus USA. Yeah. Well, you know what's going to happen is, he's going to say hell, no. That was in me. Teen is supplement Babol blah, there's a lot of those comeback does not too many like TJ do those man. I was dumb, and then they do that there little deal. This is impossible though, right? Yeah. You had to county is dumb. Yeah. Pretty much so, yeah, Neil Magny out of his fight versus Sentate Luca and it sucks for Luca. Because Luke, as like literally seven one in the and we all know, he's got really good potential, but he needs that skin on the wall. So that when you look on the while you beat him you're for real right now. He doesn't have that yet Magni woulda helped Magne's top five but Magne's been probably a top ten guy for a while. He's got some other issues that need to be sorted out, allegedly. All right. So Derrick Krantz stepping in and we'll talk a little bit more about the card today tomorrow, when Dan Tom's here do some previewing in some picks. You've sees in Rochester. So it's a pretty big deal for their continuous support of the state of New York. Remember, that's a state one of the last states that said, all right?.

Neil Magny Derrick Krantz Sentate Luca Magne dare Krantz Stephen Silas Kevin Lee Steven Siler Luke Babol Senate Dan Tom Rochester New York USA.
"krantz" Discussed on Wild Thing

Wild Thing

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"krantz" Discussed on Wild Thing

"My name is Laura Krantz. I'm a journalist I used to work for NPR. I believe in science and logic and rational thought, and I've got a story for you. It's a story of what's beyond the light of the campfire one of chasing shadows and searching for clues it's a tale of fascination. Maybe even obsession a story that you might think is crazy, and well, there's no way around this. It's about Bigfoot. That's right. I said Bigfoot this is Wild Thing. A series about sasquatch science and society a creature that people say they've seen. What was I said? I think we've yourself Bigfoot exchanging fast, very muscular, I could see the back end of the larger ones, and it was nothing but muscle. Killer airy covered thing, Walken luck and human being and the story of those who are searching for it. More than all of this. It's about why we want to believe so very bad that something like sasquatch is out there. I'll come back to what we saw in the forest and we'll hear more from Shane. But first, let's talk about why I'm out in a tick infested forest to begin with because until very recently Bigfoot was just a piece of American folklore to me a fun story to tell on a dark night around a campfire, and the people who swear the big Foot's real. Well, they're just crazy, right? I mean there on the front page of the tabloids talking about how you photos brought Bigfoot to this planet or that they'd given birth to big Foot's, baby. It's some pretty out there stuff. So Bigfoot was kind of a big joke in my mind. And then in two thousand six while flipping through the Washington Post, I found something that made me reconsider. This headline read here by my husband caught my eye using his cranium Grover Krantz is last wish was to remain with his friends, and he has Krantz. Hey, that's my last name. So I read the article which included some fun facts like how this guy signed up to let his body decay at the Tennessee body farm, and then made plans for his skeleton to go to the Smithsonian along with the bones of his three Irish wolf hounds. What a weirdo..

Bigfoot Grover Krantz NPR Washington Post Walken Shane Tennessee
"krantz" Discussed on Rose Pricks: A Bachelor Roast

Rose Pricks: A Bachelor Roast

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"krantz" Discussed on Rose Pricks: A Bachelor Roast

"Do you feel jealous when I'm with guys and he's like, well, my watch. To be happy. She doesn't make you jails kiss Krantz like Nope, no. That she goes, but I kissed him, did you sleep a kiss? And cult goes, kissed him. Still nothing still? No, nothing. Okay. Let me put it this way. Doesn't it make you upset that be kissing another guy cones like, oh, no. I think it would make you feel some sort of weight, and I want to be provoked in you, but it wasn't. And there wanna pursue me at. I can't fully do that with anybody else if I feel this half ass shit with you as all my life waiting on a man to decide to fight for me, and I can't be the one fighting anymore. Like look. Look, I don't know how to say this any clearer. So I'm gonna make it really money right now. I've months investing in myself. Myself taught. Yeah, he's a like a blonde. A blonde? Yeah. Yeah. I spent a lot of time like just getting a note Colton and guess what? Colton not into it. Sorry. Just not into it is like, well, I'll tell you something Mr. Colton, Mr. invest in yourself. If I don't give you a rose, no one else will had he like at. Go, so wait. So you're gonna go home if I don't give you this row. So like she's telling him, you better say you're going to commit to me for the rest of this thing. I'm saying to your own and he's like, I'm not gonna do that. The, I feel like she goes, I feel like you're, you're threatening me. I'm not telling you you're going to help. Yeah. So then then she tries to different tacts. She's like, all right, here's the thing calm. If I give you a rose, then you will get to date all the new people, which I guess is what you want. This free pass. So he's like, Mike, I'm still not going to be with you or whatever. You know. She starts crying and I'm not forced you the same thing. But if you don't say you aren't going to be an SUV Bester won't say. So she's like, I not giving you my brows right aren't then you're, we're done talking. So they go back up then goes to the stuffer in the stuffer. Then everybody's gonna have something to say, which just lets you know that it that cold's gonna stay. 'cause the stuff is like Tegas t will just have an accent like that. She's like tia's done with Colton, and you know what that means. I'm gonna Stephan. I'm gonna Colton at home to play ukulele for well, I, Chris when she's like laving so she walks away from him. And then hell though, is there with sweet tea? Like this guy is the worst. Okay. You've got to hairlines sweet tea. What the fuck is houses supposed to turn anybody on your pants with your favorites? Arsenic, and old lace. All of a sudden, though he Like like. you want some sweet tea and she's like, Kay lab. She goes. Wow, that is so sweet. Go still? No. Still? No. So he gives her tea and she's like, she's done with Goten. She deserves a glimpse in the feeling of being treated like a Queen with ice tea. After all day that I know what I want, and I wanna man who knows what he wants, so I won't call them. You want me this work dad. Great. Live e. Oh my God. It was. That was very funny to me. So then Colton like, all right. Well, I guess you know, I got one more chance to get something happening here. So he approaches Angela, Danielle two point. Oh, and, and he's like, can I talk to you? And she goes..

Mr. Colton Krantz Danielle Angela Chris Mike
Mitch Englander, LA and Twitter discussed on Gary and Shannon

Gary and Shannon

01:54 min | 2 years ago

Mitch Englander, LA and Twitter discussed on Gary and Shannon

"Go if they. Have to I guess if we get the order to go We'll get. A few more, things. But the more important things are put away right now firefighters say. This fire's being driven by fuel, such as grass brush and. Some timber a new federal plan would let commercial loggers thin forests north of. LA to prevent wildfires Andrew Madson with the Los Padres national forest says it's an area that's about fifteen different fires in the last twenty years what we have out there now is a lot of dead standing trees that would represent a lot of ready fuels in the event we. Had a new. Wildfire star a conservation group for the area says it's just a political ploy to let commercial logger get around regulations so they can produce more, timber in national forests the man accused of fatally shooting Long Beach fire captain Dave Rosa has died in. Jail the elderly man had been in jail at county USC medical center for pre existing health issue and he was charged with capital murder for allegedly setting off an explosion at a retirement home back in June, then shooting at the responding firefighters LA city councilman. Mitch Englander has unblocked a gun rights group on Twitter that group says it was unable to respond to the tweet from Englander about his proposal to ban ownership of three d. printed. Guns in a letter the group pointed out a federal judge has ordered the president to stop blocking people on Twitter. Englanders office says. That gun group was blocked in. Air or some time in the past, a new study of lab results is found that Lyme disease has spread to all fifty states Quest Diagnostics is four. Hundred eighty three people were diagnosed with the tick-borne, disease. In California last year that's nearly. Triple the number of Lyme disease cases in California just two years earlier Hasbro says it's investigating, claims at some place school crayons tested positive for specis the Krantz were found in thirty six pack sold at, a dollar transit cargo the advocacy. Group that ran the. Tests say those crayons were also sold online And lady Gaga has announced she's got to Las Vegas residency, in the,.

Mitch Englander LA Twitter California Krantz Lady Gaga Quest Diagnostics Los Padres Andrew Madson Hasbro Las Vegas Usc Medical Center Tick-Borne Dave Rosa Long Beach President Trump Murder Twenty Years Two Years
Microsoft Surface Go Review Roundup: A Mixed Bag

Techmeme Ride Home

04:21 min | 2 years ago

Microsoft Surface Go Review Roundup: A Mixed Bag

"In addition to its an. Uber and Detroit hubs. It has offices in Austin, Texas, San Mateo, California, and London, and quote, as Twitter user startup m. n. Jackson who claims. Interestingly, to be the artist formerly known as start up l. Jackson tweeted, quote, Jackson's law, you can absolutely build a multibillion dollar start up in the upper mid west. It just can't be sexy like at all. Since he's been in the headlines so much recently. One more quick update on Facebook's departing chief security officer, Alex stamos stay. Most is officially now leaving Facebook on August seventeenth, and his new gig will be to become an adjunct professor at Stanford where he will also be part of a faculty working group called information warfare. The remote of which is to examine the role of security and technology and society. Interestingly, Facebook, apparently does not plan to name a successor to the chief security officer position on Twitter stamos wrote, quote, Silicon Valley faces, many challenges than I am encouraged that there are so many dedicated thoughtful and skilled people continuing to tackle these challenges at Facebook. I will miss everyone, but I look forward to collaborating with them in the future. Preliminary reviews of the surface go are in and they're a bit of a mixed bag over at and gadget defender. Hardware says that the surface go is the ideal cheap windows tablet. Almost. It's not quite an ipad killer, but it's still useful. Quote, I'll admit the surface go is full of compromises. It slow and it's limited by windows tens, slim tablet apps election, but it also has a keyboard that blows away any other tablet, and it can run normal windows software if necessary. It's not meant for everyone. But if you're in the niche, it's targeted at it could be the windows tablet. You've been waiting for and quote at the verge dealer bone says, it's better than he expected, but it does have its flaws quote after using the surface go for the past couple of days I realized I've been over thinking it the surface go is simply a very small surface with everything that entails. It's a little less. Powerful and probably not the right thing to be your only computer, but as a secondary machine for windows users, it could have a real place and quote at mash -able Raymond Wong is way more critical, giving it a three point, two, five stars out of five. He said the service go is painfully slow to us barely better than a net book quote. I've been struggling to figure out who Microsoft surface go is actually good for if you already own surface pro or any laptop y, would you buy a smaller tablet with huge Basil's that often chokes windows ten up due to its underpowered Intel Pentium processor? Why would you wanna type on a cramped a little keyboard, but then it hit me the answer's right in the name the surface go is good for when you're on the move. And that's really it. And quote, contrast that with Alex Krantz at Gizmodo who calls the surface, go practically perfect quote, if you have the money and you want a solid windows machine. That's primarily for browsing emailing and word processing the surface go, is it the device you need to by looking for a second computer? It's a no brainer. Splurge on this one. There might be faster budget, laptops, and there might be cheaper ones. But the surface go feels like a perfect representation of wet laptops at this price should be and quote. So I don't know. I have links to all the reviews and the show notes, I guess it's up to you to figure out who to believe. Tech main right home is sponsored by medal lab that alab is one of the few design agencies in the world that can take a product idea from end to end from napkin sketch to real shipped product. Let's look at medal apps work for Google. You've heard of amp, right? That framework that allows web content to load. Lightning-fast. Google came no medal app to create demos that showcased amps capabilities and showed developers what was possible with the technology. So meta lab created example sites, including four art.

Facebook Jackson Twitter Alex Stamos Raymond Wong Detroit Google Austin San Mateo Texas California Adjunct Professor Officer Stanford Alex Krantz London Basil Microsoft
The Surface Go reviews are in, and... they’re a bit all over the place

Techmeme Ride Home

04:21 min | 2 years ago

The Surface Go reviews are in, and... they’re a bit all over the place

"In addition to its an. Uber and Detroit hubs. It has offices in Austin, Texas, San Mateo, California, and London, and quote, as Twitter user startup m. n. Jackson who claims. Interestingly, to be the artist formerly known as start up l. Jackson tweeted, quote, Jackson's law, you can absolutely build a multibillion dollar start up in the upper mid west. It just can't be sexy like at all. Since he's been in the headlines so much recently. One more quick update on Facebook's departing chief security officer, Alex stamos stay. Most is officially now leaving Facebook on August seventeenth, and his new gig will be to become an adjunct professor at Stanford where he will also be part of a faculty working group called information warfare. The remote of which is to examine the role of security and technology and society. Interestingly, Facebook, apparently does not plan to name a successor to the chief security officer position on Twitter stamos wrote, quote, Silicon Valley faces, many challenges than I am encouraged that there are so many dedicated thoughtful and skilled people continuing to tackle these challenges at Facebook. I will miss everyone, but I look forward to collaborating with them in the future. Preliminary reviews of the surface go are in and they're a bit of a mixed bag over at and gadget defender. Hardware says that the surface go is the ideal cheap windows tablet. Almost. It's not quite an ipad killer, but it's still useful. Quote, I'll admit the surface go is full of compromises. It slow and it's limited by windows tens, slim tablet apps election, but it also has a keyboard that blows away any other tablet, and it can run normal windows software if necessary. It's not meant for everyone. But if you're in the niche, it's targeted at it could be the windows tablet. You've been waiting for and quote at the verge dealer bone says, it's better than he expected, but it does have its flaws quote after using the surface go for the past couple of days I realized I've been over thinking it the surface go is simply a very small surface with everything that entails. It's a little less. Powerful and probably not the right thing to be your only computer, but as a secondary machine for windows users, it could have a real place and quote at mash -able Raymond Wong is way more critical, giving it a three point, two, five stars out of five. He said the service go is painfully slow to us barely better than a net book quote. I've been struggling to figure out who Microsoft surface go is actually good for if you already own surface pro or any laptop y, would you buy a smaller tablet with huge Basil's that often chokes windows ten up due to its underpowered Intel Pentium processor? Why would you wanna type on a cramped a little keyboard, but then it hit me the answer's right in the name the surface go is good for when you're on the move. And that's really it. And quote, contrast that with Alex Krantz at Gizmodo who calls the surface, go practically perfect quote, if you have the money and you want a solid windows machine. That's primarily for browsing emailing and word processing the surface go, is it the device you need to by looking for a second computer? It's a no brainer. Splurge on this one. There might be faster budget, laptops, and there might be cheaper ones. But the surface go feels like a perfect representation of wet laptops at this price should be and quote. So I don't know. I have links to all the reviews and the show notes, I guess it's up to you to figure out who to believe. Tech main right home is sponsored by medal lab that alab is one of the few design agencies in the world that can take a product idea from end to end from napkin sketch to real shipped product. Let's look at medal apps work for Google. You've heard of amp, right? That framework that allows web content to load. Lightning-fast. Google came no medal app to create demos that showcased amps capabilities and showed developers what was possible with the technology. So meta lab created example sites, including four art.

Facebook Jackson Twitter Alex Stamos Raymond Wong Detroit Google Austin San Mateo Texas California Adjunct Professor Officer Stanford Alex Krantz London Basil Microsoft
"krantz" Discussed on Rocket

Rocket

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"krantz" Discussed on Rocket

"I love it when things are messy in growth exactly and in the in the words of alex krantz from gizmodo a friend of the of the show she she had a speed a few weeks ago when she was looking at one of the betas and she's like my blogs or beautiful and how and it was it was a i guess like safari and what would her stuff look like she was looking at blogs or beautiful now that's all i can think about whenever i think of darkness is my blog full now and okay i'm i'm happy for your dark mon i hope you will i hope you will reciprocate that happiness because i'm ecstatic about stacks this is d i wanted i take about nine trillion screen shots sometimes it's like i can't believe this person just sent me this email like show it to my whole team i i have screen shots on screen shots i guess like i wanted just to stack somewhere okay we all you yeah why don't you just change the location of where your screen saved well i could do that but then still have health folder full of screen shots and she'll about it no call your shots and it lives inside your dropbox which lived resign i have older and it's a bad place i mean gary bad place at you're not wrong i have i've a screen shots folder from montana mash bullets like seven gigabytes i mean it's like you've got slack up right in somebody's like your like in you see that screen shot and you're like oh i've got to show this to chris and then you just drag it down because it's right there on your desktop you can do it i like that and then you archive the older screen shots in the yes cream shop folder this is i mean look i excited about stacks i just am not someone who has to be just because when i do instead because i'm insane as i said i have the the custom location set within i have a us default folder ex an apt called default folder x by saint clair software which is an amazing app and it would it does adds additional things to the feinerman you so that you can set a default saving place with if you're in inside a specific applications every time.

alex krantz montana chris saint clair seven gigabytes
"krantz" Discussed on The Librocube

The Librocube

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"krantz" Discussed on The Librocube

"Did all the alternate shrines did the one that eventually krantz you the motorcycle the horse motorcycle yes when i told the talking to this to a friend of haute to the horses and such when i told him a motorcycle he'd for second i think he didn't believe me that i know blunders lego nothing's pretty cool made the last bottle of somewhat easier i would assume a speaking of last battle and sort of last section because i had sort of played so many hours in sort of building up my stats and such i had every single stamina wheel i had my heart's size you could get i had the ancient armor fully upgraded as is was go ahead great weapons i was just like soup to the nines i think that made the final battle pretty easy lica i didn't even die once i don't think or maybe i did once but i even had all the upgrades to all the divine beasts abilities lick lick i was a combat us so that last battle or of course with zelda game last series of battles wasn't crazy hard the hardest bottle ever did and the game was the first shrine i did the one in the camel thing that one was tough because i had sort of hadn't played that long and didn't get what i had to do so that one was our hardest one was the one to get the motorcycle you defy one of the guys at the end of shrines sort of wizened old things one of them sort of comes alive and you have to fight.

krantz
"krantz" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"krantz" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"Uhhuh which kind of plays with the idea of the rapture occurring in the aftermath of of thrasher and i wrote a book called the story of god in two thousand fifteen which kind of takes the character takes the bible from genesis to revelation and tracks in follows him throughout and tries to make sense of his strange behavior and now i've written a follow up to that were following him out of the bible and into the other books where he appears god is a great source for comedic material is he not i mean i guess we're talking in this case about the christian god or do you go broader is more like the everybody's god kind of thing i think it's the the abraham ic god is a tremendous character i think from his first appearance in the old testament he's really really hilarious because he he has behavior doesn't make sense from the start it's it's kind of self hating and self destructive and sometimes seems very foolish and disorganized he's very funny in the christian narrative he kinda disappears his son sorta takes over but he makes a grand reappearance in in the end in revelations in boy he's he's really hugely funny there i think he's really funny and the koran you have to you have to look at it in a certain way because the krantz kind of forbidding in a certain way but that he's coming back and wanting to try again i guess because he's failed i don't know why he thinks it's going to work this time but he tries again and then he makes just a a really really spectacular appearance in the book of mormon as more than appearance i mean he's back he's easy he's he's big you know he's he's a big star he's back and better than ever and he's hugely funny there and he's even funny in a in a really obscure esa teric book called the book of your answer i don't know if you've ever heard of it or rena wanna read it it's awful it's us.

krantz
"krantz" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"krantz" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"Republicans dammit krantz lock although i stabbed trump in the back for you straight as an anti trump or i love him now because i'm trying to get access to him and i know you're so stupid you don't know i was for crews and not for him you think i've been loyal to trump for years you'll people have no collective memory you don't even remember who in the radio business was bashing you and trump for your straight and now makes believe that he's the greatest boot licker he knows though don't think he doesn't know you know it's like santa claus he knows whether you've been good or bad believe me he knows if you go to bed trust me on that one because he's told me he remembers it was loyal to him one thing you can count on his he knows it was friends are and he also knows who the johnnycomelatelies are too and one of them who has allegedly a desk in the white house won't have one for too long i can i can predict that when i learned that that moron was dictating the tweets to him i said no wonder we're in trouble in this country a man with no education a man who is the most self serving person in the history of the media is the reckoning policy in this country no one were in such trouble maybe you ought to get someone around though as a little knowledge a little history little education a little poetry and so instead of a shell alien and a nail gun i say to myself but my grandfather my great grandfather would say michael that's not what you should be talking about what should i be looking at you're not talk show host greatgrandfather he's what do you mean talk show what do you do i see him on the radio and i write books.

trump krantz michael
"krantz" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"krantz" Discussed on WTMA

"Last person on earth who even thinks about this today you're going to hear about it because where i'm going to take the time clock the metronome the metronome has no email there's no email in the universe in which i'm currently functioning was speaking from there's no email is no television is there's nothing in that world that you would understand so i'm trying to talk to you from another dimension am i reaching anybody in this fallen universe of radio where i'm not supposed to go beyond let's say the parameters of today what are the parameters of today the barriers of the mind that i'm not supposed to work outside of lock her up euler coal me republicans dammit krantz locked up although i stamp trump in the back for a year straight as an anti trump i love him now because i'm trying to get access to him and i know you're so stupid you don't know i was for crews and not for him you think i've been loyal to trump for years you'll people have no collective memory you don't even remember who in the radio business was bashing you and trump for you straight and now makes believe that he's the greatest bootlicker he knows though don't think he doesn't know you know it's like santa claus he knows whether you've been good or bad believe me he knows if you go to bed trust me on that one because he's told me he remembers it was loyal to him one thing you can count on his he knows it was friends are also knows who the johnnycomelatelies clue and one of them who has allegedly a desk in the white house won't have one for too long i can i can predict that when i learned that that moron was dictating the tweets to him i.

krantz