35 Burst results for "Kqed"

Ida Updates: The Latest on the Storm's Aftermath in Louisiana

The Takeaway

01:15 min | 10 months ago

Ida Updates: The Latest on the Storm's Aftermath in Louisiana

"Hurricane Ida are now bringing intense rain and flood risk from Virginia into Maine. Louisiana, which took the full brunt of a Category four storm when it hit on Sunday, is still assessing the damages. Several people were killed and the death toll is expected to rise. The governor warning residents who fled the worst hit areas not to come back where there's still no basic infrastructure. President Biden has announced he's headed to New Orleans Friday to check out the damage he'll meet with state and local leaders. NPR's Debbie Elliott reports hundreds of thousands of people in Louisiana. Still have no electricity. The lights are back on for some in New Orleans, but much of the region remains without power, water, sewer and communication systems are also severely damaged. New Orleans has set up cooling stations to help residents cope with the heat and humidity. Makeshift distribution points are also handing out food, water and ice in the city and in harder hit parishes to the south and west. Meanwhile, search and rescue teams are working in flooded communities, and authorities are trying to get a handle on the scope of the destruction. Jefferson Parish officials, for instance, say the barrier island of Grand Isle is uninhabitable. Debbie

Hurricane Ida President Biden New Orleans Debbie Elliott Louisiana Maine Virginia NPR Jefferson Parish Grand Isle Debbie
Sweeping GOP Elections Bill Heads to Texas Gov. Greg Abbott's Desk

PBS NewsHour

00:19 sec | 10 months ago

Sweeping GOP Elections Bill Heads to Texas Gov. Greg Abbott's Desk

"GOP bill to rewrite the state's election laws is now headed to the governor's desk. Both the State House and Senate gave it final approval today. The bill will restrict voting hours and empower partisan poll watchers. Among other things, Governor Greg Abbott has said he will sign it into law.

GOP State House Senate Governor Greg Abbott
China Limits Children to 3 Hours of Online Gaming a Week

Here & Now

00:17 sec | 10 months ago

China Limits Children to 3 Hours of Online Gaming a Week

"Is imposing some of the harshest limits on Children and video games in the world, barring minors from playing online games for more than three hours a week. Starting Wednesday. Miners will only be allowed to play games online between eight and nine PM on Fridays, weekends and public

Biden Witnesses Dignified Transfer of Remains in Delaware Ceremony

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:16 sec | 10 months ago

Biden Witnesses Dignified Transfer of Remains in Delaware Ceremony

"Or in Dover, Delaware, where they're meeting with the families of military members killed at the Kabul airport last week. Next hour. They'll be on hand to witness a dignified transfer ceremony for the 13 service members remains. Israel says its warplanes

Kabul Airport Dover Delaware Israel
Afghanistan Updates: Bidens Attend Dignified Transfer of Troops at Dover

Weekend Edition Sunday

01:55 min | 10 months ago

Afghanistan Updates: Bidens Attend Dignified Transfer of Troops at Dover

"People ahead of a self imposed deadline to leave Afghanistan by Tuesday. They're continuing this operation after a terrorist attack last week that killed at least 170 Afghans and 13 American service members outside the Kabul airport. The US responded to that attack with a drone strike on Friday, targeting the terrorist group behind the attack and as president Biden was at Dover Air Force Base this morning to witness the dignified transfer of U. S Service members killed in Thursday's attack. Another U. S drone strike in Afghanistan struck another target, a vehicle seen as an imminent threat to the operation at the airport. So clearly, it has been a challenging week for President Biden. He had already been receiving criticism for how the evacuation was being handled. And that was before these latest events. We're joined now by NPR. White House correspondent Scott Detroit. Good morning, Scott. Hey, ask my good to be with you. Scott president, Biden said after the attack that the US withdrawal would continue. And that has indeed been the case. Yeah, that the attack has not changed the effort, and President Biden has repeatedly vowed that United States work evacuating Americans and Afghan partners will keep going. Look Missions there they performed is dangerous. Is, uh, now Come with a significant loss of American personnel. And it's a worthy mission because they continue to evacuate. Uh, folks out of that region out of the airport. The number evacuated now is now north of 113,000. There has been a lot of domestic and international pressure to continue operations past Tuesday's deadline for the US to withdraw from Afghanistan. Biden has insisted the operation is on pace to finish by then. And up. Until now, he has given no indication that that would continue into September. Scott what more can you tell us about the

President Biden Kabul Airport Afghanistan U. Dover Air Force Base Scott Detroit United States Scott Biden NPR White House
US Continues Airlift Amid High Threat in Afghanistan

All Things Considered

00:54 sec | 10 months ago

US Continues Airlift Amid High Threat in Afghanistan

"The Pentagon says the U. S. Is pressing ahead with its airlift at the Kabul airport despite concerns about another possible terrorist attack. As NPR's Greg Myre reports the military carried out a deadly drone strike in response to Thursday's airport bombing. The Pentagon says the airstrike in eastern Afghanistan killed two and wounded one member of Isis K, the group that claimed responsibility for the Kabul airport bombing two days earlier. Pentagon spokesman John Kirby says the risk US troops at the airport remains high. The threat stream is still active, still dynamic. We're still laser focused on that and force protection. Nearly 7000 evacuees flew out over the past day and many more have been processed and are set to leave at any time. The airlift has now taken out 117,000 evacuees this month, a figure similar to the entire population of Billings,

Pentagon Greg Myre Kabul Airport John Kirby Kabul U. NPR Afghanistan United States Billings
Biden Team Urges States to Quickly Distribute Rental Aid

Science Friday

00:51 sec | 10 months ago

Biden Team Urges States to Quickly Distribute Rental Aid

"The Biden administration is urging state and local leaders to give tenants a chance to apply for rental assistance before evicting them. As NPR's Laura Wang's Lee reports, the move follows the Supreme Court's decision. Block continuation of the CDCs temporary eviction Ben in a letter cabinet officials call on governors, mayors, county executives and court administrators to take action to prevent what they call unnecessary evictions. Among their recommendations are local pauses on evictions and requiring landlords to apply for emergency rental assistance before they file evictions. Tenant advocates say the message is a powerful nudge too many states and counties. Evictions are handled at the state and local level. $25 billion is available in federal rental assistance. But in many places that money has been slow to reach the renters and property owners who are

Biden Administration Laura Wang NPR Supreme Court LEE Cabinet BEN
Taliban Forces in Kabul Airport Ready to Take Over

All Things Considered

00:54 sec | 10 months ago

Taliban Forces in Kabul Airport Ready to Take Over

"To take full control of the airport in Kabul, once the U. S. Military pulls out of Afghanistan. That's according to Reuters news agency, NPR's Michele Kelemen reports, the State Department says it doesn't expect a functioning airport right away. The U. S has been talking to the Taliban, Qatar, Turkey and others to try to make sure there's a smooth handover of the airport in airfield, State Department spokesperson that price says it's in everyone's interests. That there be a functioning civilian airport with the U. S military set to depart by August 31st. I think that, um It is probably unreasonable to expect that there will be normal airport operations on September 1st. But he says the U. S and Allied Air traffic experts have been laying the groundwork for resumption of civilian air services as quickly as possible after the US leaves Michele Kelemen,

U. S. Military Michele Kelemen State Department U. Kabul NPR Reuters Afghanistan Qatar Taliban Turkey Allied Air Traffic United States
Biden Keeps to August 31 Deadline for Kabul Airlift

All Things Considered

02:02 min | 11 months ago

Biden Keeps to August 31 Deadline for Kabul Airlift

NRA Cancels Annual Meeting in Texas Due to COVID-19 Concerns

1A

01:01 min | 11 months ago

NRA Cancels Annual Meeting in Texas Due to COVID-19 Concerns

"Another setback. The powerful gun rights advocacy group has canceled its annual convention in Houston due to rising covid cases. It's the second year in a row that the organization has cancelled its popular members meeting due to the pandemic. NPR's Tim Mak has more. The NRA relies on its annual meeting to bring together its members, donors, staff and gun industry partners. But due to the covid pandemic, it has been unable to hold its annual convention since 2019, the attorney general of New York, has accused the group of financial malfeasance and is seeking to shut it down. And facing challenges to its very survival. The NRA made an unsuccessful bid for bankruptcy. Recent financial disclosures filed by the group show It's weakened state revenues for 2020 were significantly down from 2016. And the NRA spent just $239 million in 2020 compared to $419 million.04 years prior when it's spending helped propel Donald Trump to the presidency. Two MAC NPR

Tim Mak NRA NPR Houston New York Donald Trump
Maersk Makes $1.4 Billion Green Bet on Methanol-Fueled Ships

Morning Edition

00:42 sec | 11 months ago

Maersk Makes $1.4 Billion Green Bet on Methanol-Fueled Ships

Study Links Climate Change to Deadly Flooding in Germany and Belgium

Morning Edition

00:42 sec | 11 months ago

Study Links Climate Change to Deadly Flooding in Germany and Belgium

Vice President Harris Starts Asia Trip in Singapore

The World

01:43 min | 11 months ago

Vice President Harris Starts Asia Trip in Singapore

Fears Rise About Safety of Afghan Airport as U.S. Warns Americans to Stay Away

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:17 sec | 11 months ago

Fears Rise About Safety of Afghan Airport as U.S. Warns Americans to Stay Away

"With these headlines, thousands are still crowding. Kabul's airport is a Biden administration faces growing criticism about the U. S military withdrawal. Yesterday, President Biden pledged to bring all Americans Hall many promised to evacuate all of the Afghans who aided the US amid

Biden Administration Kabul President Biden Americans Hall U. United States
Biden Vows to Evacuate All Americans and Afghan Helpers

Forum

00:49 sec | 11 months ago

Biden Vows to Evacuate All Americans and Afghan Helpers

"He will get every American citizen who wants to leave out of Afghanistan, along with those who helped us forces were going to do everything, everything that we can to provide safe evacuation for our Afghan allies. Partners and Afghans who who who who might be targeted because of the Association of the United States. In an address to the nation today, Biden said, It's one of the largest most difficult airlifts in history and that the US has evacuated around 13,000 people from Afghanistan. Since the U. S military airlift began last Saturday. Biden is facing criticism for the way the withdrawal from the country is being handled amid video showing chaotic scenes from the Kabul airport. This is many people there say the Taliban is making it hard to get to the airport. College and

Association Of The United Stat Afghanistan Biden United States U. Kabul Airport Taliban
Remembering Japanese Martial Arts Star Sonny Chiba

All Things Considered

01:45 min | 11 months ago

Remembering Japanese Martial Arts Star Sonny Chiba

"Sonny Chiba was a prolific actor known for his Japanese martial arts movies. His movements were brutal his facial expressions fearsome as he punched and kicked his way through more than 100 films. CIPA died this week in a hospital in Japan due to complications from Covid 19. He was 82. NPR's Andrew Lim bahng has this appreciation. You know how in the movie pulp fiction Samuel L. Jackson has that big speech that goes and I will strike down upon the with great vengeance and few well writer and director Quentin Tarantino Cryptid from a 1973 Sonny Chiba movie known in the U. S, as the bodyguard and they shall know that I am Cuba. The body. God when I shall lay my vengeance upon them, their chief of plays a vigilante who shares his name pummeling Japan's drug overlords. She was follow up movie was 1974. The street fighter is big international debut and of violent and bloody one at that scenes like the one where he punches the guy so hard on the head that the movie cuts to an X ray shot of his skull cracking and then back to the guy spurting blood earned the street fighter and X rating in the U. S senate. Chiba was born in 1939. He studied martial arts and started working on screen for a Japanese Kids TV show. He went on to have a prolific career in action movies and TV shows in Japan, and he got wider recognition in the U. S. When Tarantino continue to pay tribute by casting him as retired swordsmith Hattori Hanzo in the Kill bill movies. You My 70, he grads you need to have to enhance his Stu. For many fans of the genre. Sonny Chiba sits comfortably at the top of a mountain of broken

Sonny Chiba Andrew Lim Bahng Quentin Tarantino Cryptid Cipa Japan Samuel L. Jackson NPR Cuba Chiba U. Hattori Hanzo Senate Tarantino
Florida Orders School Boards to Relax Mask Rules or Risk Pay

Here & Now

00:25 sec | 11 months ago

Florida Orders School Boards to Relax Mask Rules or Risk Pay

"Are threatening to withhold funds equal to the salaries of school board. Members of school districts in two counties don't immediately do away with strict mask mandates. Today, those school boards received a warning from the state Board of Education, giving them 48 hours to walk back their decisions to require masks for all students. The CDC says Florida is adding an average of about 20,300 new coronavirus infections per day.

Board Of Education CDC Florida
U.S. To Recommend COVID Vaccine Boosters After 8 Months

PBS NewsHour

00:14 sec | 11 months ago

U.S. To Recommend COVID Vaccine Boosters After 8 Months

"Are expected to recommend covid booster shots for everyone, regardless of age. An announcement could come tomorrow, calling for boosters eight months after the second dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines.

Pfizer Moderna
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"On KQED newsroom California records its first death from the corona virus and governor Gavin Newsom declares a state of emergency to contain its spread plus health care workers on the frontline of treating coronavirus patients how protected and prepared are they to fight the illness also Joe Biden won big on super Tuesday but Bernie Sanders is projected to win the most delegates in California we'll take a look at the race and other key local and statewide contests good evening and welcome to KQED newsroom I'm Priya David Clemens we begin tonight with a look at the corona virus outbreaks in California and the U. S. this week governor Gavin Newsom declared a state of emergency to obtain federal aid to contain the spread of the respiratory illness and mayor London breed announced two novel coronavirus cases in San Francisco also an elderly resident plaster county died from the virus the first such death in the state the man who died had returned from a cruise to Mexico when he started experiencing symptoms there are now at least sixty confirmed cases of coronavirus in California second only to Washington state where at least fourteen people have died joining me now is KQED science reporter Leslie the clerk Leslie thank you for being with me today let's start with this cruise ship the man who died had just been on a cruise that went to Mexico came back disembarked all the passengers and then picked up another twenty five hundred passengers went on to Hawaii on the way back passenger started complaining of flu like symptoms things that seem similar to cope at nineteen so the ship is now off shore and people are being tested on board tell me about that testing and also about the risk to those who weren't showing symptoms yes parajumpers came in yesterday and help public officials lower off the helicopter in land ownership and I saw videos of that and it was interesting to see a ship that was completely empty of next to the pool so all of those people are in their state rooms right now until we have more information about the test results they're getting you know room service and and staying inside watching television hopefully and staying away from each other and so until we have more test results we won't know how many people were infected hopefully like you said that person was on a previous voyage not on this voyage but it's there's a chance that people on this voyage could have been infected because people who are on the previous voyage that went to Mexico some of those are on this voice of sixty people who are on their way to Mexico are now went to Hawaii and came back to the ship it's likely that there's some contamination we won't know until those test results come back and how many tasks are being performed so last night the grand prince or the princess cruises which is the a parent company of the grand princess said that forty five people were tested and those people were chosen because they demonstrate a flu like symptoms they were coughing or sneezing or there were people around them who it were in close contact that could have been exposed princess cruise line this is the same cruise line that had a ship that was off the coast of Japan with a lot of cases we had more than seven hundred passengers and crew members who tested positive within three thousand within three thousand a large number of six have died from that number is there something particular about this cruise line or could this have happened on with any ship company this kind of happen on any ship really so you this disease is transmitted vis vis a close contact most of the people who are getting sick or inside a house with someone else who is sick so it's transmitted via coughs and sneezes maybe touching the same surfaces think about a cruise ship like a big house with a bunch of passengers who are in the same buffet line they're sitting next to each other on the pool they're touching the same handrails eccentric and so a cruise ship is kind of like a Petri dish for a virus to really go viral amongst the passengers and potentially in fact a lot of people so this could have happened on any large vessel okay governor Gavin Newsom declared a state of emergency for California and that gives us access to more resources in federal funding it also helps to curb price gouging you know during the press conference he held up this bottle of hand sanitizer and said it was going for seventeen dollars which seems outrageous one of the things that really was of no to me in that press conference about the state of emergency is that the term goes all the way through September which seems to indicate a long term response absolutely we can be in this for for quite awhile so typically a.

California KQED governor Gavin
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:44 min | 2 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The KQED dot org I'm gonna go do you guy on prop thirteen biggest school bond in history we talked about it on form and went down to defeat well it's not looking we shouldn't have it's called we shouldn't call it yet but it's it's it's not looking good so far for proposition thirteen the school bond we were just talking before we went on a real curious I don't doubt there's any exit polling on the statewide ballot measure but curious the effect of the historical nineteen seventy eight proposition thirteen on voters minds as they went to the poll for this pretty much unheralded school bond we may never know confuse the prop thirteen so it happened even when we covered it on the air here I mean yeah I mean it it's it's I don't know how to handle something like understandable hard hard to measure I would say that the all indications are that as more votes come in this we'll get closer but I think it will be I mean it will take days before we figure out exactly how close the yes I can get yeah Michael just for them to contact us I'm hearing from folks who are much better at the mouth and I am that there could be as many as almost half of Balasore standing up to five million one point two of those and I'll let alone potentially maybe more than that and only so I think property in wouldn't be superstar this morning if I was the governor of their supporters but it's also not a done deal and I think to that point like we have to be careful on even in the presidential race the delegate count mass could change you know relatively dramatically depending on how much closer Biden gets in that looks like a you know if if if labor doesn't even hit that fifteen percent threshold right is that fifty percent threshold is both at the statewide level to get state delegates but then you have to start doing the math in every single congressional district to see who gets fifteen percent of someone falls below then you have to re divide those delegates wrestling me ask you about some of the local propositions here in San Francisco proposition a and B. actually were approved he I think didn't get approved and let let's sort this out because a lot of people at this point the tax on vacant storefronts D. is too close to call but we do know some results yeah so it is looking like voters in San Francisco were very friendly to bond managers compared to the state what about earthquake safety concern about Ruth right quick safety willing to go for that you're right that also the this measure that would essentially cap with the amount of new development of office space sort of by comparing it to how much affordable housing is being built that also looks like it's it's doing pretty well and then the vacant storefront measure property of those results for you guys yeah so the vacant storefronts neat is because it is a new tax will need a two thirds vote so that sixty eight percent yes right now generally if the trend would be as more late votes come in the more progress assigned this case the yes side would move towards higher threshold so we might see that sixty eight grow into sixty nine and seventy and the days to come put it a little more safely ahead of the two thirds it needs to pass but right now it's still within kind of a point and a half smart train needs two thirds two and Friday and that is not gonna get two thirds that's wave below that and really up I a significant blow to that entire train system as our transportation editor Dan brekkie has been detailing throughout the morning this was an extension of the sales tax that between system hope to get and now will need to look at potentially going back to the ballot or maybe even making some budget cuts in the short term okay let me go to some listener questions that are coming in Terry wants to know how much your panel compare enthusiasm for Biden versus Hillary is there a risk of another democratic loss with the white rust belt and working class I mean this is the question Mike this is the key question the democratic voters have been grappling with her last year which is who's gonna both excite the base and help flip back of those key battleground states that trump won and I mean I don't have a crystal ball so I don't know but I'm I do he doesn't have the end of this that there was against Hillary number one and he also has a much stronger union force behind it yeah and I think his strength you know in places like South Carolina where if black voters who are such an important constituency for Democrats is important and I think it speaks to you know like you can't paint this bite in victory is just the quote unquote establishment of like white rich people at the DNC we are calling on to victory but I hold on a second because there are some who was saying it was a kind of this establishment conspiracy of that wing of the Democratic Party to see it was a Bernie Sanders did not get the nomination okay but I mean tell that to the millions of people that voted for divide and I think I mean it we can have an argument all day and obviously the democratic establishment does not want to see or most of the Bernie Sanders win this nomination but that doesn't mean that you know the process was rigged I mean you're allowed to endorse people to make it just as well I know you didn't give us on that side yeah and I'm seeing those but I also think that you know to your point about Hillary Clinton it's a long a long road to November and we've already seen Republicans in Congress things are going to launch an investigation into the bidens in the Ukraine stuff we already see the trump campaign really trying to dig in and and hit him for what they see as you know his meandering comments and confusion and things like that so I do think that it's it's early yet to make to say definitively as here Clinton Clinton right here but the fact of matter is Hillary Clinton probably couldn't rally black voters away Joe Biden seems to be rolling well yeah I mean she had some baggage but some of that baggage you know Biden has as well but obviously there's a lot of affinity for him that maybe that what did not exist for Hillary Clinton but you know I think comparing twenty sixteen to twenty twenty.

KQED
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Looks like we'll have some clouds overnight with lows in the mid thirties to mid forties tomorrow mostly cloudy day temperatures ranging from the mid fifties to about sixty degrees you're listening to KQED public radio it's seven thirty two on the mon once again tragedy plus time with this one's called but we are happy here I'm standing at the kitchen sink with an old tooth brush and a bottle of dish soap having the most intense deja vu something in the dryer put grease streaks on my clean clothes and I'm attempting describe a particularly pesky one out of my favorite dress my mom.

KQED
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Dot com and the listeners of KQED cloudy today temperatures in the upper fifties sunshine tomorrow this is weekend edition from NPR news I'm laid off all that we've been talking about the targeted assassination of top Iranian general Qassem Soleimani the mastermind of Iran's regional security policy the implications of his killing are roiling the region in Iran mourners filled the streets on Friday that was the sound of people chanting in can mine silly monies hometown but who is this man and why is his killing raising fears of open war between a global superpower the United States and a regional one Iran to help us understand it Robert Ford joins us he served as a diplomat in Iraq for five years and later as ambassador to Syria he's currently a senior fellow at the Middle East institute ambassador for thank you for joining us my pleasure nice to be with you so you served in Baghdad as Slimani rose to its shadow we powerful general that wielded series influence in Iraq now this is solely on it though just a by product of American foreign policy the Iraq war well I still have money in fact began his career fighting for the Iran military in the Iran Iraq war of the nineteen eighties and he then rose to prominence within the Iranian security establishment but it is by no means a by product of some American policy in the Middle East here's the by product of the Iranian government's desire to expand its influence in the region and a lot of the opening for that influence in Iraq in Syria people will look to the Iraq war and the opening that happened there as a reason for it now questionably the American invasion of Iraq in two thousand and three was a mistake which Iran exploited but I think it's important to remember that Saddam's government itself was suffering under sanctions imposed by the international community and so Iran always had some leverage against Saddam Hussein and in addition Qassem Soleimani exploited a long standing alliance with the government of Syria in Damascus not white is Solomon he's killing just a reminder that this was a military official from a nation state assassinated by a US drone why does it raise such fears of further destabilization in the Middle East among some the concern is that because Qassem Soleimani was so high up in the Iranian government many people scribing him as the second most powerful man in the Iranian government that Iran feel obliged sooner or later to retaliate sharply now he's the man who commanded Iran's proxies in the region right for people who might not know when we speak about Iran's proxies who are those proxies and what was silly money's role there well they are predominantly non and Carly but predominantly malicious immobilize from Shia communities in countries such as Lebanon in Syria and Iraq and it's in those communities which the Iranian revolutionary guard corps and people like Qassem Soleimani and his successor general Connie they have been able immobilize them so that the Iranians don't use Iranian soldiers they use these fighters from a sheer communities in this country going forward what are you watching for in the immediate days ahead I'm watching the reaction in Iraq where we have five thousand American soldiers I'm watching to see if the Iraqi parliament meets and decides to pass legislation obliging the Iraqi government to expel those five thousand American soldiers and that would be a huge setback for the bilateral American Iraqi relationship that would be the first if you will casual eighty of the American strike that's retired ambassador Robert Ford thank you so much as my pleasure I dispute over accusations of racism has erupted within the romance writers of America the industry group which represents nearly ten thousand writers romance despite.

KQED
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And the listeners of KQED a couple of months ago the government blacklisted Chinese companies that use surveillance technology to target Muslim Uighur explicitly mandate we are analytics saying we're going to set up a security camera system and is to be able to detect whether people are wearing sunglasses household they are whether they are we I results surveillance sanctions next time on market place market place just one chance to hear it today that's at four o'clock this afternoon because it's Friday so that means will have the California report magazine the full half hour show that comes your way at four thirty six thirty and eleven PM each Friday I'm as housing is sitting in for semi autos this morning good morning we have traffic coming up and also the California report that's coming up soon it's KQED public radio's morning edition from NPR news on David green that I'm Stephen skip the farming economy had a terrible two thousand nineteen many small farmers face rising debts and gut wrenching decisions of whether to close businesses they've on for generations Stacey panic Smith reports for NPR's the indicator from planet money two thousand nineteen was a hard year for farmers small farms have been hit incredibly hard by a combination of the trade war with China extreme weather and increasingly competitive and global industry the government has stepped in with subsidies for some farmers but in spite of that the debt level of American farmers is at an all time high and the number of farmers who are delinquent on their loans is on the rise Alanis Emile's isn't economics correspondent for time magazine short story recently about what's happening to the world economy and farming right now think about the two thousand people tell me that was kind of the golden age of modern farming in that commodity prices are going up it was kind of this boom time and then in two thousand thirteen they basically ended commodity prices went down two big reasons one farms are getting a lot more efficient every year you can produce a lot more on the same land and a lot more farms entered the kind of global market place yeah I mean and you talk about the the debt level for farmers yeah so right now it's an all time high which is it's I think that four hundred sixteen billion dollars it was up really high in a eighties a lot of people lost their farms we're not seeing prices go up so how are they going to pay that debt off in her story I wanna visited a particularly hard hit area in Wisconsin a town called Fremont where she met with the Richmond family I called merry Rickman to ask her about her farm we have a small dairy farm my husband is a fourth generation on this farm I've been on here sixty years I imagine you've seen all kinds of cycles the price of milk was up and down hello what's the price right now right now it's eighteen something and for a hundred pounds melt enough to make a profit now maybe for the great big farmers but not for the small farmers and it only keeps on adding often adding up and it's just like all my gosh is part of this like that some of the trade war stuff for yeah it is in other countries is used to buy so now they're not buying it no they're not so prices have gone down the tool we're just gonna keep on struggling and struggling on tells there is nothing left to struggle for anymore because this is our home how do you kind of get through moments like this well if they have been just great wherever you can make a penny and me in a little bit I mean now we we don't do a Christmas gifts or anything for last three years what we do on non Christmas Eve there's we all get together as a family just visit and have a lunch together yeah well that's as much as what we can do time magazine's Lana Samuels says the decline of small farms like the Rickman's is killing rural communities as businesses close and tax revenues decline and Alanis as perhaps more seriously the.

KQED
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is KQED this is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm ari Shapiro and I'm Audie Cornish president trump's new national security adviser warns that China is coming for your personal information Robert o'brien says if you think Facebook and Google no lot about you it could be worse that's the reason he says he's trying to convince key allies to stay away from the Chinese telecom company Huawei here to talk about this warning is NPR's a White House correspondent Franco during is welcome back thank you all right meeting a dark picture here can you be specific about the danger he's talking about yeah well where is this Chinese tech company that has close ties to the Chinese communist government they make cell phones but they also build these highly specialized equipment for five G. networks their marketing their goods to the world but Robert o'brien is questioning why some allies would even consider allowing while weigh in at all I spoke to a Brian on the sidelines of the Reagan national defense forum in California he warns that it will open up back door for the Chinese government to access their most sensitive data to every medical record every social media post every email every financial transaction of every citizen in the country with cloud computing and an artificial intelligence can be sucked up out of Wall way into mass of servers in China given the stakes here is this avoidable well the trump administration has taken steps to block while way in other companies with ties to the Chinese government from U. S. systems the concern is about countries that accept walk away as a partner o'brien says that the United States is going to be very wary of sharing intelligence with countries that use walk away and yet it's been difficult to persuade allies to do the same how come well frankly because it's so cheap western companies like Nokia and Ericsson and Qualcomm they simply can't offer the same prices and still turn a profit now I should say that Australia New Zealand Japan they agreed to block walk away but other countries other allies like Canada and Britain said they're open to allowing the company to build some of their networks in kind of less sensitive areas again o'brien says they're taking a great rest these are very serious questions are being asked it's great to get a discount it's great to get something for free but at the end of the day there really isn't yeah it really isn't free there's no free lunch he says allies need to think about the long term consequences how is president trump talking about this with those allies trump talk to leaders last week when he was in London for the NATO summit he talked about this but he also downplayed the chances that he would be able to convince everybody well I'm not working very hard on that but I do think it's a security risk.

KQED ari Shapiro Audie Cornish NPR five G
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:25 min | 3 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Connected it's KQED public radio live from NPR news in Washington I'm Jeanine Herbst the commerce department says the US economy slowed in recent months to two point one percent growth in the second quarter and here's Chris Arnold has more the tribe administration has been emboldened by stronger growth in twenty eighteen of about three percent attributing that to the Republican tax cuts and other policies but studies have been finding that the tax cuts didn't do that much to boost the economy in part because most of the benefit went to wealthy people in corporations who don't spend that extra money the same way that lower and middle income people what many economists are predicting that the economy will continue to revert to more of a whole com rate of growth closer to percent but either way the economy is still growing Chris Arnold NPR news reaction is coming in on news the federal government will resume executing death row prisoners for the first time since two thousand three the justice department to schedule the execution of five federal death row inmates who were convicted of murdering children and the elderly but professor Rory little of the university of California says the morning moratorium was put in place because of worries over racial disparity the number of African Americans far outnumbers their percentage in the general population same is true on federal death row with regard to people from Hispanic backgrounds he still uses it will challenge the justice department's decision well Sir it's trading higher this hour the dollars of twenty one the nasdaq is up seventy nine you're listening to NPR news from Washington from the KQED news in San Francisco I'm Brian what the battle over vehicle tailpipe emissions between the state of California in the trump administration is taking a new turn governor Gavin Newsom announced a deal yesterday with four major automakers Ford Honda BMW and Volkswagen to manufacture cleaner and more efficient cars by twenty twenty five KQED science editor Craig Miller says there are likely other issues at play here many suspect that the real agenda that the trump administration has here is to override California's ability to set its own regulations this is a special right that the state has had for many many years it wants desperately to hold on to that and that could be actually the end game is you know who's going to be in charge here is it going to be the federal regulators or can states do what they feel like they need to do K. Q. E. T.'s Craig Miller members of the no new SF jail coalition are urging San Francisco supervisors to take immediate steps to shut down the jail at the city's hall of justice the group of activists successfully fought plans to build a new jail Muhammad Sheikh says the city should focus instead on mental health services bail reform and other priorities alternative actually benefit the community not when just applied to those inside with lower level offenses or even those that are not yet convicted but even those who are in for more serious charges to supervisors met Haney and Hillary ronin have expressed support for the initiative I'm Brian white KQED news support comes from Oakland International Airport with nonstop flights to six European capitals including Paris Copenhagen in Rome on the next fresh air who is the greatest.

Washington Jeanine KQED NPR three percent one percent
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:31 min | 3 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The generation of inventors more information is available and Lemelson dot org and you our listeners of KQED your bay area whether we'll have sunshine today and they're saying that it's hot but it's still be warm inland we can expect highs ranging from the sixties at the coast seventies around the bay eighties as well and the low nineties further inland offer safe haven the judge wrote that the government's decision to promulgate the rule was capricious and arbitrary that's because it would expose migrants to violence and abuse in those third countries and possibly deliver them right back into the hands of their persecutors legal learnt is the ACLU lawyer who argued the case yesterday those countries do not have fully functioning asylum systems so the administration's premise that if you really need asylum you would simply applying Guatemala Mexico is not true it's too dangerous for them to apply there so that's why yes but people have to come to the US to seek refuge the judge also said it's Congress's job to make asylum laws not the white house's and this I understand was one of two dueling rulings on the same question right from obstacles exactly on Wednesday morning another federal judge Timothy Kelly there in the district of Columbia ruled the other way he gave a courtroom victory to president trump who appointed him the judge tiger was appointed by Obama Kelly in DC agreed with justice department lawyers the quote it's in the greater public interest to allow the administration to carry out its immigration policy so in the same day you have the White House congratulating judge Kelly for shutting down quote opportunistic claims by those who want to exploit our asylum system and then a few hours later here comes judge Tigers opinion his injunction applies nationwide so judge Kelly's favorable ruling is dead in the water what's the administration's in all of this I mean what is the gist of their argument here will Rachel the White House is alarmed at what they call the ongoing crisis at the border what bugs trump is that asylum officers let most applicants enter the U. S. and wait here for months or years for their day in immigration court that's created a backlog of nearly a million cases today and yet they point to the fact that eight out of ten people who ask for asylum are ultimately denied because they don't meet the definition of fleeing persecution immigrant advocates countered that these people are fleeing genuinely dangerous circumstances in their home countries and they deserve due process and refuge this is become a pattern the right the ministration rolls out some big plan to curtail asylum and then the court's knock it down yeah the commissioner of customs and border protection mark Morgan told NPR last week they were actually expecting an injunction to suspend the new asylum rule I mean just look at the administration's track record so many of trump's immigration initiatives have ended up on hold in court last year trump tried to block asylum seekers who entered the country illegally between ports of entry and this same California judge John tiger told the administration you can't do that the government is appealing that case and that's exactly what we expect in this case DOJ will appeal to the ninth circuit and the wheels of justice will grind on number that he's in pure southwest correspondent covering immigration John thanks thanks Rachel this is NPR news coming up this morning on forum nine o'clock foreman tax the former special counsel Robert Muller is testimony Wednesday before the house judiciary and intelligence committees and then a ten other Peter owner joins the show to share his new short story collection called Maggie brown and others and then a ten thirty the California wine industry is being hit hard by Chinese terrace form discusses how the US Chinese trade wars affecting local vendors that's form beginning at nine it is time to take a look at our freeways and the complete with John McConnell it's pretty.

KQED
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Here on KQED support for KQED comes from the Bernardo sure foundation supporting higher education in the arts and support for masters of scale on KQED comes from Pacific office automation masters of scale hosted by linked in co founder and Greylock partner Reid Hoffman shows how successful company scale testing reads theories with legendary leaders airs tonight at eight support for NPR comes from this station and from the Gruber family foundation supporting NPR's efforts to promote deeper thinking broader perspectives and trusted fact based information always with the goal of creating a more informed public from the chrisley foundation expanding opportunities in America's cities through grant making and social investing more it crazy dot org then from the John S. and James L. knight foundation helping NPR advance journalistic excellence in the digital age back now to your calls and comments about the molar hearings from today still joined by Garrett graph the author of the threat matrix inside Robert molars F. B. I. and the war on global terror very mixed opinions from several of you about whether today's hearings were worth it Nikki in center city Minnesota rights today's hearings were very helpful because the issues that would come out if we had an impeachment were today made very public with the large attentive audience Robert wrote on our Facebook page this did not move the needle at all both sides got their sound bites both sides already made up their minds and independence are just sick of it all still time to get in a few more of your calls eight five five two three six one eight one a remember you can always leave us your calls and voice mails on that line including your suggestions for what you'd like us to discuss on this program eight five five two three six one a one.

KQED co founder Reid Hoffman NPR Gruber family foundation chrisley foundation America John S. Nikki Robert partner James L. knight Garrett Minnesota Facebook
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:55 min | 3 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Doing what they love on KQED NPR with your news headlines now at five thirty live from NPR news in Washington I'm David Mattingly congressional negotiators have reached a two year budget agreement with president trump and P. R. Susan Davis says the spending plan tops one point three trillion dollars it'll raise the debt limit the nation's borrowing authority until the end of July of twenty twenty one well past the twenty twenty elections it also said spending levels for defense and domestic programs for the next two years with the goal of preventing anymore government shutdowns during that time house passage is expected this week followed by the Senate next week retired US Supreme Court justice John Paul Stevens will be laid to rest today at Arlington National Cemetery Stevens died last week at age ninety nine following a stroke NPR's winter Johnston has more family friends and dignitaries gathered in the great hall of the Supreme Court on Monday to pay their final respects justice Elena Kagan who replaced Stevens in two thousand ten took part in a brief ceremony honoring his life and legacy he thought that no person however high and mighty was above the law and he insisted that the law and the legal system treat every person however weak or defenseless with dignity and with fairness in his thirty five years on the bench Stevens became one of the high court's leading liberals wins our Johnston NPR news Washington this is NPR news from Washington it's morning edition on KQED I'm Brian white fifty years ago today the USS Hornet was nine hundred miles southwest of Hawaii preparing to recover the Apollo eleven astronauts upon their return to earth today the aircraft carrier is docked in Alameda and is open to the public as a museum we sent science reporter Daniel vent in there to learn about the day when we welcomed our first moon walkers home eleven at this point in our in June nineteen sixty nine John McLaughlin was a swimmer a navy frogmen one of the precursors to the seals he never expected it would be his specialty to pluck astronauts out of the ocean who just landed back on earth somebody just said you know you're going to do it it was the job of the we took it very seriously and it was fun the USS Hornet made the Apollo eleven recovery but the assignment was kind of a fluke it was just in the right place at the right time the only aircraft carrier that was either going to Vietnam were being replenished repaired was horrified to just come back story and Bob fish is the expert on the Apollo eleven recovery he says the Hornet crew had just gotten home after a six month tour when they were told to go get the astronauts home some crew members were tired but soon they realize their ship was about to be the center of attention Paulson around is changed please contact your going to land on the moon in the presence gonna be here yeah they had about a month and a half to prepare for the mission astronaut recovery is a high stakes affair with an intricate choreography following the incredibly risky lunar landing and take off everyone wanted to make sure the Apollo astronauts had a picture perfect finish they practiced again and again and again it was tedious it was dangerous they had to repeat everything over and over and over the horn to twenty six simulated recovery exercises before they actually cover the parliament the swimmers McLaughlin included had to jump out of helicopters and swim to mock up command module the first winner would attach an anchor another would jump out swim up and attach an inflatable rims that the astronauts would step out onto in there was a separate Schwimmer on Apollo eleven that brought the the contamination suits and income to wash them down and to make sure no no insurance got around after getting sprayed down in bleach the astronauts would climb into a net shaped like a chair to be hoisted into the helicopter hovering overhead the simulations didn't always go as planned they could be downright dangerous we jumped in and we jumped into probably thirty to fifty sharks they were I mean the water was just kind of boiling so we just swam like hell and account of our lucky stars but the morning of the real recovery was shark free McLaughlin and the rest of the recovery team started off for the expected splashed on site about an hour before sunrise at report stage craft right on target point remember we saw the fireball is the command all Jewish reentering arctic report error bars one has visual contact yeah that was that was very exciting we thought we were ready but you see on that more that that got the heart beat going a little faster a few minutes.

NPR KQED three trillion dollars thirty five years fifty years six month two years two year
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:45 min | 3 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Around the bay expect more upper eighties to low nineties inland this is KQED FM this is fresh air I'm Terry gross breakthroughs in heart medicine including surgical procedures devices and medications have changed how various forms of heart disease are treated and enabled many people to live longer lives we're going to hear about some of those new developments from Haidar verite author of the new book state of the heart exploring the history science and future of cardiac disease we're also going to talk about cholesterol and blood pressure for H. previously joined us to talk about his book modern death how medicine changed the end of life he's a cardiologists too began his medical training in Pakistan where he's from and continued his training in cardiology at Harvard Medical School and Duke University in September he joins the faculty of Brigham and women's hospital and Harvard Medical School and the Boston vis a doctor harder variety welcome back to fresh air you write that during the time that you were a medical student you saw so many changes in heart medicine and technology tell us about one that you think is most significant survivors of of when I was a medical resident up at the Beth Israel deaconess Medical Center in Boston this is around the time when a new device had just started to be used in clinical practice that I had really never heard about before and this is a device called a left ventricular assist device and really what it is is it is a mechanical pump that can be sown directly right into the patient's heart and basically takes over the pumping function of of the heart and I know when this program started there is a specific role of in the hospital in the wards where these patients would be taken care of and at least initially residents were not even allowed to take care of these patients so that they had this aura this this mystery to them but the interesting thing about this therapy is that it it it fundamentally changes so many other things what we consider to be an out of key fundamental principles of being a human being so you know these patients who had these mechanical pumps and they didn't have a pulse if you'll perform CPR on them it could actually do more harm than good and these patients were basically dependent on their batteries for their life so this was such a dramatic departure from really any type of other medical intervention that I'd ever even heard about which it which is you know part of the reason why actually pursued this and now actually specialize in taking care of these patients yes and you described this device which is at an elevated which stands for left ventricular assist device how you describe it as representing the dawn of a new era in human life the union of man and machine because you're totally on the machine I mean every second of the day but really the idea of like no pulse I can't it's a car for me to conceive of that I mean it's hard as a physician I mean checking someone's pulse is part of the you know the one of those are your Esther and oldest rituals in medicine when you come up to someone you shake their hands and your examine them and almost always start by checking the polls and the rest and the other thing that happens in these patients is that if you put a stethoscope to their chest usually you'll hear the you know the caliber of the heart kind of you know running away as it has been since you know we were in our mother's womb but you don't really here the heart sounds all you hear is this mechanical pump and a whirring away pushing blood to every part of the body it it really is a surreal experience the first time and you experience a patient with an L. bad as a physician and I can't even imagine what it must be like to have one why don't you have a pulse when your blood is being pumped by the L. that device so the reason we have a pulse is because the heart beats rhythmically in a beat by beat and with every beat it sends a pulsation through the body that can be felt as the polls but the vat the motor is just continues so there is some because it's continuous there's no pulsation to be felt in most not pumping it's a continuous flow is a continuous flow isn't another strange thing about this device and again I found this really hard to imagine you write about a patient whose device was still pumping blood even though the patient had died so you know that they're really a a great therapy I've I've seen them really transform some patients lives I allowed a lot of patience to you know live parts of their life that they may never have been able to being able to attend grandchildren's graduations apartments was or do really really important things that they would not have been able to work on for the device but it but it does in some ways represent a turning point and what it means to be human you know I I I think you'll you'll you look at TV and you know everyone is talking about this distant future in which will be trans human but if you're a cardiologists like me and you take care of these patients with bad you know the trans humanism has arrived and it affects us and specially for these patients were dependent on these machines it's it's central part of their life but not just your life but also at the end of their life so one of the things that allowed to make a bit hard is that you know the deal that separates the heart from the rest of the body because the the of the rest of your body still mortal while the L. that in some ways has removed that feature from your heart because it'll keep pumping as long as it has power and has a battery life so when patients do in fact pass away it may be that their L. that is still functioning and it has to be it has to be turned off which is again something that is so foreign to really anything else that I had ever done but it is a really important part of taking care of these patients a lot of patients who get L. bads they they get it and if those things will stay in them until they pass away there's another breakthrough in heart medicine that happen while you were a medical student in fact you witnessed it I'm thinking of aortic valve surgery you observe the first time a trance catheter aortic valve was placed in a patient in a minimally invasive procedure so like what was tell tell tell us about this procedure so so one of the things that is a disease that's fairly common is called your external assisted the the arctic valve is the last day door that the blood has to leave before it leaves the heart and enters the rest of the body starting with the order of it is the big greatest vessel in your in your body over time this valve can sometimes get they can and it can basically because an obstruction of blood flow basically raising the pressure that is that is needed for blood to leave the heart and then it can be a fatal diagnosis and initially in before like nineteen fifties we really didn't have any treatment for it but then the serve revolution in cardiac surgery meant that now people who had aortic stenosis especially if it was severe it could be repaired with surgery but then starting in Europe physicians and researchers started to think about you know how can we do this better how can we help patients with aortic stenosis without having to necessarily cut their chest open you can replace the arctic valve without doing surgery through small catheters that are inserted through your leg or other blood vessel and its transformed the treatment of the arctic valves surgery and I was a researcher in up in Boston when one of the first few of these devices were ever implanted at the United States and I and I don't think anyone could have ever imagined at that point just how revolutionary this treatment might be in fact the most famous tower patient is actually Mick Jagger he just had his he had in a severe aortic stenosis and he under vent tower Sir travel this type of procedure and within days of this he shared this video and put her in which he was back at you know doing his act dancing and in fact he was back during a concert just a few days ago and this was unimaginable on imaginable I would say even you know in a few years ago that we would be able to transform treatment in a way that no one could have really imagine and these for the this is what's really one of the really interesting things about hard diseases that even though it doesn't get as much attention as so many other diseases the the advances that we have seen and the advances that you keep seeing in this area are just extremely fascinating and to me represents the pinnacle one of the pinnacles of human achievement there are several heart procedures now that used to be much more difficult and risky and now they're minimally there like minimal invasive procedures but by pass surgery I hasn't really come very far in the past decade or so I mean doctor still have to cut the chest open and saw through the the breast bone and but the heart and the heart lung machine I mean it still seems like such a really difficult procedure for the patient I mean it is a difficult procedure it it has gotten better over time and of but but again I in in one of the patients that I spoke to who had had by pass surgery I mean he described to me what it felt like when he woke up and it was it it I guess I mean the amount of pain that he had for the for even that you know adequate pain control it's still not enough it is a it is a it is still a it is a big deal and we haven't really seen we've seen incremental progress in bypass surgery that has helped you know improve outcomes but you haven't seen dramatic you know a dramatic shift in how the procedures performed what we have seen is now a lot more patients who may have gotten bypass surgery a few decades ago now they get coronary stents which are really minimally invasive and at least for many cases have provide patients outcomes as good if not at times better better than bypass surgery well I want to talk with you about stands a little later right now we have to.

KQED
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:31 min | 3 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Listeners of KQED we'll have sunshine today after mourning over cast temperatures mid sixties to low nineties this is weekend edition from NPR news under the Garcia tomorrow it's forecast to be a hot day for a lot of the countries of before the temperature peaks let's take a cooling plunge into the puzzle joining us is will Shortz puzzle editor of The New York Times and weekend edition's puzzle master hi well hi Lou remind us of last week's challenge yes it came from listener Eric Berlin I said taking eleven letter word with to dis and that if you drop both these who got a world capital followed by a sign of the zodiac what's the word and the word is drama dairies you drop those two days and you get Rome and Aries we received over eleven hundred responses and the winner this week is Alan Winston of Oakland California congratulations so how do you figure it out well you have eleven letters you drop to dis that leaves you with only nine letters to make the capital and is very excited so they both had to be short and I was going to do it the hard way but then I realized if I just thought about if you roam came to mind and then Aries seems like a good fit and I got dromedary there you go SO talent are you ready to play the puzzle I am all right take away well all right Allen I'm gonna give you two four letter words rearrange the letters in each of them to make two new words that rhyme for example if I said cafe and savor you would save face and vase okay all right number one is Colin C. O. LA and lose ello Essie roll and soul that's it near any A. R. and rent he earn and turn nice live L. I. V. E. and Lena hello I am a male and male Davis D. A. I. S. and deal D. E. A. L. said and let that's fast seeing as I. N. G. and deny D. E. N. Y. G. and now in our what can you re arranged a night to spell dine and sign there you go there you are really good at this wow try this one each E. A. C. H. and B. B. E. A. K. Hey Hey that be bait and eight that's it close P. U. S. and polo P. O. ello the lieutenant Hale P. A. L. E. and T. K. E. N. how weird one what can you make from Keene knee and Klay that's a good one rely our E. L. Y. right R. I. T. E. higher and a liar good once O. N. C. E. news and E. W. S. one would make hone where yes it does calling in stone that's it good or is A. R. S. ogre O. G. R. E. R. K. so now let's see right gore gore and gore that's it went W. E. N. T. roto are Teo the sequence you need new and a room that's it saw T. H. A. W. and the US T. H. U. S. saw wow why no except except I pronounce it with a short you sound you say what I say what so it the headset Latin shot and his last one it's not just rhymes it's homophones and the words are I'll I. S. L. E. and zeal Z. E. A. L. D. E. A. L. see the lines in the ladies lazily I. S. and ladies you got a second Allen you are amazing at this that was incredible thanks no really really well for later anagrams there's a limited number of well thank you for letting us know that but it makes it possible I guess so but you did really well and that is incredibly impressive how do you feel I feel great you should all right for playing our puzzle today you'll get a weekend edition lapel pin as well as puzzle books and games you can read all about it and PR dot org slash puzzle and Alan your member station when you listen to KQED in San Francisco that's Allen when scent of Oakland California thank you so much for playing the puzzle so exceptionally well thanks Lou thanks well all right well tell us next week's challenge yes the challenge comes from listener Steve baggage of Arlington Massachusetts think of a common two word phrase in nine letters name me something that makes it easy to get money rearranges letters to spell another common two word phrase naming something that.

KQED NPR two days
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:06 min | 3 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And the listeners of KQED this is weekend edition from NPR news I'm Scott Simon president trump hasn't seemed to settle on what he thinks about the chance of send her back that erupted his rally in North Carolina this week the crowd's response to the racist which he directed at for minority members of Congress president retreated from an earlier claim that he was unhappy with the chant calling the crowd quote incredible patriots and heroes run elven joins us from thanks for being with us good to be with his god what what we learned from all the back and forth the president has had on his own position that the president wants to have it both ways Scott he wants to tap this anger and resentment wants to feed it and nurture it and use it to drive turnout among his core voters in twenty twenty but at the same time he also heard the distress and discomfort last week after that North Carolina rally it looked kind of ugly in prime time and many of his own allies got worried so he dialed it back for a day said he wasn't responsible for the champ and then as you say he was back at it again siding with those who had taken up the check there's a bit wrong on whether the president's continuous racist remarks are part of a calculated political strategy what do you think in the broad sense yes it's very much a part of a strategy responding to widespread fears that immigrants and people of color are becoming something other than minorities in America that they're rather redefining America so it is not hard to exploit this particular sense of anxiety and at the same time that tension over tactics is also very real there's a clear and present danger of going too far especially this early in the long campaign how do you explain how and why so many Republicans have declined to criticize the president for March all politicians reflexively think first of their own reelection and right now in the Republican Party that means staying on the right side of the president less the White House help someone challenge you and a primary or just withhold its help in the general election and at the same time again there were some who did speak up some who were in positions themselves let us say with respect to their own campaigns where they needed something less raw in its appeal to fear and nativism meanwhile the there's a real crisis on the president's hands in the countries with Iran's isn't with Iran isn't there yes we shall see how much of a crisis this began like so many others seem to with a tweet the the president announcing the United States had destroyed an Iranian drone mid week at first it seems like it might be kind of a distraction in the midst of other news but there's more going on here of the Iranians are obviously being strangled by some of the sanctions of the United States and other countries have put on them and they have detained two tankers in the strait of Hormuz releasing one but holding a second one hostage it's a British flagged vessel so that could engage not only the United Kingdom but also its NATO allies including the United States Robert Miller has close up before Congress next week Democrats have been practicing their questions probably the Republicans too what do you expect at this point I'd expect there to be some degree of disappointment quite frankly and quite possibly on both sides the Democrats want Muller to boldly go where he's never gone before contradicting the summary of his investigation that we got last spring from Attorney General William Barr while also laying out the full extent of Russian interference in the twenty sixteen election and the links some had to some trump associates and then describing the president's resistance to the probe itself in terms that could be called obstruction of justice Republicans for their part are going to try to discredit motor and the rationale for investigating all of this in the first place there will be aggressive efforts on both sides but in the end neither side is likely to be satisfied with the results scout NPR's Ron Elving senior Washington correspondent thanks so much thank you Scott another change U. S. immigration policy the trump administration is issued a new role that migrants must seek protection and at least one of the countries that travel through before asking for asylum at the US Mexico border as Texas public radio's we're not only on yours junior reports from the way of a raid on Mexico the constantly changing policies are creating confusion and fear for migrants already in dangerous situations a group of women are sitting on a white wooden bands at got so then we get on the I'm not chatting and eating fruit on a blistering hot summer day one of the women mark there later than its way less oppressive regime the day after she arrived in level letter though she was robbed.

KQED trump NPR Scott Simon president
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"KQED San Francisco in KQ we I north highlands Sacramento from KQED public radio in San Francisco on Michael Krasny they're a writer and artist chenille del worries that all of the things competing for our attention from social media to a twenty four seven work I think are preventing us from connecting with the very things that we need in order to thrive and trying to push back against what we think productivity is kind of asked the question you know productive of what and for whom and why engaging with others and with the environment along our brains to run free and speculate these activities are losing out to materialism and gazing at Instagram feeds coming up junio del joins us to talk about her book how to do nothing resisting the attention of a condominium that's next after this new live from NPR news in Washington I'm Laxmi saying bail is denied for jail financier Jeffrey Epstein who is behind bars on sex trafficking charges today New York a U. S. District Court judge rejected the defense's request to allow the sixty six year old I've seen to be confined to his New York mansion while he awaits trial and peers will Lawrence reports from the courthouse the judge says he doubted that any bail package could overcome F. scenes danger to the community judge Richard Berman said that the defendant abstains bail request was quote irredeemably inadequate and he essentially agreed with all of the government's reasoning YFC should.

San Francisco Sacramento Michael Krasny writer Washington Jeffrey Epstein Richard Berman KQED NPR New York U. S. District Court Lawrence sixty six year
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:29 min | 3 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Dot com NPR with your news update on KQED now at five thirty live from NPR news in Washington I'm David Mattingly a federal judge in New York is permanently blocking the trump administration from adding a citizenship question to the twenty twenty U. S. census still as NPR's Hansi low long reports the census bureau is sampling public reaction to the question around a quarter million households have been randomly selected to complete twenty nineteen senses test forms with a citizenship question some senses advocates are worried the testing will confuse the public the census bureau had said that it will continue testing public reaction through mid August even after was confirmed that the question will not appear on twenty twenty census forms last week president trump said his administration is relying on government records instead of the question citizenship information based on those records could be used by state officials to draw voting districts in a way that a GOP strategist concluded with politically benefit Republicans and non Hispanic white people until long NPR news New York house resolution condemning president trump's recent Twitter comments as racist was passed largely along party lines two hundred forty to one eighty seven NPR's ten Max as a handful of Republicans supported it about a dozen house Republicans spoke out against the president but only for Republicans ultimately joined with Democrats to support this measure the president insists his comments were not racist when he urge for minority freshman democratic lawmakers to go back to where they came from this is NPR news the trump administration is imposing sanctions on Myanmar's top military leaders for their roles in the mass killings of Muslim or hanga NPR's Michael Sullivan reports in a statement secretary of state Mike Pompeii said the four including the military's commander in chief are responsible for gross human rights violations and says Washington has barred the four men and their immediate families from entering the U. S. it's the strongest action the U. S. is taken against Myanmar in response to the mass killings of Muslim minority row and go to date Pompeii said the US remains concerned Myanmar's government has taken no action to hold accountable those responsible for human rights violations and abuses two years ago attacks by Myanmar's military and Buddhist mobs forced more than seven hundred thousand Rohingya to flee to neighboring Bangladesh Michael Solomon NPR news Seoul the World Health Organization is considering whether to label Democratic Republic of Congo's Ebola outbreak as a global threat as Lisa schline reports the virus has killed nearly seventeen hundred people in Congo the conflict raging and D. R. C.'s north cable in the Tory provinces is happening international efforts to contain the deadly virus the spread of the disease to Goma a city of two million people has triggered this latest meeting I'm Dave Mattingly NPR news in Washington good morning live in San Francisco I'm Dave Freeman thanks for listening to KQ we day ahead on morning edition and just a few minutes president trump's weekend tweets aimed at for non white lawmakers were widely views it viewed as racist but some trump supporters don't see it that way coming up in just a couple of moments more on the controversy from trump voters and the state of Montana and later today at eleven here now returns.

NPR KQED two years
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Peter finch for KQED brought to you by peninsula del Rey senior living they are very tiny but collectively they're bigger than we are in fact collectively they do a lot of things that Michael Ellis says we could and should be doing here's this perspective I noticed so many ant trails on the fire roads this time of year well worn path by medium sizing instantly to huge debris piles these are harvester ants they're easy to identify not because of shape color size but because of the rubble they leave at the entrance to their underground homes they're harvesting seeds and the germ of the seed is the most nutritious part the chaff provides little sustenance so surrounding the holes are huge amounts of unwanted chats seeing these hard working in six I immediately consider that biblical proverb and well known Aesop's fable both from the indoctrination of my childhood answer often used as metaphors for industrious behavior self sacrifice for the greater good in planning ahead for future scarcity the proverb admonishes go to the end you slugger consider her ways and be why switch having no captain oversee our our ruler provides her supplies in the summer and gathers her food in the harvest and then there's the ant and the grasshopper the grasshopper this meant the nice warm summer months just singing while the amp prepare for winter the grasshopper beg for food the ant refused the grasshopper died that'll teach him like most people I was more grasshopper then and as a kid but lately that and is making more and more sense human species take note the total biomass of ants on the planet is greater than the total biomass of human beings ants have been around for hundreds of millions of years and have survived and involved to several mass extinctions there are well over twelve thousand described species and are found in nearly every habitat on every continent but Antarctica so while humans are singing and fiddling away with climate change the answer meanwhile thriving and adapting to the changes we are manifesting across the environment.

Peter finch KQED Michael Ellis Antarctica
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:00 min | 3 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Chair and by the listeners of KQED it's five twenty one it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm Rachel Martin after a long effort to add a citizenship question to the twenty twenty census the trump administration says it's done trying speaking at the White House yesterday president trump blamed his opponents on the left I'm proud to be a citizen you're proud to be a citizen the only people who are not proud to be citizens of the ones who are fighting us all the way about the word citizen so even though the president has stopped fighting to try to get the question on the census he is now trying to get the information a different way in Paris Hansi low Wong is with us now Hansi you what you gonna do what's the administration going to do to try to get the citizenship information president trump says the administration is going to do what the census bureau recommended it to do to begin with which is if they wanted to have more detail citizenship data that to use in bit ministry of records or existing government records from various federal agencies including the social security ministration department homeland security at that data would be more accurate and collecting suffer for responses to a citizenship question so let's back up why did the trump administration give up on this in the first place getting the question on the census president trump and Attorney General William Barr said that the ministration was really crunched for time that to add a question at this point about citizenship now that the printing of the census forms has already started without that question that would really derail the senses there would be no time to make that happen without harming this constitutionally had Casterly remanded head count from happening on time and so this executive order that president trump has issued tries to make sure that Mr to records existing government records are ready to go but it's unclear what impact that might have the again the bureau has already been directed by the restoration to compile these records but it does give some vitality that there will be citizenship information them ministrations wanting to push forward and it opens up the next potential fight here well like what what's that what's the purpose of the fight the contracts there are two main fights that are that is likely to take place now that there might be citizenship information when the census is done numbers from the population counts to determine how many congressional seats each state gets but there is this ongoing lawsuit by the state of Alabama which is challenging this long standing practice of dividing of congressional seats to involve every person living in the country that's based on the Fourteenth Amendment which calls for the whole number of persons in each state to be counted but Alabama is arguing that rational see should be divided up based on the number of just U. S. citizens and green card holders and the justice department has been defending the census bureau including unauthorized immigrants in those numbers but yesterday at US Attorney General William Barr said something that really raises questions about what the ministry since position is on this issue going forward let's listen to what he said there is a current dispute over whether illegal aliens can be included for apportionment purposes meeting on the resolution of that dispute this data may be relevant to those considerations we will be studying this issue it's important to point out that other groups have intervened in this case in case the truck ministration does want to defend the census bureau we'll see what the truck negotiation does next week when a court filing is due uhhuh so that's one battle you said they were too the next one is about citizenship for information information how that could be used at the state and local level for trying new voting districts president trump said this could be used to draw voting districts just based on citizens old enough to vote a strategist has said that could benefit Republicans and we'll see if that happens all right NPR's Hansi low long force on this latest development with the twenty twenty census thanks so much on the you're welcome it is Friday when we hear from story core and today we have an example of a saying that you have two families the one you're born with the one you're fine Carinthia isam was just a child winner.

KQED Steve Inskeep NPR