36 Burst results for "Kqed"

9 More States Will End Pandemic Unemployment Aid on Saturday

All Things Considered

01:45 min | 8 hrs ago

9 More States Will End Pandemic Unemployment Aid on Saturday

"Cornish. Tomorrow 440,000 unemployed workers in the U. S will lose some or all of their federal pandemic benefits. Those benefits include the extra $300 a week on top of regular unemployment money, along with benefits that covered freelancers and part time in gig workers. 26 states all but one Republican led are cutting short federal pandemic aid this summer. Nebraska is one of the eight states where those changes take effect tomorrow. Nebraska Governor Pete Ricketts is here now to talk more about that. Welcome to the program. Thank you very much. I appreciate you having me on just so people have some context here. The unemployment rate in your state has been dropping for more than a year. It's tied for lowest in the nation at 2.8%. So what's the rush to end these benefits now? Why not just let them expire? Well, we are essentially letting them expire by ending our emergency here in Nebraska. So what we've worked while you're cutting it off sooner than when they would X set to expire, So they're set to expire in September. You're doing it now, which means 15,000. Nebraskans will lose benefits tomorrow. Yes, sure. As you pointed out, we had the lowest unemployment rate in the country and we have related for the last year and a half. And if you look at our state generally, we're returning to normalcy. We're hosting the U. S swim trials. Right now. We've got the college World Series of philosophy coming up here later this month. Carter works is going to be here with 90,000 fans. We actually also have analyzed our numbers here. We can see that there's two jobs available for every one person on unemployment right now. And that 51% of the folks on unemployment are actually making more money. Now with that $300 a week and they were pre pandemic, So we're our state is way to transition back into normalcy, and so this is just part of our

Nebraska Governor Pete Ricketts U. Carter
Fresh update on "kqed" discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

00:41 sec | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "kqed" discussed on All Things Considered

"Sutter also has to pay a $575 million antitrust settlement with the state for over charging patients for care. And employers for health plans. I'm Raquel Maria Dillon. KQED News. California's attorney general, is creating two new law enforcement teams to combat human trafficking in the state. Rob Bonta says the move is meant to address a huge increase in emergency calls from victims of human trafficking during the pandemic. He's also issuing new guidelines for law enforcement to be more survivor centred a long time are sexually exploited. You We're not treated as they should have been as victims as survivors, they repeated as criminals that was wrong. That needs to change..

Rob Bonta Raquel Maria Dillon $575 Million Kqed News California Two New Law Enforcement Teams Sutter
Antidepressants in Our Water Make Crayfish Go Buck Wild

Science Friday

02:06 min | 14 hrs ago

Antidepressants in Our Water Make Crayfish Go Buck Wild

Vaccinations Clear the Way for Vermont to Lift COVID-19 Restrictions

Morning Edition

01:46 min | 3 d ago

Vaccinations Clear the Way for Vermont to Lift COVID-19 Restrictions

"Vaccination campaign. Not only did we lead the United States, but Vermont is now a global leader and vaccinations to defeat Covid 1980% of the states eligible population. Those 12 and over have received at least one dose. The White House has touted Vermont success as it pushes to have the whole country reached 70% vaccination by July. 4th Liam Elder Connors from member station Vermont. Public Radio joins us now. Good morning, Liam. Good morning. What does it mean for Vermont to drop all covid 19 restrictions? Well, things were already somewhat loosened here in this state. You know, the masking mandate had already been relaxed a little bit. But now there are no limits on gatherings or capacity caps for events and restaurants, and any masking and distancing requirements are now gone. And this wasn't a completely unexpected change. These restrictions were going away by July 4th. But when the states saw that The vaccination rate was going up so quickly, Governor Phil Scott said. Once we have that 80% mark, he would drop all restrictions. And so we hit that yesterday and here's the governor dropping those restrictions at a press conference. I'm lifting all remaining state pandemic restrictions in state of emergency will formally and at midnight. June 15th tomorrow. And here's why. Because it's safe to do so. And it's safe because Vermonters have done their part to keep the virus from spreading. And stepping up to get vaccinated should say the only real exceptions are for some federal rules like masking is still required on public transportation. And as we heard there, Liam, the governor is also letting the state of emergency expire in Vermont. What is the effect of that change?

Vermont Covid Liam Elder Connors Governor Phil Scott Liam White House United States Mark
Israel's Parliament Approves New Government

The World

01:59 min | 4 d ago

Israel's Parliament Approves New Government

State Appeals Court Upholds Approval of Minnesota Pipeline

Here & Now

00:16 sec | 4 d ago

State Appeals Court Upholds Approval of Minnesota Pipeline

"The line three pipeline by Enbridge Energy is designed to replace an older one that can only run at half capacity about 1000 people protested against the pipeline early last week. You're listening to here and now

Enbridge Energy
Israel Swears in New Coalition, Ending Netanyahu's Long Rule

BBC World Service

01:46 min | 5 d ago

Israel Swears in New Coalition, Ending Netanyahu's Long Rule

"When we begin this morning with political drama in Israel, where Benjamin Netanyahu lost his 12 year hold on power. After the Knesset, the parliament voted in a new coalition government, a coalition Rather unlikely coalition. Many think of eight parties. The right wing nationalist politician and former ally of Netanyahu. Naftali Bennett has been sworn in as the prime minister for the next two years. He calls it a government of change. Mr Netanyahu remains head of the liquid party and will become leader of the opposition. So all change in a dramatic vote as well. Let's speak to a member of the Knesset. Unusual member of the Knesset for the far left Hadash Party or Fear, CASS. If who joins us now? What was it like making the vote on the end of Netanyahu's career? How did you vote offer? Good morning. We voted against the government because one has to understand the situation. Well, yeah, for years, of course objected, opposes opposed the policies of this government. Netanyahu is a racist. And there is been inciting against the Palestinian national minority within Israel. Of course, we wanted to do whatever we could in order to get rid of him. But at the same time we couldn't vote but against the Taliban it and his government because this is a far right government. It is true that within this coalition All some representatives of the center of Liberal forces. But in the end of the day, the government is ruled by far right politicians and parties. Bennett and his allies, and in that sense, we added to vote against it in this is this is what we did

Netanyahu Naftali Bennett Mr Netanyahu Knesset For The Far Left Hadas Benjamin Netanyahu Israel Parliament Cass Government Center Of Liberal Forces Taliban Bennett
G-7 Leaders Confirm Vaccine Pledges, Pressure China

Weekend Edition Sunday

01:25 min | 5 d ago

G-7 Leaders Confirm Vaccine Pledges, Pressure China

Biden to Hold Solo Press Conference Following Putin Summit

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:17 sec | 6 d ago

Biden to Hold Solo Press Conference Following Putin Summit

"The White House says President Biden will not hold a joint news conference after he meets with Russian President Vladimir Putin next week in Geneva. Instead, Biden will hold a solo press conference. Biden remains in southwestern England for the G seven summit where the focus is on China.

President Biden White House Biden Vladimir Putin Geneva England China
Elephant Herd Wanders Through China, Causing Chaos and Capturing Hearts

PBS NewsHour

01:52 min | Last week

Elephant Herd Wanders Through China, Causing Chaos and Capturing Hearts

Kamala Harris, in Guatemala, Discusses Plan to Deter Migrants

The World

01:57 min | Last week

Kamala Harris, in Guatemala, Discusses Plan to Deter Migrants

"Is in Guatemala today. If the start of her trip is any sign yesterday, Air Force to had to turn back after take off for a safety check. The assignment is going to be a challenge. Mrs Harris first foreign trip Mission, President Joe Biden gave her find ways to reduce migration to the US by improving conditions in Central America. One of the big challenges in the region is how ineffective governments there have been at solving the simple, grinding problems of daily life in their countries. Speaking from Guatemala City today, Harris said she and Guatemalan President Alejandro Geometry talked about a key issue Corruption on the issue of corruption. Uh, the conversation that I had with President Janet Today was very Frank. And very candid, and I think this is a quality that he and I appreciate in each other. Following all of this is Adrianna Beltran with the watchdog group, The Washington office on Latin America. She said Harris is right to focus on corruption. And unfortunately, over the last several years, what you've seen across the region, including Guatemala has been a backlash against anti corruption, anti impunity efforts and increasingly actions by corrupt elites to undermine democracy and the rule of law. So as long as we're on the subject, explain in simple terms how corruption actually reduces the impact of USA to Central America. When we talk about corruption in Guatemala in Central America, we're not talking about a few bad apples, a few corrupt government officials that accept bribes But what we're talking about is systems that have been put in place where corrupt elites and in the case of Guatemala, increasingly tied to criminal groups have taken hold the government institutions And have used their positions of power to enrich themselves by embezzling millions of public funds at the expense of the majority of the population. You know,

Mrs Harris President Joe Biden Guatemala Alejandro Geometry Central America President Janet Today Adrianna Beltran The Washington Office Harris Guatemala City Air Force USA Latin America Frank
Google Fined $267 Million for Abusing 'Dominant Position' in Online Advertising

The Takeaway

00:45 sec | Last week

Google Fined $267 Million for Abusing 'Dominant Position' in Online Advertising

"France's anti trust watchdog that it abused its market dominance in online advertising. KQED S Rachel Myrow explains from our Silicon Valley desk. French regulators say Google has engaged in algorithmic ad auctions that penalize Google's competitors as well as news publishers. Their investigation was prompted by complaints from European publishers that Google's ad technologies preference in house and servers. Over those arrivals. Google opted to settle and says it will make changes that it expects to roll out globally in the coming months as antitrust regulators in Europe and beyond flex their muscle with Google and other tech giants. I'm Rachel Myrow KQED news. Find more online

Rachel Myrow Google Kqed France Europe Kqed News
Duke and Duchess of Sussex Welcome Baby Girl

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:15 sec | Last week

Duke and Duchess of Sussex Welcome Baby Girl

"Duke and Duchess of Sussex, Megan and Prince Harry have a second child Little bet Diana Mountbatten Windsor, named after Queen Elizabeth and Princess Diana. Was born Friday. I'm Barbara Klein. NPR

Diana Mountbatten Windsor Duchess Prince Harry Duke Sussex Megan Queen Elizabeth Princess Diana Barbara Klein NPR
Senators Announce U.S. Donating 750,000 Vaccine Doses to Taiwan

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:18 sec | Last week

Senators Announce U.S. Donating 750,000 Vaccine Doses to Taiwan

"Three U. S. Senators visiting Taiwan say the US is planning to send 750,000 doses of Covid 19 vaccines, part of President Biden's moved to share the shots globally. Taiwan is dealing with a spike in infections and has complained that China is trying to block the island from obtaining

Taiwan Biden United States China
Federal Judge Overturns California’s Ban on Assault Weapons

Reveal

00:51 sec | Last week

Federal Judge Overturns California’s Ban on Assault Weapons

Colombia Under Pressure to Halt Police Violence Against Protesters

The World

01:53 min | 2 weeks ago

Colombia Under Pressure to Halt Police Violence Against Protesters

"More than month has now passed since the start of anti government protests. They were triggered by a government plan to increase taxes. Even after the tax plan was withdrawn, though the anger in the streets continued and police clamp down hard More than 40. People have been killed in these demonstrations, and now activists are driven by another goal, putting an end to police violence. A long standing grievance in Colombia manual Rueda report from the city of Cali, which has seen some of the most intense protests in the calypso neighborhood in Cali, The main road has been blocked with stones, bricks and bright orange barriers. There's a police helicopter flies over the road block young men with their faces covered. Keep an eye on who's entering the neighborhood. Dozens of these world blocks have been set up across Colombia to pressure the government into meeting protestors demands. But the road blocks her also here to keep the police away when Children's documented island were being She says, come from guns fired by the police. Dozens of people are killed each year in Colombian police operations, and in the current protest, many demonstrators have been shot at by officers beaten or hurt with tear gas canisters. Now reforming the police is one of the protesters main demands They want officers who commit crimes to be held accountable in civilian courts. But again, yeah, but reconciliation. Nika. They're pretty metal that about until there's truth. There can't be real peace says in memory of Alaska's an artist who showed up at a recent marching Callie wearing black, she says she's mourning the protests victims.

Cali Colombia Rueda Nika Alaska Callie
Services Held to Remember Tulsa Race Massacre

BBC World Service

00:19 sec | 2 weeks ago

Services Held to Remember Tulsa Race Massacre

"Events have been taking place in the U. S city of Tulsa in Oklahoma to mark the Centenary of a race related massacre in which up to 300 black people were killed. Speaking at a memorial service, the head of Oklahoma's national Guards, Major General Michael Thompson, apologized for the guards. Failure to stop the violence.

Oklahoma Tulsa U. National Guards Major General Michael Thompson
4-time Slam champion Naomi Osaka pulls out of French Open

The Takeaway

00:19 sec | 2 weeks ago

4-time Slam champion Naomi Osaka pulls out of French Open

"Four time Grand Slam champion Naomi Osaka has pulled out of the French Open. Her decision comes a day after she was fined for refusing to appear at a news conference following her first round victory. In a statement posted on Twitter today. Osaka cited mental health

Naomi Osaka Twitter Osaka
Russia to Add 20 New Military Units to Counter NATO

Here & Now

00:18 sec | 2 weeks ago

Russia to Add 20 New Military Units to Counter NATO

"Capital. Russia's defense minister says the military will form 20 new units in the country's West this year to counter what he described as a growing threat from NATO. He points it a growing number of flights by U. S bombers. Deployments of NATO warships near Russia's borders and increasing drills by

Russia Nato
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"On KQED newsroom California records its first death from the corona virus and governor Gavin Newsom declares a state of emergency to contain its spread plus health care workers on the frontline of treating coronavirus patients how protected and prepared are they to fight the illness also Joe Biden won big on super Tuesday but Bernie Sanders is projected to win the most delegates in California we'll take a look at the race and other key local and statewide contests good evening and welcome to KQED newsroom I'm Priya David Clemens we begin tonight with a look at the corona virus outbreaks in California and the U. S. this week governor Gavin Newsom declared a state of emergency to obtain federal aid to contain the spread of the respiratory illness and mayor London breed announced two novel coronavirus cases in San Francisco also an elderly resident plaster county died from the virus the first such death in the state the man who died had returned from a cruise to Mexico when he started experiencing symptoms there are now at least sixty confirmed cases of coronavirus in California second only to Washington state where at least fourteen people have died joining me now is KQED science reporter Leslie the clerk Leslie thank you for being with me today let's start with this cruise ship the man who died had just been on a cruise that went to Mexico came back disembarked all the passengers and then picked up another twenty five hundred passengers went on to Hawaii on the way back passenger started complaining of flu like symptoms things that seem similar to cope at nineteen so the ship is now off shore and people are being tested on board tell me about that testing and also about the risk to those who weren't showing symptoms yes parajumpers came in yesterday and help public officials lower off the helicopter in land ownership and I saw videos of that and it was interesting to see a ship that was completely empty of next to the pool so all of those people are in their state rooms right now until we have more information about the test results they're getting you know room service and and staying inside watching television hopefully and staying away from each other and so until we have more test results we won't know how many people were infected hopefully like you said that person was on a previous voyage not on this voyage but it's there's a chance that people on this voyage could have been infected because people who are on the previous voyage that went to Mexico some of those are on this voice of sixty people who are on their way to Mexico are now went to Hawaii and came back to the ship it's likely that there's some contamination we won't know until those test results come back and how many tasks are being performed so last night the grand prince or the princess cruises which is the a parent company of the grand princess said that forty five people were tested and those people were chosen because they demonstrate a flu like symptoms they were coughing or sneezing or there were people around them who it were in close contact that could have been exposed princess cruise line this is the same cruise line that had a ship that was off the coast of Japan with a lot of cases we had more than seven hundred passengers and crew members who tested positive within three thousand within three thousand a large number of six have died from that number is there something particular about this cruise line or could this have happened on with any ship company this kind of happen on any ship really so you this disease is transmitted vis vis a close contact most of the people who are getting sick or inside a house with someone else who is sick so it's transmitted via coughs and sneezes maybe touching the same surfaces think about a cruise ship like a big house with a bunch of passengers who are in the same buffet line they're sitting next to each other on the pool they're touching the same handrails eccentric and so a cruise ship is kind of like a Petri dish for a virus to really go viral amongst the passengers and potentially in fact a lot of people so this could have happened on any large vessel okay governor Gavin Newsom declared a state of emergency for California and that gives us access to more resources in federal funding it also helps to curb price gouging you know during the press conference he held up this bottle of hand sanitizer and said it was going for seventeen dollars which seems outrageous one of the things that really was of no to me in that press conference about the state of emergency is that the term goes all the way through September which seems to indicate a long term response absolutely we can be in this for for quite awhile so typically a.

California KQED governor Gavin
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And the listeners of KQED a couple of months ago the government blacklisted Chinese companies that use surveillance technology to target Muslim Uighur explicitly mandate we are analytics saying we're going to set up a security camera system and is to be able to detect whether people are wearing sunglasses household they are whether they are we I results surveillance sanctions next time on market place market place just one chance to hear it today that's at four o'clock this afternoon because it's Friday so that means will have the California report magazine the full half hour show that comes your way at four thirty six thirty and eleven PM each Friday I'm as housing is sitting in for semi autos this morning good morning we have traffic coming up and also the California report that's coming up soon it's KQED public radio's morning edition from NPR news on David green that I'm Stephen skip the farming economy had a terrible two thousand nineteen many small farmers face rising debts and gut wrenching decisions of whether to close businesses they've on for generations Stacey panic Smith reports for NPR's the indicator from planet money two thousand nineteen was a hard year for farmers small farms have been hit incredibly hard by a combination of the trade war with China extreme weather and increasingly competitive and global industry the government has stepped in with subsidies for some farmers but in spite of that the debt level of American farmers is at an all time high and the number of farmers who are delinquent on their loans is on the rise Alanis Emile's isn't economics correspondent for time magazine short story recently about what's happening to the world economy and farming right now think about the two thousand people tell me that was kind of the golden age of modern farming in that commodity prices are going up it was kind of this boom time and then in two thousand thirteen they basically ended commodity prices went down two big reasons one farms are getting a lot more efficient every year you can produce a lot more on the same land and a lot more farms entered the kind of global market place yeah I mean and you talk about the the debt level for farmers yeah so right now it's an all time high which is it's I think that four hundred sixteen billion dollars it was up really high in a eighties a lot of people lost their farms we're not seeing prices go up so how are they going to pay that debt off in her story I wanna visited a particularly hard hit area in Wisconsin a town called Fremont where she met with the Richmond family I called merry Rickman to ask her about her farm we have a small dairy farm my husband is a fourth generation on this farm I've been on here sixty years I imagine you've seen all kinds of cycles the price of milk was up and down hello what's the price right now right now it's eighteen something and for a hundred pounds melt enough to make a profit now maybe for the great big farmers but not for the small farmers and it only keeps on adding often adding up and it's just like all my gosh is part of this like that some of the trade war stuff for yeah it is in other countries is used to buy so now they're not buying it no they're not so prices have gone down the tool we're just gonna keep on struggling and struggling on tells there is nothing left to struggle for anymore because this is our home how do you kind of get through moments like this well if they have been just great wherever you can make a penny and me in a little bit I mean now we we don't do a Christmas gifts or anything for last three years what we do on non Christmas Eve there's we all get together as a family just visit and have a lunch together yeah well that's as much as what we can do time magazine's Lana Samuels says the decline of small farms like the Rickman's is killing rural communities as businesses close and tax revenues decline and Alanis as perhaps more seriously the.

KQED
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is KQED this is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm ari Shapiro and I'm Audie Cornish president trump's new national security adviser warns that China is coming for your personal information Robert o'brien says if you think Facebook and Google no lot about you it could be worse that's the reason he says he's trying to convince key allies to stay away from the Chinese telecom company Huawei here to talk about this warning is NPR's a White House correspondent Franco during is welcome back thank you all right meeting a dark picture here can you be specific about the danger he's talking about yeah well where is this Chinese tech company that has close ties to the Chinese communist government they make cell phones but they also build these highly specialized equipment for five G. networks their marketing their goods to the world but Robert o'brien is questioning why some allies would even consider allowing while weigh in at all I spoke to a Brian on the sidelines of the Reagan national defense forum in California he warns that it will open up back door for the Chinese government to access their most sensitive data to every medical record every social media post every email every financial transaction of every citizen in the country with cloud computing and an artificial intelligence can be sucked up out of Wall way into mass of servers in China given the stakes here is this avoidable well the trump administration has taken steps to block while way in other companies with ties to the Chinese government from U. S. systems the concern is about countries that accept walk away as a partner o'brien says that the United States is going to be very wary of sharing intelligence with countries that use walk away and yet it's been difficult to persuade allies to do the same how come well frankly because it's so cheap western companies like Nokia and Ericsson and Qualcomm they simply can't offer the same prices and still turn a profit now I should say that Australia New Zealand Japan they agreed to block walk away but other countries other allies like Canada and Britain said they're open to allowing the company to build some of their networks in kind of less sensitive areas again o'brien says they're taking a great rest these are very serious questions are being asked it's great to get a discount it's great to get something for free but at the end of the day there really isn't yeah it really isn't free there's no free lunch he says allies need to think about the long term consequences how is president trump talking about this with those allies trump talk to leaders last week when he was in London for the NATO summit he talked about this but he also downplayed the chances that he would be able to convince everybody well I'm not working very hard on that but I do think it's a security risk.

KQED ari Shapiro Audie Cornish NPR five G
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Connected it's KQED public radio live from NPR news in Washington I'm Jeanine Herbst the commerce department says the US economy slowed in recent months to two point one percent growth in the second quarter and here's Chris Arnold has more the tribe administration has been emboldened by stronger growth in twenty eighteen of about three percent attributing that to the Republican tax cuts and other policies but studies have been finding that the tax cuts didn't do that much to boost the economy in part because most of the benefit went to wealthy people in corporations who don't spend that extra money the same way that lower and middle income people what many economists are predicting that the economy will continue to revert to more of a whole com rate of growth closer to percent but either way the economy is still growing Chris Arnold NPR news reaction is coming in on news the federal government will resume executing death row prisoners for the first time since two thousand three the justice department to schedule the execution of five federal death row inmates who were convicted of murdering children and the elderly but professor Rory little of the university of California says the morning moratorium was put in place because of worries over racial disparity the number of African Americans far outnumbers their percentage in the general population same is true on federal death row with regard to people from Hispanic backgrounds he still uses it will challenge the justice department's decision well Sir it's trading higher this hour the dollars of twenty one the nasdaq is up seventy nine you're listening to NPR news from Washington from the KQED news in San Francisco I'm Brian what the battle over vehicle tailpipe emissions between the state of California in the trump administration is taking a new turn governor Gavin Newsom announced a deal yesterday with four major automakers Ford Honda BMW and Volkswagen to manufacture cleaner and more efficient cars by twenty twenty five KQED science editor Craig Miller says there are likely other issues at play here many suspect that the real agenda that the trump administration has here is to override California's ability to set its own regulations this is a special right that the state has had for many many years it wants desperately to hold on to that and that could be actually the end game is you know who's going to be in charge here is it going to be the federal regulators or can states do what they feel like they need to do K. Q. E. T.'s Craig Miller members of the no new SF jail coalition are urging San Francisco supervisors to take immediate steps to shut down the jail at the city's hall of justice the group of activists successfully fought plans to build a new jail Muhammad Sheikh says the city should focus instead on mental health services bail reform and other priorities alternative actually benefit the community not when just applied to those inside with lower level offenses or even those that are not yet convicted but even those who are in for more serious charges to supervisors met Haney and Hillary ronin have expressed support for the initiative I'm Brian white KQED news support comes from Oakland International Airport with nonstop flights to six European capitals including Paris Copenhagen in Rome on the next fresh air who is the greatest.

Washington Jeanine KQED NPR three percent one percent
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Comes your way on KQED you will meet here about a couple who have been married for seventy years they will remember the day they met we expect partly cloudy skies in the morning then becoming sunny may see some patchy fog in the morning as well and a slight chance of dry thunderstorms in the morning as well today's high in San Francisco expected to go to sixty seven Oakland size seventy four and a high of eighty six anticipated in San Jose according to the weather service next time on the California report as climate change leads to rising oceans and ever more destructive wildfires how prepared really are insurance companies to cover future disaster losses I would say they're not a conversation with California's top insurance official about climate change in insurance coverage and other news from around the Golden State that's next time on the California report my head at five fifty one and six fifty one on KQED public radio it's morning edition from NPR news I'm no well king and I'm Rachel Martin for the past sixteen years the government of the United States has not executed any inmate on federal death row that is now about to change he was Attorney General William Barr announced that the department of justice will resume capital punishment and he has ordered the first federal executions since two thousand three five inmates who've been found guilty of murder are scheduled for execution beginning in December Corley is following the story and joins us now good morning show good morning so when the Attorney General said he was reinstating a.

Rachel Martin department of justice Attorney NPR Oakland murder William Barr United States KQED official California San Jose San Francisco seventy years sixteen years
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Here on KQED support for KQED comes from the Bernardo sure foundation supporting higher education in the arts and support for masters of scale on KQED comes from Pacific office automation masters of scale hosted by linked in co founder and Greylock partner Reid Hoffman shows how successful company scale testing reads theories with legendary leaders airs tonight at eight support for NPR comes from this station and from the Gruber family foundation supporting NPR's efforts to promote deeper thinking broader perspectives and trusted fact based information always with the goal of creating a more informed public from the chrisley foundation expanding opportunities in America's cities through grant making and social investing more it crazy dot org then from the John S. and James L. knight foundation helping NPR advance journalistic excellence in the digital age back now to your calls and comments about the molar hearings from today still joined by Garrett graph the author of the threat matrix inside Robert molars F. B. I. and the war on global terror very mixed opinions from several of you about whether today's hearings were worth it Nikki in center city Minnesota rights today's hearings were very helpful because the issues that would come out if we had an impeachment were today made very public with the large attentive audience Robert wrote on our Facebook page this did not move the needle at all both sides got their sound bites both sides already made up their minds and independence are just sick of it all still time to get in a few more of your calls eight five five two three six one eight one a remember you can always leave us your calls and voice mails on that line including your suggestions for what you'd like us to discuss on this program eight five five two three six one a one.

KQED co founder Reid Hoffman NPR Gruber family foundation chrisley foundation America John S. Nikki Robert partner James L. knight Garrett Minnesota Facebook
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Doing what they love on KQED NPR with your news headlines now at five thirty live from NPR news in Washington I'm David Mattingly congressional negotiators have reached a two year budget agreement with president trump and P. R. Susan Davis says the spending plan tops one point three trillion dollars it'll raise the debt limit the nation's borrowing authority until the end of July of twenty twenty one well past the twenty twenty elections it also said spending levels for defense and domestic programs for the next two years with the goal of preventing anymore government shutdowns during that time house passage is expected this week followed by the Senate next week retired US Supreme Court justice John Paul Stevens will be laid to rest today at Arlington National Cemetery Stevens died last week at age ninety nine following a stroke NPR's winter Johnston has more family friends and dignitaries gathered in the great hall of the Supreme Court on Monday to pay their final respects justice Elena Kagan who replaced Stevens in two thousand ten took part in a brief ceremony honoring his life and legacy he thought that no person however high and mighty was above the law and he insisted that the law and the legal system treat every person however weak or defenseless with dignity and with fairness in his thirty five years on the bench Stevens became one of the high court's leading liberals wins our Johnston NPR news Washington this is NPR news from Washington it's morning edition on KQED I'm Brian white fifty years ago today the USS Hornet was nine hundred miles southwest of Hawaii preparing to recover the Apollo eleven astronauts upon their return to earth today the aircraft carrier is docked in Alameda and is open to the public as a museum we sent science reporter Daniel vent in there to learn about the day when we welcomed our first moon walkers home eleven at this point in our in June nineteen sixty nine John McLaughlin was a swimmer a navy frogmen one of the precursors to the seals he never expected it would be his specialty to pluck astronauts out of the ocean who just landed back on earth somebody just said you know you're going to do it it was the job of the we took it very seriously and it was fun the USS Hornet made the Apollo eleven recovery but the assignment was kind of a fluke it was just in the right place at the right time the only aircraft carrier that was either going to Vietnam were being replenished repaired was horrified to just come back story and Bob fish is the expert on the Apollo eleven recovery he says the Hornet crew had just gotten home after a six month tour when they were told to go get the astronauts home some crew members were tired but soon they realize their ship was about to be the center of attention Paulson around is changed please contact your going to land on the moon in the presence gonna be here yeah they had about a month and a half to prepare for the mission astronaut recovery is a high stakes affair with an intricate choreography following the incredibly risky lunar landing and take off everyone wanted to make sure the Apollo astronauts had a picture perfect finish they practiced again and again and again it was tedious it was dangerous they had to repeat everything over and over and over the horn to twenty six simulated recovery exercises before they actually cover the parliament the swimmers McLaughlin included had to jump out of helicopters and swim to mock up command module the first winner would attach an anchor another would jump out swim up and attach an inflatable rims that the astronauts would step out onto in there was a separate Schwimmer on Apollo eleven that brought the the contamination suits and income to wash them down and to make sure no no insurance got around after getting sprayed down in bleach the astronauts would climb into a net shaped like a chair to be hoisted into the helicopter hovering overhead the simulations didn't always go as planned they could be downright dangerous we jumped in and we jumped into probably thirty to fifty sharks they were I mean the water was just kind of boiling so we just swam like hell and account of our lucky stars but the morning of the real recovery was shark free McLaughlin and the rest of the recovery team started off for the expected splashed on site about an hour before sunrise at report stage craft right on target point remember we saw the fireball is the command all Jewish reentering arctic report error bars one has visual contact yeah that was that was very exciting we thought we were ready but you see on that more that that got the heart beat going a little faster a few minutes.

NPR KQED three trillion dollars thirty five years fifty years six month two years two year
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:45 min | 2 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Around the bay expect more upper eighties to low nineties inland this is KQED FM this is fresh air I'm Terry gross breakthroughs in heart medicine including surgical procedures devices and medications have changed how various forms of heart disease are treated and enabled many people to live longer lives we're going to hear about some of those new developments from Haidar verite author of the new book state of the heart exploring the history science and future of cardiac disease we're also going to talk about cholesterol and blood pressure for H. previously joined us to talk about his book modern death how medicine changed the end of life he's a cardiologists too began his medical training in Pakistan where he's from and continued his training in cardiology at Harvard Medical School and Duke University in September he joins the faculty of Brigham and women's hospital and Harvard Medical School and the Boston vis a doctor harder variety welcome back to fresh air you write that during the time that you were a medical student you saw so many changes in heart medicine and technology tell us about one that you think is most significant survivors of of when I was a medical resident up at the Beth Israel deaconess Medical Center in Boston this is around the time when a new device had just started to be used in clinical practice that I had really never heard about before and this is a device called a left ventricular assist device and really what it is is it is a mechanical pump that can be sown directly right into the patient's heart and basically takes over the pumping function of of the heart and I know when this program started there is a specific role of in the hospital in the wards where these patients would be taken care of and at least initially residents were not even allowed to take care of these patients so that they had this aura this this mystery to them but the interesting thing about this therapy is that it it it fundamentally changes so many other things what we consider to be an out of key fundamental principles of being a human being so you know these patients who had these mechanical pumps and they didn't have a pulse if you'll perform CPR on them it could actually do more harm than good and these patients were basically dependent on their batteries for their life so this was such a dramatic departure from really any type of other medical intervention that I'd ever even heard about which it which is you know part of the reason why actually pursued this and now actually specialize in taking care of these patients yes and you described this device which is at an elevated which stands for left ventricular assist device how you describe it as representing the dawn of a new era in human life the union of man and machine because you're totally on the machine I mean every second of the day but really the idea of like no pulse I can't it's a car for me to conceive of that I mean it's hard as a physician I mean checking someone's pulse is part of the you know the one of those are your Esther and oldest rituals in medicine when you come up to someone you shake their hands and your examine them and almost always start by checking the polls and the rest and the other thing that happens in these patients is that if you put a stethoscope to their chest usually you'll hear the you know the caliber of the heart kind of you know running away as it has been since you know we were in our mother's womb but you don't really here the heart sounds all you hear is this mechanical pump and a whirring away pushing blood to every part of the body it it really is a surreal experience the first time and you experience a patient with an L. bad as a physician and I can't even imagine what it must be like to have one why don't you have a pulse when your blood is being pumped by the L. that device so the reason we have a pulse is because the heart beats rhythmically in a beat by beat and with every beat it sends a pulsation through the body that can be felt as the polls but the vat the motor is just continues so there is some because it's continuous there's no pulsation to be felt in most not pumping it's a continuous flow is a continuous flow isn't another strange thing about this device and again I found this really hard to imagine you write about a patient whose device was still pumping blood even though the patient had died so you know that they're really a a great therapy I've I've seen them really transform some patients lives I allowed a lot of patience to you know live parts of their life that they may never have been able to being able to attend grandchildren's graduations apartments was or do really really important things that they would not have been able to work on for the device but it but it does in some ways represent a turning point and what it means to be human you know I I I think you'll you'll you look at TV and you know everyone is talking about this distant future in which will be trans human but if you're a cardiologists like me and you take care of these patients with bad you know the trans humanism has arrived and it affects us and specially for these patients were dependent on these machines it's it's central part of their life but not just your life but also at the end of their life so one of the things that allowed to make a bit hard is that you know the deal that separates the heart from the rest of the body because the the of the rest of your body still mortal while the L. that in some ways has removed that feature from your heart because it'll keep pumping as long as it has power and has a battery life so when patients do in fact pass away it may be that their L. that is still functioning and it has to be it has to be turned off which is again something that is so foreign to really anything else that I had ever done but it is a really important part of taking care of these patients a lot of patients who get L. bads they they get it and if those things will stay in them until they pass away there's another breakthrough in heart medicine that happen while you were a medical student in fact you witnessed it I'm thinking of aortic valve surgery you observe the first time a trance catheter aortic valve was placed in a patient in a minimally invasive procedure so like what was tell tell tell us about this procedure so so one of the things that is a disease that's fairly common is called your external assisted the the arctic valve is the last day door that the blood has to leave before it leaves the heart and enters the rest of the body starting with the order of it is the big greatest vessel in your in your body over time this valve can sometimes get they can and it can basically because an obstruction of blood flow basically raising the pressure that is that is needed for blood to leave the heart and then it can be a fatal diagnosis and initially in before like nineteen fifties we really didn't have any treatment for it but then the serve revolution in cardiac surgery meant that now people who had aortic stenosis especially if it was severe it could be repaired with surgery but then starting in Europe physicians and researchers started to think about you know how can we do this better how can we help patients with aortic stenosis without having to necessarily cut their chest open you can replace the arctic valve without doing surgery through small catheters that are inserted through your leg or other blood vessel and its transformed the treatment of the arctic valves surgery and I was a researcher in up in Boston when one of the first few of these devices were ever implanted at the United States and I and I don't think anyone could have ever imagined at that point just how revolutionary this treatment might be in fact the most famous tower patient is actually Mick Jagger he just had his he had in a severe aortic stenosis and he under vent tower Sir travel this type of procedure and within days of this he shared this video and put her in which he was back at you know doing his act dancing and in fact he was back during a concert just a few days ago and this was unimaginable on imaginable I would say even you know in a few years ago that we would be able to transform treatment in a way that no one could have really imagine and these for the this is what's really one of the really interesting things about hard diseases that even though it doesn't get as much attention as so many other diseases the the advances that we have seen and the advances that you keep seeing in this area are just extremely fascinating and to me represents the pinnacle one of the pinnacles of human achievement there are several heart procedures now that used to be much more difficult and risky and now they're minimally there like minimal invasive procedures but by pass surgery I hasn't really come very far in the past decade or so I mean doctor still have to cut the chest open and saw through the the breast bone and but the heart and the heart lung machine I mean it still seems like such a really difficult procedure for the patient I mean it is a difficult procedure it it has gotten better over time and of but but again I in in one of the patients that I spoke to who had had by pass surgery I mean he described to me what it felt like when he woke up and it was it it I guess I mean the amount of pain that he had for the for even that you know adequate pain control it's still not enough it is a it is a it is still a it is a big deal and we haven't really seen we've seen incremental progress in bypass surgery that has helped you know improve outcomes but you haven't seen dramatic you know a dramatic shift in how the procedures performed what we have seen is now a lot more patients who may have gotten bypass surgery a few decades ago now they get coronary stents which are really minimally invasive and at least for many cases have provide patients outcomes as good if not at times better better than bypass surgery well I want to talk with you about stands a little later right now we have to.

KQED
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Granted fifty and dont work and by the listeners and members of KQED public radio eighty eight point five FM this is morning edition from NPR news I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Steve Inskeep good morning the American rapper a sap rocky turned himself into Swedish authorities almost three weeks ago he remains in custody and is being investigated for alleged aggravated assault following a fight his case has commanded the attention of Kanye west and Justin Bieber and Kim Kardashian and now the president of the United States who were all encouraging his release president trump confirmed over the weekend that he spoken with Sweden's prime minister and that he would personally vouch for the rapper's bail Rolling Stone writer Charles homes been covering the stories in New York the morning good morning I done okay what are the facts of the assault so far as they're known so on this all started the altercation on June thirtieth TMZ on July first released a video they didn't look good a man that looked like a sap rocky look like he had thrown a man but the next day a sap rocky went to his Instagram any posted two videos that showed more of the story in one of the captions it read so a few drug addicts are not my fans we don't know these guys and we didn't want trouble they followed us or four blocks and they were slapping girls **** who passed in throughout the video you could see rocky is security guard and his friends trying to defuse the situation and trying to say can you please turn around we don't want any problems things like that and it was not a great video to watch just to see kind of the predicament that rocky was and okay so yeah reminder that different angles of the same scene can seem to provide different truths but one of the Swedish authorities saying they presumably have access to all the videos and other evidence and they they want the man in custody yeah so far the Swedish police officers everybody investigating it really hadn't said much about the case they're still investigating it actually on Friday prosecutors had asked for an extension for the pre trial the tension in to investigate further what had actually happened throughout this whole process okay so it's a pre trial detention here which normally you would have an opportunity at payless you're considered a flight risk that's the way would be in the United States I'm sure it's not too different in in in in Sweden what is his circumstance what is what are you trying to do and where where is he being held right now I can't speak to too much of it but right now what we know is that they lost the petition that when I checked this morning had over six hundred thousand signings for it his team and multiple celebrities Justin Bieber Kim Kardashian Kanye all of these people are really fighting for and and one of the interesting things that another rapper by the name of Jesus easy said was that he actually had run into problems in Sweden and he went to Twitter to point out that he was treated differently are for those who don't know G. easy is a white rapper so he was saying that basically on Twitter that this is a problem because the way he was treated when he was arrested was a little bit different just to understand the seriousness of this alleged assault was anyone seriously hurt from right now what I know now I don't think anybody is seriously hurt from everything that I've read in the research that I've done okay Mister Holmes thanks for the update I really appreciate it yeah thank you Charles homes is a staff writer for Rolling Stone he's giving us an update on the wrapper a sap rocky who turned himself into Swedish authorities but now has a has a supporter in the president of the United States it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm Rachel Martin stay tuned to keep you waiting for the California report from the San Francisco and Los Angeles in a few moments bay area traffic.

NPR KQED three weeks
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:31 min | 2 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Listeners of KQED we'll have sunshine today after mourning over cast temperatures mid sixties to low nineties this is weekend edition from NPR news under the Garcia tomorrow it's forecast to be a hot day for a lot of the countries of before the temperature peaks let's take a cooling plunge into the puzzle joining us is will Shortz puzzle editor of The New York Times and weekend edition's puzzle master hi well hi Lou remind us of last week's challenge yes it came from listener Eric Berlin I said taking eleven letter word with to dis and that if you drop both these who got a world capital followed by a sign of the zodiac what's the word and the word is drama dairies you drop those two days and you get Rome and Aries we received over eleven hundred responses and the winner this week is Alan Winston of Oakland California congratulations so how do you figure it out well you have eleven letters you drop to dis that leaves you with only nine letters to make the capital and is very excited so they both had to be short and I was going to do it the hard way but then I realized if I just thought about if you roam came to mind and then Aries seems like a good fit and I got dromedary there you go SO talent are you ready to play the puzzle I am all right take away well all right Allen I'm gonna give you two four letter words rearrange the letters in each of them to make two new words that rhyme for example if I said cafe and savor you would save face and vase okay all right number one is Colin C. O. LA and lose ello Essie roll and soul that's it near any A. R. and rent he earn and turn nice live L. I. V. E. and Lena hello I am a male and male Davis D. A. I. S. and deal D. E. A. L. said and let that's fast seeing as I. N. G. and deny D. E. N. Y. G. and now in our what can you re arranged a night to spell dine and sign there you go there you are really good at this wow try this one each E. A. C. H. and B. B. E. A. K. Hey Hey that be bait and eight that's it close P. U. S. and polo P. O. ello the lieutenant Hale P. A. L. E. and T. K. E. N. how weird one what can you make from Keene knee and Klay that's a good one rely our E. L. Y. right R. I. T. E. higher and a liar good once O. N. C. E. news and E. W. S. one would make hone where yes it does calling in stone that's it good or is A. R. S. ogre O. G. R. E. R. K. so now let's see right gore gore and gore that's it went W. E. N. T. roto are Teo the sequence you need new and a room that's it saw T. H. A. W. and the US T. H. U. S. saw wow why no except except I pronounce it with a short you sound you say what I say what so it the headset Latin shot and his last one it's not just rhymes it's homophones and the words are I'll I. S. L. E. and zeal Z. E. A. L. D. E. A. L. see the lines in the ladies lazily I. S. and ladies you got a second Allen you are amazing at this that was incredible thanks no really really well for later anagrams there's a limited number of well thank you for letting us know that but it makes it possible I guess so but you did really well and that is incredibly impressive how do you feel I feel great you should all right for playing our puzzle today you'll get a weekend edition lapel pin as well as puzzle books and games you can read all about it and PR dot org slash puzzle and Alan your member station when you listen to KQED in San Francisco that's Allen when scent of Oakland California thank you so much for playing the puzzle so exceptionally well thanks Lou thanks well all right well tell us next week's challenge yes the challenge comes from listener Steve baggage of Arlington Massachusetts think of a common two word phrase in nine letters name me something that makes it easy to get money rearranges letters to spell another common two word phrase naming something that.

KQED NPR two days
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:06 min | 2 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And the listeners of KQED this is weekend edition from NPR news I'm Scott Simon president trump hasn't seemed to settle on what he thinks about the chance of send her back that erupted his rally in North Carolina this week the crowd's response to the racist which he directed at for minority members of Congress president retreated from an earlier claim that he was unhappy with the chant calling the crowd quote incredible patriots and heroes run elven joins us from thanks for being with us good to be with his god what what we learned from all the back and forth the president has had on his own position that the president wants to have it both ways Scott he wants to tap this anger and resentment wants to feed it and nurture it and use it to drive turnout among his core voters in twenty twenty but at the same time he also heard the distress and discomfort last week after that North Carolina rally it looked kind of ugly in prime time and many of his own allies got worried so he dialed it back for a day said he wasn't responsible for the champ and then as you say he was back at it again siding with those who had taken up the check there's a bit wrong on whether the president's continuous racist remarks are part of a calculated political strategy what do you think in the broad sense yes it's very much a part of a strategy responding to widespread fears that immigrants and people of color are becoming something other than minorities in America that they're rather redefining America so it is not hard to exploit this particular sense of anxiety and at the same time that tension over tactics is also very real there's a clear and present danger of going too far especially this early in the long campaign how do you explain how and why so many Republicans have declined to criticize the president for March all politicians reflexively think first of their own reelection and right now in the Republican Party that means staying on the right side of the president less the White House help someone challenge you and a primary or just withhold its help in the general election and at the same time again there were some who did speak up some who were in positions themselves let us say with respect to their own campaigns where they needed something less raw in its appeal to fear and nativism meanwhile the there's a real crisis on the president's hands in the countries with Iran's isn't with Iran isn't there yes we shall see how much of a crisis this began like so many others seem to with a tweet the the president announcing the United States had destroyed an Iranian drone mid week at first it seems like it might be kind of a distraction in the midst of other news but there's more going on here of the Iranians are obviously being strangled by some of the sanctions of the United States and other countries have put on them and they have detained two tankers in the strait of Hormuz releasing one but holding a second one hostage it's a British flagged vessel so that could engage not only the United Kingdom but also its NATO allies including the United States Robert Miller has close up before Congress next week Democrats have been practicing their questions probably the Republicans too what do you expect at this point I'd expect there to be some degree of disappointment quite frankly and quite possibly on both sides the Democrats want Muller to boldly go where he's never gone before contradicting the summary of his investigation that we got last spring from Attorney General William Barr while also laying out the full extent of Russian interference in the twenty sixteen election and the links some had to some trump associates and then describing the president's resistance to the probe itself in terms that could be called obstruction of justice Republicans for their part are going to try to discredit motor and the rationale for investigating all of this in the first place there will be aggressive efforts on both sides but in the end neither side is likely to be satisfied with the results scout NPR's Ron Elving senior Washington correspondent thanks so much thank you Scott another change U. S. immigration policy the trump administration is issued a new role that migrants must seek protection and at least one of the countries that travel through before asking for asylum at the US Mexico border as Texas public radio's we're not only on yours junior reports from the way of a raid on Mexico the constantly changing policies are creating confusion and fear for migrants already in dangerous situations a group of women are sitting on a white wooden bands at got so then we get on the I'm not chatting and eating fruit on a blistering hot summer day one of the women mark there later than its way less oppressive regime the day after she arrived in level letter though she was robbed.

KQED trump NPR Scott Simon president
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"On KQED on day Freiman good morning it's five thirty live from NPR news in Washington I'm David Mattingly the White House says the U. S. is removing Turkey from its F. thirty five jet program the decision was announced after akhara began accepting delivery of an advanced Russian missile defense system NPR's lamb L. ari and says Turkey is calling on the trump administration to reconsider Turkey's foreign ministry says this move is unfair and quotes a mistake that would open irreparable wounds and strategic relations a Pentagon official said moving supply chain from Turkey would cost between five hundred and six hundred million dollars in engineering costs and it would also cause Turkey to lose jobs and future economic opportunities the US here's a deepening relationship between Turkey and Russia the White House says the F. thirty five cannot coexist with the Russian intelligence collection platform that could be used to obtain secret information about its advanced capabilities liminality and and news today's deadly fire at an animation studio in Kyoto Japan is being called a suspected arson police say as many as thirty people are presumed dead one person is under arrest the brother of a suicide bomber who attacked a concert venue in Manchester England is facing twenty two counts of murder HM Abedi appeared in court today in London where he pleaded not guilty Betty's brother Selmon blew himself up at the conclusion of a pop concert at the Manchester arena two years ago this is NPR news from Washington the centers for disease control and prevention says it supports the decision by the World Health Organization to declare Democratic Republic of Congo's latest Ebola outbreak in international health emergency NPR's the fed be a quick start and says a bowl has killed more than sixteen hundred people in Congo over the past year the latest aboard outbreak began in early August Congolese health minister doctor or any longer says one he accepts the WHL expense decision to declared a public health emergency medics have been working hard in Congo for the past year trying to stop a bullet spreading the minister said Corning a W. H. O. emergency could however galvanize more global attention in cash donations the Associated Press also quitting room that's saying he hopes the decision coming now was not under pressure from unnamed groups as a way to raise funds for certain humanitarian actors in eastern Congo is a board lesser long mind in a divisive armed conflict health workers all facing deep mistrust and resistance plus some violence and death often the equis Stockton and Piane use chip maker qual com is being fined roughly two hundred seventy one million dollars by the European union's anti trust chief the California based company is accused of abusing its market dominance through predatory pricing to drive a competitor out of the market Qualcomm says it does plan to appeal I'm Dave Mattingly NPR news in Washington on KQED at five thirty three coming up on morning edition who's taking out the garbage in Rome in Rome Italy piles of garbage throughout the city are testing the patience of residents and tourists it's so bad that doctors are now warning of increased health hazards the story coming up and our statewide coverage on the California report at five fifty one AM years ago California credit system for tracking sexual harassment complaints against government workers creating a gap in the state's ability to monitor misconduct it is unbelievable to me is saying that when you consolidate state government the one thing that falls off the table is a tracking of sexual harassment in housing you can hear that story and other news from around the state next time on the California report five fifty one AM six fifty one AM eight fifty one more of the same today for the bay area yes clouds some patchy fog some clearing on most of the sunshine in the inland areas again today and a little cooler from the sixties to the.

KQED Washington Freiman NPR two hundred seventy one millio six hundred million dollars two years
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Dot com NPR with your news update on KQED now at five thirty live from NPR news in Washington I'm David Mattingly a federal judge in New York is permanently blocking the trump administration from adding a citizenship question to the twenty twenty U. S. census still as NPR's Hansi low long reports the census bureau is sampling public reaction to the question around a quarter million households have been randomly selected to complete twenty nineteen senses test forms with a citizenship question some senses advocates are worried the testing will confuse the public the census bureau had said that it will continue testing public reaction through mid August even after was confirmed that the question will not appear on twenty twenty census forms last week president trump said his administration is relying on government records instead of the question citizenship information based on those records could be used by state officials to draw voting districts in a way that a GOP strategist concluded with politically benefit Republicans and non Hispanic white people until long NPR news New York house resolution condemning president trump's recent Twitter comments as racist was passed largely along party lines two hundred forty to one eighty seven NPR's ten Max as a handful of Republicans supported it about a dozen house Republicans spoke out against the president but only for Republicans ultimately joined with Democrats to support this measure the president insists his comments were not racist when he urge for minority freshman democratic lawmakers to go back to where they came from this is NPR news the trump administration is imposing sanctions on Myanmar's top military leaders for their roles in the mass killings of Muslim or hanga NPR's Michael Sullivan reports in a statement secretary of state Mike Pompeii said the four including the military's commander in chief are responsible for gross human rights violations and says Washington has barred the four men and their immediate families from entering the U. S. it's the strongest action the U. S. is taken against Myanmar in response to the mass killings of Muslim minority row and go to date Pompeii said the US remains concerned Myanmar's government has taken no action to hold accountable those responsible for human rights violations and abuses two years ago attacks by Myanmar's military and Buddhist mobs forced more than seven hundred thousand Rohingya to flee to neighboring Bangladesh Michael Solomon NPR news Seoul the World Health Organization is considering whether to label Democratic Republic of Congo's Ebola outbreak as a global threat as Lisa schline reports the virus has killed nearly seventeen hundred people in Congo the conflict raging and D. R. C.'s north cable in the Tory provinces is happening international efforts to contain the deadly virus the spread of the disease to Goma a city of two million people has triggered this latest meeting I'm Dave Mattingly NPR news in Washington good morning live in San Francisco I'm Dave Freeman thanks for listening to KQ we day ahead on morning edition and just a few minutes president trump's weekend tweets aimed at for non white lawmakers were widely views it viewed as racist but some trump supporters don't see it that way coming up in just a couple of moments more on the controversy from trump voters and the state of Montana and later today at eleven here now returns.

NPR KQED two years
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Peter finch for KQED brought to you by peninsula del Rey senior living they are very tiny but collectively they're bigger than we are in fact collectively they do a lot of things that Michael Ellis says we could and should be doing here's this perspective I noticed so many ant trails on the fire roads this time of year well worn path by medium sizing instantly to huge debris piles these are harvester ants they're easy to identify not because of shape color size but because of the rubble they leave at the entrance to their underground homes they're harvesting seeds and the germ of the seed is the most nutritious part the chaff provides little sustenance so surrounding the holes are huge amounts of unwanted chats seeing these hard working in six I immediately consider that biblical proverb and well known Aesop's fable both from the indoctrination of my childhood answer often used as metaphors for industrious behavior self sacrifice for the greater good in planning ahead for future scarcity the proverb admonishes go to the end you slugger consider her ways and be why switch having no captain oversee our our ruler provides her supplies in the summer and gathers her food in the harvest and then there's the ant and the grasshopper the grasshopper this meant the nice warm summer months just singing while the amp prepare for winter the grasshopper beg for food the ant refused the grasshopper died that'll teach him like most people I was more grasshopper then and as a kid but lately that and is making more and more sense human species take note the total biomass of ants on the planet is greater than the total biomass of human beings ants have been around for hundreds of millions of years and have survived and involved to several mass extinctions there are well over twelve thousand described species and are found in nearly every habitat on every continent but Antarctica so while humans are singing and fiddling away with climate change the answer meanwhile thriving and adapting to the changes we are manifesting across the environment.

Peter finch KQED Michael Ellis Antarctica
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Chair and by the listeners of KQED it's five twenty one it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm Rachel Martin after a long effort to add a citizenship question to the twenty twenty census the trump administration says it's done trying speaking at the White House yesterday president trump blamed his opponents on the left I'm proud to be a citizen you're proud to be a citizen the only people who are not proud to be citizens of the ones who are fighting us all the way about the word citizen so even though the president has stopped fighting to try to get the question on the census he is now trying to get the information a different way in Paris Hansi low Wong is with us now Hansi you what you gonna do what's the administration going to do to try to get the citizenship information president trump says the administration is going to do what the census bureau recommended it to do to begin with which is if they wanted to have more detail citizenship data that to use in bit ministry of records or existing government records from various federal agencies including the social security ministration department homeland security at that data would be more accurate and collecting suffer for responses to a citizenship question so let's back up why did the trump administration give up on this in the first place getting the question on the census president trump and Attorney General William Barr said that the ministration was really crunched for time that to add a question at this point about citizenship now that the printing of the census forms has already started without that question that would really derail the senses there would be no time to make that happen without harming this constitutionally had Casterly remanded head count from happening on time and so this executive order that president trump has issued tries to make sure that Mr to records existing government records are ready to go but it's unclear what impact that might have the again the bureau has already been directed by the restoration to compile these records but it does give some vitality that there will be citizenship information them ministrations wanting to push forward and it opens up the next potential fight here well like what what's that what's the purpose of the fight the contracts there are two main fights that are that is likely to take place now that there might be citizenship information when the census is done numbers from the population counts to determine how many congressional seats each state gets but there is this ongoing lawsuit by the state of Alabama which is challenging this long standing practice of dividing of congressional seats to involve every person living in the country that's based on the Fourteenth Amendment which calls for the whole number of persons in each state to be counted but Alabama is arguing that rational see should be divided up based on the number of just U. S. citizens and green card holders and the justice department has been defending the census bureau including unauthorized immigrants in those numbers but yesterday at US Attorney General William Barr said something that really raises questions about what the ministry since position is on this issue going forward let's listen to what he said there is a current dispute over whether illegal aliens can be included for apportionment purposes meeting on the resolution of that dispute this data may be relevant to those considerations we will be studying this issue it's important to point out that other groups have intervened in this case in case the truck ministration does want to defend the census bureau we'll see what the truck negotiation does next week when a court filing is due uhhuh so that's one battle you said they were too the next one is about citizenship for information information how that could be used at the state and local level for trying new voting districts president trump said this could be used to draw voting districts just based on citizens old enough to vote a strategist has said that could benefit Republicans and we'll see if that happens all right NPR's Hansi low long force on this latest development with the twenty twenty census thanks so much on the you're welcome it is Friday when we hear from story core and today we have an example of a saying that you have two families the one you're born with the one you're fine Carinthia isam was just a child winner.

KQED Steve Inskeep NPR
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Kqed at kqed public radio it's now 23 minutes past eight it's morning edition on kqed i'm brian watt san francisco police officers have been wearing body cameras for over a year now in the city's police commission is trying to change some of the rules for how officers use those cameras the police commission met last night the topic was front and center kqeds alex emslie his followed the sfp dis use of body cameras and the long debate around the rules he was there last night he joins us this morning alex what rules did the commission vote off they were considering a few you could call him small tweaks but are targeted brought by the city's police chief william scott who said that issues had arisen mrs with officers use of the mute button when they shouldn't so they're recording video but they're not recording audio it's about who gets the c videos of critical incidence say officerinvolved shootings before homicide inspectors have interviewed a an officer who is involved in safeguarding and i think most strikingly it it just had an underscore that officers who failed to turn their cameras on when they're supposed you will be disciplined so what prompted the police commission to examine these particular issues while there there's been a few highprofile incidents relieved shootings fatal shootings where officers were wearing these cameras but they work turned honor they were turned on just after the shooting and captured a little bit of the incident but again no audio and not the entire thing the most recent was awesome early december the fatal shooting of kiet day o'neill in the baby you district that's a disturbing video it does capture thirty seconds of the shooting but no audio so you can't year with the officers are talking about and that's because the camera wasn't activated during a vehicle pursuit which is required by this policy so this would make people wonder why the cameras aren't always on a lot of police departments have these cameras i'm not aware of any one that that runs them for an entire officer shift there's datastorage issues with.

police chief officer o'neill Kqed san francisco the commission william scott thirty seconds 23 minutes
"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"kqed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The kqed news rumonge we've o coming up on our program in the wake of the devastating california wildfires another hazard remains toxic chemicals left's lingering in the ash and debris we'll look at the threats they pose to residents and the environment plus artisan filmmaker i way way on his new fail human flow i tackles the global refugee crisis and who he thinks is responsible for solving it but first hollywood has been forced to take a hard look at itself as news of harvey weinstein sexual misconduct spiralled into a scandal virtually overnight women in hollywood and elsewhere have gone on social media to share their stories of sexual harassment and abuse using the hashtag me too this week women in california politics joined the fray saying enough more than one hundred forty women in state politics from staffers to lobbyists to elected officials have signed an open letter calling out what they say is the culture of sexual harassment and assault in the halls of state governments to discuss this further i'm joined by sacramental lobbyist pamela lopez who helped organize the litter campaign california state senator nancy skinner of berkeley and kqed politics and government reporter marie salah goes who joins us from sacramento welcome to you all and pam let me begin with you why did you and other women who work in the state capital community decide to issue this open letter because we've had enough in the wake of the harvey weinstein scandal i and several other friend started comparing notes and talking about our experiences working in california politics and the california political community and started sharing some very upsetting stories about quidproquo sexual harassment that we've faced from powerful man in the capital community not only legislators but other powerful lobbyists other appointed officials and even if.

toxic chemicals hollywood social media harassment california assault pamela lopez nancy skinner berkeley marie salah kqed harvey weinstein senator reporter sacramento pam