20 Episode results for "Kpcc"

The 'L Word' For A New Generation

The Frame

28:07 min | 1 year ago

The 'L Word' For A New Generation

"KPCC PODCASTS are supported by twentieth century. Fox presenting forward versus Ferrari directed by James Mangold starring Christian. Bale and Matt Damon now nominated mandated for a Golden Globe for best actor Christian Bale and five critic's choice nominations including best picture of the year. KPCC supporters include Fox searchlight presenting. Joe Rabbit nominated for the Sag Award for Best Ensemble. Seven critics choice awards including best picture. The Golden Globe for Best Picture and one of AF is ten best pictures of of the year for consideration in all categories from the broadcast center. KPCC this is the frame. I'm John Horn born on today's show just as the criminal trial for the disgraced mogul Harvey Weinstein got underway in New York. New Charges were filed against him here in Los Angeles plus and we'll find out why cast members of the original l.. Word were so passionate about rebooting the show with an updated perspective the years we just for like no one's come to fill our shoes so frustrated us and we thought you know what Queer people need to be represented on television. It's our job to bring the show back. Plus a look look at the life and legacy of one of America's foremost conceptual artists all that coming up on the Frank. KPCC PODCASTS are supported. You by Twentieth Century Fox presenting forward versus Ferrari directed by James Mangold and starring Christian. Bale and Matt Damon now nominated for a Golden Globe for best actor actor Christian Bale and five critic's choice nominations including best picture of the year more than two years after the Harvey Weinstein Story First broke the former film producer and studio chief entered a New York courtroom today to face charges of rape and sexual assault but just as court was adjourned on the East Coast. New Charges were filed against Weinstein here in Los Angeles County. Prosecutors are filing criminal charges against Harvey Weinstein the district attorney is charges against Harvey Weinstein of assaulting and raping two women in incidents that occurred nearly seven years ago at hotels us. Dominic Patent senior editor deadline is covering the Weinstein trial in New York and he explained what happened today in Manhattan. Everyone is talking about the trial l.. Starting it's kind of like how people have been talking about the new decade starting. It's not really the math is this was dealing with the pretrial motions of which there were many one which was expected that the judge James Burke did not rule on whether or not he was going to allow cameras in the courtroom. That's looking more and more unlikely now though it still could happen what was talked about was a number of issues around requested successor the jury which the judge rejected basically a gag order on the lawyers from the prosecution institution which the judge rejected. There was talk about How we're going to deal with incidents from other jurisdictions to occur or not there was also discussions about how we're we're going to deal with this incredible process of taking jury Harvey Weinstein's lawyers his latest round of lawyers? I should say have insisted for the past several months there is no way he can receive a fair trial in the media. centric environment of New York City actually unsuccessfully tried on two occasions they have moved out of Manhattan over two thousand thousand jury. Summons have been sent out vis-a-vis this case to give you a sense of what that means for a regular case usually about two hundred or sent out and that's topping it for most. Yeah so clearly. There is a sense of getting a large pool of which to draw from over the next few days. What we're going to see here in New York City is these pre jury selections? We're they're just GONNA try to start skimming off stuff as they go through through batches of one hundred fifty at a time in front of the lawyers then next week on January fourteen. Gene they're going to get to actual jury selection and if that moves along somewhat faster probably somewhere around the twenty first of January. They're actually going to get to the actual trial if there's no hiccups. More than eighty women have gone public with claims that Harvey Weinstein sexually assaulted or harassed them but this is a much narrower case. There are only two women involved here and we don't know the identity of one of them. What are the charges that Harvey Weinstein is facing in New York? What he's facing five felony charges and those charges which have gone through various stages since he was first arrested in May two thousand eighteen with new indictments coming in and one woman was dropped from from the case now of Harvey Weinstein is looking at is essentially life in prison if he is found guilty on these charges but even very very complex in the court of public public opinion a lot of people have already condemned Harvey Weinstein clearly there? Dozens and dozens of women reporting Assaults and harassment by him and just like with Bill Cosby I and many others in these situations the ammos seem to be an eerily repetitive. So people make their own decisions but in actual court. These things are quite hard to prove they have got to show that these were nonconsensual relationships which Harvey Weinstein always insist they were they might have been messing. He's definitely has admitted he's been on people who is now. Divorced live but they were consensual and there are part of the defensive strategy is to show that there were back and forth and relationships and even sometimes quite warm and and what seemed to be at least through through text messages and emails intimate conversations between these women and Harvey Weinstein. It's going to be very hard. Believe it or not for the prosecution to get a guilty however and again I mentioned bill cosby in the first trial cosby ended in a mistrial. The second trial bill cosby what happened. Was the the judge allowed. What are called prior bad act testimonies that were other women outside of Andrea? WHO's the woman in the bill cosby case other women who had been reported being assaulted by because these testify the judge in this case justice of the New York Supreme Court here in New York City is now allowing this to happen including a former actress from the Sopranos? Who's GonNa give her account of what happened? That could prove the tipping point as as happened with bill cosby so we know what happened even though it was brief inside the New York courtroom courtroom today back in Los Angeles. La County District Attorney. Jackie Lacey announced that Weinstein has been charged with raping one woman and sexually assaulting another what was happening outside the courtroom on the steps of the courthouse. Where in the streets in New York today? What we saw outside? They've been very chilly. New York morning For people on on the West Coast is we saw individuals. Rosanna arquette rose McGowan other women who have alleged. They were assaulted by Harvey Weinstein taking to the street and simply saying time's up. Doc as is the name of the organization that has come to represent many women who have been sexually assaulted and harassed times off on this kind of behavior on individuals like Harvey Weinstein. They were very direct direct. Why is he himself was jeered and heckled by people as he entered the courtroom on a Walker Earlier today so very much. You're seeing there as explosions happening inside the courtroom and outside the courtroom so as we mentioned the L. A. District Attorney filed charges against Harvey Weinstein. Today even as he was almost leaving court in New York mark how might those two cases effect one another. Well this has been a big thing even before l. a.. Jackie Lacey made her announcement of these charges. Today because a lot of time onto Weinstein has been trying to either halt pause or or kill civil cases that have been going on against him like the one that Ashley Judd has going on which is on hold right now but his lawyer simply saying saying he can't be in all these places at once and we have to concentrate on this criminal trial this issue other jurisdictions actually came up in court today and Judge James Burchett a kind of pushed away from it. Now it's GonNa come much more to the fore. This could really change the focus of this remember. Jackie Lacey is looking putting Harvey Weinstein away for twenty eight years over on the West because they have to bring him they have to bail for him. There's a whole process that has to happen suddenly. You almost have competing cases and that could work in Weinstein's favor even though the DA's on both coasts are trying to do justice as they see fit. Dominic Patten is a senior editor at deadline. He is in New York covering the trial of Harvey Weinstein Dominic. Thanks for coming on the show. Thank you and you can hear more about. The charges announced today Los Angeles Against Harvey Weinstein during KPCC'S ACC's newscasts next on the frame. The L word makes a comeback with a new generation in mind. KPCC's supporters include Fox searchlight presenting Joe Rabbit from writer Director Tyco WTIH included on both. Afi's the National Board of reviews ten best pictures of the year and now nominated for the Sag Award for Best Ensemble. Poland best supporting actress. Scarlett Johansson seven critics choice awards including best picture and best adapted screenplay and the Golden Globe Award for best actor and Best Picture. Sure of the year awards eligible in all categories KPCC. PODCASTS are supported by Warner brothers presenting Joker Todd Phillips Cinematic Vision winner of two Golden Globe Awards including best actor drama Joaquin Phoenix Varieties Owen. Gleiberman named joker the best film of the year ear describing it as a movie that can and will stand the test of time. See Walking Phoenix's screen actors guild and critic's choice nominated performance for your consideration consideration in all categories including best picture director and actor when the original L. Word premiered on showtime in two thousand and four. It was the first and only TV show entirely about the lives of Lesbians Fifteen years later. The show's reboot the L Word Generation. Ration- Q. is still the only such series. The new show set ten years later than the I l. word features some of the original characters but it also so introduces a younger more diverse group of Queer entrance characters and stories cast members and executive producers. Kate Manning unleash a hail told me they they wanted to revive the show with an updated perspective but even with Marja Lewis Ryan replacing. Eileen shaken lead producer the show keeps true to the original as Lucia Haley relayed the new series started with an intimate lesbian sex scene. Okay Oh my my dad came to see the premiere with me the other night and he he was sitting next to me he loves popcorn and he had his popcorn and the opening shot happened. And I'm not gonNA give anything away but he. He leaned over and he goes well. That was alarming a- and it feels really intentional that this is the show we're going to have and get used to it and love it or hate it but this is what we are. Yep Yep I agree. That was the point. I don't think it was something that was overlooked or accidental accidental. No not at all before the title card. It's before it's very intentional. Yes when you think about returning to the show what was important. And what did the show need to have. That made it attractive to both of you ask actors. Did you feel that the stories left to be told. What was the motivation of coming back doc? Well we we made it come back. I mean this. This has been a goal and a project of Kate myself in Jennifer beals and Eileen the original Creator Creator For about what your ears we've been trying to Bring it back because a couple of things we thought it ended prematurely No one including Eileen was very proud of the last season and when we ended gay marriage wasn't even legal so as the years went on and the world was changing an in opening up We just felt someone else was gonna come along and fill that void like someone else is GonNa do this. There's going to be another lesbian show and there was orange. Just a new black which we're fans of and now there's a lot more gay content out there but you know through the years we just were like. No one's come along to fill our shoes so frustrated us and we thought title what Queer people need to be represented on television. And it's our job to bring the show back and we couldn't figure out initially what that looked like because when we talked about at this many years ago reboots didn't exist. We thought Oh maybe it would be a film. What would that look like? And then slowly but surely all of these other shows start doing reboots so it was giving us at Lee something to work towards and have an idea of what that would with that would be and just to fill in the BLANKSON. Tell not only the three of us what happened to the three three of us but then also show where the world is. Now I think one of you said that you weren't totally happy with how the series ended. Did you feel in some ways that returning to the outward you could maybe correct something that you think. You didn't get right no no. It wasn't about the the the the course correction just that that last last season itself was kind of a mess. Everyone knew it like Lisa said even I lead admits it now. It's no big secret We're trying to course correct anything. We knew there were flaws in the original. No question and and it's been pointed out many times over and some of the flaws you know it was in two thousand five so nobody had had the vocabulary that we have now or the knowledge and I think that gets overlooked very often and They're easy to see in hindsight. I WanNa play a clip where there is what. I'll call network brass that have some thoughts about what Alice should do with her show. So let's listen to the scene when we bought your podcast cast. We bought a brand a- poppy phone palatable lesbian brand we want to build off that I do too I really do I issues this. I'm a very curious person and I think my audiences to and I just want to give them a little credit you know. I think we have a real opportunity to make an impact and we will always be completely open to your ideas. Are we gonNA stay true to our season one audience right but they might be interested in something more substantial inch. It's unlikely could talk about why that scene is so important about what has to say not just about this character about what's going on in popular culture and the watering down Well you know it's hard because I don't WanNa say that I that are new. showrunner is is writing her experience directly because because we we do have the most incredible network that we work with showtime but I think that through through her past maybe she's dealt with networks. That aren't that great. And when you try to to have. Queer content edgy feminist driven content on television. It's it's not always people's favorite subject and people want things. I mean my character actor back in the day was on a similar show to the view and they were like you know be fun Gay Fun Gay and I was trying to talk about diverse subjects. It so oh you know. I think people don't always want to talk about the hard stuff and and television can be fluffy and that's the baseline of my character is going through the network. Bought her podcast called the chart And she talked about everything she loved and wanted to talk about him once they bought her. They're like no now now be he from gay. We're talking with Kate manege and Leash Haley about the return of the L. Word. There's a segment in episode. Where Megan re piano who I will say you just won the Golden Boot as the world's best female soccer player comes on and she's asked about coming out but I'm wondering in the context of the show? Do you think that there are ways that people who might be closeted who are thinking about coming out can look at the l word either now or in its previous iteration and have have the courage somehow through the show to be open about who they are. I mean I hope to God that is the case. That's that's one of our goals deep down on that that we want queer kids to have representation I personally longed for it when I was a kid And it have Albany and that would have changed the entire course of my life if I saw someone on. TV or in the movies that looked like knee talked like me felt like me Because when you see yourself represented In a positive way. And and that's what I also love about our show we have. We have women that are in powerful positions that that are doing well financially that have a chosen family Who are surrounded by friends community? That loves them A world that loves them and I think when that's reflected It helps people and that's kind of a deep way to look at our show but the original had that too. I mean people still to this day. Come up and say how much that show meant to them because it helps them realize who they were and what a beautiful beautiful powerful message that is entertainment was able to not just entertain but to help someone feel good about themselves. Kate I wanNA play a scene where your character is thinking about opening a lesbian bar. This used to be a gay bar. Though right and years ago damn times have changed intestines always trying to By the owners turned back to what it used to be should just rip tease out which the menu of them clean the place up. No would be the only lesbian bar in the city. Only when bye guys run it evison serious. Is it actually the case that there are no yeah no lesbian bars in La Right now. Apparently so yeah. I guess they throw night Z.. They are they have pop up fan. I don't I I wouldn't know I don't go out that much but that's certainly not the way it used to be a lot of the original spots in La of shut down so that was Normandy room at Oxford in. They're all gone. Oxford's gone all right all right. These are serious. Yeah we know. It's we need places so I think that was the whole the whole point of that but also there are other points that even though we have progressed in some ways that there are still issues that the characters and society are wrestling with. There's a conversation about the church and about whether or not a church can be inclusive and whether or not it can embrace marriage equality so it does feel like even ask the show is celebrating rating. How far we have come? There are still a long way to go. There is and I think something we we've all talked about. Is that you know. A lot of terminology has changed changed. But in a Lotta ways the world is still the same in in some regards and then we've progressed certainly from the last ten years but but we can't. We can't sit comfortably. Tripling go. Well we will fix it fix it all and then there's still a lot of work to be done the still for sure. Yeah and hopefully other shows will. We'll follow in the steps of this show and they're harsh shows that are helping you know carry on the message and whatnot. We have pose. Yeah what an incredible show of it and I know that has reached a broad audience. And how incredible and and then there was transparent unlikely she said orange new black so there are politician in the politician. Yeah US want to ask you about the people who are making the show. The writers and the directors I saw the second episode was directed by a friend of Mine Alison Brown Lesbian Director. It feels like probably very specifically there are a lot of women and probably a lot of gay women who are making their show. And how does that start to affect not only the stories stories that are being told but also the feeling onset and the community that that creates. It's everything I mean. It's it's been most important important for us to be surrounded by the Queer community the Trans Community. I mean the production office and to give everyone a chance in a role That that may be heaven. Had One in the past give them space to work and show it. They've got our crew is so diverse. You know we're proud. We're proud of that. What else you one last thing? The show is obviously from the very beginning very sex positive. How do you make sure that in a show that is going to be very candid about women women having sex together that you create a safe place for the actors were doing those scenes? Well now there's something that shows have intimacy coordinators that we discovered discovered back in the day. We were our intimacy coordinator but now there's some that actually comes to set Most speaks to you beforehand to make sure you're okay with what the scene entails. And you're like yeah I'm fine. We're good because we have this very safe environment and we're very fortunate to to to have everyone have a group of people that look out for us it. It's it feels like overkill but it's it's also it's just like this added protection but it's it's such a welcoming group of people We've we've been very very fortunate. Kate Manning and Lisa Haley are executive producers and co-stars of the L Word Generation. Q Kate and Lisa Asia. Thanks so much for coming on the show. Thank you appreciate it. The our generation Q Air Sunday nights on showtime up next on the frame the legacy of artist John Baldessarri. KPCC PODCASTS are supported. By Warner Brothers presenting just mercy based on the true story of attorney Brian Stevenson's heroic fight to save an innocent man's life now nominated for the screen actors guild for outstanding performance by a male actor in a supporting role Jamie Fox and winner of the National Board of Review's freedom of Expression Award The New York Times Nicholas Kristof called it. Searing and soaring every every generation has its hero made ours for consideration in all categories. What makes art art? That's the question. John Baldassare tried to answer with his work. The southern California native was a conceptual art. Pioneer in in a huge influence on generations of artists. He passed away last week at the age of eighty eight L. A. Times art critic Christopher Knight joined us to talk about Baldassare stories lasting impact on the art world. John of course was one of the Quote Unquote founders of the conceptual art movement. which sounds very grand and John was not a grand grand person at all the conceptual ism based on his work? Basically came out of a desire to question the idea of what a work of our is and he made objects of all kinds from prince two collage photographs to paintings on canvas to photograph on canvas and John was curious to know how art fit within a mess media culture and so that's what he began to explore. I WANNA play a clip from an interview that you did with Bala. Sorry in two thousand and eleven at the Hammer Museum. And it's this conversation about what is and is not art and who gets to decide when it becomes heart if you have let's say hunk of concrete with rebar in and he said it's out in the street. It's just a hunk of concrete with rebar going to put it in Museum mm-hmm art sculpture so it's contextual but if you see a canvas out in the street it's still hard and that makes me think about what he was a teacher. He taught famously at Cal Arts and at UCLA. What was his legacy asset teacher in terms of how he changed perceptions of what was and was not art? I think. John's legacy as a teacher has been pretty enormous. He always understood that as a teacher it. It was not possible for him to instruct someone how to be an artist but he also understood that what he could do would be to create the conditions conditions within which a student could discover him or herself as being an artist. One of his most famous works is is a text piece in which he scrawled on the wall and Chuck. I will not make any more boring art and he scrawled it over and over and over. It's the kind of thing that a naughty student in elementary school is made to do. So the pedagogical aspect of that work because important and the pedagogical interest of his own art in in terms of of creating an environment in in which one can CONC- oneself emerge is important. Just a couple of years ago Jon Balka sorry went on the simpsons as a voice actor and performed as himself itself. So you moved into painting. Giants Sh- MAZES MARGE. The mouth has had it say. Now it's time to find out what the nose those those I heard one did all the sorry take himself not terribly seriously. He took himself really seriously. Ah By not taking himself seriously. Humor is everywhere in John's work. The more you know about are the funnier and more ride work becomes but I think he understood that one of the great things about a joke is that's a response to the joke is instantaneous you either laugher you don't laugh and once you left then you can begin to peel the artichoke and find out. What is it that major left? Why is this funny but the the humor is really important and whose work I want to ask you about a piece that Baldassare he did in the late sixties? It was called tips for artists who want to sell. It was a sign Eh. Had three bullet points. I'll just read the first. Generally speaking paintings with light colors sell more quickly than paintings with dark colors and it goes on to describe. I should be in those paintings. How Bala sorry see art and the art marquette was he comfortable with the fact that his art was worth something he was? I think. vexed by the idea that his are was worth something what he wanted more than anything was for people to look at his work. But there's one story I wanNA WANNA tell you from from two thousand fifteen which I think explains a good deal about John his his work his place within his work in two thousand fifteen fifteen. He made a multiple sculpture. That had its debut in a party at the architect. Cool Hula Party entre fast and when you arrived at the House for the presentation of the sculpture. They're hanging over. The swimming pool was in enormous sculpture of a carrot orange carrots with the green top and John with here it's a opening party and I looked at the carrot and I looked at John and I thought this carrot is a self portrait. The Carol was about six and a half seven feet tall. John was six foot seven. You always knew John was in the room because towered above everyone else and the carrot kind of embodied. What John's aren't interest was and that is he saw a work of art art as a carrot? Not a stick that whatever influence it had was not to beat you over the head it was to entice you. Christopher Knight is the art critic at the Los Angeles Times Christopher thanks so much for coming back on the show happy to do it and that is all for today but don't forget to follow us on facebook and twitter. You will find us at the frame. I'm John Horn. Thanks for listening or back here tomorrow off at the moment broadcast center.

Harvey Weinstein Los Angeles New York City Manhattan KPCC John Los Angeles County Kate Harvey Weinstein Dominic Bill Cosby Best Ensemble KPCC John Horn Weinstein Fox searchlight Jackie Lacey John Baldassare Joe Rabbit James Burke
The Autobiography Of A Flea (To A Point)

The Frame

18:25 min | 1 year ago

The Autobiography Of A Flea (To A Point)

"KPCC PODCASTS are supported by twentieth century. Fox presenting forward versus Ferrari directed by James Mangold and starring Christian. Bale and Matt Damon now nominated mandated for a Golden Globe for best actor Christian Bale and five critic's choice nominations including best picture of the year. KPCC supporters include Fox searchlight presenting. Joe Rabbit nominated for the Sag Award for Best Ensemble. Seven critics choice awards including best picture. The Golden Globe for Best Picture and one of AF is ten best pictures of of the year for consideration in all categories from the broadcast center at KPCC. This is the frame. I'm John Horn and thanks for joining us during our winter. Membership drive today. My guest for the entire show is musician and bassist. Michael Peter Ball Zari you. You probably know him as flee as a teenager. Flea met Anthony. Keita's Hello Slovak. And Jack Irons at Fairfax High Together. They formed the Red Hot Chili peppers in the nineteen eighties and the rest is history breath in addition to his work as the basis for the Chili peppers. Flea is also an actor you might remember his role as needles in back to the future her chicken or as one of the nihilists. In the Big Lebowski Nas he has a small part in a new movie written by Lena Waif and directed by Melina soukous Queen and slim credible spent flea wasn't really here to talk about acting. He was here to talk about his new memoir. It's called acid for the children and it's about his wild days before for main. We're rolling take one. We've had this ritual that okay so I call me tissues bad dude everytime that's good okay. Yes the ritual usual but we took a brief pause and then we launched in and fully started with the event that would change the course of his life. When I was a kid? My father father was a very strict man. He ran the house in a very kind of militant shipshape way everything was wholesome we at dinner every night at seven he wore a suit at a case went to work every day. Hey very you know very normal and we came from Australia to America because we were in Australian family. We were in New York for only for four years while he completed his assignment. Edmund destroy and constant and to return to Australia where we were going to live Australian lives and my mom my wild ass heart following irresponsible. Mom took off with a junkie jazz musician. Who lives in his parent's basement? We left my dad. He went back to Australia without us. And we moved into this life and everything flipped upside down. I mean everything. So what is it like to go back there because what you're doing in a book is your excavating the memories about the physical things that happened but attached to those physical things are emotional feelings about what is happening in and around your life absolutely and I think some stories. I think about Halloween story involving your stepfather. So when you're recalling these events how much do you think about your state of mind. He at that time. Do you have new perspective on how you become the person you are as you're starting to revisit and write down all of these memories all of that in spades. You know it's when I was actually doing the writing. Firstly I would read it to my editor often. I'd write all myself and I would read it to him and while I was reading invariably I would I would start sobbing and when I did audio book it was just like a sob fest man. It was really the emotional. For some reason I can write it and it's cool like I just wanNA write it well and really describe what I'm feeling and try to do a good job but when I read it out loud it's it's very very emotional but anyways yeah that particular event it was Halloween and I was out trick or treating with some friends and we ran and all these other kids these trick or treaters when you're from school in. They're all running home and like this crazy guy in the street. He's shooting a gun. He's if scared everyone's going home has to get home. Tom And I'm running home and I get home and see like all debris in my front yard the windows busted out like the TV at flown through the windows in the yard. And I I didn't register shirt and it's grand inside the house and she my Stepdad. There and I realized as soon as I walk at. Oh He's The gun shooting madman. He's that lunatic. That everyone is terrified of and certa this combination of absolute terror. What was he going to do? Next Kiwi Cedeno slumped on the couch in his underwear. Blood and guns and also embarrassed. Because it's my house. People always concentrate. You know a big part of my child is when I meet Anthony Keita's grand up citing Chili peppers and it's a it's a very important relationship chip in my life but for me kind of the emotional center and the thing that I talked about in the book. Most is my relationship with Walter my Stepdad because he was terrifying man but he was also I mean he was a brilliant musician he was jazz bass player. He was an absolutely ferocious musician. And he played this upright bass in when he played it. He tacked his instrument with like violent frenzy. You you know these fast bebop walking bass lines but he was taking all his torment and turning it into something beautiful beautiful through his base and and even like when I got older and I thought I was rebelling against him by playing rock music. I was doing exactly what he showed me to do. We're talking talking with flea. His new book is called acid for the children. I WanNa play another jazz musician. This song is called a night in Tunisia. I think you you recognize the player. I'm crystal clear. Sound cutting a hole in the sky. Man That's dizzy. Gillespie so tell us about your encounter with dizzy. Had started playing the trumpet in Seventh Grade. And I fell in love with it and my hero was dizzy. Gillespie he had this magical trumpet is cheeks puffed up played he was funny dressed. Wild eld was smart. He was everything that I saw. A great person could be. He was my hero. My mother took me to see him play at Royce Hall at UCLA. I I believe it was nineteen seventy three. I was twelve years old. We're sitting an audience at Royce Hall Getting Ready Waiting Dizzy to come on. I think what does he got him on Wednesday coming coming when she was just you know he's coming into one and I entered the bathroom. I Jump Up to go pee I ran out. I run down. I'll and instead of going back to lobby where you're supposed to go. Go to the bathroom. I was just excited and ran toward the stage. Assad door and ran in it looking for the bathroom I run into people walking around. And there's I'm by myself. I'm looking dizzy. Gillespie standing there holding holding his horn horn. But the Bella pokes up to the heavens. I run up to him and total. Mr Gillespie I I mean Steve Does He. And I'm just I can't speak to so an odd that it's him and he pulls me in and hugs me with his arms from a heads up in his armpit and I'm cuddled huddled up next to him and he just kind of holds me there. And he's holding his haunting one hand he's holding me and the other hand embracing me and it's like loving embrace speaking to somebody and it's just in heaven you know I'm sitting and I to this day. I remember the feeling of him by the smell of his Cologne. His suit his everything about it and he was so kind so sweet man and anyway keeps talking this guy after a few minutes and then he stops talking guy kind of looks down to smiles at me. PATS man head walks. onstage starts playing night in Tunisia and I'm just forget all about appeaing you know so it was just so happy and it was such a beautiful thing and that is up next on the frame more my conversation with flea who talks about growing up in a very different. LA KPCC. PODCASTS are supported by twentieth century Fox presenting forward versus Ferrari directed by James Mangold old and starring Christian. Bale and Matt Damon now nominated for a Golden Globe for best actor Christian Bale and five critic's choice nominations including best picture of the year here. Katie supporters include Fox searchlight presenting Joe Joe Rabbit from writer director. TYCO not included on both AF is as a national board of Review's ten best pictures of the year and now nominated for the Sag Award for Best Ensemble and best supporting actress. Scarlett Johansson seven critics choice awards awards including best picture and best adapted screenplay and the Golden Globe Award for best actor and Best Picture of the year awards eligible in all categories. KPCC PODCASTS are supported. By Warner Brothers. Michael B Jordan Jamie Fox and Brie Larson's star in just mercy based on the true story of Attorney Attorney Brian. Stevenson's heroic fight to save an innocent man's life. Every generation has its hero made ours variety raved. Just mercy will shake you to to your soul nominated by the screen actors guild for outstanding performance by a male actor in a supporting role for Jamie Foxx for consideration in all categories including including best picture and best supporting actor. Welcome back to this pledge drive edition addition of the frame. I'm John Horn before. He wore pants made of stuffed animals before he wore socks in the wrong places even before he played the Bass Flea was into jazz and books in his new memoir. Acid for the children flee writes about his childhood years before there were such a thing as the red hot chili early peppers. I'm GonNa play another piece of music. This is probably my favorite song by a band that I think you and I both love Phone Duda Duda Duda deemed Carl. So we've got jazz. We got dizzy and then we got. Let's plan at what point to those different and forms of music. Start to coalesce in your mind as a way to bridge. What you've heard your Stepdad playing the bass what led Zeppelin's doing and how you can move into the rock and roll what happens is I meet a boy named Hal Slovak and you know at this point I had grown up in such a jazz household? I adopted the JASAR's attitude of a disdain for rock music. I thought it was music for people who just wanted haircut silly magazines and clothes. They didn't really care about music. I saw like de-evolution of of what music is capable of which is an arrogant stand for thirteen year. Old Fourteen year. Old boy whatever hold old I was to take but that was where I was at and meet Hulo. And he's just as beautiful artistic poet of a kid you know he writes he makes these beautiful paintings. Things Plays Guitar and he's in Love with rock music and he's in love with the Holy Romancing rock stardom the whole thing and we become already become friends with Anthony. We are very close. Camila we become a threesome and I start falling in love with rock music. I see them play. There's no teachers. There's no one around girls come and watch and they want to see because it's cool in the room and they're playing. I watch plan. I start softening towards it. Music becomes less like notes and learning complex harmonic ideas than just like this. This fun wild awesome thing you know and I started playing and shortly after that Alaska to start playing a basin Jason happens. We're talking with flea. His new book is called acid for the children. I WanNa ask you to read something from the book in front of you. It's page one. Forty three He. Can I use your reading glasses. They're not reading any reading glasses around. I don't know because I always say such a rush to come here. That didn't let's see. It's Oh my God look what Jesus put in your pocket. The gods want me to read this so it starts on page one forty three then. There was Freddie gold. Then there was Freddie gold. His two older sisters were both friends with my sister. At Hollywood high. Freddie was my first rich friend when it went over to his house I discovered an opulent previously known to me a big spread up in the in the West Hollywood hills in the bird streets up above the sunset strip including the famous blue Jay way. There's a fog upon. La and my friends have lost their way. That's a Beatles song a big swimming pool to well-stocked refrigerators. Refrigerators a Salvadorian housekeeper. Named bessie in a white suit and hat. Everything clean immaculate White Shag rugs a massive aquarium that bubbled doubled. Its modern CONVEX. Way Out of the black tiled wall Freddie always had weed weed smoke it going pool than Asana listening to loud music the popular stuff which being jazz nerd I knew very little about Peter Frampton P funk led Zeppelin living it up. What's interesting about the Freddie gold? That story is this idea. About class and privilege you are essentially a latchkey kid. You're on your own left your own devices and you have this friend or these friends who have a different life that you have a glimpse of how do you think that starts to affect the way you see the world and the way you navigate your way around the things that you don't have. Yeah well one interesting. Quick aside to that question is that the world was so different than here in the early seventies because now if a parent aren't any money you're going to a private school but back when I went to La Public schools. We had every class of kid that doesn't exist in public school. Now I had kids who were poor. Mother's streetwalkers. I had kids. Who Freddie Gold? We're wealthy and crazily enough like I liked. You know the Yummy food the swimming pool you jump in the pool going Asana do all this fun stuff. You always had weed. But I didn't cover that I treasured Mike Connection with with my other friends who I had profound relationships with who had nothing so it wasn't really about that for me but it wasn't enough that nothing we had was nothing because we had no peace show harmony in the home. That was how our home was scary home to be in. You know the things that I wanted to do. Well at didn't revolve around making money. It was never like I'm GonNa make money. I'm going to get this. I'm going to do that. It was more like I'm going to be a bad ass ass on this trumpet. I'm GONNA wear a suit like dizzy. Gillespie and Blow my horn. We listen to some music dizzy. Gillespie we listened to led Zeppelin play one more shortcut. This is a storyteller that I think is important to you. This is a tale of a meeting of two lonesome skinny fairly old white men on a planet which was dying fast. Just one of them was a science fiction writer named Kilgore Trout. He was a nobody at the time and they supposed his life was over. He was mistaken. As as a consequence of the meeting he became one of the most beloved and respected human beings in history. That's Kurt vonnegut rating breakfast of Champions. I've never heard that before before we can find everything. Yeah wow he did a lot of my book me looking for our moral compass and and me not having anyone as apparent to guide me as a kid to like help me transition from a boy to a man to be there for me to be present to be looking at the things I was going through and pay attention engine and I found that in my solitude with the books that I loved I always read every day. I read all my life. I've read every day except my drug doc days when I was just too damn wasted word to not be a blurred message of ants. Walking around on a page you know and I loved Kurt Vonnegut. When that was a kid when I got I guess it was like I was sixth grade seventh grade? When I I I read Becker champions and you know one after other than you know Science Titan you know slaughterhouse five all of them and he meant so much to me? I just think because he put the most profound and beautiful statements in the simplest terms terms. And I really got it when I was a kid is way of being funny the way he drew in told asterisk which ends up being the Chili peppers. You know sign. I just loved them and and he gave me hope that people could be really good. People could do great things not because they needed to get into heaven because they wanted something but because it was the best way to be fleas new book is called acid for the children. Flee thanks so much okay just say no I'm not recommending ending children take LSD. This is a cautionary tale thin. Thanks so much for having and that is it for the frame today. Thanks for listening both on the radio and on demand I'm John Horn and thanks for supporting. KPCC the to the KABC. PODCASTS are supported by Warner brothers. Presenting Joker Todd Odd Phillips Cinematic Vision See Joaquin Phoenix's Golden Globe and screen actors guild nominated performance winner of the Venice Film. Festival's top prize and one of the AF AF is top films of two thousand Nineteen Varieties Owen. Gleiberman name Joker the best film of the year describing it as a movie that can and will stand the test of time for consideration in all categories including best picture director and actor.

Mr Gillespie LA KPCC Anthony Keita Freddie gold John Horn Jordan Jamie Fox Christian Bale Fox searchlight Flea James Mangold Tunisia KPCC Warner Brothers Joe Joe Rabbit Matt Damon Best Ensemble Ferrari Kurt Vonnegut
Bradley Whitford Plays The Field

The Frame

18:25 min | 1 year ago

Bradley Whitford Plays The Field

"KPCC PODCASTS are supported by twentieth century. Fox presenting forward versus Ferrari directed by James Mangold starring Christian. Bale and Matt Damon now nominated mandated for a Golden Globe for best actor Christian Bale and five critic's choice nominations including best picture of the year. KPCC supporters include Fox searchlight presenting. Joe Rabbit nominated for the Sag Award for Best Ensemble. Seven critics choice awards including best picture. The Golden Globe for Best Picture and one of AF is ten best pictures of of the year for consideration in all categories talk from them on broadcast center at. KPCC this is the frame. I'm John Horn. And thanks for joining us during our winner. Membership drive today my guest for the entire show is actor Bradley Whitford. He's probably best known for starring starring in the West Wing and doing some bad things in a basement in get out more. Recently he was in transparent and Topi drama the handmaid's Tale now how he starring in a broad NBC Sitcom called perfect harmony. And if it sounds like a big departure that was intentional I was sort of looking to do. Do a comedy. I've been doing a lot of dark stuff I wanted to get out of Gilead for a time. I talked with Brad Whitford before a live audience at KPCC's recent open house in perfect harmony Whitford plays a character who's very close to the show's creator. Leslie Flee Wake Webster Leslie. Had this story about her grandfather at the end of his life he was very pretentious. Kind of snooty eastern coastal dude. A WHO ended up at the end of his life kind of stock in Kentucky where she is from any ended up finding real joy and and nourishment working in this little church that he thought he didn't WanNa have anything to do with and that was sort of basis of it and I was looking for something to do in in these insane. Polarized Times that put radically different people together and and sort of transcended it in a non preachy way with humor. And this has this added element of Music Zik. This is unacceptable. Latina girl is up to each. No which ruins listening experience Whitney. Houston we have a problem. Your confidence exceeds your talents snake. Tattoo George Frederick Candle. Didn't know anyone named Hal. It's not new year's tall open vows vows. Things that PAT say Jack makes you pay your character passes pass out. Yeah it was actually a tricky thing with this show because it it opens I have gone to Kentucky to be with my wife in her last as she was sick so that it was a very tricky thing. Because we're like opening a Sitcom on the day of my wife's funeral and I am downing sleeping pills Dell's with Bourbon. So it was tricky to find how exactly to do that. How to navigate that? Yes but you do. I suspect can make an argument about how this show is not a polar opposite to handmaid's tale and transparent even though they're very different beasts in terms of what they are trying to say that you're working in shows that you think have a meaning beyond the show itself and how would you define it for this show. Well I always hesitate to say I always remember in nineteen ninety four. I did a Clint Eastwood Movie. A perfect world and I'm sitting on the set and I have the New York Times and the Arts and Leisure section big headline he had just one The Oscar for unforgiven. Clint Eastwood's Vision Enough America. And I go over to him and I said did you see this. And he goes my vision of America. He's like a Oh about ten years ago is working with a monkey now. They think I'm Gandhi like you. Take the best job you can. I don't I don't have a like a a civic vegetable agenda which guides my showbiz choices but I've been very lucky to be on these shows that tend to have some sort of cultural impact. I'm asking about a show that you're probably best known for and that is West Wing. Thank you Look what a civilizing effect political discussion. This is a clip that is easily found. And I think it's called Josh. Lyman yells at the president. So let's listen to it. You need to listen to me. You have to listen to me. I can't help you unless you listen. You can't send Christmas cards to everyone you can't do it forget the. ESPN let's get the IMF like. We said. We were going to listen to what I have to say about the. Please listen to me I WANNA ask you about working with Aaron Sorkin Eric and because you had a long relationship with him I think it started with few good men is that right. It did our young actors will always say like. How do you get on a show like like the West uh-huh and the answer for me? Is You take part in a movie that you don't want to do really important film called revenge of the nerds two colon and nerds in Paradise Finish and Annette movie timber. Field played poindexter with glasses and the violin. And and Tim and I were kind of theater rats and we would fly up to the one act festival in Kentucky. Because we were shooting in Florida I became became friends with him. Tim Replace Tom Halse and a few good men. Tim said to Aaron. I think this guy can do your stuff and that. That's how I got. The West Wing was playing a jerk in idiotic moving but what about his writing and what that means for an actor outside of what it did for your career about the challenges that earned sorkin gets an act that kind of writing. Yeah I mean. And that was a snippet of what he asked his actors to do. Yes it it is intense and some really great actors. It's just not what they can do. I've seen really great. You have this relentless verbal obligation. There is a rhythm Aaron sits at the Monitor going on. They're like here's a rhythm and the great thing about his writing is thank God. It's it's weirdly easy to memorize. Because there's a flow to it and all the actors actors in that show a ninety eight percent of them. Allison Janney WHO's incapable of a false moment? But Johnny was doing eight shows a week for a decade before she did that. It was a lot of theater people. There's a verbal obligation if you're we're doing a speech like that and there's all this political CHEURFA and you're really upset about something and you say couldn't instead of could not you gotta go back and and get it get it right. He's he's an amazing writer. Who Breaks all the rules? I mean it was absolutely absolutely astonishing. He wrote twenty two episodes of a one hour for four years. That's the equivalent of eleven feature feature films a year. I got a chance after he left to right a couple and I thought my spine was going to fall out of my back. I can't can't believe that he did it and it'll never happen again. Nobody in that position will submit themselves to doing twenty two a year. And when we come back Brad. Whitford explains why parental encouragement might not be the best thing for a kid who's interested in the arts and KPCC. PODCASTS are supported by Twentieth Century Fox presenting Ford Verses Ferrari directed by James Mangold and starring Christian Bale and Matt Damon now nominated for a Golden Globe for best actor Christian Bale and five critic's choice nominations including best best picture of the year. KPCC's supporters include. Fox searchlight presenting Joe Joe Rabbit from writer Director Taika Waititi included on both AF. Is the national border reviews. Ten best pictures of the year and now nominated for the Sag Award for Best Ensemble and best supporting actress. Scarlett Johansson seven and critics choice awards including best picture and best adapted screenplay and the Golden Globe Award for best actor and Best Picture of the year awards eligible in all categories. He's KPCC. PODCASTS are supported by Warner brothers. Presenting Joker Varieties Owen. Gleiberman named Joker the best film of Twenty Nine Teen Calling it a movie that can and will stand the test of time. Joaquin Phoenix mesmerizes in the performance of the year now nominated for the screen screen actors guild for outstanding performance by a male actor in a leading role seven critics choice awards and four Golden Globe awards including Best Picture Best Director and best best actor for consideration in all categories. Welcome back to this pledge drive edition of the frame. I'm John Horn and my guest. Today is the emmy winning actor Brad Whitford. We spoke in front of a live audience at KPCC's recent open house. Whitford has had some very big successes in his career acting in film film and TV and in theater but he says the rewards and accolades don't always match up with how much effort goes into the work. I think you should get an Oskar for making a moment in a crappy movie work because it really is the the most difficult thing. And what do you get rewarded for. You get rewarded for you. Know the greatest writer in the world. who gets you? And you're looking into Allison Janney is is. It's like a conspiracy to make you succeed. I felt frustrated early on. I was playing just like a jerk Kirk and these movies that that were frustrating. But it really helped me. I think it R- doing theater makes you audacious And the great thing about doing film or television is you cannot lie the moment you lie and you so you can see it on film almost. It's almost worse on television because people know you. You're in bed with them. It's very weird breath. But the one thing I consciously do try to do is completely mix up. I try to challenge myself. I don't want one approach to acting to work and I it's very it's a totally different thing doing handmaid's tale well then Then a pratfall and I think mixing it up if you're lucky enough to have those opportunities he's is. The is the way to become a better actor. We're talking with Brad. Whitford about many things including his new series perfect harmony. Brad and I are parents parents of boys who are good friends. And we're debate partners in high school and I was wondering about parenting somebody who has a passion for something like debate or or the arts and about the conversations that you had when you were growing up about your passions and how you hope other parents talked to kids who are interested in becoming mini musician or an actor and how do you encourage them to follow their passion and make sure that they also understand what it is. They're getting into. Yeah I I. It's it's a very difficult thing. I talked to people. I went to Wesleyan. And then I went to juilliard and I talked to students all the time who are coming. Hang out there and a girl from juilliard was graduating and said and it broke my heart. She said but if you're really good and you work really hard you can have a career career right and the answer. I what I realized is if you love this and you pursue it relentlessly you can be a part of storytelling. It may not Aaron Sorkin. Wanted to I wanted to be more than anything a musical theater actor. It didn't work out. Thank God thank God Lin Manuel Miranda. Didn't get into acting school or he would be playing being a Doctor Ramirez on Chicago Med. There you need to be open to being part out of the storytelling process. I it's interesting to me I would never say. Hey I think acting is absolutely the most wonderful developmental therapeutic experience you can have. I had like a Pitney like like seventh grade where I was like. Oh my God this is everything when I when I'm in doing a sport I have to turn off my head had in my heart when I'm sitting reading a book I have to turn off my body. This like it was like Holy God. I fell in love with this stuff and but the career of it is a nightmare. It's cruel it's superficial. I who are I feel like I'm about as lucky as you can get. I am constantly dealing with the fact that I don't know so what my schedules could be. It's like dating schizophrenic. And like sitting here now like doing interviews and promoting his show a couple a couple of years ago right before. Get Out I was like. Maybe this doesn't work. This feels kind of the kind of scillies heroin. An interesting thing I think is that my I grew up in Wisconsin. I didn't know anybody who had any connection action as you would if you grew up in. La or New York like somebody's cousin is on TV shows. The thought of this as a profession never entered my mind signed and looking back I realized since seventh grade. Oh my God this is all I loved it but I worry because if my father had come as I would I would tend to want to do to that play in seventh grade. If I was parenting me I think I said Oh my God like I've never seen you so happy. Do you want to take an acting class and I swear if my parents had done that I don't think I'd be an actor even though they were supportive. But I wouldn't have owned it and I was mentioning to you backstage that I did a a movie. That Bruce Springsteen wrote a song for him we were talking about this thing about is the Philadelphia. Yeah about parenting and he was like. Oh absolutely if my mom had had come down and said hey you got something buddy you know you wanna take guitar lessons. He's you know he'd be a drunk in Trenton. So I don't know what the answer is to that with my kids when they fall in love with something I have a daughter. Who's WHO's who's obsessed with dance? I have never are consciously. I never said to George about debate which she loved. You should go work on your debate. That's an I think that about acting. I always think about this. The Best Actors Good Actors Act as if they're in school great Actors Act As if it's recess. That's where the really fun stuff comes. And so it's a very difficult thing. I remember raising kids here in all the sports slick. It's like you know. I just wish there was like a theater league of AO. So there should be Brad Whitford. Thanks so much for coming in my pleasure thank thank you all. Thank you. Perfect harmony starring. Brad Whitford airs airs Thursday nights on NBC. And that is it for the frame today. You can keep up with us on twitter and facebook. You'll find us at the frame. We also have a weekly newsletter letter. That goes out every Thursday. You could sign up at the frame dot org slash newsletter. Thanks for listening both on the radio and on demand and thank you for supporting wording. KPCC John Horn. We'll see you tomorrow back here at the broadcast center KABC PODCASTS are supported. By Warner Brothers Presenting Joker Todd Phillip. Obscenity Matic Vision see Joaquin Phoenix's Golden Globe and screen actors guild nominated performance winner of the Venice Film Festival's top prize and one of the AFI's buys top films of two thousand Nineteen Varieties Owen. Gleiberman named joker the best film of the year describing it as a movie that can and will stand the test of time consideration in all categories including best picture director and actor.

Brad Whitford KPCC West Wing John Horn Aaron Sorkin Bradley Whitford Best Ensemble Christian Bale Clint Eastwood Fox searchlight Allison Janney Kentucky NBC James Mangold Warner brothers Joe Joe Rabbit Joaquin Phoenix Matt Damon writer
Lena & Melina & 'Queen & Slim'

The Frame

28:14 min | 1 year ago

Lena & Melina & 'Queen & Slim'

"KPCC PODCASTS are supported by twentieth century. Fox presenting forward versus Ferrari directed by James Mangold and starring Christian. Bale and Matt Damon now nominated mandated for a Golden Globe for best actor Christian Bale and five critic's choice nominations including best picture of the year. KPCC supporters include Fox searchlight presenting. Joe Rabbit nominated for the Sag Award for Best Ensemble. Seven critics choice awards including best picture. The Golden Globe for Best Picture and one of AF is ten best pictures of of the year for consideration in all categories from the broadcast center at KPCC. It's the frame. I'm John Horn. It's been five years since hackers targeted Sony pictures around the release of the studios North Korean comedy. What is Hollywood? Learn since that massive cyberattack then Lena wait the writer. The new movie queen and Slim says her film about a violent encounter between a white police officer and a black couple reflects the nation's nations racial tensions. It does at war. You know I think is a sort of element of people being worried. This film star Raise Ryan you know and will to start a war. Will this make temperatures even hotter all that coming up on the frame. KPCC podcasts casts are supported by Twentieth Century Fox presenting forward versus Ferrari directed by James Mangold and starring Christian. Bale and Matt Damon now nominated for a golden in Globe for best actor Christian Bale and five critic's choice nominations including best picture of the year. Welcome to the frame. I'm John Horn five five years ago. Just as Thanksgiving approach employs at Sony pictures logged into their computers and were greeted by this ominous message hacked by Hashtag. GOP over picture of a sinister looking red skeleton. GOP reportedly stands for guardians of peace a previously unknown group now claiming credit for the hack. The hackers leaked millions of files putting confidential employee information and embarrassing e mails about the studios internal workings out in the Open Ben. Fritz is an editor at the Wall Street Journal and the author of the book the Big picture the fight for the future of movies and he remembers being in the Journal. Newsroom when he heard about the hack I remember I remember reading about it online and talking to a few sources I knew it Sony and Of course I I didn't really understand the magnitude of it and how how damaging it would be That wasn't until the next week. I believe when the when they started leaking all these documents and information and I started to see some of the stuff that was coming out and realized just how serious this is was for. Those who don't remember the hack was quickly connected to North Korea and Kim Jong Hoon anger over the film the interview. It started Seth Rogan. James Franco As a couple of TV journalists who are going to interview and potentially assassinate the North Korean president and at the time we were interviewing the screenwriter. Dan Sterling Moore Lane. This is back in two thousand fourteen. I was at a party on Saturday. Night where the per- The the host was introducing me to everybody at the party. As this is the guy that brought down Sony who it was funny by that well the first four or five hundred times the joke was made It was funny except Zip. Actually it's a way it's actually not funny to me. How was the hack essentially blamed on the movie and was that theory actually borne out after the fact North Korea? was in fact behind the hacking and Kim Jong UN was very very mad that the American film was was was mocking him. North Korea's a very poor country. But they do. Actually we have a very good hacking program and He wanted to stop them from coming out and or punish Sony having made it and he was pretty successful on both fronts. At the time the leading theory that experts was there was North Korea but a lot of people around Sony thought. It couldn't be it. Maybe it was angry employees arrivals or something but the FBI About a year ago concluded pretty definitively was North Korea and in fact they indicted Somebody who was part of a North Korean backpacking team that was called Lazarus project and it was for numerous cybercrimes including the intrusion Sony. People forget is set. The movie didn't really get released. Sony was so worried about it that they've pulled the release and then they kind of backtracked on that and at the time we we were talking with a guy named James Kerr's he's the founder of. La's downtown independent theatre. He is in the studio talking about the movie. And this is what happens. There's been so much buzz we get A. We're getting calls about it with my phone's ringing. Yup Oh it's the rep from Sony. Go ahead take it. Hi this is Jim so he actually gets a call from Sony in the middle of the interview saying can you play the. Can you play or movie in your theater. It ends up. It's not getting much of an exhibition schedule at all. Does it. No it only a few hundred independent theaters briefly What happened was the hackers threatened that they were going to Bomber caused violence at an attack. Any theater that played the film and You know understandably a lot of theaters didn't WANNA play it as a result and Sony You know incorrectly. They weren't going to force any theater to play it. Even those that had contractual obligations to do it and then it was just crazy thing where a few hundred independent theaters did play it and it was also released online simultaneously by a few companies. That were willing to do that. Not many people ended up seeing the film as a result. So if that was Jongmans goal he was very successful at that. Most most people didn't see the film and Sony was severely damaged by the hack. So you gotTa give the Wind Stores Korea here very sadly well. Let's talk about how Sony was damaged by the hack. You spent a a lot of time looking through documents released in the hack for part of your research in your book. The big picture the fight for the future of movies. So what did it reveal about Sony. Tony and how did it more important reveal how the studio had kind of lost. Its Way all right so the hack just released tons of you know from the top executives take the time as well as internal documents than really sensitive financial stuff and it revealed when it comes to the interview that they had numerous discussions about something like this happening and didn't take it seriously. There was a conflict between the top executives at the studio and they were just having a lot of trouble coming up with major motion picture franchises. That could compete with you know the marvels and the fast and furious of the world It was really an amazing insight into a studio that was struggling to adapt to the modern movie business. Well I'm going to ask about marvel because has one of the most remarkable pieces of information in your book is how and why Sony Refuse to pay twenty five million dollars for almost all all of Marvel superheroes in the late nineties. So what did that episode say about how Hollywood is changing and how Sony really missed the future. Sure Yeah Hollywood in the late. Nineties was not rule I- franchises the way it is now is really ruled ruled by movie stars. Tony we've got Adam Sandler we've got will Smith. That's that's what really is valuable. You know we're not gonNA waste our money these lists who share it was maybe spider-man's valuable but that that's all that's all they wanted. And of course Sony horrifically miscalculated. Oh you did. And there's a lot of stuff in the hack about Sony's attempts to to fix that mistake including trying to revive the spiderman franchise a few years ago. I think it's fair to say that in the wake wake of the Sony Hack Studios and a lot of companies probably tried to improve their firewalls and had better. It security but you think there's a bigger less than about Hollywood they would. That might be remembered from the hack. Do you think it still has an impact on the business into people still talk and think about what happened to Sony people. You know people all the time reference Sony when they talk about. How much sensitive stuff should we say on an email? There's a sense that there's this knowledge knowledge that email is never truly secure. And if you're not necessarily comfortable with the world knowing about it then you'll probably shouldn't put it in an email if you don't have something nice to say. Don't say it at all. I guess yeah or at least eight on the phone Ben. Fritz is is an editor at the Wall Street Journal and he is the author of the book. The big picture the fight for the future of movies Ben. Thanks so much for coming back on the show. John was my pleasure coming up on the frame. Lean away throat. The new movie Queen and Slim which Molina Dot soukous makes her feature directing debut and they are thrilled to be working together. KPCC he sees. Supporters Include Fox searchlight presenting Joe Rabbit from writer Director Taika Waititi include on both. Afi's the National Board of reviews ten best pictures pictures of the year and now nominated for the Sag Award for Best Ensemble and best supporting actress. Scarlett Johansson seven critics choice awards including best picture and best adapted screenplay and the Golden Globe Award for best actor and Best Picture of the year awards eligible in all categories. KPCC he. PODCASTS are supported by Warner brothers. Presenting Joker Varieties Owen. Gleiberman named Joker the Best Film Twenty Nineteen calling it a movie that can and and will stand the test of time. Joaquin Phoenix Mesmerizes in the performance of the year now nominated for the screen actors guild for outstanding performance by a male actor in a leading role seven critics choice awards and four Golden Globe awards including best picture. Best Director and best actor for consideration in all categories Welcome back to the frame. I'm John Horn this week. Queen and Slim opens in theaters. It stars Daniel Kaluga from get out and a newcomer. Jody Turner Smith. They play an African American couple. Who are driving home from an awkward first date when a white police officer pulls them over the turn signal back there? I bet step out of the vehicle can it has no. You may not guilty around around now. Are you serious. Pleased Queen Slim is written by Lena Waif and directed by Melina soukous who is making her feature directing debut she's done TV and lots of music videos including beyonce as formation wasted about soukous collaborated on an emmy winning episode of Master of none before making Queen and slim and there were a number of reasons why Melina thought the film should be set in Ohio. Lena had written into the script. Ohio still has the death penalty for obviously. It was is really important into Queens character because he defends people on death row but I had traveled to Ohio for a Nike Commercial. A couple of years before four and I have been to Cleveland and there was a area Cleveland in the really black neighborhood and shot. I still had the location pictures on my phone In on this one st call Saint Clair says really pushing to start there. I wanted to start in a really cold environment and have them travel south through the story. I always think of it as a reverse leave escape. Narrative and Cleveland was also the last album underground railroad before as we get to Canada so I thought that was really pertinent. Like metaphorically for our our film and then also it's where Tamir Rice was killed. You know where I got a chance to visit the playground Where he was shot dead and so I just felt like it was? It was the right place for us. He wrote it in and then like you know. Visually it had been there. I had had witnessed like how pertinent was us. And then when you know a lot of other people on our crew we're really pushing for us to just stay in New Orleans because that's where we were already shooting and obviously for budget reasons. It's easier to just shoot in one place but I wanted to travel with and I wanted them to feel that journey as actors and let that inform their performance so so we went up to Cleveland and while we scouting we were on this. This that street Saint Clair and it was my director scout so we hadn't decided definitely go there but maybe and a half hours hours like Tuesday night. At least six black people were pulled over by COPS In a half hour time period and one of them was in a white accord and you are watching happening as we're scouting which blossomed me. And he wanted to be here and we have been saying in downtown Cleveland where there was no police presence so so this is like a trap in a black neighborhood to just like get people and in a half hour they were all pulled over and there was this one car with a a cord and it with the Cleveland. Police car was behind enhance. Pulled them over and my production designer took a shot of it and I was like that's slim slim. That's his car. That's who he is every man and we have to be here. I WanNa play some audio audio from a police stop. I think you're GonNa know what this is. This is Sandra Bland. Being pulled over in Texas Coloma takes toll. The reason for you stopping. She didn't fail. You fail to Signal Elaine. Chao at insurance for the give me a few minutes all right. Okay no you this. I'm like no. You seem very irritated I am. I really what I'm getting. I believe the speeding up tailing so move over eight. You stop so yeah I am a little here but that doesn't stop you from giving tickets. Uh done we asked me well I told circuit so now I'm dying. You mind putting your cigarette Britt. Please remind I'm in my car while I put out my you can step on out now. I don't have to step out of my step out of the car still out of the car. I have the right to do that. You have the right now step out or I will remove refused. Talk to you identify myself. I will remove remove visit like to hear that I watched that video. Hundreds of times uh-huh Every time I hear it it's debilitating. It's infuriating it's upsetting obviously The most and all well you know I I wanted I saw so much myself in Sandra Bland and actually Lena have written We we worked on an episode. Massive non called Thanksgiving and she wrote in those lines that that could have been any of us and I remember watching that video over and over because I wanted Queens reactions to somewhat. You know Mira Sandra Bland. When when's dare pulled over because they are pulled over for no reason just like she and I should add? Sandra Bland died in police custody. Three days later she was found hanged energy and and you know he was being picked on and prided harassed by policemen that she pulled over to get out of his way and then he pulled her over. Not using signal to me is just traumatizing tossing. And I think people don't realize for particularly black people when these stories come across our news fees. Televisions Asians are instagram. Fees is not just another story is not just a piece of news to us. It's it's like a piece piece of US dies every time we hear about a person being a piggly a black person bid an unarmed black person being killed by police officer. I it's it's we. We are all living in a state of trauma. And I think that's where the movie was absolutely born out of for me and I think that's why I knew I I need it. Molina Alina to do it with me because it was something so personal. It wasn't so dark and there's very few people I trust with that level of vulnerability that I was in that space that I was in and out already trusted Molina once something very vulnerable and She had me the and care and we bonded Very quickly and so with this it was just it was important that we we take those ninety to go. We're talking with. Lina wave. The writer Queen Slim and Molina Matt. Soukous who directed the film. Is it fair to say that Queen Slim. Like Tamir. Rice like Sandra Bland. Land like Eric Gardner are fighting in a war that they don't even know they're a part of absolutely. I feel like listening to that. We've we feel like we're hunted. Did you know and and I think that that's shown in just hearing those those words it's there. There's this war going on and you know Lena called another day of genocide which is exactly right. I want to play another clip from the film and this is I think kind of a moment of reckoning between Queen and Slim. I'm GonNa play it and then we'll talk about the the look on Slim's face in this conversational. Where are you going to find somebody with a phone call my family? They'll know where we they can say that there's no guarantee they won't. You're a black man. Killed a cup took his gun. Amanda criminal you aren't on ask you about the look on Daniel Clubs face in that same. Look everything that he gave. He's a giver With his emotion. You know he feels the weight he feels the gravity. He's starting to understand how he he will be viewed that he is now viewed as a monster you know when he was in the right when he was just trying to defend himself and and and his woman in that moment but I think you know his eyes I think in every scene especially that one they really transform and the the weight of of what just happened is starting to land on him Yeah I think to me the the look that breaks my heart every time. I've seen the movie lot but it's just after that. When he says I just WanNa go home? Yeah he's pleading around. Go home and I want to see my family and I think that is interesting because I I remember writing that and as as a person who is not super close family but I was thinking in that moment. When you're afraid all you want to get home to your family because that's all you can think about and it's also too I think about Fruitvale station you know. And that moment where Michael Jordan says as I just WanNa go home you know. That's what we all want. We all want to go home and wait on me because I am close to my family. So like in times of extreme need or with terror or fear. That's where I went on the go to the next to my mom and my father right. You won't ever look at me as a criminal you know and I think he has that same satisfaction and eleven. His home slim has a line in the movie. I ain't gone bend the world which feels to me like a little bit of an echo of what Martin Luther King Junior her said which is the arc of the moral universe is long but it bends toward justice? Thank slim says oh I can't change it well. A little bit of it is a slim doesn't feel as if he needs to be some famous person he doesn't need to leave a a mark on the world to know that he existed. And there's something very honorable about that and and I'm speaking to you as a person who who away is known like people are aware of who I am or something like that you know. I'm leaving a mark on the world but what I think are Russell with is that everyone's life is just as valid as mine. Just because of how I make a living or the fact that I've done something that people will notice doesn't mean that my life is more valuable than someone else's and I think that's really what I wanted to do with slim that he represents the majority orgy that they're working every day trying to be the best person that he can be and we he has a very different experience of that because he's he's a black man so his life is political whether he likes it or not. Why were they named Queen and slim slimmer sort of born out of like old school black lingo and in terms of like if you look at old like black seventies movies you'll hear a black may refer to each other's I went up slam was going on and therefore the quaint thing is almost self explanatory? I think whoa acquaintance up next on the frame more of my conversation with Lena Wave and Malina Matt soukous the writer and Director of coin and Slim K. P. C. podcasts are supported by Warner brothers. Presenting Joker Todd Phillip Cinematic Vision see Joaquin mckean Phoenix's Golden Globe and screen actors guild nominated performance winner of the Venice Film. Festival's top prize and one of the AF is top films of twenty nineteen and Varieties Owen. Gleiberman name Joker the best film of the year describing it as a movie that can and will stand the test of time for consideration in all categories including best picture director and actor. I'm John Horn. And this is the frame. We continue our conversation now with Lena. Wave and Malina mud soukous the writer and director of Queen and slim the film's stars Daniel Columbia as slim. He made a big splash when he started in Jordan peels get out and newcomer. Jody Turner Smith Plays Queen. We pick up the conversation with Molina soukous all when we started. Lena hadn't already talked to Daniel. And mm-hmm what should have been you know a five minute conversations and then so hopefully. It will be a lifelong collaboration because he's an immense talent. And so we had Daniel and and then was important to both Lena. And and I that we use this opportunity to create a platform for a new black actress for a new voice because we don't get many of those opportunities and we knew we didn't wasted so we wanted to find our queen. We wanted her to to be introduced. Somebody new and then we needed to have somebody that would stand up against Daniel and then the other thing that was really important for us is that she was dark skin lead. Could I'd love to be a part of redefining. What beauty is in the world and we've never seen a love story between two dark skin? Actors turns on on screen. The tendency is to get light skinned actors feel more white. Yeah exactly. There's you know in this country. Obviously there's a tendency that the lighter you are the more you essentially looking you are that that. That's what's considered beautiful right and and so so. Many of our brothers and sisters don't grow up really having having pride in themselves as dark skinned beauties and so that was really important and and also to show the love between those two people that could be darts gain and and and have that in represented to the next generation. Because that's not even something I grew up in and there's also a way that you light their bodies that's fascinating and that is also so unusual. Yeah I'm very Protective I think of lighting black skin. I'm very selective when it comes to choosing a DP VP I also studies Matafi in Grad School. So very specific in how I want to portray Black bodies he's on screen and I wanted to feel real at times fantastic. Oh there's certain elements of light. That are more beautiful on our screen. Because it's really reflective um them than others So I utilize that and I like to play with color and tone shadows and and And brightness as well in order to to And translate my visual language. Lena I want to ask you about this balance in the film between brutality beauty because this is a story about something gene that is brutal that starts this couple on the road and yet it's also a love story and there's a lot of beauty not only in their relationship but also in the people they meet along the way and to be you will care for them when you're right in the story and trying to figure out the balance that you want to strike. What were the things that you were focused on a big thing was? I wanted to focus on a sense of community And it was a bit of a meditation on underground railroad for a modern age and away. I and the fact that it does feel like we're at war you know. I think there's this sort of element of people being worried. Will this film start a race riot. You know and we'll start a war. Will this get this. Make temperatures even hotter and but the thing is they said the same thing about the right things at the same thing about Bob poisoned her. They said the same thing about new. All these these are conversations while you're pitching this idea. Well this was. I think once we were done. Okay you know and once people started to see this yes and to me is like when writing it. I'm very aware of that war that we're already in his tooth and so it was almost about. What side are you on? And they never know when they go out into the world who they're encountering if they're on their side if they're not How you'd be surprised about who was on their side and who isn't and there are so many influences that I have whether you know? I think people people are quick to say Elma lease and Bonnie and Clyde which I understand but also wizard of is is in there. You know it's also the with the wiz also Set it off is You know elements of badlands. There's there's references that I think people don't expect me to have or don't think that I'm as well versed in cinema as much as I am. I've I've watched so many different kinds of cinema that and writing it I really wanted to break rules That had been set up about like. I don't have a cop that you sympathize with along this journey to cut away to I'm I'm telling you I'm letting the story unfold slowly and intentionally But for me the people they encounter you know these these are somewhat small roles. I want every role to feel gigantic. I want to ask ask you both about this idea. That to be provocative to make a point that people are gonNA feel uncomfortable that idea of making sure the audience white or black is challenge. was that something you were consciously thinking about as you're making the movie or as you're seeing it play in front of audiences now. That's the way I was raised. You know my parents They're very they were very political and they were very leftist. And I was brought up to know that I needed to give back to the world and give back. Act The privilege that I have been given and to have some sort of activism and what would that be and so you know this is my active and this is my protest art. This is the way I chose into You know it'd be a part of the change that has necessary in this world Even if it's in a small way and yes in order to to be part of the revolution like you really have to make some some people uncomfortable. You know Nina Simone said it is an artist duty to reflect the time. I think that is something I live by and I don't like pulling punches. I don't I'm I'm not a I'm not a black artist that necessarily believes in writing about a world that I want to live in I find more I find it to be for me. It makes more sense to write about the world in which I live because I want to hold a mirror. You're up to US and force us to get the reflection even wanNA turn away Lena. Lena thanks so much for coming in. Thank Lina wait. As the writer of Queen and Slim Molina Matsushita's is the film's director is in theaters On November twenty seventh. And that'll do it for today. Remember you can follow us on twitter and facebook. You'll find us at the frame. I'm John Horn at the MON broadcast. A CENTRE-RIGHT K._p._C._C. Tomorrow.

Sony Queen Slim Lena writer John Horn director North Korea Sandra Bland Lena officer Jody Turner Smith Slim Fox searchlight Wall Street Journal Hollywood KPCC Sony Hack Studios US
'Horror Stories' From Liz Phair

The Frame

18:25 min | 1 year ago

'Horror Stories' From Liz Phair

"KPCC PODCASTS are supported by twentieth century. Fox presenting forward versus Ferrari directed by James Mangold starring Christian. Bale and Matt Damon now nominated mandated for a Golden Globe for best actor Christian Bale and five critic's choice nominations including best picture of the year. KPCC supporters include Fox searchlight presenting. Joe Rabbit nominated for the Sag Award for Best Ensemble. Seven critics choice awards including best picture. The Golden Globe for Best Picture and one of AF is ten best pictures of of the year for consideration in all categories from them on broadcast center. KPCC this is the frame. I'm John Horn born and thanks for joining us during our winner membership drive today my guest for the entire show is singer and songwriter. Liz Fair Hi John. How are you elgood Indie rocker? who was at a New York studio when we spoke burst on the scene in nineteen ninety-three with her debut record exile in Gainesville? She followed that with a number of albums and then sort of retreated for a while to raise her son now fifty two years old. Liz Fair has a memoir. It's it's called horror stories and in the prologue. She describes a phone call with their manager. Following the death of Prince in two thousand sixteen. It was a very funny phone in conversation. A unique conversation where he kind of challenge to me in a way. I wasn't expecting I didn't think of myself as old but he was like Liz. You know none of us know how long we've got you know you don't know. Are you GonNa be here tomorrow. You don't know is what you're making right now. What you'd WANNA leave behind if it was the last thing you ever did and it just shook me up because I suddenly thought like no I have more to say? I have more to say that I would like to say and sort of when I started writing and your book is out now. This may seem almost like an existential question but as the songwriter and Liz in the author the same person we are we are says the royal we we are are the same person I would say. Liz Fair is a narrower if you picture a pie chart right picture in eighteen percent wedge of that a pie chart and then extend that wedge outward is if it's a focused beam of energy that is so strong just like shoots out of the Pie chart that would be he lives fair and then the person who wrote the book is sort of all of me the whole pie chart everybody because very early in the book q wrote and I'm quoting yourself back to yourself. You say I'm trusting you with my deepest self and I'm wondering if you think you can be more honest s ask a writer than you are as a musician in a way. Obviously you have more room to explain a situation. Listen get more granular with it and really sort of muse about the unanswered questions. I think that was maybe the most fun thing about the pros. Writing is that I can russell with the problem that I can't find a solution to and I can wrestle with it page after page and it's interesting but but it doesn't resolve and I think with a song you kind of have to resolve it and kind of say like do. Here's here's what here's what I'm setting up. Here's what's happening and here's switch your takeaway as it's just it's almost symbolically stated in the song I'm GonNa give you the intense points and nothing thing else and in prose you can really slow time down. Bring you into the experience. As if you're looking at a my is feeling everything I'm feeling and and I can really take you on a journey. I'm going to play a bit of a song from your first record. Exiling Guy Hill. This song is called Bull was I. Just listen you write in the book. Everybody thinks this song is about sex and on one level it is is but it's also about these moments when real connection and feeling is abandoned in favor of self preservation and it got me thinking about the way the an artist's sees his or her songs and the way an audience does and where they align when they don't and what. That's like that occasional disconnect. I have never found it. Served anyone to answer the question that is commonly asked of me. What is this the song about every single time? I explain what I think about it. Disappoints never speaking with really sat. Ask this whole idea of what they wanted to be about and for them if that is what it is about that is what it is about. It really isn't mine anymore and I know that's a cliche. Everyone says it always sent off into the world. They're like my children but I let them go. I don't think of my songs is my children but I also don't think of them as mine. Once completed once a song has been recorded properly it ceases to be mine it can be created by me but it belongs to everybody at that point in a weird way. We're talking with Liz Fair about her new book horror stories. There's a chapter in this book called Hashtag and there's a lot going on it but I'm going to ask you about a couple of things and one is that you write. Being female in the entertainment industry can sometimes feel like running a never her ending gauntlet of Horny dudes. I if you think I invited that kind of interest after I published sexually Frank Lyrics. You'd they have gotten the cause and affect flipped and then you're right on the same page they can't make you an object. I reasoned if you are adamantly and vociferiously the subject of your own sexuality. So that's what you believed but then other people saw you in a different light based on what you were singing about. So what is your take away from how you wanted to be seen and how people interpreted what you are trying to say. That's a very good question I think that that never quite resolves for me I saw it. I knew what I was doing. I knew that it would be provocative for a woman to sing so explicitly about sex so I intended that certainly I did not realize how the sexual aspects would the eclipse any discussion of anything else. or how that would be picked up in a headline and sort of amplified. I thought of it as rightfully a part of my personality and there was a lot of song I mean there were eighteen songs on exiling Guy Ville and I would say at least fifteen aren't really about sex per se. They may have dynamics that involve that but they're not like explicitly explicitly sexual and I think again. Why is this culture so comfortable with violence in so uncomfortable with sexuality? Why why is that? It's weird. It doesn't seem healthy to me. Psychologically well and there's I think more than that that a woman can be sex positive in her life and in her art and that's considered an invitation to be described in a certain way whereas men can do that and they're they're not categorized right. We have this idea that this is biological destiny. And there's so many more forces shaping it than that when we come back Liz fair shares. How she spoke with her son about porn? Yeah you heard me right. Porn San Sanitary friends famous man and Henry said KPCC. PODCASTS are supported by twentieth century Fox presenting forward versus Ferrari directed by James Mangold old and starring Christian. Bale and Matt Damon now nominated for a Golden Globe for best actor Christian Bale and five critic's choice nominations including best picture of the year here. Katie supporters include Fox searchlight presenting Joe Joe Rabbit from writer director. TYCO not included on both AF is as a national board of Review's ten best pictures of the year and now nominated for the Sag Award for Best Ensemble and best supporting actress. Scarlett Johansson seven critics choice awards awards including best picture and best adapted screenplay and the Golden Globe Award for best actor and Best Picture of the year awards eligible in all categories. KPCC PODCASTS are supported. By Warner Brothers. Michael B Jordan Jamie Fox and Brie Larson's star in just mercy based on the true story of attorney Turney Brian Stevenson's heroic fight to save an innocent man's life. Every generation has its hero made ours variety raved. Just mercy will shake you to to your soul nominated by the screen actors guild for outstanding performance by a male actor in a supporting role for Jamie Foxx for consideration in all categories including including best picture and best supporting actor. Welcome back to this pledge drive edition of the frame. I'm John Horn and our guest. Today is singer Songwriter. Liz Fair last year her debut album exile and Guy Ville got a rerelease for its twenty fifth anniversary. She's currently working with the producer of that record on some new music. But in the meantime she's written a memoir. It's it's called horror stories and its collection of reflections on her life in the music industry and as a mom fair rights that singing frankly about sex was just one part of what she did but it came to define her in some people's eyes just in the two years that the metoo movement has been blazing I feel on social media a difference in tone. I feel you know for whatever reason more respected did more my boundaries respected more less sort of horny solicitations and I have to say it's nice. It's kind nice age so bad on the other side at least not for me. You're probably writing this book all around the time that Harvey Weinstein and Les Moonves Invest. And you write in almost kind of an offhand way about the propositions that you got mostly from record label executives including somebody who's like I'll pay you you five thousand dollars a month to be living concubine you like I make twice that amount and yet it seems so casual. It seems like this is the thing that any woman has to deal with on a daily basis. I'm sorry to tell you but that's the truth like this is what seems so weird to me is how how many men are unaware of what women's lives are like especially and most particularly if you step out of your lane if you dare to live a life. If that isn't one of the prescribed and approved of roles for women you're basically fair game and that hurts that feels bad that's not a positive causative thing and I think I think I wrote that chapter in the end to kind of just say the point is not all the separate things that happened happened. The point is I don't WanNa have to feel like I'm guarding my sexuality behind like a Defensive Wall just to grow up and be mature sure and have sexual relationships I would like a world in which I can do both. I can be intelligent and safe and still have sex. That's pretty much all all. I want thirty to draw are plays in that equation. How do you think a song writer a playwright? A filmmaker can use was his or her voice to say. This is the way that people should talk about each other. I think it's very important. I think artistic output. We're we're kind of like creating myths for us to believe in like that's sort of what our entertainment industry does it. It's a myth making industry. I think the problem has largely largely been that women haven't been seen separate individuals. They're more like a man's life is complete. He's got one of those you know. And if I can't have her as mine what uses she to me. I need to go find someone who will be my woman because at completes my life and she's supposed to do certain things and that's sort I'm an old mentality. No thank you next myth please. And that's where artists step in and they give us different myths to believe in and shoot black. We're talking with Liz Fair about her new book horror stories. Even if you don't really think about or worry about what people read into your songs wchs. How important is it that they feel that you are singing about something that is relevant to their lives especially for women and young women that they feel like thank? You are telling stories that make them feel understood. That's my whole thing. That's my whole thing. I don't want to write songs. Things are actually. That's not true. I do write songs. That are not the kind that would resonate with the listener. They're just very particular to me and I try to keep them off the album so because because they don't fulfill what I want to be doing which is to extend a hand of friendship out there and say like are you feeling alone alone in the cosmos. I'm here to like that's sort of what I'm interested in. Doing is is eliciting a certain emotion from someone explaining what it was like. Take for me to go through it and inviting them to sort of think about their own experiences and feel less alone and how does that change as you grow older. Well I wanNA talk about all sorts of stuff. That isn't sexy and fun to talk about like aging and death and stuff like I I think about it. Once you pass fifty. I think the horizon horizon is there and you see it and it's beautifully. Poignant I mean you really do understand. Your parents finally really do understand. What a gift after every day is and I try to get up and appreciate? It doesn't always work but I try to appreciate how lucky I am. I especially especially feel that way when I see colleagues and people pass away. I'M GONNA ask you one last question. I think you have a teenage son. Is that right. Well He's twenty two. Okay so have you have a young son. Nineteen year old son. I will tell you. He's not listening to Liz Fair right now. But he's listening to a lot of hip hop and I'm curious when nuhere teenage kids. Maybe your own listening to music. That is maybe it's complicated. But maybe it's ultimately a little misogynistic take what are the conversations that you have a parent about musical taste because it's really tricky for me. And I'm wondering how you navigate that. I don't think there's a good way to do that. or I'm not a good enough parent to navigate that well I think where it came up in our household because my son he's into pretty his stuff is more like synth wave. He's into that kind of like eighties revival or not. I'M GONNA get in trouble if I say that. I can't speak for what he likes. I do know he introduced me to Synth Cinthois but I am not authorized to speak on his behalf But I think with porn and stuff I did try to tell my son like that doesn't feel good a woman like you need to know that you need to know that like when you're physically with another person that it's a different thing than what you're watching. You know the same way that you go to a movie wouldn't just like shoot someone or flip your car. I did spend some time explaining the difference and the importance of the difference between porn and real connection. So you may not. You may not listen to hip hop with your son but you watch porn with your son is at the take no I just. I can't I was not one of those monitoring mothers that like you know. Made sure he could only see this. That and the other thing I kept pretty good track track of it for a while and then when he hit like adolescence. There's just no stopping it so I just tried to work on the on the character and the brain. Yeah I think I did okay. He's he's pretty great. Liz Fares new book is called Horror Stories. Liz thanks for coming on the show. Thank you so much and that is it for the frame today. Thanks for listening both on the radio and on demand and thanks for Supporting KPCC SEC. I'm John Horn and we'll see you tomorrow back here at the broadcast center. KABC see podcasts are supported by Warner brothers presenting Joker Todd Phillips Phillips Cinematic Vision See Joaquin Phoenix's Golden Globe and screen actors guild nominated performance winner of the Venice Film Festival's top prize and one of the AFI's defies top films of two thousand Nineteen Varieties Owen Gleiberman name joker the best film of the year describing it as a movie that can and will stand the test of time time for consideration in all categories including best picture director and actor.

Liz Fair Liz John Horn Christian Bale writer Fox searchlight Jordan Jamie Fox KPCC James Mangold Joe Joe Rabbit Warner Brothers Best Ensemble Matt Damon Guy Ville Ferrari Liz Fares Guy Hill New York
A Mariachi Group With A Rainbow Of Sound

The Frame

28:17 min | 1 year ago

A Mariachi Group With A Rainbow Of Sound

"KPCC PODCASTS are supported by twentieth century. Fox presenting forward versus Ferrari directed by James Mangold starring Christian. Bale and Matt Damon now nominated mandated for a Golden Globe for best actor Christian Bale and five critic's choice nominations including best picture of the year. KPCC supporters include Fox searchlight presenting. Joe Rabbit nominated for the Sag Award for Best Ensemble. Seven critics choice awards including best picture. The Golden Globe for Best Picture and one of AF is ten best pictures of of the year for consideration in all categories talk broadcast center. Kp See this is the frame. I'm Steven Cuevas in for John Horn on today's show the movie studios are touting their Golden Globe nominations. But what are we really to make them then. The curator's have an exhibit about the year. Nineteen nineteen thousand nine hundred thousand. One hundred years ago seem not so far away rather than kind of hammering away on the Nineteen nineteen twenty nine thousand nine hundred miles what we hoped hoped is that people moving through would nick those connections themselves and we introduce you to a rarity all LGBTQ Mariachi group all that coming up on the frame. KPCC podcasts casts are supported by Twentieth Century Fox presenting forward versus Ferrari directed by James Mangold and starring Christian. Bale and Matt Damon now nominated for a golden in Globe for best actor Christian Bale and five critic's choice nominations including best picture of the year. Welcome to the frame. I'm Steven Cuevas filling in for John Horn. But we're about to hear from John. He's covered the movie industry for more than two decades is a print reporter and so we figured he's the best person to explain the significance vacant or lack thereof of the Golden Globe awards. The Hollywood Foreign Press Association today announced the nominees for its annual awards which take place in early January. Sorry but rather than detail. The usual inexplicable nominee choices and snubs. We thought we talk about the relationship between movie fans the Globes and the entertainment. I'm an industry first. John tells us who makes up. The Association was important to me about the Golden Globes and about some other kind of minor film. Awards is that this is not a representative body. They're about ninety journalists. And if you go on the website for the Hollywood Foreign Press Association you can no longer even find their names or where they work is a very small group of people and they have undue influence because the movie studios have figured doubt that if they do the voters for the Golden Globes and they're filmmakers win awards at the Golden Globes it kind of creates some sort of momentum for the Academy Awards but none of it is very legitimate and at the age of. PA has cleaned itself up. It's not a scandal ridden as it has been in years past but this isn't an elite group of film writers or film critics that are making the selections and if you look closely closely at the selections not just this year but in past years the fact that they are really that serious as kind of film lovers starts reveal itself pretty quickly how so. Well let's talk about a couple of pass nominations twenty-third teen there. Were three nominations for a movie. I bet you you've never. I heard of salmon fishing in the Yemen That was a Golden Globe Walker. If you go back nine years to twenty ten there was a movie with Johnny Johnny. Depp called the tourists that was largely derided that ended up getting multiple nominations of the Golden Globes. And I think if you look closely at some of the selections this this year it's clear it's driven by the red carpet like who do they wanna have on the red carpet you look in the TV category. There are multiple nominations. The Nation's for the morning show a apple series that didn't get great reviews because Jennifer Aniston is coming reese. Witherspoon is coming nominees. And then you look at Ava d'auvergne as when they see us. One of the most critically acclaimed series of the past year. Didn't get any nominations. So it's it's important for the NBC. Show to have that star Klaus. So there's eyeballs soap so people watch I think that's part of the bias historically for the Golden Globes that you can say if they're judging between good filmmaker and a less name. They generally are going to vote for the alias name and they also have some historical by sees that are shared by the Academy in the seventy seven year history of the Globes. Only five women have ever been nominated for best director in this year. There are lots of really good female filmmakers that we're up Greta Gerwig for Little Women Livia Wild for Book Smart Allah Hurrell Ralph. Honey Boy Marielle Heller Beautiful Day in the neighborhood. Not One of them got nominated so golden gloves has a pretty poor history when it comes to nominate women Amen. The Golden Globes has made some effort to try to rehabilitate this reputation. What has it done? It's made sure that people. Oh who are members actually have legitimate credits as journalists. There've been some reports of. I guess you could call it. Bribery or are expensive gifts. In the past I think they've tried to eliminate all of that so again. They have cleaned up their act. But there's only so much legitimacy yeah see you can bring to yourself when you're only ninety journalists writing for publications that if we had the names I guarantee you you've probably never heard of them and yet the industry I guess mostly plays along and an actor or director or studio can use success at the Globes as part part of their campaign going into Oscar season hundred percent and I think that is one of the most interesting parts of the story everybody in Hollywood they would knows in their soul that the Golden Globes are really not totally legitimate and yet the studios and independent in companies and marketing departments. Embrace them because they recognize. There's a game to be played and the game is. We're going to court the Golden Globe voters we're GONNA this have screenings and QNA's for them and if we get a nomination are actor or are filmmaker is going to be on their award show and people are going to start talking about the film film and one thing that gets the other but they do know that really. It's not totally legit but it serves their purposes academy award. Campaigning is a multi million dollar. Business there are people who work as campaign consultants who get hundreds of thousands of dollars for getting nominations. Oscar wins. There is a huge business behind all of this and in some ways it might drive ticket sales or people to stream movies so it's driven by finance is driven by trying to get eyeballs on the movies but it's all kind of a hustle so John I've never covered the entertainment industry that closely so like a lot of people in the public. I really always just saw the Golden Globe awards as the first among that more high profile award shows to spotlight the top films of the year. Going into Oscar seasons am I am I off on that or you're not technically off. I mean because because the Hollywood foreign press association nominates into different categories for most of the major film awards they cast a wider net. So just mathematically they're bound to include a lot of movies that end up getting nominated. I wouldn't say that much of a bellwether but because they're embracing so many movies they have a mathematical chance of getting most of those things right. John Horn out in New York. John Thanks for joining us to talk about the Golden Globes will see when you get back thanks for sitting in and before airtime we reached out to the Hollywood Foreign Press Association to request a list the voting members and the news outlets they represent. They declined our request coming up on the frame a look back at a turbulent year not twenty nineteen nineteen in nineteen. KP We see. Supporters Include Fox searchlight presenting Joe Rabbit from writer Director Taika Waititi include on both. Afi's the National Board of reviews ten best pictures pictures of the year and now nominated for the Sag Award for Best Ensemble and best supporting actress. Scarlett Johansson seven critics choice awards including best picture and best adapted screenplay and the Golden Globe Award for best actor and Best Picture of the year awards eligible in all categories. KPCC he. PODCASTS are supported by Warner brothers. Presenting Joker Varieties Owen. Gleiberman named Joker the Best Film Twenty Nineteen calling it a movie that can and and will stand the test of time. Joaquin Phoenix Mesmerizes in the performance of the year now nominated for the screen actors guild for outstanding performance by a male actor in a leading role seven critics choice awards and four Golden Globe awards including best picture. Best Director and best actor for consideration in all categories Welcome back to the frame. I'm Steven Cuevas in for John Horn. If you've ever been to the Huntington in San Marino not far from our studios in Pasadena you you know. It's easy to spend an entire day. Just strolling through the neatly manicured botanical gardens. But next time you're there don't skip the library and the art museum in celebration of Huntington's founding one hundred years ago by Henry and Arabella Huntington the exhibition nineteen nineteen paints. A picture of that first. MULCH was year. The exhibit is comprised entirely of items from the Huntington's collection there were either acquired published or displayed in nineteen nineteen from. Benjamin Franklin's handwritten autobiography geography to suffer just pamphlet celebrating the passage of the nineteenth amendment. John Horn recently paid a visit to talk with James Glistening Jennifer Watts Co curator's of nineteen eighteen nineteen. They explained what Henry Huntington was focused on collecting one hundred years ago by the time. No one thousand nine hundred rolls around Huntington had purchased on the Order of one hundred and twenty thousand then item says a huge collection. It was on the East Coast still and he's still aggressively buying so he puts bids at something like fifty auctions that year. He The week before the trust document is actually signed. One of his favorite dealers springs. One hundred twenty one thousand dollars worth of Shakespearean works to the House here here in San Marino so he is still all in and actually just ramps it up in the twenties so he's still buying the great works of British and American history and literature richer really focused on the great men of history so he is also trying to do something in San Marino. California I think is important in terms of what we're seeing now and that is to establish this area as a rival to the east coast and maybe Europe and does that start to affect the kinds of things. He's he's bye-bye well. He's very much focused on early. American history and literature and early British history and literature and so he's working really hard to collect all the first editions since Shakespeare. He's actually competing with the British library. And he's also competing with some of the major east coast institutions. But he's got the leg up because he's buying entire libraries at a time so all the early papers of Virginia you know come here and whatnot. But it's really not until a few years later that he really starts thinking talking about California as an emphasis collecting and California as we call it and his librarians. Really start going in whole hog on that I I mean Huntington is creating history as. He's he's settling here by bringing this institution here but also by just the very fact that. He's brought the Streetcar System System. He's real estate is his main occupation and he's laying out suburb so he's sort of history in the making with Huntington here like anybody who who is collecting art. At the time Henry Huntington has a European white male focus and that is reflected in a lot of what you you see in the art gallery walls when you're thinking about how you can represent a broader spectrum of the country at that time at nine hundred nineteen order order things in the collection that can illustrate beyond what Huntington himself might have been drawn to because his collection is focused was pretty narrow. WPRO ASKS FOR A lot of people at that time so keep in mind that while this exhibition is about the year nineteen nineteen. It includes food items brought to the Huntington all the way up to twenty nineteen so some moments in the show where we tell other stories are the US marshals papers for instance. That are right here. They're the kind of parole records so to speak for German citizens who were required are to report to the Marshal's office once a week and kind of check in other. German citizens were jailed under pretty flimsy charges. We have have An amazing book by Delilah Beasley. It's the history of African Americans in California published in Nineteen nineteen. We have wobbly. Industrial Workers of the World Literature. We also have a lot of material believe it or not about the German revolution. So one thing was discovery of Jenny's in fact. The Huntington Huntington has an extraordinary collection of German posters from roughly nineteen seventeen to about nineteen twenty nineteen twenty one. We've got ten thousand one of them. We've got four on the wall and one of them reads Warning I'm translating. Stopping is prohibited riders. There's will be shot. This is an image from the German revolution of January. Nineteen nineteen which was a short-lived Communist revolution. And I think that's definitely a story. Sorry along with the wobbly material along with this. US marshals material that one might not expect to encounter at the Huntington. So much of what you're talking about. How suggests what's going to happen? In the years and decades to follow the registration of german-american suggests the internment that's GonNa Happen during World War. Two you there are artifacts about the wobbly and about the fight to unionize and the penalties that some union organizers faced which was death and lynching and then there are are things like the German revolution when you start thinking about what this snapshot of Nineteen Nineteen represents how much of the future history of the country during the world. Do you think is really told. Start looking closely at what. We're seeing here an extraordinary amount so really. It's the mishandling for the stumbles. At the precise peace conference that set the stage for the Second World War. It's the social chaos and Germany in nineteen nineteen and the near breakdown of civil order right as the Weimar Constitution's being written that sets the stage for the rise of the Nazis in the nineteen thirties. `Isolation Azam in American foreign policy for the Twenties and thirties. Become set at this moment. But it's not as I like to try to say it's not all bad. So women got the the right to vote. Huntington's Streetcar System is kind of its edits. Apogee in Nineteen Nineteen And that's the sort of backbone around around which the metropolis of La would continue to grow for another forty or fifty years before they ripped it up and put in the freeway in what we hoped in setting up the exhibition is did did people. Moving through would make those connections themselves rather than kind of hammering away on the Nineteen Nineteen Twenty nineteen parallels. Let people make those connections themselves and certainly you pick you did it so I want to look at a map so we go walk. It's maps there are some amazing maps around us right now. What is this epic map? That goes almost across tire gallery. This is an epic map. This is thirty nine foot long linen map rolling a map which is completely unrolled. That's the first time we've ever unrolled it. which is depicting the delineating the Pasadena? Short Line Redcar system from Old Town Pasadena. All the way to the outskirts of you've downtown Los Angeles drawn over decades. The short line opened in one thousand nine hundred two and was going for many many decades. so so everything that's shown on this map reveals not only the route of the Pacific Electric Red Car but all contiguous real estate holdings the titles was to land the deeds the changes in placenames the additions of towns. But it really shows the extent to which transportation and real estate are intertwined in the city of Los Angeles Really Huntington put in his transportation network to get people to his real estate holdings. It was a loss leader leader for him and so he was really trying to move people out to the hinterlands where he had built these suburbs and remember the suburbs also had racially restrictive covenants on them him as did many of these neighborhoods. That the streetcars going through. So it's just an amazing time to really reflect on the demographics and the topography. Yeah of the city and how it got to be the way it is how does sound and music play in this show. I saw that you put together. Gather a spotify playlist what elements of music represented either visually or. Do you want people to walk around the gallery. Listening to their spotify playlist about the Huntington show. Well right here on the wall. We have some sheet music covers and I think just reading the titles. Give you a sense so there's salvation lassie of mine. She's in an army uniform. And you can see in the distance a bunch of soldiers heading into what looks like canteen. There's another called. I'm forever blowing bubbles in. Its this woman looking in the distance surrounded by a whole bunch of bubbles. Let the rest of the world go by my baby's online on. Ah You'd be surprised by Irving Berlin and then my favorite how you gonNA keep them down on the farm after they seem Perry only after a Wave banning What all of these started to say to us is that this was a really a moment of nostalgia so for all of the world changing events for the horrors of the war for the tragedies of the route summer and the violence against African Americans that year popular culture pop culture? That's what the says isn't reflecting that instead it's giving us a nostalgic light view and we felt like this room we're standing in his cold return and the return section is not just about soldiers coming home but about this desire to turn the clock back which we we all know is an possible. James and Jenny thanks much gas. Thanks a lot John. That was John Horn Jennifer Watts. James glisten Co curator of Nineteen nineteen at the Huntington Museum. The exhibit is open through January twentieth. Coming up on the frame in L. A. on Szabo that bills itself as the world's first LGBTQ Monte Achi Group on an KPCC. PODCASTS are supported by Warner brothers presenting just mercy based on the true story of attorney Brian. Stevenson's heroic fight light to save an innocent man's life now nominated for the screen actors guild for outstanding performance by a male actor in a supporting role Jamie Fox and winner of the National Board of Reviews Freedom of Expression Award The New York Times Nicholas Kristof called it. Searing and soaring every generation has its hero may ours for consideration. Listen in all categories. Welcome back to the frame. I'm Steven Cuevas in for John Horn. Warn the word for Rainbow in Spanish is article eighties. Rainbows are rarely associated with the Super Macho World of Mariachi music but one group is changing Matt. Here in southern California they are the mighty Achi Art go east of Los Angeles or L. A.'s. Rainbow Mariachi the names and not to the gay pride flag and that's appropriate given that the band calls itself the world's first. LGBTQ Mariachi group the frame contributor. Marcus has the story. You know it's Christmas when you hear me. Burrito seven zero. The Classic Latin American Carol Tells The story of a child's journey of faith there countless versions like the seventies original to this more modern take by Guatemala's Gaby that'd be Moreno scenario given meals solman aloe black it but nobody does it quite like Mariachi Arcoiris Dilettante Hilas. They said Domina Meena and eh that's because this is arguably the world's first out and proud Mariachi troop because we're we're special star is Talia Marie Melendez Diva S. She's equal parts musician and history-maker the true promotes the violinist as the first transgender woman. In my I didn't know I would be like a spokesperson for community. I try to set the standard really really high but out in Pico Rivera. Recently I hang known this rising star faced much more mundane problems. I'm a curl bring a late night. Run through a Burrito. Her manicure melted down. These ones one's here see what I do. Is I get my nails done. But my left hand. Because it's the my my fingering hand they'll cut short but my on my right hand. I have all the Qinglong thirty but there to find. Don't clown me clowning. I was like out honey. Brie girl read read you can tell Melendez and her fellow musicians have formed a little family over the years. We communicate through an APP. It's our own personal muddy and she app girl grow. That library stays open twenty seven. There's lots of laughter and light hearted teasing rehearsals an shows it's a rare sense of camaraderie and good cheer the troop tries to offer fans. That is exactly what we give Q.. Plus community LGBTQ DT Cupolas ABCD. If they just keep adding and adding it adding girl off of it okay on a serious note we want to engage you when you go here. Mario Rigamonti out she like you. Hear the man Singh and then he's singing all that pain to his woman or whatever. Well what if there is a gay man that is feeling that pain you want to feel that to. You really do me as a trans woman. I always wanted to sing to me. God Yea and I want him to mean it then saw it and that's aww man seemed to the lesbian will seem to another woman. That's our niche. Hi Nancy Menendez fell in love with the Violin at eight years old while all growing up in. LA's L. settle neighborhood some good years but famine strife and deep deep depression crept in by the time. The young boy became a team and soon he left L. A. for a year to live a Christian retreat. I just prayed about it because I was like. I was at my my wits end because trying to numb who I really was a this. We ask God. I'm here I surrender to be a man and be with a woman. Put It in my heart and let me know or the woman that I feel I am and obviously. That's that's what he gave me. So I left over there and I came back to Los Angeles trailblazing looking back Melendez wishes. She had a trans woman role model to look up to. Ironically had the internet been more reliable back in the late nineties. Belinda might have learned about another trailblazer did a CPA CAMPESINA UP. A scene was a trans woman who performed born Mariachi music in San Francisco's mission district back in those days. UC Santa Cruz. Professor Mario or Chore Remembers For Well. Everything stopped when she started thinking. You know it was just all about channeling. That boys choice says well. Natalia and that seat that may have never met she believes that watches over Natalia as a trans ancestor. As we say now you and I a transept bit more back in. La Crying Uggla uses director. Godless Santiago leads rehearsal with a bit of an iron fist. Get the right phrasing. But these rigorous rehearsals he's had paid off. They are in constant demand. I remember when we did our first. Same Sex what I got the phone call and it was one of the grooms and he said is this I. I can't believe it. He's like I can't believe you guys exist. I'm like my dad shaddock elite. He's saving the day with mighty at your gay wedding. That and I think it's fabulous. Ah I'm Markus negative for the frame that'll do it for today. I'm Steven Cuevas. The frame is back here on Thursday from the Mon Broadcast Center. Happy Hanukkah and Merry Christmas to all

Huntington John Horn Golden Globes Los Angeles Golden Globe awards Steven Cuevas Henry Huntington Globes director Hollywood Foreign Press Associ Golden Globes James Mangold John California Talia Marie Melendez Fox searchlight Matt Damon Christian Bale KPCC
For Jon Batiste, Better 'Late' Than Never

The Frame

28:17 min | 1 year ago

For Jon Batiste, Better 'Late' Than Never

"KPCC PODCASTS are supported by twentieth century. Fox presenting forward versus Ferrari directed by James Mangold starring Christian. Bale and Matt Damon now nominated mandated for a Golden Globe for best actor Christian Bale and five critic's choice nominations including best picture of the year. KPCC supporters include search presenting. Joe Rabbit nominated for the Sag Award for Best Ensemble. Seven critics choice awards including best picture. The Golden Globe for Best Picture and one of AF is ten best pictures of of the year for consideration in all categories from the Mon Broadcast Center at KABC. This is the frame. I'm John Horn on today's show. The major Hollywood guilds have released their award nominees giving some films a boost as the Oscars get closer then. Stephen Colbert bandleader man leader. John Batiste wants to open your ears to new musical experiences. The sound of John Coltrane the way that he plays the sax though to wait at Nina Simone plays the piano is just. It doesn't always have to be lyrical to carry a deep profound meaning. In fact I think that every combination of melody's Elodie in different TAMBOR's all carry a meeting all that coming up on the frame. KPCC podcasts casts are supported by Twentieth Century Fox presenting forward versus Ferrari directed by James Mangold and starring Christian. Bale and Matt Damon now nominated for a golden in Globe for best actor Christian Bale and five critic's choice nominations including best picture of the year. Welcome to the frame. I'm John Horn Award. Season is truly upon us. The directors guild of America and the Producers Guild of America have announced their nominees for this year's awards taken together together. The DIGI A. N.. PJ selections can help predict who will be in the running when the Oscar. Nominations come out next Monday. The Writers Guild of America also released released. Its list of screenwriting nominees this week. Kyle Buchanan covers movies and writes the carpet bagger column at the New York Times and he points out that all of the best picture dominates at the Academy Awards last year where I nominated by the producers guild. It's often a very good harbinger and this year. We've got some of the things some of the movies that you'd expect to see 'cause you've seen them all award season like the Irishman once upon a time in Hollywood parasites marriage story be a lot of populist Tapia versus Ferrari you have out and little women made it in Joker nineteen seventeen. So the ones that were left out where bombshell farewell L.. And the two popes I guess are the ones that might have been in but the fact that they recognized movie like knives out and Ford versus Ferrari are the producers typically a little more populous if you listen to the academy they are. They do have a blockbuster so there was there. Were some people who thought maybe adventures endgame couldn't get in but this is a pretty terrific list. I would say this solace. I would give to the people who weren't included when it comes to Oscar occasionally one or two variations concur. It's just that they tend to happen for smaller or eater more highbrow movies. So you're not in that category didn't get in today okay. That could be your best picture. Chapters and the directors guild of America released its nominees for best directors for features in twenty nineteen. I'm going to skip to the punchline. which is it's the eighth of the last ten? Dj nominations to be made up solely of men. Which means Greta Gerwig wake from? Little women didn't make the cut. Yes in Greta Gerwig was one of you know you mentioned too. That weren't all five men. One of those was two years ago in credit card. Wink was nominated. The Lady Bird does use nominees. It's of course is the Tarantino function. How would they terrify seven days to direct it back in seventeen won the Golden Golden Globe for best director and td WHO director Joe Rabbit? That was kind of the surprise. Some people thought it would be Gregor Way or taught phillips directed right to choke or marriage stories bomb back and the Oscar lineup for best director. They usually about three for five of four or five so they're still suppresses and the DJ also recognizes first time directors. In two thousand eighteen. There are three women on that list. Matt Yep did not Alma Harrell. Who did honey boy? Oy EMELINA Matsushita's for Queen and Slim. Is it ever the case that the nominees for the DJ first time feature end up going on to it'd be nominated for directing at the Academy Awards. That's happened last year. Rather famously Bradley Cooper who was nominated for both wasp both didn't get nominated for best director at the Oscars so again you really never know. I enjoy days like today because it gives us some go into some sort of clear case of how this now but cries. Let's talk about the writers guild of America and its nominations. It does like the Academy Awards nominations for original and adapted screenplay. Were there any surprises in terms of films that didn't make the cut for the WPA. Yea I think the biggest surprise with that is not even eligible. If you're not part of the writers guild they won't nominate you no matter how great your screenplay. So that's why you might not think that's why you don't see Quentin Tarantino who won the Golden Globe for screenplay his once upon a time in Hollywood screenplay was snubbed by the writers guild because he's snapped joining them and in his ranks include Pedram Adobo painting glory and one for the well. Well we're also not part of the guilt so if you look at what the producers go the directors guild and the Writers Guild have done the last couple of days. Is there a fillmore more. Are there films that seem to have a little bit more momentum than they might have had a week ago. Yes I think when you take them in concert with the screen actors guild so these the the most major industry to weigh in the movies that you've seen score across. The board are Irishman parasite which is significant again for a forum so Joe Rabbit surprisingly and look at the end that if he were able to be in that because of the rightist jokes ELT exclusion. We're talking with Kyle. Buchanan of the New York Times about Hollywood's guild or nominations. I'm GonNa talk about an organization that is is not in Hollywood but in London BAFTA which is the British equivalent of the Academy Awards. They came out with their nominations. Among Twenty actors nominated knitted in lead and supporting roles. Not a single person of color. What has been a backlash to the BAFTA? Nominations I would say it's pretty significant. You'll see and that's nominated you look at them but not only. Are there no people of color but there are also actors nominated white actors nominated Multiple Times Margot Robbie is nominated against herself in best supporting actress bomb zone. What's apartment time in Hollywood the Oscars the academy has taken great pains to diversify its membership and I would? I think it's way past my path. It's do that. Something I noted today on. Twitter is that during his entire career then Washington in has never been nominated for a BAFTA award. And it's that sort of thing that makes you wonder what's going on over there at what needs to go along to make their govt too so the Academy Award. Nominations are coming out early Monday morning. Is it your guests that they will be maybe a little bit more diverse than the baptist. I mean I don't know how they could be any less. I think they'll be somewhat more diverse than Modesto's the cockeyed optimist. In me. Why I think you know this is partly because there is fantastic work that has been done by people of Color? Who could recognized by some other places? Relations kills my hope is that the economy will be paying attention. So it's high time to do it. Because Oscar voting closest it does indeed Kaya Buchanan. You can writes the carpet bagger column in New York Times Kyle thanks for coming back on the show coming up on the frame. John petits talks about balancing his music career with his job as bandleader on the late. Show with Stephen Colbert. KPCC he sees. Supporters Include Fox searchlight presenting Joe Rabbit from writer Director Taika Waititi include on both. Afi's the National Board of reviews ten best pictures pictures of the year and now nominated for the Sag Award for Best Ensemble and best supporting actress. Scarlett Johansson seven critics choice awards including best picture and best adapted screenplay and the Golden Globe Award for best actor and Best Picture of the year awards eligible in all categories. KPCC PODCASTS are supported. By Warner brothers Michael B Jordan Jamie Fox and Brie Larson Star in just mercy. Based on the true story of attorney Brian. Stevenson's heroic fight I to save an innocent man's life. Every generation has its hero made ours variety raved. Just mercy will shake you to your soul nominated by the screen screen actors guild for outstanding performance by a male actor in a supporting role for Jamie Foxx for consideration in all categories including best picture and best supporting Gordon Actor. Welcome back to the frame. I'm John Horn pianist. John Batiste leads the band on the late. Show with Stephen Colbert arm. He grew up just outside of New Orleans but has lived in New York City. Ever since attending the juilliard school. Batiste and Colbert bonded. After the musician position appeared on the talk show host former series on comedy central and when Kobe was named CBS late night show he called on Petit's to lead the the band. Batiste was raised in a very musical household and has an appetite for all kinds of music from bebop to Beethoven Katy Perry but he says some of his earliest inspiration came from video games. Well I grew up playing video games and gaming was at its peak when I was coming up in late nineties early. Two thousands. You talk about playing. Sonic the hedgehog because it was such a big part of my upbringing. It it seeped in without me trying they either. They'll notice from a game and they'll be thrilled or shocked by how transcendent it is. The arrangement that I've done kind of opens the door in their mind to listen to it or they won't even know Dad's from a game. They'll listen to it as if it's any other piece of music without having judgment or having a bias. I WANNA play the the opening track from your twenty eighteen album Hollywood Africans. This song is called Kenner. Bogey So a lot of people who visit New Orleans don't know where Kenner there is. It's where the airport is named after the Armstrong. I want to ask about growing up in Kenner and what it was like for you. Musically Kenna was basic. You know it was very very small and then New Orleans being this city with this epic culture and I have this family lineage that I come from and heavy we you know have having that kind of as part of my upbringing as well. It was almost a sense of Having these dual realities Inner Betty's family family being one of the largest musical families out of New Orleans and you think about the history of New Orleans in all of the different cultural influences whether whether it's You know the French and Spanish and African the The the the northernmost tip a Caribbean is kinda without considering Orleans to be. Ah I I will go back and forth between those two places and I think that's why I have this kind of What I consider to be a mix of influences in the Gumbel of what I call my My sounded the essence of of of GIANBATTISTA. I WANNA play something to get at that idea of the ingredients that go into your Gumbo. I think you're gonNA recognize the musician behind this on that's evidenced by thelonious monk. I WanNa ask you about the first time you've heard monk and what he meant to you in terms of how he put together a song. Oh my goodness well you know. Mark was one of those individual artists where you hear them immediately. No it is and his piano plan even further that that reality by showing us that up instrument that is not meant to bend could be bent. He stretched base in time time and really came up with his own harmonic language in his own understanding of rhythm by blending sounds of the music. They came from the church. And the music of ragtime stripe piano he he was just a genius of The highest proportion. So I I really am influenced Kamanga. When I was really hurt him? I had heard of him before but I really heard it when I was eighteen in just moved to New York. You're a year before that and I listened to him almost exclusively for one year until the point where my playing kind of Changed it absorbed. ORB D- His approach. And you can kind of hear a shift between my first album when I was seventeen And then my second album when I was nineteen it was a great period of discovery for me and I feel like he's a kindred spirit to To me in terms of my musical objectives lives in the things that I'm going after he had already kind of defined some of those objectives fifty years prior. So it's Kinda like piggy agee backing off debt and continuing down the road when you leave New Orleans for New York of New Orleans stays with you and was it always a choice to try to incorporate what I'll call traditional New Orleans. Sounds in what you're doing or you always kind of working away from it. You know there was a time where I didn't really want want to Come out of the New Orleans bag every time I was performing because I think it can be a way of pigeonholed in an artist and I think a lot of times. You have people who consider your your music to be something before they even hear it because they hear your story or to hear something about you that says Oh. This is a New Orleans artists. So maybe this is the only thing that They can play it on the thing that is relevant for me to to pay attention to from there. Currently I think is just a a part of who I am in his apart. Ladies that I'm from and his I guess to answer the question. It's not really something I have to try to do. It comes across because I I am the thing I am it. We're talking with musician. John petits he's the band leader. The late each show with Stephen Colbert. There are a lot of people who think that music should be listened to do in a performance hall or a club. And then there's a whole another way of thinking and I think it ties a little bit back to the whole idea of a second line in New Orleans where there's a public performance aspect to music even celebrating. Somebody's life at their funeral and it feels like that is something that really has stayed with you. That music should be taken into the streets on the subway. It shouldn't be confined by a physical space. How did that become become critical to your thank in the way that you wanted to perform? I'm more of a curatorial mind than anything I think about Q.. Hugh rating experiences bands twilight to be banned leaders is because I'm here rating souls cure any people putting people together who I believe will have chemistry and create something in graded into someone apart. So it's kind of a special kieft for me to give to people in the audience into give to the band members to be able to curate this experience that will all never forget that's truly would drives me especially with The love riot concept of you know creating this processional sessional taking audience instead of doing an encore on stage. Taking the audience out of the venue and doing processional up the road a mile and gathering people all along the way and you know the explosion of emotion and the possibilities of what people are expecting from a concert being expanded. You know that that special to me it feels like a lot of musicians can address how they're feeling about the world and how people might look at the world through lyrics. How can you do that when you're just doing instrumental music? What is your approach to to that whole idea? I think all instrumental music carries a spirit. I think all music carries them a Spirit that is deepening. The words even if it's Lyric based music the sound sound has essence in in in essence of sound has a deeper meaning than what we the Sometimes can realize sometimes realize we do realize it actually on an instinctual level We feel it Like when you hear trap music you hit the drums a when you hear a Samba that carries lineage with it. You know a when you hear the the sound of brushes on symbols of the sound of Of of John Coltrane in the way that he plays the sax or the way that you know Nina Simone plays. The Piano is just doesn't always have to be lyrical to carry a deep profound meaning. In fact I think that every beat in every corden every every combination of beats and Chords and melodies in different tambor's all carry meaning. And that's what really is the job of the musician You can take all of these energies and all of these meanings in these histories in The different lineages and entangled them to create a statement and That's how you do it. You just gotTa know what you're dealing with. That's one of my issues with the education of music. It doesn't deal with the deeper understanding of what what music is about his way. Deep in just the notes talking about spiritual frequencies in in the depth. They're mm-hmm coming up more. My conversation musician John Batiste. He tells me how Stephen Colbert gave him carte blanche with the late. Show music KPCC PODCASTS are supported by Warner brothers. Presenting Joker winner of two Golden Globe. Awards including best actor drama varieties Owen gleiberman named joker the best film of Two Thousand Nineteen calling it a movie that can and will all stand the test of time. Joaquin Phoenix Mesmerizes in the performance of the year now nominated for seven critics choice. Awards and the Writers Guild of America's best adapted screenplay for your consideration in all categories including best picture director and actor. Welcome back to the frame. I'm John Horn. We return turn down to my conversation with pianist and bandleader John. Batiste much of his role on the late show with Stephen. Colbert is to provide some musical backdrops. But on on some skits for the show his music takes the lead as in this recent bid following the testimony before a congressional committee by former United States ambassador to Ukraine Ukraine. Marie Ivanovich Ladies and gentlemen. We have a federal cash joining US tonight. He had the Blue Valley Jazz Club. Join the vocal local stylings a former ambassador. Marie you're our Ukraine policy has been thrown into disarray. I do not understand Mr Giuliani's motives for attacking. How could our system lightness? It's very intimidating. They wait a minute president. Trump just tweeted at you every jazz club. Marie Ivanovich goals to turns bad. What a jerk? Whatever we really bring to the show come from life experiences? Johnny Carson said this and He said to Letterman. Who then told it to Stephen? which is you gonNA bring everything you know to a show like like this and you're going to do everything you know and jazz is something that I do? So this is a way for us to speak to was happening in the world in comedies. With Steven Stephen Does and it comes together on the show. If people watched the show they might hear ten twelve seconds of a song. But if you're in the house you're hearing a whole performance of a piece and you're doing what four five songs every day for the show. Yes about five or six songs there's opening theme and the closing thing which I composed and we plato's every night and then there are the bumpers that happen between acts and we have to to acts of comedy one being the monologue one being a desk comedy piece and then we have two guests typically a night and then maybe a music guest so between all those acts ax and also walking on each guest play Stevens really open to giving me the opportunity to just do whatever it is that I WANNA do. So we'll play all types of music on the show from video game music to Beethoven to Classic Jazz to top forty two drake. I mean it. Ranges sang this full thing over and over again. It's the new lock. Her Up may come from Mexico land. It almost feels like on a show like Stephen Colbert. You can have an audience of millions of people in terms of like almost an online music appreciation class. You can open their ears and their minds minds to new ways of interpreting and listening to music. Is that part of the appeal of a show like that that you are essentially every night teaching a class S. even people don't know it about how to listen I think my existence and My whole purpose is to be an example in a lot of ways you know. That's one reason why I think I was so fortunate to even Meet Stephen on his own. Show Kobe report and get the opportunity to do this show. Because I wasn't really looking to do a television show and I wasn't. I mean honestly. I wasn't familiar with Steven. Or the Colbert report. And he wasn't familiar with me on my music and we met and it was just a spark that was something deeper and Is a beautiful thing you know. I mean being the youngest person ever to do this job on the late show and and expose people to stuff kind of feels like I'm educating them. But I'm also I'm learning so much you know I'm I'm just getting started. I feel what was it that Stephen Colbert said to you. That was so interesting. What we aligned on a lot of different things in terms of what he he really loved about comedy and how it can really bring people together in how it can speak to something that is tied to our humanity humanity and you know the times have changed and you know with the current political divisiveness and all the things that are going on? The show has become something that is A point in our culture where people can laugh and people can feel since a release and for him to be able to do something like that with such hard material and in such a emotional stressful time speaks off first conversations which All about fine in the light. In the darkness I remember watching Samantha. B on the night of the presidential election and Liz was on and she did a performance events of lift every voice and sing fun coming and you just did a cover of what a wonderful world and I'm wondering what role you think. Music has in being hopeful. Music is just a special special force in the universe that speaks to all of the different struggles and triumphs is that humanity has faced since the beginning of time. We've always used music as a way to speak to our ancestors and also to document our time on earth and to pass on the wisdom and the The essence of of of who we are and wonderful world two major something that I think I created as a meditation foul times where we have so so much. Stimulus is so much stuff going on at pushes us into space of isolation even when we're amongst other people and I think it's important important to kind of get perspective sometimes in the see that the universe in the planet and the creation all the things that we exist rounded rounding we exist within environment all of these things that we share in each other this steel wonderful even in its doc is time John petits is the pan later for the late. Show with Stephen Colbert John. Thank you so much for coming on the show. Thank you And that'll do it for today. Don't forget to follow us on facebook. Twitter you'll find us at the frame. I'm John Horn. Thanks for listening. We're back here tomorrow at the Broadcast Center.

Stephen Colbert New Orleans John Batiste Academy Awards John Horn writers guild director Joe Rabbit New York City directors guild John petits Kyle Buchanan Stephen Colbert John Steven Stephen John Coltrane New York Times Ferrari Hollywood KPCC Nina Simone
Marielle Heller pulls off a directing feat with 'Can You Ever Forgive Me?'

The Frame

27:00 min | 2 years ago

Marielle Heller pulls off a directing feat with 'Can You Ever Forgive Me?'

"From the broadcast center at see. This is the frame, I'm John horn on today's show. Disney has for decades made films with a Princess in a lead role. But connect kind of character continued to work in this day and age, then the lead in the movie, can you ever forgive me as a woman who's over fifty. She's a hoarder an alcoholic Misanthrope and our closest relationship is with CAD director, Marielle Heller said she wasn't taunted. Hell, yeah. Gimme that movie. I want it. I think that there's something about a character like that if it was a male if you gave that exact same description, and it was a man we'd be like that's interesting all that coming up today on the frame. KPCC supporters include FOX searchlight, presenting the favourite a- tale of loyalty power and deception from director Yorgos limos, starring Livia Coleman is Queen and Emma stone. Rachel vice as the women of the court vying for her favor in select theaters Friday KPCC podcasts are supported by. Netflix presenting an original film from Academy Awards winning directors. Joel and Ethan Coen the ballot of busters scrubs. An exploration of life's joys and woes said in the American frontier the words eligible on Netflix. And in select theaters welcome to the frame, I'm John horn. Thanks for joining us from the very start of making animated movies. The Walt Disney company bet heavily on princesses. They're snow. White Cinderella rapunzel Aurora area bell the list goes on and on. Nearly a dozen Princess rations currently generate billions of dollars for Disney, and it's not just the movies. It's a never ending cycle of toys sequels. And stage shows, but the unrealistic body shapes the sparkly dresses, and the idea that so many of these princesses just need a prince doesn't really look right anymore. Not that it ever should have Eric Schwartz whole wrote about it this weekend for the Wall Street Journal. And when we spoke today, he started with the most common complaints about Disney princesses, if you look at some of the classic characters there's a sort of a passivity to them like in beauty and the beast. There's some consternation over the fact that bell falls in love with the man who has taken her captive, essentially. And in the little mermaid Ariel. The mermaid decide that she's willing to give up her voice in order to be with prince, Eric those are some narratives that even though they were hits at the time. And they're still hits. Now in some quarters of really raised some issues. I wanna play now a scene from the upcoming movie wreck it Ralph. How? Do you have daddy issues? And now for the million dollar question. Do people assume all your problems guts, all because a big strong man showed up? She is. I remember seeing this scene at cinema con in Las Vegas in the spring. And I too was a little taken aback what's going on in this scene. And why was it? So controversial within Disney really as you can hear in that clip. These princesses are portrayed as incredibly arch. Ironic self-aware, and it's really out of character for a company like Disney, which has always been very protective and very serious about its brand. And so I started asking employees about the scene, and essentially, I was told you have no idea it turned into a bit of a referendum as to how the Princess should be treated within the company. There are some rules about how these princesses are portrayed, including one that I think will change the way you look at any Princess product now, which is that all of the princesses if you put like like what they four or five princesses on the same lunch box or the same book bag you have to animate them. So that there is are looking in different directions. Because there's this longstanding rule at the company that even if they are in the same visit. Space. These princesses are not supposed to know one another. And so when you have something like the the wreck it Ralph seeing that you played where they're all clustered together. And they all know each other. And they're all hanging out that is like anathema to some people within the company, and I don't wanna say it's like a majority. But I think that there is definitely a camp of the more traditional employees who say, look, I'm all about, you know, having progressive independent princesses, but I have to sell book bags and lunch boxes and every state in the country. So these are massive franchises that have to find. If not a common denominator, then a mix that allows them to sort of tap into that nostalgia for the princesses. Well, also acknowledging that a lot of moms today don't want that classic Princess narrative you quote, one former Disney executive who says this no matter how hard you try a four year old girl is going to want to be little mermaid. But if they try to make areo into a lawyer, there's going to be a Hugh. Huge backlash so house. Disney trying to figure out that balance. And are there certain films? I'm thinking, maybe a Moana or frozen where they're trying to bring the Princess into the twenty th century. Absolutely. And actually heard from a a lawyer who said, oh, yeah. Wouldn't it be awful aerial became? Became an attorney. Now it tips both ways though, because I've talked to folks within the company who say they worry about making those princesses to independent or too strong willed because then you might alienate boys, right? You still have to have these movies that need to gross three hundred million. Plus right to turn a profit. They still need to pull in all kinds of movie goers. And I think one of the things that a lot of parents liked about frozen and mwana is that these characters were wrestling with this whole idea of why should we even aspire to be a Princess, and it feels like that's exactly what Disney is struggling with. Because they can't just let these characters be girls or young women because in the world of Disney being a brand. Character means that you have to be a Princess. So how is Disney trying to figure out how they can retain what has sold in the past and what will sell in the future. I don't get the impression that there's anyone within the company who thinks, you know, let's make a movie about a Princess who, you know. You know stays in the kitchen all day. I think that the ark of the portrayals bends towards the progressive portrayal. However, there are these sort of modulating factors within the company, for example. The upcoming live action Aladdin movie is going to elevate the role of jasmine jasmine, if you remember in the animated version really doesn't have too much to do beside, you know, fly the carpet. They did the same thing with the live action Cinderella that came out about three years ago. I talked to the writer, and he told me that actually what he had to do in. That movie was deepen the character of the prince not necessarily of Cinderella because he said it really doesn't look good for Cinderella to fall for a guy. She doesn't even know. So he had to deepen the prince character to sort of make him worth her time. I wonder if what Disney might be thinking about especially as they start taking these animated characters and put them into live action stories is that they're not so much princesses, but they're superheroes. Who tend to be female? That maybe Disney is going to borrow more from marvel than it is from its own animated history. Also, I think another wrinkle of that is that a lot of young girls are gravitating toward the superheroes themselves next year, captain marvel starring breed Larsen is going to come out from Disney's own marvel studios. And we all know that Ray in the new Star Wars movies, the daisy Ridley character, she has really been hit with with young women. So I think you will see more young girls sort of gravitating away from the princesses and toward those other characters. Eric Schwartz all covers the movie business for the Wall Street Journal. He is the author of the article beauty and the backlash. Disney's modern Princess problem. Eric, thanks so much for writing the interesting story and for coming on the show to talk about it. You're a print. Thank you. Up next on the frame director, Marielle Heller on the making of can you ever? Forgive me with Melissa McCarthy. KPCC supporters include FOX searchlight pictures, presenting the favourite Royal tale of loyalty power and deception from director Jorgo slant demus starring Olympia Coleman, Emma stone. Rachel vice nNcholas Holt, Joe Allen, and Mark Gaddis. In select theaters Friday. Welcome back to the frame. I'm John horn. Thanks for joining us director, Marielle Hellers new movie is can you ever forgive me? It starts Melissa McCarthy as the author Lee Israel, despite once having a promising career as a biographer Israel came to be known mostly as a literary forger and the early nineteen nineties desperate for money after her books didn't sell Israel started forging letters from famous authors, she wrote fake letters as no coward and Georgie Parker among others, and then sold them to unsuspecting collectors Israel ended up getting caught by the FBI and the memoir that she wrote about her life as a forger also called can you ever? Forgive me form the basis for the new movie can you ever? Forgive me is the second movie. That Marielle Heller has directed her. I was diary of a teenage girl, which was about a young girls sexual awakening. It was a passion project for Heller who struggled to get it made for years. The film premiered at the Sundance film festival in two thousand and fifteen I think teenage girls scare people to begin with. But I think particularly a movie about a teenage girl in her sexuality and her power was really freaked people out. But for that same reason, I think it's the type of movie we don't have a lot of. And so people who loved it felt like it was made just for them. And like it was the movie they had been waiting for. And that's my favorite comment. I'll get from woman who says that movie was about me, I've been waiting for that movie, and you made it for me. And I feel really, you know, I, it's it's what you hope for when you're making art is that people will actually connect to it in their hearts and feel. And feel something when they see your movies. So the fact that had that kind of visceral response for people where they felt kind of fervently in love with it in a way that was passionate made me so happy, and it meant that I had a lot of meetings with really wonderful, largely female executives after that who all said, this was my favorite movie and then wanted me to make more movies. It's often very hard for women out of success, even to make another film. It's weird. That way is directors jail for women is almost like Alcatraz it's impossible to get out of whereas men get out of it very quickly. But even women who have very successful. I features often struggle getting their next film. Yes, going how conscious of that were you? And how you make sure that didn't happen to you. Well, I was really aware of the statistics that women the the length of time it takes women to make their second feature is so much longer than men. I think the statistic is something like for men. The average is three years to make their second feature. For women at something like eight years, and I saw it firsthand. I would be at Sundance, and I'd be at the premiere of some amazing muscular beautiful first feature, and I would hear people saying like well that was really good. But let's see what she does next. And which is never the conversation about men, you know, a man makes an incredible first feature and everyone goes, I gotta be the first one to get him to do the next giant movie. So I was aware that I didn't wanna fall into that situation. I knew I wanted to make another movie very quickly, and it had taken me eight years to make my first one I didn't wanna wait another eight years to make my second. So when this project came my way, and an Kerry who had been one of my producers from diary brought me this project, and it had some interest from Melissa McCarthy at the time and Nicole hall of center who I knew and respected an an Kerry who I loved and adored I thought, oh, this is a chance to make a movie with a lot of smart women who are bringing me something that I've never read anything like this. And I felt like it was a character. I had. I just had never experienced a character. Like her in movies. I found her to be so compelling and fascinating. So I jumped on board quickly. Well, there's a reason why you have never experienced a character like her movies, and that nobody else has and that is because this kind of character scares people, and it scares people who make movies and pay for movies. So let's pretend you're the studio executive I'm gonna come in. And here's my pitch for can you ever forgive me. It's about a woman. She's over fifty her strongest romantic relationship is probably with her cat. She's bitter. You could call her misanthropic. She's probably alchoholic. She's a hoarder she's failed in her profession. She's gay. She's not very attractive, and she's a criminal. Yes site. Green light. Right. I'm like hell. Yeah. Give me that movie. I want it. I think that there's something about a character. Like that that if it was a male if you gave that exact same description, and it was a man we'd be like that sounds interesting. Yeah. Bruce, Willis, that's go. Yeah. Tony soprano. This sounds like a, you know, a fascinating person more connected to their animals than to other. People the smartest person in every room. She's someone who cares about her intelligence and her writing more than she cares about how she looks which I think is another thing that scares people and scares the industry because women are known for their looks. And we're only supposed to show beautiful women who looked perfect in every frame and movies. We're talking with director Marielle Heller about her new film, can you ever forgive me. Let's talk about how the Israel got into the situation. She is when this film, more or less begins Israel is a very talented writer, and she has written some biographies. And there's something that happens with Estee Lauder that really kind of two rails her career what happens with her biography with. Has an unauthorized biography that she's writing about Estee Lauder, and it ends up coming into conflict with what is becoming an authorized biography for Estee Lauder with a different writer, and because she is not somebody who will play the game, and she will not change her writing in order to please people. She ends up really kind of in the doghouse with the publishers and her book is not well received. It's a it's a disaster because water offered a buy out and make it go away. He says no because that's the type of person she is an and the way she she believes her job as a biographer is to tell the truth and to not make her books about herself. It's all about really telling a truthful story about somebody. And she's such a good biographer. She's actually she almost can channel people's voices. She learns about people's personalities through their writing styles and can almost channel them, and that leads her kind of naturally into this criminal activity where she can almost channel the voices of all of these famous writers who she's idolized the people who really she wishes she was a contemporary of but something else happens, and that is and it's almost like somebody who doesn't have health insurance who has a catastrophic illness when you're a writer, and you're not able to sell your writing the margin between getting by and essentially risking losing everything you have is razor. No, she is at the edge. She is being told by everyone that she is obstacle. Eat. She is no longer a viable writer, and she cannot make a living. She can't get work doing magazine pieces. She can't get work writing copies. She is at the end of a rope. And she's not the type of person who can keep a day job. Lee Israel, tried to keep many different types of day jobs, personal assistance, doing paralegal work in the middle of the night. And she couldn't keep those jobs. So she finds herself really not being able to make a living not being able to make ends meet and like many artists in New York. She finds herself struggling, and she has to go to extreme measures to make ends meet to ask you about is seen in the film in which Lee Israel played by Melissa McCarthy is having dinner with a bookseller and a play by Dolly wells, who she is selling forged documents to. And there's a suggestion that there's something happening between them, and this is nineteen Ninety-one New York on line. Here was particularly clever. Don't you think it's wonderful. I love his writing and. Dorothy parker's. Well, caustic wit. Caustic wit is my religion. I can't carry it off. You certainly can. Doesn't help too much in the relationship department. Sure. That's not true Leah's. Somebody was very guarded and does not wear her sexuality on her sleeve. So we talked all about what was not being said, and the context of the sort of code that they spoken when they were asking each other to have coffee, and what that might mean. And the things that are being unsaid and the confusion of wanting to know, whether the other person knows what you mean when you say certain things that was the tension of the scene, that's sort of the beauty of the scene. You see these two people who are searching each other's eyes to know, if they're thinking what you hope they're thinking and she. She so identified as a writer that not feeling appreciated for her talent was the most painful thing, she could possibly experience and part of what's beautiful about this relationship that starts to develop with this bookseller, Anna is that Anna recognizes her talent and loves her wit, and is a genuine fan of her books and for Li it's like a little glimpse into what could have been how she could have been regarded by the world, but she isn't she's she has never gotten that type of recognition. And it's it's a true pain for her Lee Israel was unapologetic. And she didn't worry about what other people thought of her. You're making a movie about a character where you actually want the audience to care about her. They don't necessarily have to like her. So how do you make sure that you can figure out a path where audiences understand her even if they're not wholly sympathetic to her? I think the first step is finding. An actor who doesn't judge the character? So in casting Melissa McCarthy, she and I met, and we both very much agreed about all of the parts of Lee that we loved we found her refreshing and funny and witty she's the smartest person in every room. She moves through the world like a force of nature, and and she kinda doesn't care. And there was something about her that that we both fell in love with. So having an actor who approaches a character like that with a certain amount of humanity and understands this person inside their bones is key risk was how will people take it? Do will people wanna see her in this type of role? It's almost like when you go to see your favorite band. You want them to play their greatest hits. You don't see them do something different? So I think we were aware that that was the risk. We were taking and I'm just so pleased that people seem to love seeing her in this part people are so blown away by her performance. She really she really shines. She's very move. Ding. Coming up more with Marielle Heller who's now, directing a film about Fred Rogers that stars Tom Hanks. KPCC podcasts are supported by. The Netflix original film, the ballot of BUSTER scrubs from the incomparable minds of Joel and Ethan Coen comes a six part film original stories that only they could tell set against the harsh and unforgiving backdrop, the American frontier. The valid of busters Scruggs is an exploration of life's joys and woes winner of the best screenplay. The Venice film festival the ballot of busters scrubs on that flicks. And now playing in select theaters. Welcome back to the frame. I'm John horn to track Marielle Heller career as director is to note, some differences in the film business, historically, female directors who've had their first features debut at Sundance or other top festivals. Don't often get the same opportunities to make a second film that male directors do Heller. It was all too aware of those stats when her debut feature diary of a teenage girl premiered at Sundance in two thousand fifteen now her second film is in theaters it's called can you ever forgive me. And it stars Melissa McCarthy and Heller is actually at work on her third film that stars Tom Hanks as Fred Rogers still the industry is far from parody Hellers Melissa McCarthy film was just one of two American narrative features that were directed by women at this year's telluride film festival. So I asked Heller what she thinks the role of festivals are an expanding whose films get seen on the most prestigious stages. Traditionally. Film festivals have proven to be more diverse than Hollywood at large. I know Sundance proves to be very diverse festival and the year. I was there was fifty percent, female filmmakers, and their numbers are so much better than if you look at the numbers of the studio films that are put out, and I do think the film festivals are beacons for women people of color, LGBTQ filmmakers who are hoping to get their films scene and more widely accepted. We have an industry wide problem. This is not a festival problem. This is an industry wide problem. And I think there are many many ways that we need to be fixing this problem. I know I went through the Sundance labs, and that was a program that is incredibly diverse and champions, the voices of people who otherwise would not have their movies championed. So I think hopefully, people are starting to take notice. Of programs like that. And starting to recognize that not only is it important to tell these types of stories, but these are the stories that the public wants the audience is ready and willing and once more diverse stories the fact that I made a movie about a fifty one year old lesbian cat lady. And that people are going to see it in droves shows that I mean, it's a beautiful thing. So you make this transition from your Sundance film to make a film with FOX searchlight to now making a bigger budgeted film about Fred Rogers with Tom Hanks, how do you make sure that at every step of the way, you remain, the director who made diary of a teenage girl. Weirdly, these projects don't feel all that different to me. It's all the same problems and excitement of trying to work out story. Trying to make characters feel Centric trying to work with actors to make sure the choices they're making feel like the bravest and boldest choices that they can part of what I love is a director is creating a space onset. For actors to do their best work. I'm an actor. I come from the theater and part of what I love is breaking down scenes and working on a project from sort of the one word up and each project. I've been able to do that I have moments where I stop and go on my gosh, I'm giving notes to Tom Hanks. I'm giving does Melissa McCarthy or whatever it might be. But if I can let go of that and just realize we're all artists together coming together trying to be as honest, and truthful and and brave as possible in our work. It all kind of feels like the same thing Morgan Neville made an amazing documentary about Fred Rogers called won't you be my neighbor that I think made a lot of people feel not only nostalgic for Fred Rogers. But also how he has left a void in today's pop culture. What do you hope to tell them the story? Well, I hope that rather than feeling like Fred Rogers left avoid we can feel the message of kindness and the light. Which he brought to the world which I feel still has a lot of power. And by spreading it even further and wider. We can all become better people I've been in Pittsburgh for the past four months, and that's a city that you can feel the reverberations of his heart in every aspect of the city. He is such a present figure in that city where he lived, and I feel myself becoming a better person. I feel myself becoming a better mother. I feel myself becoming just a kinder person within my community because of his teachings and because of his true commitment to. Kindness and our feelings, and what it is to recognize each other as fellow human beings. So for me in the current climate. We're in where the world feels so desolate and sometimes hopeless living with Fred's words spending the past year thinking about how he would feel and trying to to let his words guide me has been a joy, it's been a privilege and part of what our movie is focusing on is the effects that he had on the people who he befriended. It's really from the perspective of a journalist who's getting to know Fred and writing about him and his life is changed. And we've read thousands of stories of people who had the same experience, which is that as they met him as his message of kindness seeped into their consciousness their life changed forever. And I feel and Tom Hanks, and I spoke at one point about how we both feel that that's happened to us that by. Living with his words. We we've been changed forever. And yet in the neighborhood where Fred Rogers lived. There was a horrible shooting. Just a couple of weeks. Yes. It was. I mean, there's nothing to say except for. The pain that surrounded that it's devastating. The community of squirrel hill is a community that I've become very close with and feel very connected to and as one of the most loving resilient communities. I've ever seen. We had a unity event in Pittsburgh last week that we were able to attend the spirit of Pittsburgh and the their resoluteness about not letting hatred change them as a city is so palpable. I really feel like they are a guiding light in how we should be reacting to tragedy. They are requesting gun control. They are asking for a reform in our policies, which stoke the fires of hatred, and they are also saying we refuse to fall into a pattern of hate. We will be resilient. We will be love filled, and we will hold each other close through this tragedy REO Hiller. Thanks for coming in. Thank you, very all Hellers movie, can you ever? Forgive me with Melissa McCarthy is in theaters now, and that's the frame for today. I'm. John horn. We'll see you back here tomorrow.

Melissa McCarthy Marielle Heller The Walt Disney company director Fred Rogers John horn Eric Schwartz Tom Hanks writer FOX searchlight pictures Lee Israel Netflix KPCC Israel Wall Street Journal Ralph Rachel vice Sundance Emma stone executive
Meet the documentarian who embedded with a Jihadist family for 'Of Fathers and Sons'

The Frame

27:01 min | 2 years ago

Meet the documentarian who embedded with a Jihadist family for 'Of Fathers and Sons'

"From the Mon broadcast center at KP. See this is the frame. I'm Steven Cuevas sitting in for John horn today when the Turkey or vegan quivalent is eaten what can family watch on TV LA times. Television critic Lorraine Ali has some tips and to make the documentary of fathers and sons filmmaker tell Derek put his life on the line to tell the story of Syrian terrorist. Grooming, his sons for she hod by hope that the film can give more understanding of who are those people from really inside their mind. Also, an installation created by a Slavic artists pays tribute to American liberalism all that coming up today on the frame. KPCC supporters include FOX searchlight presenting the favourite attain of loyalty power and deception from director your goes length MOS, starring Livia Coleman is Queen and Emma stone and Rachel vice as the women of the court vying for her favor in select theaters Friday KPCC podcasts are supported by. Netflix presenting an original film from kademi awards winning directors. Joel and Ethan Coen the ballot of busters groves. An explosion of life's joys and woes set in the American frontier awards eligible on Netflix. And in select theaters welcome to the frame. I'm Steven Cuevas in today for John horn. Thanks for joining us a lot of spend days, maybe even weeks planning out our thanksgiving meals for friends and family, but probably little or no thought to what to do. Once the eating is over. That's where TV can bring us together. Give us a break from one another or possibly rile up some conflict. Well, never fear. We asked LA times TV critic Lorraine Ali to join us in studio to give some holiday viewing tips. I think it depends on. On what you're looking for in terms of time. And who you're watching with in other words, do you want to get away from the family and spent a lot of time binging kind of take a break from them or do you actually going to sit on the couch and go through a couple hours with them? So there's a couple of news series that Netflix series atypical to seasons innovate typical. And it's an excellent family series. But it is it revolves around one member of the family, the son who's autistic and the rest of the family kind of has to work their lives around him. But they're very much a typical quirky family. Let we all are. And so I watch it with my fifteen year old and my husband, and we all really like it other ones you can go for classics, which the twilight zone is now on Netflix. Would you go the original original? If you grew up watching it, you know, you remember them. And then you watch them in another way as an adult like, oh, wow. There's all these kind of little lessons in here. All these comments about society, and where we are two conquest do not necessarily come with bombs and explosions far around. There are weapons that are simply. Prejudices to be only in the minds of men. For the record prejudices can kill kids watching it. We'll also see a lot of those themes that they're hearing about in other forms of are now in the news in these old twilight sends up Assode 's if you're gonna be with relatives who have very different political views than you, or the you may have some sort of tension with is their programming that you can recommend it may satisfy everyone in help kind of keep the peace. The good place is on NBC. You can binge that it's really not politically specific. There aren't barb jokes in there about Trump or about, you know, red state blue state it's starting to Danson and it's about the afterlife. It looks at larger existential questions with humor about you know, what constitutes being good here on earth ensuring you're going to get into the good place of the bad place. And it's really funny. And I think it's a political, but it still smart. What about programming could help foster a conversation about some of these more touchier topics like politics, like religion, something like black ish? It's a comedy. It's about a family really kind of average American family, but inside of it they tackle a lot about politics about race about faith about child rearing about how all of those things effect child-rearing parenting. All of that our today. Great I joined the young Republicans club at school. No free lunch for you. I don't want to spend your Republican sensibilities by giving you a handout, I think that gives you many ways in to discuss some of the touchier, you know, subjects now that you wouldn't want to turn on the news to sort of illicit that conversation, but you could do it through something like black ish like fresh off the boat. Maybe even the Connors, you know, look at look at something like the Connors, that's a spin off of Roseanne. Right. And that family has a liberal in there. They have conservatives in there. They have Muslim neighbors. They have Christians have people who are atheist, and they all have to live in the same set sitcom that can Eliza those kind of conversations and also deal with those things within a fictional world. Therefore, you know, it's a lot less scarier when it's another family talking about it as opposed to your point. And I think what you see is a family that can disagree a lot. But clearly love each. Very much. And maybe there's a lesson in there for all of us. I think that is a great lesson. And I think that underpins really any good family series any good series where you know, relationships are at the core of it. And what about just pure escapism? A great family watch stranger things. It's about family about relationships about this little town helping each other out while they're kind of being invaded by this alien force. Yeah. And if you watch something like that altogether as a family, it's fun because it's kind of cliffhanger, right? You wanna move. What happens next in my family was always a good opportunity to bring out some old classic to expose the kids to that. They had no idea existence. And it's really amazing. How those old programs can connect with the kid, right? Well, friends is a great example. It's being rediscovered by a younger generation because their parents are playing it for them. And that's been. Kind of a throwback that everybody can enjoy together. A lot of people will spend a long holiday alone or mostly alone. So for people that just want a nice distraction and maybe tune holidays out a little bit. What do you recommend for those of you who really don't like the politics season and actually really feel pretty angry about it oxygen is rolling out homicide for the holidays, and really you've it's a true crime series where horrible murders happen around the holidays, and they reenact those, and yeah that is something to thanksgiving. My favorite holiday. We had good food. Good conversation laughter. As we always did. Everything's Clint great everything is enrolling beautifully. L broke lose. So every every episode is kind of self contained is it's own. Yes. Yes. It can be a murder around the Christmas. Tree stabbing. By the Turkey via Lorraine Ali is television critic for the LA times Lorraine, happy thanksgiving, happy thanksgiving to you too and happy watching and Beijing. And if you wanna get out of the house and head to a movie theater, we have some advice for you on that too. Just go to LA, that's LA. I S T dot com coming up after the break, the filmmaker who embedded with jihadi family and lived to tell about it. Key supporters include FOX searchlight pictures, presenting the favourite Royal tale of loyalty. Power in deception from director yoga slant. The most starring vehicle Mun and stone. Rachel, vice nNcholas Holt, Joel win and marquess. In select theaters Friday. Welcome back to the frame. I'm Steven Cuevas in today for John horn who right about now may be in thanksgiving holiday traffic, and wherever you are. Thanks for joining us. So after Syrian filmmaker tell Derek completed his documentary of fathers and sons, he got his first and only tattoo tattoos are forbidden within the strict Islamic terrorists community. He embedded with to make the film his tattoo. It would prevent him from ever going back. A fathers and sons tells the story of Abu Osama a bomb expert and founding member of the newsra fronts in off shoot of al-qaeda Durkee documents. How Abu Asama grooms has eldest sons to follow in his footsteps at the start of the film. The boys are just twelve and thirteen years old in one. A group of boys making improvised bomb using a plastic water bottle. See if it works. They scamper outside and start kicking it around like a soccer ball until. Durkee is no stranger to conflict zones. He's worked at the freelance war journalist for CNN Thomson. Reuters when Durkee and I spoke I asked him about going undercover to make fathers and sons and how he first got introduced Abu Asama and his family and a quick note. This conversation does include graphic descriptions of violence and audio of gunfire. We found the Keats in one of sharia com. During the decision for the because I was looking for a similar family and for months, I couldn't find that. I people and we found the Keats, and we talked to them sons, the he son see he son some, and we talked to the people there that we need to feel with him and his father and the two to the father, and I was super lucky that he accept I second that he's got his Matic. But as interest in the end of the he's generous, so he's in structure of the unto Doug on east, but lead gut father or like like narcos all of those field who resent bad people. The should be his Matic bad people in order to be able to watch until the end. Yeah. So he believe in califat and for the liver that his rated. Advice with all his sons to to build it. It is Osama's eldest son, Osama, you meet I who also is kind of the the second main character in the film in a sense. Well, under under what pretense did you not only gain the trust of him in the family and his associates, but also convince them to let you film off and on very intimate moments for roughly two and a half years. He's good Meyer of al-qaeda leaders. Yeah. And those become famous because of the media, so he understood that the media can make him famous, but he did understand that the film documented his can go different than media that it can be in some way like criticize or can't show different with that he won't to export himself. So he agreed thus to film him. Then also because I I. Present myself as a student there that bear sewn who want to learn more about jihad because I told him that I understand that that I own my life has wrong. So you portrayed yourself as someone who wants to learn more about this. 'cause and and if much sympathy with with their ideology, so wow. Because it's not about MC them trust. You also you have to make them love you. So the the feel the responsibility for you. Like MENA journalist went there from outside the get the chance to feel like a week's with with those people. But those people only allowed don't know who what is your background the only allowed you to feel what they want to show about observe. So they cannot go deep in the society in the brainwashing system. How it's. Oh. At the newsra training camp. I don't think you had the cover of Abu Osama you were kind of on your own and had to prove yourself to another. And that a group that was really dangerous and difficult time for me. Because always we had all the time to convince them that we do the right things for yet. But didn't they ever do a search on you? And I I clean everything online. And does I told you I told them that I had a bad bust? And now, I'm here to to change. We're speaking with tall Durkee, the director of the documentary of fathers and sons in watching this documentary, it's hard to not like Osama at times and the children as well Osama is very loving towards them and very tender. And he's new flavor fall. He's like any other father. Did you ever find yourself sympathizing with parts of? There 'cause that you didn't before. No, I didn't at all. Because if you see from the moment, the first scene heated Cheam, how he slide the bear the bird the biz at son's capture small bird little songbird, and they bring it into the house. It's still alive. But then later one tells his father quite proudly that they beheaded the bird. Not only did they behead the bird. The boy says we beheaded just like you did to that man. Exactly. And it said so kind of casually and proudly. Yeah. So this is a film. It's like not to make people scared, but try to open the eyes of tof dangerous to transfer this violence how dangerous to teach should Rin religion in school of dangerous that Barents believe that if the if the children can Stig this should hit them. This is how you build the violence inside the human. And this is when when when something bad can been why some people decide to carry and why people decide not because of the dictation of the of the shine Hoed years. So we need to understand this illness. Very good and to find the really the right treatment and to make to take them what vision of side of their hands. I hope that this film can give more understanding about who are the people from really inside the mind. Well, and by focusing a lot on the on the boys you see how violence is sort of woven into the everyday fabric of life. And there's another scene. I want to mention it's when the boys are out of school. The father had taken them out of school after some conflict with the principle. So the boys are just kind of aimless and at one point owns the goes throwing stones at schoolgirl. This is how they limped respect woman. Yeah. Goose we. I should say that Osama has a huge family twelve kids wife, not all boys lives to wives and several girls. But we never see them. We never see that why. Because it's forbidden to appear in front of camera woman should stay at home. And learn religions ticket of the kids while you were embedded with Osama's family. You were separated from your own. You would come and go if I understand, right? So it's not like you didn't see your family for two and a half years. But still when you're when you were out there and bedded with them and your life was on the line. How did you how did you deal with that? You would all your career on this risk and not only your career people who support you like producer in broadcasters, and and you don't want to avoid them. Because if this film didn't happened on my future would be endangered and and this. Also like I had the plan with the producer. And with with my wife system Tadic of the film that I give her the map in case that I get killed there. They were no have to continue the fear. So it was very important that this film will be out and people when watch it, and I was a shadow of myself. I was a ghost like because it was tension that something bad I have a and tragedy. And and that's meek mutely really really need a lot of treatment. And when I return to to Germany to be with the family, I was really like like a ghost. I wasn't a bear son who can tell what I should do to to and. I don't want to this again. So this is like this this experience was really wish me. Bushman like you said that when you got back you felt like a bit of a ghost. What do you mean that that you were despondent that you fell off his hopeless? I feel like I can do anything. I cannot enjoy any moment there is there is a fear that I would lose my life that and this is this furious. You cannot end it until until the end of the shooting. So it's happened. Like you see this tattoo now, I have it. Yeah. This is on your forearm, and my this to decide to make it because that was forbidden in slump spit and had moved for shorts more forbidden. So I made it an order not to go back for those who are just listening to this. Can you describe this this fairly elaborate tattoo as your metric? It's more. Like this is like design connected to the Asian civilization different Asian. This is like kind of slammed his kind of my and. This again, it so ingesting case you you really feel like I have to go back. You're not going. They would see this. They would cut. My no matter. What story you tell them? Like. Oh, no. I'm not going to be happened. Well, tell out Derek is the director of the new documentary of fathers and sons Tele it was such a pleasure to not only to meet you to see the film and thank you so much for. Thank you. He's coming up by California is the perfect place for video installation. That celebrates American liberalism. KPCC podcasts are supported by. The Netflix original film. The ballad of BUSTER scrubs from the incomparable minds of Joel and Ethan Coen comes a six part anthropology film original stories that only they could tell set against the harsh unforgiving backdrop of the American frontier. The valid BUSTER Scruggs is an exploration of life's joys and woes winner of the best screenplay. The Venice film festival. The ballot of us are scrubbed on Netflix and now play and selects leaders. Welcome back to the frame. I'm Steven Cuevas in for John horn. And now we're going to revisit a story about an art installation. Inspired by one artist love of America. The visitors was created by the Icelandic artists Ragnar kjartan sin and twenty twelve it's now on view at the Brody museum in downtown Los Angeles, the pieces composed of nine videos or singing paintings, eight of the videos show musicians playing together. But in separate rooms of decrepit old mansion the ninth video shows a group of singers on the front porch who occasionally shoot off an old cannon the frames. Darby Maloney reached Kiara and sin on Skype at his home in Reykjavik to find out how the visitors came to be the idea for the visitors came we many years ago. I mean, it's it's it's a piece from a totally different era. I would never have made this piece today we believe in generous America a compassionate America in tolerant America. I was just so excited about a medic about that. And it's like two thousand twelve day of Obama time and fest like sort of liberal, ideas were unstoppable, everybody was in together. And I was like a citizen end the American empire being in love with Medica. My name is Kevin. And I'm a visual artist. And I live in Reykjavik Iceland. Also, I had been very much in love with his house Roca house. It was built in eighteen fifteen by John Armstrong who was commander in in Washington. Army the were independence. It's one of the kind of last houses upstate New York to be still owned by the the same old ground nineteenth century family. An it's obsolete. A place of magic. And then the came this idea about to to feel with my friends from the music scene to just fill it up with song. So that it's a real what sort of vibrate with music? In the room were Christianized playing the court. There's like on the piano flute John Armstrong like the one built the house. You would play the throat of the trenches the war of independence. There's like the flu the freedom and the puck of the raiders by all the rooms that we are in our historic in ways. Like the rumor soft is playing the Bunge. Oh, and and the Bertone Qatar. That's where like teddy Roosevelt would sit by the fire with. Channel early in the house. They would like this. If America should enter the world and become a player in politics and stuff like that. It's like these things really happened in that house. So it's really like you. Um you save on American history. But it's a home. It was a nine commerce and nine foams on the building that record up exactly the same time in one frame. It's me playing acoustic guitar on the bus stop. And so I would play guitar a little bit water percussion, and vocals and Vanda. It's cello drums guitar and bundle piano. Accordion guitar bass Hertie Gertie out on the porch. There's a quiet with the inhabitants of rogue. There was a quite a because I really remember very fondly how you could feed like the goal room Saddam to being full of music. Sunday, you hear a common outside and things. Title come from from this record the visitors by the Swedish make Palko abo-, basically almost because I really loved up had had the problem with the title and the night is that the collection on this album sleeve almost looks like on the car. They are also get some gloomy big mantra. There's a great song on that. Which is like. One of us is crying on the is li- like that saw. I think that's my favorite song from just one of us. Trying one of his life really like pretty pretty hardcore the navy. I'm paying for your. I there's never really an ideal way to see it's just like it's really piece what you can just like walk through amnesty like seeing kind of singing paintings and just like, okay, I get it as walkout or you can just link into it. And. And sort of be immersed in all its seductive sentimentality. Actually, I think it's just really appropriate that is in Los onto now. It's funny. You make a piece and go somewhere. It was not intended to be there. But it is like it just makes sense that the, and I'm just of course, the lighted that is being shown in the capital of show business. I love the movie Sohn, I love lay and I'm really happy, but it sets no one like, you know, one California is like it's fight records liberalism. And it's in this new state of America. I think it's good to have this to have this memorial for for for good American liberalism. Ragnar kjartan sends video installation visitors at the road museum in downtown Los Angeles Ness, the show for today. The frame is produced by Oscar Garza, Darby Maloney. Monica bushmen and Jonathan shift. Let with help today from Julia Paskhin. Our intern is Marie Alexa, Hannah are engineer is Valentino Nevada. I'm Steven Cuevas. Half of all of us have a happy and peaceful thanksgiving.

Abu Osama Steven Cuevas director Netflix America Los Angeles Lorraine Ali John horn Derek Joel tall Durkee FOX searchlight pictures California LA times Ragnar kjartan Reykjavik Rachel vice KPCC
Will Linda Perry make Grammy history?

The Frame

26:54 min | 2 years ago

Will Linda Perry make Grammy history?

"From the Mon broadcast center at KPCC's. This is the frame, I'm John horn. Today's show we hear from the new director of programming for the Sundance film festival which kicks off tomorrow in Park City Utah. Then no woman has ever won the Grammy for producer of the year. But Linda Perry was worked with singers. Like Dolly Parton wants to change that they're not going home army. Daddy, I wanna be like, you know, her. So what we need to do is establish more of the women that are producing their own stuff and dramatic storytelling is at the heart of the big one KPCC's podcast about surviving. A major earthquake all that after this break. We'll start today with the Sundance film festival. The annual event is a big deal for those working in film and increasingly in television. There's quite a history of breakout hits that were bought by studios at the festival. Little miss sunshine. Is one example more recent film is the big sick which earned an Oscar nomination for the screenplay written by husband and wife team, Camille nanjiani and Emily v Gordon and the documentaries that debut at Sundance heaven crazily found themselves award winners for the five documentaries that earned Oscar nominations yesterday screened year ago in Park City because the festival can launch a filmmakers career. The stakes are really high for the people who decide what gets in Kim. You Tani is head programmer for Sundance somebody has watched each film in its entirety. And in many cases, it might be more than one person. The the worst thing we do as program. Ours is to miss a film. We wanna make sure no film great film gets away from us this year a record number of movies were submitted to Sundance more than fourteen thousand four thousand of them were feature length festival programmers chose one hundred twelve features representing thirty three countries. More than half the film screening in competition are directed by women. And I asked him you Tani if that was intentional or accidental. We of course, want to have a festival that first and foremost programming films that are bold and visionary and just taking chances and telling stories in new ways, and the fact that fifty three percent of filmmakers are women in our US dramatic competition is something that happened kind of organically. I think it's we are we're always looking for for gender parody in our competitions. But because the. These films also met these other criteria that we're looking for in films is this wonderfully organic thing that just happened. I been going to Sundance for many years than I care to share. But I can say that when I first started going independent film was just kind of coming up. It was when turn Tino and Soderbergh were starting to be important filmmakers, and then there was the whole rise of independent film with Miramax and all of that, you know, ten years ago. And now, it seems to be an interesting point because the big studios have either closed most of their specialty film divisions or are making big tent pole movies, like Harry, Potter vendors and things like that. Do you think that the role of independent film in Hollywood has changed dramatically even in the last couple of years? Definitely I think that now people are looking at independent film as as almost like. Almost giving it more important than than ever. You know? I think that a lot of the stories that we're seeing are coming out of this real genuine need to tell this story. People are feeling like they aren't being represented in the mainstream. And there really are looking for this real outlet to tell their stories and some of the things that we noticed this year in the program. And this is something that. Someone mentioned to me after the program was released because we don't we often don't. Sometimes it just don't even know what we have until later when we can kind of take stock of of the whole program. And somebody said, you know, there are a lot of lot of new faces. Like, I don't know a lot of the films in the competition or the filmmakers, and I think that's a that's a very positive sign to me the that we are able to be the place where people are able to discover new talent and to hear new stories and to to hear what new voices are passionate about you and your programming staff look at hundreds upon hundreds upon hundreds of submissions narrative documentaries thousands of short films. Do you notice certain kinds of ideas or themes that filmmakers right now seem to be particularly interested in especially in narrative films? We can talk about dachshund a second but especially in fictional narrative films. Do you start to recognize similar stories or ideas through all of those emissions? That's a that. That's a really good question. Because I think because we don't program by theme, or you know, we're not looking for anything in particular. We are coming to our TV screens or monitors with with really open minds in terms of what what we discovered this year. It seems like filmmakers are are focused on. What is they're they're looking at what is. Truthful to the like, I we see a lot of in. This actually goes across all of our sections not just in fiction. The people are searching for the truth this year in particular. I feel like there's a real stress on shedding light on the issues that we face whether if be in fiction or documentary, there's obviously away that documentary and nonfiction film can change the way that an audience looks at an issue and idea changes the way they think what they do. Do you think narrative film can do the same thing? If it's not about an issue or topic can narrative film changed the way the audience things or sees the world, I think so you know, I think about when I first became aware of independent cinema. Or when I first the first time I went to Sundance that was in nineteen ninety five and I saw I saw the films. Safe by Todd Haynes kids by Larry Clark, and those those films kind of I say changed my life. You know, just the idea of somebody was making films that spoke to me in this in this very clear way and forced me to think in in different ways. And look at the world in in ways. I had never thought of I think that is such a powerful thing in fiction filmmaking. Is the director of programming for the Sundance film festival Kim. I will see you in the snow very soon. John. And tomorrow, the frame is heading out to Park City, Utah where we'll bring you stories and filmmakers from the Sundance festival. Make sure your subscribe to our podcast. So you get the latest news coming up. We've is it with Linda Perry. She is a Grammy nomination for producer of the year. Southern California the home of Hollywood dodgers Disneyland sometimes it feels like paradise. But any second now that could change bigger quake is coming. This will happen. There's no likelihood of it not happening. We are not stopping Playtex things when the earthquake hits our world will be shaken. So what can you do to prepare? I'm Jacob Margolis host of KPCC's new podcast the big one your survival guide. Listen an apple podcasts. Welcome back to the frame. I'm your host John horn. No woman has ever wanna Grammy for producer of the year and not since two thousand four has a woman even been nominated. But Linda Perry is poised to change that her Grammy nomination for producer of the year follows a busy two thousand eighteen in which he wrote and produced music with Dolly Parton for the Netflix movie dumpling, the L A rock outfit known as Dorothy and the up and coming. Singer songwriter. Willa Amai, Linda Perry actually got her start as lead singer of the nineteen nineties band four non blondes, you might recognize her ninety two hit what's up. Perry went on to write and record songs for a leash keys, pink, Christina Aguilera, and many more. I recently visited Perry's workspace in studio city, it's called we are here. It's a label and publishing company that she co founded with music manager Kerry Brown Perry began with how the music industry has changed since forming four non blondes just being in San Francisco and joining a band. There was always these really great opportunities because we made our opportunities. You know, we didn't have internet to rely on in the nineties we made flyers. And we went out in the streets. We met people. We we didn't have the opportunity of these, you know, home studios, and all that, you know, we made little cassette tapes on four tracks, and we had a perform we had to go to rehearsals, we had to do all the stuff, you know, nowadays, these kids don't have this opportunity at all they they don't know what it's like being in a rehearsal room. They just stay in a room like this and all Sunday invent who they are. And that really isn't who they are. I wanna play a song from an artist you're working with young artists, and we'll recover of death punks harder better faster stronger. Make us strong. After. Work is never. I say material departure from the daft punk song. So tell me a little bit about a little bit. Tell me a little bit of how you met. We'll and what your creative partnership is like with her friend of my wife called me up and said, hey, my best friend has a daughter. She's twelve years old. And they just wanna see if she's got something, you know. And I'm like, okay for you. Of course, you're the nicest person. So I go and meet, and I this total dorky kid big bottle caps braces for days. I mean, talking Ahmadullah minute, and I'm like going I loved her. Alright. I'm like, oh my God. What a dork. I love this kid and okay. Well, you got she's like, well I wrote a song, but not really a song. It's it's kind of a beginning of song. But not really because I don't have the beginning yet. But I kinda come in in the middle. And I have the middle of it and not really the end. So I said so you got a mid. All of us on and she's like kind of you know, and so she sits in plays me like this a minute song, but I could instantly tell in her voice, there is something more soulful happening here. So I tell you what right five songs. Call me in two months on the clock. She calls me up and says I've got five songs. So I kept my end of the deal. She came to my studio. So I put her up at the microphone with the piano. I said, okay, I'm just going to record this just for my own self. So I can just hear it. So she does that didn't make one mistake plays al-sokh songs, and I'm in tears. Okay. And I come out, and then I decided right there. I'm going to mentor her I never mind, you just have to say this. I never touched her songs. All I did was teller to change keys because she would tend to write lower, and I raised that key and tempo I would speed songs up or slowed down. That was all I did how much of. Your work with somebody like that or any artist is grounded by your own experience as a musician having played in a band and having worked on stage. Does that change the way you see the relationship between a performance of producer and the benefit the artists in some ways because you understand what he or she is going through for me. All I know is my job as a producer and with anybody that I work with is to create a safe environment. But an honest one like so when you come to me it's like everything's from scratch. I sit we talk and then while you're talking I start feeling something pick up the guitar go to the piano, and I'm like, it's time. And they'll you go time for what I'm like a song is coming and then we'll start creating song. So very important for me to put your clothes on not you put mine on. So that part is really really what was really. Important with will. Because I didn't wanna be Linda Perry this old producer that comes in and tells us little kid that has a fresher perspective than I do at this point. You know? So my job was to just help her end her. We're talking with Linda Perry who is nominated for producer of the year or at the Grammies. So I'm going to ask you about the opposite side equation when you're working with people who are not quite as young as willa you work with people like Pat Benetton or pink Wednesday Fani I wanna play the song halfway gone. It's a song you wrote for paying. The serve like a girl. Soundtrack those were all demos that were done in one day. So like that song by pink. It was never released. So all these songs were demos that were written that day and recorded that day. So that's just to me very, very cool. And when so when this serve like a girl came to my attention. It was so touching to me. This whole story about these women that are coming back from doing their term and coming back to absolutely no support from the government whatsoever. The women actually had to go to get welfare. That's what the movie is about a one hundred percent of all the funds. I asked all the artist. Hey, I'm working on this documentary. You mind us this unreleased song, they're like, yeah. One of the things that was remarkable to me as you work with Dali Parton on dumpling. And I think I read that she had never had a woman producer before. Yeah. Let's unbelievable. But I guess when only three percent of producers are women statistically it fits, right? Why is that why it's been so hard for women to get even a toehold of producing jobs. I think there's a lot of women producers. They're just producing their own stuff. There's not a lot of women engineers and that to me is far more important than being a producer. You know, anybody can jot their name on production and go, I'm the producer of this. And we know tons of those people to me the power position is the engineer that person's actually the person that's really actually doing all the creative stuff and getting cool. Sounds and creating a beautiful sonic bed for people to perform their songs on 'em that position. It's just not sexy. You know what I mean? So they're not going home army. Daddy, I wanna be like, you know, her. So what we need to do is establish more of the women that are doing more of the technical. Side, and there are others Grimes, but she works in the box. You know, we have an artist named angel haze that produced her albums. She was in the box. But then she took it out of the box. Put real horns strings did all vocals in the studio. But created the bulk of the foundation of the album in the box. So there's producers are engineers that engineer in pro tools. And then there's engineers like me. I move microphones around. I know how to Mike drum set. We don't come from that world right now we're getting samples, and I just did a for this artists of mine named Dorothy. That album was live. Like, we rehearsed. It wrote it in a rehearsal room did all the pre production then went into the studio and just recorded in. And this sounds great and people I'm up for Grammy producer of the year because of that album. So it's like I'm working on getting you an answer. But I'm hoping that we won't have to answer it anymore because I'm working on being proactive and just doing we are now. What can you do inside the academy because you know, a governor with the Recording Academy from inside to change not only, you know, engineers producers to make sure that there is much more equality and equity in the years ahead than there is now I'm so excited to be of service for them because they do a lot the Recording Academy does a lot. We just don't know about it. But they are advocating on so many levels, you know, fighting for songwriters musicians. And so right now, I'd started this. I'm calling it. We are now like I just shot one. It's me in the studio the keys angel haze. And we're just talking about our favorite jump technique. How leash got that? Since part. You know, we're talking to angel haze about how she went from being in the box to recording, you know, horns for the album. So it's it's not talking about where women at all. You can see where women is talking about what we like to do. So I just I just added it. It's really really available. Well, that's what I'm working on. So I have a deal right now with YouTube that we might release it on YouTube and make it a series. I have one set up for with Sheryl Crow Grimes, and Dolly that we're gonna shoot in Nashville in a few weeks. So you know, like I said, I'm trying to be proactive. So I'm on it. I'm on it. The show. Thank you. Coming up storytelling is that the heart of everything that comes out of Hollywood. And now, it's a key element of KPCC's new podcast. The big one. Coon still above so brazen. Velvety cushioned seats and saw. In my favorite movie. Welcome back to the frame. I'm John horn Hollywood is famous for using all the devices of cinematic storytelling realistic production design, well place swell of music and always at its core. A character driven narrative to bring you into the story today podcasting has exploded with similar creative approaches and one of the newest arrivals to the story driven podcast scene is a KPCC original called the big one your survival guide the podcast about surviving. A major earthquake has made to draw listeners into the story using storytelling and sound design all while leaving the audience with potentially life-saving information are when champion Knicks head of KPCC on demand and the executive producer of the big one checkup Margolis his KPCC's science reporter, and the host of the podcast when I spoke with two of them Jacob began by explaining exactly what they mean by the big one. So the big one that we're talking about in this podcast is. A seven point eight magnitude earthquake on the southern San Andreas fault. Let's compare it to Northridge for a second which was six point seven that only impacted a small portion of LA this seven point eight magnitude quake will impact the majority of southern California. So San Bernardino, Los Angeles, riverside counties all those areas, Orange County, as well the way you tell the story are when is pretty novel. You kind of make up a story and you have at its center the guys that you're left which is a coup- about what he's going through. But it's essentially a fictional story that you're creating in the aftermath of this horrific earthquake. Why did you side that was affective way to tell the story all the science says this will happen? But like you said it hasn't happened yet. So we wanted to orient all the listeners give them someone to relate to and we thought why not make the listener the hero of the show. This is going to be about people preparing about what they're going to see what infrastructure will fail you make your way outside of Union Station New Year's with dust. Stop lights out. Traffic is jammed and it's loud. The people who ran when the earthquake hit or laying on the ground injured. They're holding their broken legs and twisted ankles. An aftershock hits. We wanted to put people in the heart of that scenario and show him what it's going to be like, so they know what to prepare for. So even if people know on some level that this event could happen in the immediate future. But certainly in their lifetimes, they don't do enough to prepare for it. So what prevents people from not taking the next step and saying I need to do these five things before this happens. We have this thing called optimism. Right. And we actually have a whole episode episode eight we cover this at length. We developed optimism at the same time as we developed a sense of mortality that way. We get into cars. Even though we know that situation could be dangerous, but that same optimism is what keeps us from preparing. I don't wanna be a spoiler. But in the second episode. It comes out Jacob that you have very limited. If any earthquake preparedness at your own homes, fair statement. Not anymore. Okay. Time you're doing this at the time. I was doing it. Yes. When we were recording up to that was absolutely true. My wife, and I had a very come to Jesus moment about what our plan was. We have a new baby. So we have to kind of factor that in by episode seven, which is when we start to address this issue building a survival kit for my family, I still hadn't anything which was kind of crazy, and we get to dive deep into the psychology of why people don't do it. That was really fascinating. And applying it to myself, I thought was kind of disturbing in nineteen ninety two. There was a seven point three magnitude earthquake out near yucca valley called the Landers quake, and I drove out there because I was assigned to cover the news. There was one immediate tally from that earthquake. It was a three year old boy who was over for a slumber party and some as in Ray fell off a chimney and fell on his head. And because I was reported I went to the coroner's office. And I saw the polaroid photograph of the sleeping bag and the bricks and the blood. And I didn't have kids at that point. But when I had kids, I did everything everything in our houses anchor down, and it was that one image that I always remembered is that part of what you're going after that idea if you put yourself in the story and visualize it that you then start to do something. Yeah. We want something people can hold onto I want you to really put yourself in a situation where imagine you have to walk fifteen miles a really common commute in Los Angeles. Imagine having to walk that home, and what you're going to see. So we want to put you in that situation to prepare you. So when these things do happen, you're a little bit more familiar, and maybe a little bit less afraid that was very similar to my turning point. And it wasn't that Roussum of that difficult, but we had someone visit our house and lay out here. All the problems that I see your kid, by the way is just getting up starting to walk and we'd just yanked his dresser a little bit. That thing was ready to topple right over. And I could just imagine him getting very. Hurt by that. And I was freaked out. And so soon thereafter, we kinda went through and and dealt with all that you have clearly worked very hard to make sure that the listener is kind of embedded in this story through a lot of the things that you do both musically. And just the way that the sound is coming at you. Why was that important? And what does that do in terms of the way the information that you're imparting to listener is received one I love sound design, and I love action movies. So I wanted to create this immersive experience in sound is so powerful in doing that. It's one thing to say an ambulance is going to pass you by it's another thing to hear it happening. It's another thing to hear masonry crumbling into have the vibration in your stomach. The other thing that was really important to me was to differentiate between when you are hearing an expert or someone who's lived through a disaster. And when you're hearing a fictional part of it. So the fictional part is very heavily sound designed to indicate. Hey, this is the fiction. This is what hasn't happened, and then we stripped out away and just use music when we're interviewing people who've lived through some really intense stuff index is the head of podcast KPCC and the executive producer of the big one Jake Margolis KP science reporter and the host of the podcast. I'm gonna check a pinch for coming downstairs. Thanks. Episode number three of the big one is out tomorrow. You can get the podcast from your favorite sources including apple and Stitcher. That's our show for today. I'm John horn. Thanks for joining us. We're back here tomorrow.

producer Linda Perry KPCC Grammy John horn Dolly Parton Jacob Margolis Hollywood KPCC Park City Utah Daddy director US Sundance California apple executive producer Tani engineer
Mark Duplass Defines Being A Multi-Hyphenate

The Frame

25:51 min | 1 year ago

Mark Duplass Defines Being A Multi-Hyphenate

"The from Broadcast Center at KPCC. It's the frame. I'm John Horn on today's show. The box office is typically driven by teenagers teenagers. But over the Thanksgiving weekend adult ticket buyers helped lead the way then filmmaker and actor mark applause talks about the morning show and bombshell and the nuances of playing a supporting role. It's not my job to go into those seams and shine as Megan Kelly husband. It's my job to be John Giselle L. and to support. Its weirdly thing that a lot of people don't get and rapper and producer J.. Paik Mafia tells us why he thinks all heroes are cornball born balls all back on the frame welcome to the frame. I'm John Horn. Today is giving in Tuesday. And it's when you have the chance to make a huge difference for the work we do here on the frame and everything else said. KPC You could be one of three hundred listeners to donate to KPCC today and help unlock a ten thousand dollar challenge for the news you value give now at KPCC dot Org and now some box office news frozen to dominated ticket sales over the Thanksgiving weekend but something unexpected happened adults turned out in droves. I for some new movies aimed at people a lot older than the kids. Watching Disney's animated sequel varieties Rebecca. Rueben explains so this weekend came in a little a bit behind last year but it was still a release strong weekend and frozen to had the biggest haul ever for the Thanksgiving period. Made One hundred twenty twenty four million dollars between Wednesday and Thursday. I'm going with you know. Excuse me I climbed to. North Mountain survived a frozen heart safety from my ex-boyfriend so nope I'm coming. A handful of other new movies came in ahead of expectations. Like knives out. Are you baiting. Detect him. It'd be thorough so we can figure out the manner of death humane if someone killed clean. Slim changed now. Here's why so. Let's talk about the movies that did surprisingly well. You mentioned knives lives out. Ford versus Ferrari has also done pretty well. Queen and Slim did pretty well. Even though it wasn't in nationally wide release that seems like an important development development because so much of Hollywood's releases are sequels and prequels and knockoffs. How important is it? That original movies did as well as they did exactly and especially over the holidays. This is a time where studios tend to release these all audience tent Poles last year. We saw movies. Like Ralph breaks the Internet from in Disney creed to fantastic beasts the grinch all of these movies are either from big franchises. Or they're based on very well known. I P and this year there were still movies that attracted a wide range of audiences but it was leaning more towards original content. And that's a really reassuring signed signed for studios to show that franchises like frozen are definitely big. Draws audiences still wanna see something fresh something different something. They haven't haven't seen before and they're still willing to movie theaters to see it. I want to talk about the overall numbers because even with this good Thanksgiving weekend. The year to date box office office is a little bit of what like six or seven percent behind last year. Is that abril concern among Hollywood studios right now exactly. It's about five point five percent behind last year and there are so few big movies Chicago. There's the Jumanji sequel and there's the last star wars movie into Those will hopefully help make up that deficit comparing it to last year's a little tricky just because last year did set a record. There've been a couple of movies that have have had limited runs. I'm thinking of the Irishman the net flicks movie to we know at all what that business has been. Are they reporting or is it more or a question of Netflix buying theaters and selling tickets. So we don't really know what. The box office grosses are right so we don't know what the box office grosses are for these. These movies that net flicks is putting out in theaters. And the caveat. There is because they weren't able to agree with major theater chains on an exclusive window window to play the film the Irishman's not playing in most theater chains so it's only screening in about one hundred theaters compared to something like frozen frozen or even knives out. Those are screening in three four thousand theaters in so to compare the box office grosses. It's not really possible. But then on top of that dot net flicks doesn't really provide a metric. There we're talking with varieties Rebecca Rubin about box office given the performance of movies like Ford Versus Ferrari Murari Beautiful Day in the neighborhood knives out queen and slim is that going to be noticed by the studios. Will they see that more as an anomaly or proof that audiences are. We're actually interested in original stories. Oh absolutely I think that to studios it shows that people are interested in original content. And what's more notable. Well is that these movies don't cost as much money as you're frozen and your avengers and your star wars so we need movies like this to be able to turn a prophet to even out these big temples that are bigger swings for studios and so they certainly want to find a movie that they can put out to make an easy profit. And that's what you have these mid Veg- movies for and I think it's also probably important in terms of moviegoer choices that Queen Slim Beautiful Day in the neighborhood Ford versus Ferrari knives out all got really good reviews in fact a lot better than frozen to our critics driving some of this business I think especially with older. Audiences dances the reviews and the positive word of mouth does drive a lot of attention and so when they hear A. You've got to go see this movie theaters. It's so creative. It's so funny it's so fun. Something like knives out. It's it's something different than that's what's driving the conversation. And that's what's getting people to go see these movies so I wanna ask you about the end of a year. There is a Jumanji sequel coming out December thirteenth and then on December twentieth we have star wars the rise of skywalker. I assume both those movies are going to be huge but also around Christmas we have little women. Greta Gerwig adaptation of the wease May alcott novel and Nineteen Eighteen. Seventeen Sam Mendez World War One drama given that some other original films are doing well. Is there expectations that little women in nineteen in seventeen could succeed also definitely and I think both theater owners and studios are kind of hoping that with movies like little women in the mix. It's going to appeal L.. To a wide range of audiences because with these original movies it's instilling a little bit of confidence in moviegoer showing that studios are putting out quality movies right now and so the hope is that over the holidays. After you've seen your star wars and your Jumanji you'll go back to see movies like cats and nine hundred seventeen. Rebecca Rubin is a news editor at variety where she writes about the box office Rebecca. Thanks so much for coming on the show To keep up with entertainment industry news be sure to visit variety dot com coming up on the frame mark applause on his multifaceted career in Hollywood. Welcome back to the frame among John Horn marked. Applause is a bit of a renaissance man in Hollywood he and his brother Jay got their start. Making low. Budget often improvised indie films. Films like bag head and the puffy chair. Now he writes directs produces and acts. He's in the upcoming bombshell in which he plays. Megan Kelly's husband been. He's also in the new Apple TV series the morning show and the net flix film paddle ten which he wrote and Co Stars in with Ray Romano to plus I spoke recently at the Alamo Draft House in downtown La and as someone who likes to improvise a lot in his own films. I was curious if heavily scripted projects like the morning show. Oh are creatively stifling for him. Yeah I haven't run into a situation yet where it's been at odds I think that there's a nuance there. There and I definitely find myself adjusting depending on the nature of the set. I'm on I think most people who hire me are hiring me because they want the the thing that I do. Adding a little naturalism adding a little. Improvisation I think the morning show is a really interesting example of trying to be as casual Louis as possible trying to throw in improvisation bombs to surprise people express myself. But then there's other part of me weirdly that functions as well on that show because you know if you watch it. There's all these insane walk and talks and four minute takes where you're where you have to kind of make sure are your dialogue hits at this point and grabbed these papers and turn into this point. Do whatever you have to do. I'm August Rena. Where is today's schedule? We'll looking for it. It says today's schedule. Yes you very much. You're probably thank you and the filmmaker side of me actually pays off quite well in that stuff hanging in there. I can't feel my body. I'm so stressed out. I'm like a brain floating in space the phone in my hand. Yeah I don't feel the need to like take over that show or get any of my direct to`real vision into the show. I'm so happy to just be like like number five on the cast list support guy. Would he need both morning show and bombshell have at their centre me too story. Yes and maybe it's a coincidence. Maybe it's not but in terms of what those stories have to say about the issue. What you want them to say? How would you define that? I Yeah I think it's a coincidence that I ended up in both of those projects. Don't think it's a coincidence that those stories are are being told right now. I think that you have have female movie. Stars who are producers on both of those projects leveraging their popularity and leveraging urging their political capital. I'll tell stories that they wanna tell. That's Reese Witherspoon Agenda for innocent on the morning show and Charles their une bombshells right. Yes Reese Witherspoon in Johnston both producers on the morning show and Shirley Sarah in his you know just. It's no secret she's coming in and working at a you know a Smidgen of her rate and she's doing it and and very uncomfortable makeup and hair and wardrobe and everything and I think that one of the main reasons speaking candidly why I get a job like that is yes because I am a filmmaker who knows that. It's not my job to go into those scenes and shine as Meghan. Kelly's Kelly's husband. It's my job to be John Zale to support it was blood. Coming out of her is coming out of her. Wherever did he do is accuse me of the Ingram ratings? Are you understand I have to be above the spray. You know the entire country is talking about your period right now. It's weirdly thing that a lot of people don't get an I played Charlie's brother in totally. I think she knew like I'm going to be dealing with a lot. I want someone here who understands hands how to be in the ALLEYOOP position. We're talking with Mark Dupe loss at the Alamo draft house in downtown La. I WanNa ask you about like Bike your childhood with your brother your older brother and about when you guys thought you might want to become filmmakers and how you imagine getting there what what did you guys do growing up in in New Orleans the environment for us was there was only one model of a successful artists that you could follow follow and that was a really amazing aren be musician. WHO has a weekly residency making a hundred twenty five dollars a week and and also working a day job at that same place? That was the model of of an artist success. There was no filmmakers. I could look to. It was a very insular experience. agreeance it really wasn't until I got to Austin or more importantly when Jay got to Austin in Nineteen ninety-one the University of Texas University of Texas. The home of the Alamo Draft House. When I'm Mike Fourteen Jay's eighteen and I start to visit him in Austin and and we come across cross Richard Linklater and Robert Rodriguez and they're normal looking guys particularly later he so normalized what it an artist could be for me because he was like a semi out of shape ex athlete in jeans and a t shirt who wasn't isn't particularly eloquent? And and I it was just like Whoa. He makes movies. Holy we might be able to be filmmakers filmmakers like they're not all wearing berets and smoking skinny cigarettes. And when you say we do you mean you and your brother there was never an individual thing with something that you were. I'M GONNA do at least at the outset. Always brothers always and I think that that definitely was probably the more I think about me. Being the younger brother just could not imagine doing anything without Jacob. He was literally until his fourteen year years old. My my religion. I mean he was my God. My leader my everything you know so if I was going to try to do anything much less something as daunting scary three as becoming an independent filmmaker it was. There just wasn't a question I was GonNa do it with him. Do you remember. I'm sure you do the first time. A movie of of yours was shown to pain customers in a theater. Oh my God I mean. There was a couple of a couple of instances because they they come in they come in wave's first things first are short film. This is John at Sundance in two thousand and three. We're in a short program with these gorgeous looking films produced loosed at NYU people have spent thirty. Forty fifty thousand dollars on ours was shot on our parents video camera in our kitchen with the on-board microphone with a dead. Ed Pixel in the center of it. This is John. Hey It's John Sorry Mr Call but I will return your calls soon as possible beyond that one of the I think one of the craziest moments we had for me was bag. Had which is a move we made in two thousand eight. We sold at Sundance. And I just I just. It hadn't clicked in my mind. We sold it to Sony pictures classics the company. I loved it put out so many movies and I saw it open up in theaters in New York and the Sony Pictures Classics Logo came up and I gasped in the theaters. Oh I just forgot. This can't be my movie. You have an acting career you have filmmaking career you have a writing career you have a producing career you still. I think. Play a little music when you are waking up in the morning and saying this is the thing that excites me. What does the math? And how do you decide right because you are in a great place now in terms of having more options than most people it. It is very true that I'm in I'm in the fabled catbird seat as Cohen Brothers would say I I just when I wake up and I have something that I'm excited to tell and I do get inspired fired. The first instinct is I should partner with someone very different than me to tell the story so that I won't tell the same story the the same kind of way and that really gases me up these days like partnering with Twenty Six year old filmmakers just made their first short and they're so excited and their excitement eight MC juices me up. That's what I'm mostly looking to. And that would describe. I suspect a movie like Panton. Correct perfect perfect example. Yeah how important is that movie to You and Equally Important Ray Romano's performance in it yet. Patterson is one of those projects a lot like a blue the J. that I'm able to Sarah Paulson a couple of years ago and it's the same filmmaker. Alex Lehman that I partnered with on it. That just is my heart. There's something about this one and there's something about what Ray did for this movie for us. I mean it really is movie doesn't exist without Ray for a number of reasons and I can't quite explain it but I just found myself as an extremely pragmatic person who understands the way. This industry works who has been fine for years to not get awards campaigns who who has made fun of awards for years. Oddly Feeling dammit rated service in ward and I don't know what it is but I think it has something to do with the fact fat. I feel like this movie is me at my best and this isn't enough. I don't know what is and you're doing it yourself. I mean it's a lot like independent filmmaking L. Making you're doing independent awards campaign. That's what I've always done is. I've always known the proper path and I've always made up pass and it has generally worked for me Mark thanks so much for coming. Thanks for having me up next on the frame. The rapper and producer J. Mafia plays against type and just one more note today on giving Tuesday. I just want to say thanks for listening to the frame on. KPCC everything you hear on the show is powered by listeners. Like you who donate your support also drives the KPCC newsroom with its reporting on southern California and the national and international news you get from NPR and today. Your support goes even further forgiving Tuesday. We have a ten thousand dollar challenge from a group of KPCC SEC members. But we can't unlock that money unless we hear from you so please give now at KPCC DOT ORG or call eight six six eight eight eight five seven two two n thanks. I'm John Horn. And this is the frame. The L. A. Based Rapper and producer J. Peg Mafia is not your typical hip hop artist born in Brooklyn and raised there and in Alabama. He began making beats when he served in the military including during a tour in Iraq he also has a master's degree in journalism He came on the music scene in two thousand sixteen with his debut album. Black Ben Carson. He followed that up last year. With an album titled Veteran Jay Peg Mafias. Latest record is titled all my heroes are corn balls. And it's what he calls the most me album I've ever made in my life. He also Oh said. He hopes that disappoints. Every last one of you. Who is Jason Jason Mafia using a Here's a cornball is a good phrase for this era. It's just like flatly expectations from people who are looked at as role models. I guess we're heroes or something because they're all human beings and they're doing something wrong. It's just like who's best at hiding it. You know what I'm saying so like it's just kind of like breaking the fourth wall is a better way to deal with it. I think race people you know because like some people deserve deserve to be a race but then there's other people were kind of a gray area. I think people have pigeonholed me until like annoys. Rapper thing. It's like that's completely fine. ART is out there to be interpreted however. But it's just it's very weird defensive. People get with art than they didn't make they just just start telling you what you're supposed to do with it or what you're supposed to do next and like I wanted to immediately before anyone gets twisted I want to show you. You're not in control. It's time for you coming and Gilda Scott so Jesus forgive me. I'm a house chandler energy a lot of like black people like grow up kind of religious against their will they. I know I'm not a religious person so like I never have been but when I was younger I had to go to church so like I was just channeling. That light CLAUSTROPHOBIC trapped energy. I got I feel from religion. It's like it wasn't like now. We pray pray because you have to win that because you want to so like. I'm MM using like religious imagery and like the some of the wording is kind of like centered around God but the the connotation I use it in a commanding like when I say pray I liked shouted Eh guy by processes that have a process so like when I find something I like or like a bunch of ideas I like I just hone in on them and I do my thing in that window of time I naturally just let whatever come out and then you know I just look at the chaos afterwards and figure it out With production is something. I'm very close to not just think. I think that's the most fun thing for me to do because like it's so much science in it and it's just it's like I could really put intelligence into it and like really talk to people through music like without even saying you know what I made that beat it was just very free. Formed in stream of consciousness. Like what I when I sat down and looked at it I was like I like how this feels. I like how I felt when I made this. It was very like there was no the intent behind it. I just made what felt seasons nations with the lyrics. It took me a while to find a way to live on it but That's one of my favorite one on June. I really like. There's a lot of studio trickery. Does like Guitar Guitar Player. But like I was able to work out but I just I just live with it and like tinkered with an that's that's like one of the most of these songs are just like songs that I sat and looked at in lake. Raise them like kids. Okay it sounds like I'm I was like surgically putting it together but it's the process was very true. I'd say what you said on twitter right now. According to put you in a ground I think is very unfair. That like these anonymous people can just like V very visible to them but they're very not visible to you. It's just like an unfair advantage to me so like I'll continue to call them out because is like I see a lot of racism and a lot of the route Stress for a lot of black people in these people coming directly from these people and they caused so much is damage from the safety of their home. Come out to the light to say this being smart in black is always a threat threat to somebody remember that and move according to fill annoy strange tain whatever I make next. Don't expect it to be this. I'm showing a Lotta like ego and stuff but like in my head I know for a fact I have to earn it. I have to keep keep making like art that they respect. Because I'm just getting ahead of it and just like manifesting it in my head by like Lowering people's expectations so that they know off the rip like this is my thing thing. I don't do the same thing over and over again. I'm just going to do and I feel like that story with rapper. Jay Mafia was produced by. KPCC's Itsy CANEA and that'll do it for today. Remember you can follow us on twitter and facebook. You'll find us at the frame. I'm John Horn at the broadcast center. KPCC we'll see you back here tomorrow

John Horn KPCC Megan Kelly Hollywood Ray Romano producer KPCC dot Org Ford Alamo Draft House Jason Jason Mafia Mike Fourteen Jay Slim Rebecca Rubin La Disney John Giselle L. twitter North Mountain mark applause
The Frame's Five Years In Review

The Frame

32:29 min | 1 year ago

The Frame's Five Years In Review

"KPCC PODCASTS are supported by twentieth century. Fox presenting forward versus Ferrari directed by James Mangold starring Christian. Bale and Matt Damon now nominated mandated for a Golden Globe for best actor Christian Bale and five critic's choice nominations including best picture of the year. KPCC supporters include Fox searchlight presenting. Joe Rabbit nominated for the Sag Award for Best Ensemble. Seven critics choice awards including best picture. The Golden Globe for Best Picture and one of AF is ten best pictures of of the year for consideration in all categories. You have some degree of greater confidence that you belong to something bigger than yourself. You can like watch. History happened or you can choose to be a part of it. I just like that feeling of making people feel. The frame is five years old and today we celebrate. Celebrate that with some of our favorite frame moments we travel back to memorable interviews dynamic guests strange location some tears and a few. There's a bathtub with a writing desk in the bath. Now there's there's a there's a frontal toilet that's the difference between La and New York. You convenient you are and have the space to be on thought who old not to walk tool bad day when that happened it I still feel that page on from the broadcast center at KABC. I'm John Horn today. We celebrate the first five years of the show. What was some of our favorite moments covering the cultural world and spending time with the people who inhabited when we launched the frame? We were doing something for the very first time I had been a print reporter my entire life so we ask our guests for stories when they first succeeded or failed failed. We have a thirty second request so in two weeks everybody who comes on is saying the first thing that something happened hi. I'm Gina Davis and the first time I got cast in a movie was in tootsie on twelve. Few the first job did I failed in actually got fired on was American gangster eastern. I'm John Stewart. The first time I bob on stage funnily enough was the first time I was on stage. For some reason I was absolutely not nervous at all what my first scene was with. Dustin Hoffman in my underwear. What I learned from that was Is Not all about meal and you have to learn how to navigate sometimes as filmmaker The Bitter End New York City. One o'clock in the morning following three doors cover bands. I had a good five minutes prepared about two two minutes into it. The audience realized I might suck at this but the funniest thing was. I didn't know you're only supposed to come on the days that you're working and nobody bothered. Can you tell me for six weeks. I showed up at six and went home when everybody else did. I'd get a chair and put it right next to Sydney Pollack and sit there and bad day they wouldn't have. I still feel that page on field. I walked into the night I thought to myself you know. There are a lot of law schools. I could I could go to them. And our first guest in two thousand fourteen was Christopher Nolan. He was about to release his movie. Interstellar a lot of people are saying that this is your most personal film. How do you respond to that? You take it as a compliment. Do you think they might be right I six. They don't know me. How would they know I? I don't know myself when either mm-hmm there been a lot of real world events that have driven our coverage over the years but the one that coincided with our launch was a Sony Hack today the. US government pointed the finger of blame directly at North Korea for the devastating cyber tech against the only pictures taken down the movie. The interview that poked fund the North Korean dictator whole. They cost a lot of damage. The cyber attack of Sony pictures which allegedly was conducted by North Korea came in response to who a movie it was called the interview. It Starts Seth Rogan and James Franco. It was a crazy story. It evolved every day and in the middle of it. Dan Sterling Elaine. who was the screenwriter of the interview was with us in studio? Hi thanks for having me. It's very rare that a screenwriter is like with us to talk about breaking news news so I guess my breaking news question is what the Hell's going on today. Well I just know what's going on in my email inbox which is an increasing flood of people asking me if I'm okay. Both emotionally physically and financially was your answer. What are you telling you know I was at a party on Saturday? Night where the host was introducing me to everybody buddy at the party as this guy that brought down Sony the first four or five hundred times the joke was made it was funny except The one thing that I know that I'm not happy about is actually the real suffering that is going on at Sony. Not just by the person who green that my I film so bravely but also by all the people affected by the hack quite concerned about them that was screenwriter. Dan Sterling on our show in two thousand fourteen. I'm John Horn and you're listening to the frames fifth anniversary special for music fans. This is one of those days that you will probably always remember. Where are you were when you heard the news that Prince had died? This is Oscar Garza senior producer of the frame. One of the memories that sticks out for me from our first five years is the day we had to report on the death of one of my musical heroes. There have been reports at Prince wasn't well but certainly no indication that he was hooked on opioids so so it was a shock that he was gone but like every day we simply put our heads down and focused on producing the show once. We were done though. I started thinking of The Times that I witnessed his electric live shows and it was incredibly sad to realize that he'd never take the stage again breath. I'm John Horn. You're listening to the frames. Fifth Anniversary special on the show were always interested in in how and why artists do what they do especially if they're working a little bit outside the norm like this. Game of thrones sound designer. I'm Paula Fairfield. And I I do all the kind of fantastical stuff on the show. The white walkers the dire wolves mammoths but one of the biggest things. Obviously that I do is dragon. Well the funniest part about this with the purse sounds I hunted and hunted for just the right sound. And while I was was trolling around I found a sound of two giant tortoises having sex and I'm not kidding. And and the Mon from the mail is what I took for for as the basis for the purring of young drove on. And what's funny about it is that I I remember watching people watch it and every time that sound would come up. People would giggle and it was just funny. It was just automatic because it has a prime element still in there so knowing that as I proceeded through the seasons I have actively we looked for Sounds of larger animals. Having that piece was produced by James. Kim Who is one of our original producers. I'm John Horn. And this is the frame. Fifth Anniversary special over the years have shared how the changing political climate has affected their work. One example is the playwright John Robin Bates before the two thousand sixteen election. He wrote a play called the Kunia with a trump like character actor he mounted it in La a year later he launched a revised version in Washington. You know people asked me last night at a talk back here in DC. What's the answer to all this because the play in its epilogue ends with the question now and the answer is numbers and in a weird way I thought I could justified getting back to the play because it brings us together? I'm very corny about what the theater is still and I do believe it's a sort of gathering gathering an a church and a communal act and that it has a deep social relevance and resonance are also. It's nothing nothing and so it brought me back to working on it and and doing it in. DC felt like the right place a year later. Let me ask you about the question in the epilogue. It's what are you doing to prevent this. So why was that the question that you felt needed to be asked in the epilogue. It's the only question I think I live with is. What are you doing to prevent this? What are you doing to counter it? What are you doing to answer it? When will you not remained remain silent? Can you remain silent. And it's time to ask that question all the time. Now you know I have friends and family who are Trans and people of Color and immigrants and they are under under constant threat and so so it's up to people like me and maybe most of our listeners that can be an opposition to it vocally actively coming up Meryl Streep and a visit with Liz. Oh in her. La Studio. That's next on the frame fifth anniversary. Special stay with US breath. KPCC PODCASTS are supported by twentieth century. Fox presenting Ford Versus Ferrari directed by James Mangold and starring Christian. Bale and Matt Damon now nominated for a Golden Globe for best actor Christian Bale and five critic's choice nominations including best best picture of the year. KPCC's supporters include. Fox searchlight presenting Joe Joe Rabbit from writer director. TYCO not included on both AF. Is the National Board reviews ten best pictures of the year and now nominated for the Sag Award for Best Ensemble and best supporting actress. Scarlett Johansson seven in critics choice awards including best picture and best adapted screenplay and the Golden Globe Award for best actor and Best Picture of the year awards eligible in all categories. He's hello it's Bryan Cranston. And you're listening to the frame on eighty eighty nine point three k. PCC and now. Here's John Horn. Thank you Brian. Welcome back to the frame. Fifth Anniversary. Special producing the daily show can sometimes make it hard to get out of the studio but we do it. I'm a cyclist and I've actually done interviews on bicycles. The first one didn't go so well. You know twenty therapist. That was me trying to interview. TV Rider. Tom Smuts in two thousand and fourteen a couple of days later he safely wrote his bike to the MA's probably because I wasn't with him this trip to the L. A. River with filmmaker Karn Kasama went a lot better. Maybe maybe because we were on foot depending on where the light was. When we would scout you could look into the river and just see giant fish? A key scene from her twenty eighteen to call Kidman movie destroyer was shot along the banks of the river. It's a collision of natural troll and human ecosystem and there is something about this like wild green landscape coming up against these like concrete eight slopes that felt. I don't know like we haven't seen much of that yet. That was filmmaker Carin Kusaba on the frame in two thousand eighteen. Another memorable time out of the office was when we went to visit with Mel del Toro he invited us to tour his creative layer. The House is a library every of images a library of sounds on a library of ideas. He calls it bleak house. There's a secret room. Inspired by Disney's haunted had mansion complete with Gargoyles and some ten thousand items. I am the caretaker and like Jack Nicholson in the shining. I've been here forever so so. I pulled the book shelves. I clean I dost and the house is truly truly an installation if you would is not a hoarder. House is not a house where things are out of order they have an order. They have a reason in on and what is important is that it's he speaks intimate legitimate. So do you ever spend the night here again. The first Lord. Yeah the second floor is kind of scary. What does that mean? A there was a there have been stranger noises in the second Florida. And I don't believe in anything but we in Mexico go we have a saying. I don't believe in which is but they're real. Okay now. We're entering one more room. Yeah this is the film will rump film film book room so this is kind of history of general film but in the projection room. I have my favorite filmmakers whereas that room. I'm seeing I have to say. There's a bathtub with a writing desk in the bath. There's there's A. There's actually a desk in front of the toilet. And there's a desk in front of the Tortoise Del Toro thank you so much for your This is the frame fifth anniversary special. I'm John Horn I'm Darby Maloney editor of the frame on November tenth two thousand and sixteen the day. After the presidential election Lizardo Lizardo performed on full-frontal with Samantha. B and I was floored. Only they celebrate after that I was determined to get her on the show almost a year later. John and I went out to her studio up a winding road near Dodger Stadium. And that's what I like about the studios that like I feel like I'm in nature. Sure I wanna ask you about something that happened. Almost I think exactly a year ago we are going to get up. Change our pampers brush off our shoulders and push Ashok through together. Please welcome Liz. Oh and you began your performance by singing lift every voice in saying which is also known as the Black National National Anthem insane to let them have marine ring in with the needs of the Birdseye we were on the plane. Flying New York and I was washing the election election on the back of someone's head and I went to sleep woke up in New York and I woke up in a trump presidency and I have been thinking about the whole drive there. And then Samantha came in my dressing room and she asked me she was like crying. She was so devastated and she was like whatever you WanNa do. Would you WANNA they do. And we're GONNA continue to do good as hell because I have a job to do and like part of that job is to uplift people so when I thought of lift every voice I asked her I was like well. Can you see if this cleared. Can I sing this on television. And they just were like. We don't even care if you can't and they did the research and they're like you can and then and I was like okay horns just play this one note and I'll sing over that sing song full of faith that the past Esau. I realize there's two things you can watch history happen or you can choose to be a part of it and and instead of ignoring I chose to engage in it and it worked. That was liz so in two thousand seventeen. You're listening to the frame anniversary special. I'm John Horn. And we're celebrating our fifth year on the air one issue. We've always covered on. The show is equality and inclusion. Especially in Hollywood. Here's Meryl Streep from two thousand and fifteen it's important portent that women's stories and the things that interest them concern them confound them are on our screens. That's important important because it's it will define us. I think it's easy for people to assume that this issue or the broader issue of equality has been resolved. I I suspect a lot of people including yourself have a very different opinion. Yeah I think it's It's a fight that's not over but I I probably shouldn't say a fight. I think it should be an agreement. It should be an agreement within the human family that both sides are important and it seems to be very very difficult to get that agreement. I just think that somehow it's an interior change change in the minds of men. I still when you bring up anything that sort of has the rosy at cast of feminism them to it even the most enlightened men I can even my husband Kinda go. They're exhausted by this subject because because it's not their subject but I wanted to be I wanted to be everyone's I don't want women's rights to be a women's issue. Yeah that was Meryl Streep from our show in two thousand fifteen. You're listening to the frame anniversary special. I'm John Horn and we're celebrating five years. Here's on the air. Let's see if we're on the right place. We're here to see a filmmaker. Eva Juve Rene is a founding member of times up and through her company array. She's a tireless champion for new voices and expanding who gets included in Hollywood. What La Means to me is is it is true educational experience to me Because there's a little bit of everyone here and they have space that's the difference between La and New York. You can be who you are and have the space to be. This is a sprawl and so whether you're in spaces where large Persian community you know. I love driving through behind melrose because I always see beautiful families Orthodox Jewish families walking walking together in then I go a little bit further. And I'm in Korea town and then and it's not just a block like it's a full little city you know what I you mean. People can really put their roots down here and it grows into these beautiful and of flowers of of an array of people. That's what I love about it and and And I grew up in Compton which is was not just a black space Compton Lynwood longbridge southgate. It's black it was black and browns Filipino. Guatemalan Mexican EXA can black American African. And that's that's the kind of city this is it starts to get very modulus when you get into quote unquote Hollywood. But that's it's not really La and hate it when people come here and they go to Beverly Hills and like it's kind of fake like do you didn't go anywhere you went from lax. Like the Beverly Hilton. That's you didn't experience it that was from a visit with director and producer Eva devante earlier this year. Coming up on the frame Fifth Anniversary History Special Emma Thompson. Tom Hanks and Jordan Peele. That's next stay with us. KPCC PODCASTS are supported. By Warner Brothers. Michael B Jordan Jamie Fox and Brie Larson and star in just mercy based on the true story of attorney Brian. Stevenson's heroic fight to save an innocent man's life every generation has its hero made ours this variety raved. Just mercy will shake you to your soul nominated by the screen actors guild for outstanding performance by a male actor in a supporting role for Jamie Foxx walks for consideration in all categories including best picture and best supporting actor from Ramon broadcast all costs. And this is the free daily report on the world of art entertainment and culture. And here's your host John. Thank you Professor Xavier. I'm John Horn. And this is the frame fifth anniversary special. There been a lot of news events over over the frames. I five years but one that has really shaped our coverage with reporting in October of two thousand seventeen about Harvey Weinstein's long history history of alleged sexual abuse and assault to the latest on Harvey Weinstein. The New York Times Reporting Ronan Farrow has written a frankly harrowing account of the Herat. Missed the Weinstein did not invent the casting couch in Hollywood. We're going to need a new Oscar category. This you best actor whose movies we can't watch anymore. Following the Weinstein News. We ran ran numerous segments on multiple aspects of the story from the toxic use of nondisclosure agreements to safety on movie and TV sets. Here's a part of our conversation with the actress and writer Zoe Kazan. I think that the history of our industry of the movie industry is has a history in which women have been sexually harassed raped. Coerced treated like objects treated dispose supposedly treated as if we're not perennials. You know treat it as if every season they need to plant a new crop of bulbs and once you cut those flowers. There's IT's no more use for the plant Like even the fact that we have the concept of a casting couch the people use colloquially is meaningful I had a lot of fear when these allegations came out against Harvey Weinstein that people were going to treat him like the exception instead of the apotheosis of the problem and These women men who come out women and men who've come out since then about other people I think are like real heroes because they are making it impossible for has to say it is just Harvey Weinstein. Emma Thompson also had something to say about this issue John Lasseter who was forced out of his job as the ahead of Pixar and Walt Disney animation over. His Treatment of women was hired by an animation company. That Thomson was going to make a film with. When they hired lassiter her she spoke out thought too old not to walk my own talk? Time is very much shaw's marching on and because I had spoken before when the Weinstein thing blew up and I've always spoken up about this since I was a young woman. I'm there was absolutely no choice. Really and the clever thing about anybody who's going to bully is that they'll do it nor or in front of someone who's going to say you can't do that. They'll do it in secret or in quiet or in private and it's very difficult for instance for someone on who's a runner and who can be replaced in five minutes to say anything bad about someone who it will cost a lot of money to replace. I'm GonNa ask you a favor right now now and this is not part of your letter. That's Pacific disguised. Answer John lasseter. I'm asking me to paragraphs from it because I think it's something that everybody needs to hear. If a man has speen touching women inappropriately for decades. Why would a woman want to work for him? If the only reason he's not touching them inappropriately now is that it says in his contract that he must behave professionally. If a man has made women at his companies feel undervalued and and disrespected for decades. Why should the woman at his new company think that any respect he shows them anything other than an act that he's required it to perform by his coach his therapist and his employment agreement? The message seems to be. I am learning to feel respect for women so please be patient patient while I work on it. It's not easy that was Emma Thompson reading from her letter to Sky Dance Animation about John. LASSETER you're listening listening to the frame fifth anniversary special and we're taking a trip down memory lane like this visit with Jordan Peele when he released get out. This movie movie had to feel cinematic in a way. That only a handful of my favorite or movies pull off a year. We would approach approach this like a an elevated art like it was high art we would try to approach this with Kubrick in Precision and of course fall short but Die Trying unlike Stanley Kubrick. You made the movie a little faster than he typically works. That's right you clearly pay a a lot of attention to music We have some horror. Music Cues lined up for you. I'm going to test to see how much of a horror movie music nerd. You really are you ready to play. Let's it's here the The I q John Carpenter's Halloween. That's the tubular bells from exorcists. Okay one on for one next cue. Carpenter's Halloween I knew it was coming. I knew it was coming. Okay next cue very good three per three and Herman and the last one this is Philip. Glasses candyman what do you think about that. I was unbelievable anything about that. It's unbelievable another memorable. Moment was when Tanya Saracho creator of the star series Vida demonstrated the vocal talent. She used on her day jobs as her writing career got going. I was for ten years. I was voice in Spanish for Special K and the tag was Special Gate the various interior. Komo to care like you'd still friendly and then ten years for Walgreens Raines is still see mining walgreens with compared to those Nova nine wavy tenure. That's how I was able to write plays and not star in Chicago because I I was doing voices and when Tom Hanks and Clint Eastwood made a movie about the pilot Sully Sullivan Burger. I ask them about what it means to be a hero and to play one onscreen screen Tom. I think the other day gave a definition of of hero that I thought was A spot on it was it to me. It's is somebody who does US something extraordinary and yet he doesn't think it's extraordinary. He may think well I. I was on my game that that week there is this projection objection that is put upon you that because you play these guys. You actually have some of the attributes that that you do and believe me. My skill set is to make it appear as though I have these attributes without having any of the actual attributes that being said the power of the cinema and the power of the heroic visions the guy that Ukraine lie on in in motion. Pictures makes you feel as though you have to be dedicated and you have to. You have to be trained and you have to follow through and if you get that lesson from literature richer from opera from theater from Shakespeare cinema rates as one of those great One of those great art forms and so yes you. You actually do become enlightened in a way by the heroic portrayals big and small this is the frame fifth anniversary special revisiting moments from our first five years on the air. This is Monica Bushman producer on the frame and I'm also a cryer. I cry at the movies and watching. TV shows even during some commercials. I try not to cry at work but one of the things that I really enjoy about working on the frame is that John Horn born is a prior to he cries at work and he's not at all ashamed about it attended stands out for me was when he was talking with my erskine ankle there the creators and stars of the Hulu. Blue Show Penn.. Fifteen it's a beautiful scene but it's really I mean it's I mean it's Real Jonathan Shift shift one or the other producers here remember this moment from John's interview with Randy Newman When she was I was drying tips? I didn't make didn't make throw without crying and Julia. Paskhin recalled this moment from an interview. She produced with with Mahershala Ali little world when he and John talked about the powerful swimming lessons seen from moonlight. It's all I can do to cry Eh up so much for me. It really does John Horn. Go ahead and shed a tear and don't feel bad about it and that'll do it. I want to thank everybody. Who is tuned in over the years? I thank you for listening to the frame. I also want to thank Colin Campbell. Who hired us to start this show back in two thousand fourteen and our current program director Sallow Curto who guides us now and thanks to the Budo span which supplied our original theme music? And a Taylor mcferrin who wrote our current theme song. The frame is produced by Darby Maloney. Jonathan shiftless Monica Bushmen and Julia. Paskhin our news clerk is Andrea Gutierrez and our intern is Paul ratliff. Our original regional producers are Michelle Lands and James Ken Edward Up. Res- is our engineer. And we say goodbye this month. To our longtime engineer Valentino Rivera. Thank you val get some sleep. Our senior producer is Oscar Garza. And I'm John Horn from the MON broadcast center at KPCC. Thanks for being part of our frame family. We'll see you back here for the daily version of the frame on Monday. KPCC deep podcasts are supported by Warner brothers presenting Joker Todd Phillips Cinematic Vision See Joaquin Phoenix Golden Globe and screen actors guild nominated performance hence winner of the Venice Film. Festival's top prize and one of the AF is top films of two thousand Nineteen Varieties Owen. Gleiberman named joker the best film of the year describing it as a movie that can and will stand the test of time for consideration in all categories including best picture director and actor.

John Horn John The Times Meryl Streep New York Emma Thompson Jordan Jamie Fox Hollywood producer Christian Bale Fox searchlight John Lasseter US James Mangold KPCC director Harvey Weinstein KPCC Joe Joe Rabbit Warner Brothers
Kim Gordon, Solo And On The Record

The Frame

28:17 min | 1 year ago

Kim Gordon, Solo And On The Record

"KPCC PODCASTS are supported by twentieth century. Fox presenting forward versus Ferrari directed by James Mangold starring Christian. Bale and Matt Damon now nominated mandated for a Golden Globe for best actor Christian Bale and five critic's choice nominations including best picture of the year. KPCC supporters include Fox searchlight presenting. Joe Rabbit nominated for the Sag Award for Best Ensemble. Seven critics choice awards including best picture. The Golden Globe for Best Picture and one of AF is ten best pictures of of the year for consideration in all categories took from them on broadcast center at. KPCC this is the frame. I'm John Horn born on today's show. Ten years after writer Nell scovell called out her former boss David Letterman. They meet to Hash it out. Then Kim Gordon talks about her her debut solo album and her artistic life after Sonic Youth. I think I've come to terms. With what personal would be and I think it just means to do things in your own way. There's one way right way to be an artist or have in our career or music career and we'll meet the director of Atlantiques Senegal Els Official Oscar entry for best feature fell all that can coming up on the frame. KPCC podcasts casts are supported by twentieth century. Fox presenting forward versus Ferrari directed by James Mangold and starring Christian. Bale and Matt Damon now nominated for a golden in Globe for best actor Christian Bale and five critic's choice nominations including best picture of the year. Welcome to the frame John Horn ten years ago. TV writer Nelson Avella took a pretty big risk. She published an article calling out her former boss. Late night King David Letterman for running writer's room and a show that favored men scovill has since co authored. Sheryl Sandberg's two thousand thirteen book. Lean in and last year she published a memoir. You're just the funny parts and a few hard truths about sneaking into Hollywood boys club for her latest piece. In Vanity Fair Scoville met with Letterman to finally talk about gender discrimination at late night. Scoville join me in studio and described what it was like to write for Letterman in one thousand nine hundred ninety. Yeah so this was a dream. I'm job for me I had already worked in Los Angeles. I actually worked on the last season of newhart. And I'd written a Simpson's episode road and I finally. After years of sending material to the Letterman people got a call asking me to come in and meet with Dave and like a lot of late night shows not a lot of women in the writer's room. Now there's only been one before I got hired it was Merrill Marco who was a genius and the first head writer on that show and also Dave's girlfriend at the time so I guess I was the first female hired who was in a relationship with Dave so many years after you leave the show in two thousand and nine something compels you to write about your experiences sir. Right Dave was the victim of a blackmail attempt. He was having an affair with one of his assistants Whose boyfriend found her diary and the scheme was that he threatened to write a screenplay about the affair? If Dave didn't give him two million dollars at the same time Nancy Franklin writes a piece in the New Yorker that points out that there were zero female writers on Letterman Leno and Conan. And I have to say Dave's announcement was not surprise. Is anyone who worked on the show knew about his extracurricular activities. But the fact that I'd been gone for twenty years and they'd move backwards awkward as far as gender in the writer's room that was stunning to me and I literally lost sleep so on a fast forward word to a decision you make and certainly there's another party to this conversation which is going back today. Insane I want to have a conversation about about the fact that you didn't respond to what I wrote. And how did that come about because there seems to be an important condition and that is that it's on the record as we approached October twenty nineteen. I knew it was the ten year anniversary of this article I had written for Vanity Fair and then I just got this crazy idea which is With Dave sit down and talk to me and I knew he hadn't read the article because in this weird coincidence he and I ended up working together in twenty fourteen on the Kennedy Center Honors and I actually had a chance to ask him. Did you ever read that article. And he said to my face no. I don't worry about that stuff. Don't worry about that stuff it meaning inning. He didn't wear. He doesn't worry about what people write about him. Is that what it means. Already doesn't worry about how he behaved and how he treats women he claims it is the former when you sat down with David. I'm curious what was the most striking thing that he had to say. Well first of all it was pretty extraordinary that he agreed to sit down with me. If you do any reading about apologies and someone wronged you find out that as the person who has been wronged you lose status status and so the second Dave agreed will sit at a table and talk. He really did offer me the status right. We were equals at that table and I would love to see more powerful white men doing that sort of thing which is being open to that discussion so the point was not just for me to get what turned out to be an apology from Dave but also to you try to model behavior that I would like to see more. We're talking with TV writer and author Nelson cavill you mentioned in your Vanity Fair Peas. How male all writers rooms have been for people like Jay Leno and he has no regret and no apology? No it's all about the material. Just if you give me material than I will hire you. Just come up to me in a comedy club. He says you know Jay Leno went off. The air was zero female writers and that's he should be ashamed that for the rest of his life. What would you say are the things that make you optimistic about how conversations are changing not just in and around this issue but in the workplace about a show runners interest in hiring a room that looks like the country not like the country club? I do think we've made some improvement and I think it certainly helps to have people like Kenya barriers and Shonda rhimes who have been so successful and even giverny They're all doing amazing work. And I think it's Shonda who made an amazing observation. which is if you walk outside? You see people of all colors. There's US see people from all walks of life that's normalcy so we actually shouldn't call it. Diversity what we want is normalcy. You know in Nineteen nineteen ninety. I went to the EMMYS for the first time Letterman had been nominated and I was in the audience when they announced the nominees for the five best comedies comedies and it was Murphy Brown Golden Girls Designing women wonder years and cheers three and a half of those shows were created by women. Diane English one for Murphy Brown and I sat there in nineteen ninety and thought we we solve this. We proved it. You're if such a dreamer now I just want to get back to where we were in. Nineteen Ninety nells. cavill is a TV writer. She's the author of the memoir. Just the funny parts in a few hard truths about sneaking into the Hollywood boys club. Now thanks much for coming in. Thank you coming up on the frame. Kim Gordon has. I've been in band since nineteen eighty-one including sonic youth now. She's released her first solo album. KPCC's supporters include Fox searchlight presenting Joe Rabbit from writer Director Taika Waititi included on both AF. Is the National Board of reviews reviews ten best pictures of the year and now nominated for the Sag Award for Best Ensemble and best supporting actress. Scarlett Johansson seven critics choice awards including best picture and best adapted screenplay and the Golden Globe Award for best actor and best picture of the year awards eligible in all categories KPCC. PODCASTS are supported by Warner brothers. Presenting Joker Varieties Owen. Gleiberman named joker the best film of Two Thousand Nineteen calling it a movie. We'll be the CAN and will stand the test of time. Joaquin Phoenix Mesmerizes in the performance of the year now nominated for the screen actors guild for outstanding performance performance by a male actor in a leading role seven critics choice awards and four Golden Globe awards including Best Picture Best Director and best actor for consideration in all categories. Welcome back to the frame. I'm John Horn. Kim Gordon is best known as the bassist and singer of the New York City based no wave wave band sonic youth but her artistic output goes way beyond music. She's a fashion designer actress. Visual artist and poet she published a memoir in two thousand fifteen called girl band. Gordon has also released albums under her side. Project called body head but now she's celebrating her debut solo album. It's called no home record. It's a collaboration with producer Justin Raisin. We met recently at ten in the morning so we started with her loudest song. It's called murdered out. I wake up. I think this is the first song that you put together with your producer. Her Justin. Can you tell a little bit about that song. And how it came together and the conversation that you just had leading up to recording it well kind of happened sideways He's working on another project and having different people come in and play instruments and sing and he kept sending me song about this one And then there was one that I felt the sensibility I could I was kind of curious about what his whole deal was. And I thought it was would be a good way to kind of work with him a little head and see what that was like and he kind of really got my sensibility and so I went back and I did more vocals and added some guitar and we mixed it and that's became murder when you're making your first solo album. Is that liberating in a way that. There's no pattern or model that you have to follow you. Can you just start essentially from scratch in terms of what you WANNA do. Yeah I guess I guess it was liberating just didn't really think about it that much. which I I am I always I kind of like the hip hop model? Just starting with the rhythm and building stuff up Even though I wasn't making hip hop record and I don't know I just like the kind of appropriate of Attitude within Senate and my vocal style is not As a conventional singer so that was somewhat of a model. You know even though there aren't really any hip hop song side you're describing some of this music almost like it's a collage of visual art work. We describe it more like AAC painting or poetry. I mean different things and so many different meeting collage is kind of like that song. Sketch artists actually think is the most most collage song knowing in dead status flags and the wind in it did staff strikes. Yeah that's a song recorded and sent to him and the way he put it together is totally the different. I don't even remember what the original was but the other song I sent him. Get Your Life back as pretty much. The same it's the same structure and and that is more like it kind of almost like a poem or something. What are the differences? How would you define what is a poem versus? What is a song? Well just figured whatever I gave him you'd make into a song. It was almost like a challenge. You said in your book is a conversation you had with Danny off men you said Danny said to me once. Your art is very personal. So it'll be popular and you write. Personal is something. I still equate with Sunday painters. I still carry around with me. A battle between working conceptually sexually art based on some overriding idea and my pure carnal sensory love of materials. I think I've sort of come to terms with what personal would be and I think it just means to do things in your own way. You know not everyone. There's no one way right way to be an artist or have in our career or are music career and I find that I sort of have the arc career that suits me. I got I think I would have been bored or did I was just a painter or just a singer. I mean not that. There's anything wrong with that. It just doesn't suit me you. Do you think that's been helpful to you to have different disciplines because listening to you say that I was thinking about how hard this business is is. And how hard people's expectations of what you should do and how you should look. Is there a lesson that you took away that has made you survive live Well Yeah I mean I think that most women are it's your DNA. It's almost pathological this desire to please as or something and I mean it's not just men have different pressures that are very similar. You know like the expectation to be responsible. I don't know I guess it's made me just aware of that like you. You never feel like you're gonNa ever arrive anywhere because you're you have to do everything you have to balance everything if your mom were you know and then work and be creative and and looking good good and everything so Mostly I'm actually too lazy to a lot of that I I really just try to focus on what's most important so when you have a conversation with somebody like your daughter who is an artist. Would you tell the young artist about how to measure success and happiness about what the goal should be about pursuing a passion. Well I I think you have to really be sure you want something because you might just get it. You might get it accidentally but no I mean like you if you achieve something you could look around and go well. This is really what I want. Is this meaningful you know or am I just doing this. Because I'm good at it. Or like for instance bands are really like machines. I mean you get in it and you just go go go until you don't go anymore. And the lifestyles structured in a way that it's hard to do other things and there's a lot of boring boring parts you know waiting around sitting in airplanes and airports and buses and then there's the whole being known part and not everyone can deal with that I and in case there was very we. I think we kind of always had the edge of will we kind of had niche audience. But we could still do other things things because we didn't have the trappings still to be a visual artists. It's difficult because most people know me as a musician so that's been kind of challenging. We're talking with Kim Gordon about her record. No home record. I'm wondering when you are recording these songs things. Are you thinking about a specific person who is the narrator of a certain Song Some you know have done that in the past alike Hungry baby it's sort of you know it's about sexual harassment and but it's it's from the point of view of the man so that's kind of specific. I guess let's listen to a little bit of a song. Hungry baby awesome. He said that this is written from the point of view of a guy. How did that song come? I'm together and why was that important to write from that perspective. Well I wrote a song called Swimsuit issue I can ninety one or something that was about sexual harassment right after we signed to Geffen. There is an incident and within well-known air now person and then I didn't want me to two stuff was going on. I just thought I should update it her. You know just not Go back into that territory Tori. How do you think that your music reflects the things that are happening in the country in the world today and are intentional about brethren seen it but it also intentional about not overloading? Yeah I am intentional about exactly. referencing it but not being pointed because they feel like music it works well when there is room for the listener to project an take what they want from it. You wrote your memoir girl in a ban which is very honest and very open and then you have this record. That is not memoir. But I'm wondering wondering. Can you be more honest or open in an album that you can be in a memoir because people are judging and looking at the facts versus what you're talking about in a song long can you actually be more emotionally vulnerable more. Open that way Yeah I think so I also like to use the word you because it can also refer to the audience dance but other records certainly like body head records. The first buddy had record it wasn't it was so emotional and and a lot of people think I was writing about my life but it was also writing about Catherine. Earn inspired by this French filmmaker. Sure Katherine Braveheart like specifically the song last mistress like her movie but A lot of people. I'm sure took took it to be about my life. Kim Gordon's new record is called no home record. Kim thanks for coming in. Thanks for having me Coming up on the frame. The film Atlantiques is both a love story. And a ghost story KPCC PODCASTS are supported. By Warner Brothers. Presenting Joker Todd Phillip. Philip Cinematic Vision see Joaquin. Phoenix is Golden Globe and screen actors guild nominated performance winner of the Venice Film. Festival's top prize and one of the AF defies top films of two thousand Nineteen Varieties Owen. Gleiberman name Joker the best film of the year describing it as a movie that can and will stand the test of time time for consideration in all categories including best picture director and actor. Welcome back to the frame. I'm John Horn Matti. Mattie Diaz Film Atlantiques is a love story about a seventy old Senegalese girl and a struggling construction worker. Who are kept apart by forces beyond their control? Troll Atlantiques is the first film directed by a black woman to screen in competition at the Cannes film. Festival it also won the Grand Prix award there this year her. When I spoke with the up at the Middleburg Film Festival we began with how her two thousand nine documentary short of the same name lead to her making a narrative feature length version of Atlantiques? It was a moment in Senegal in Dakar were a lot of young. People would migrate to reach Spain to escape an employments clients To to to escape a very difficult economical situation and at that time Mass media would really talk about it through the perspective of very abstract way you know through statistic and the approach was mostly very miserabilist artists and As a French Senegalese person engine maker. I had I was really how can I say I was close to what was going on I met some people who was about to leave. And I made a film about somebody who drifts had returned from I'm from that migration and so I've been a close witness to that situation and I used the tools of cinema to approach that reality in Mora sensitive existential and mythological Approach and as this young man was telling me his true story it was true it was what he experienced but the way he told about his crushing was already so epic in so mythical and so full of of a metaphors and symbolic. That's the way he told himself made the film shift into something more than documentary and A couple of years later I decided to on the same theme to to write a feature because I wanted to to address rest who larger audience and also to to really go further about the the supernatural and fantasy approach of film. When you you made your short there was somebody who spoke to you? Who said something that you said at the time struck you and that is when you make the decision to leave you're really already dead that's Serene hero of context short. Who told that to me that night and is true that The numbers of boys have been Talking with who have been told me about their project to leave the car to Spain. You were so much obsessed and possessed by the desire of being elsewhere that they were no longer here anymore which gave gave that very ghost feeling of of being seated in front of boys in flesh and bones in front of you but who minds were so far away from here and I think these amongst other thing really made me think of writing a ghost film about that. Let's moment about that situation at your gates getting into Selena We're talking with Manti. Te'o about her film Atlantiques or if you want to say it the Americanized Way Atlantic's. This is in some ways a movie about refugees. It's also a movie about what's left behind because so many stories about refugees are about the journey but auto the people who don't make the journey and how their lives are changed by the people who leave exactly. Actually that's why I decided to dedicate hate me to this last youth in the US but from the perspective of the living and of the woman who stay behind because it was also from my own point of view. Thirty till just more right to talk about. where I I stood you know about experience of losing these boys and how this woman transcend and face their unreality reality without the presence of the men is really how the life of these women are? Reinvented by the absence of these men. This is a movie that was shot in and around Senegal. And you also use sengalese actors. So I'm GonNa ask you about finding your actors and why it was important to have local actors. Even if they don't always have a lot of experience experience to play these parts for me the fact US actors and people of the police in the place I shot is very natural. I mean the film is as A. It's really a theme. which is really happening in a very specific precise place? The name of the neighborhood is It's in the suburbs of the a car and the character Connected to the story where oversee had to be found In the same place and the film had to be shot forming in Wallaf. which is the language people? Speak there to be as close as the humanity and the intern imaginary of this of these people Um So it was as most of the characters are quite young in the film there are between eighteen and twenty five because they're at that age I wanted to street casting because you don't really find professional actors of of of this age in internal but mostly because I have a very very documentary approach to casting to give you an example for the character of Suleiman. The Lover of Dr who has who worker and who who hasn't been paid for four months on his work construction sites a went to search for my exer- you know work construction site. Because I needed somebody somebody who knows about what what he's defending in the role. The people I choose for the character are bringing all their knowledge or their experience or all their soul and their person to the character. which is everything Mattie? Thanks so much for coming on the very much for having me. Mattie the OPS film can be seen on Netflix and it is among ten films that were just shortlisted for the Foreign Language Academy Award. And that'll do it for today. Remember remember you can follow us on twitter and facebook. You'll find as at the frame. I'm John Horn. Thanks for listening. We're back here tomorrow from the Mon Broadcast Center

Kim Gordon writer David Letterman Dave John Horn KPCC Letterman Leno director Golden Globe US KPCC Christian Bale Fox searchlight Mattie Diaz Warner brothers Best Ensemble Joe Rabbit Senegal James Mangold Sheryl Sandberg
The Science

The Big One: Your Survival Guide

35:51 min | 2 years ago

The Science

"Don't have an emergency kit in your car preppy has you covered. Use the code the big one to receive a free three day emergency kit with any purchase food water. First aid and emergency, essentials all included. Go to preppy dot co. That's P R E P P, I dot CO slash the big one. Before we start today. I want to say thank you tall. The KPCC members who've listened thank you for your time and your support. And if you aren't KPCC member, you can become on injustice, you seconds. Go to KPCC dot Oregon. Click that donate button. Give whatever you can. We appreciate it. Have you found yourself thinking that this earthquake isn't gonna happen? I get that. Yes. We invented our own dungeons and dragons kind of journey for the first two episodes. But every scenario we've put you through so far is completely possible. How do we know this a three hundred and eight page document called the shakeout report? It's full of fun estimates like this eighteen hundred people dead nearly fifty thousand injured two hundred and seventy thousand people out of their homes about twenty million people without power more than two hundred thousand people that experience new mental health disorder. Anxiety, depression PTSD. I did this from a feeling of a moral imperative. I could see people were going to die because they didn't know basic information. I had information that could help them, and we had to do it in a way that they could use. There are a lot of other people who did that too. I mean, I didn't do this alone by a long shot. Lucie. Jones and hundreds of other people worked on it for years. They published it back in two thousand eight from Thomas golden, director of the southern California earthquake center was this quote, the springs on the San Andreas system have been wearing very very tight and the southern Andreas fault in particular looks like it's locked loaded and ready to go frightening was and I want to be clear snotty crystal ball. This earthquake could be a whole lot better. Or a whole lot worse reports. Based on the best information we have available. It's as close to a crystal ball as we can get. How likely is it that none of this happens? This will happen. There's no likelihood of at not happening. We are not stopping tectonics the details may change. But the earthquake is a hundred percent inevitable. Just give it enough time. I'm gonna get to the story of this report. First, let's talk about how we know that big one is coming. Let's go back nineteen seven Greenland middle of the night. Dark freezing wind blowing over fields. Snow? Don't worry north quakes on about the hit explorer. Alfred Vagner is on an expedition with some other guys into sled dogs. He's on the eastern coast. And it's brutal. One of the coldest years Greenland's ever had after a long day veterans team stopped for the night to set up camp in the go to sleep. During the night. He heard a terrible commotion outside was that grabbed his gun. Just in time to see a polar bear charging the tent. He picked up the shotgun. And got it up and shot the bear right through the face. Just in time to keep it from killing him his notation in his diary for that day is a commotion in the night. The dog's got a good meal afterwards. This guy this dog loving bear killing ice terrain. Explore the total bad ass served in the first World War. And hated it saying wars, a waste of life and money. But this isn't why we know him it's because of his theory about how the continents we know came to be remember when you were in elementary school. And you learn about the supercontinent Panja. That's factor. He changed the way that we look at the along came outfit vaguer, and he reckoned Alford Vic nerve versus the world fraught all the different kinds of evidence together. Rare people that's just good at an interested in a lot of different things. His first love was doing science. His wife always said of him that family life, however, much he loved her and the children that family life was just background music for his scientific work. This is Mike Greene Matsu kinda guy who when you try to make small talk about the weather tells you about the air quality and then references Picasso's blue period, he's charming. He wrote the biography. Alfred Vagner science exploration in theory of continental drift. I don't think he was a Misanthrope, but he was an introvert and he liked being alone in his study. He never went out of his way to promote his own career. The way people normally would Vetter who has a PHD in atmospheric science. He decides is gonna take a break from exploring. He starts working at a university in the south of Germany. So winter of nineteen eleven his first day back in the office after the Christmas break he gets back to. His office before the spring semester begins and his office mate tells him come into my office. I got this fabulous world. Atlas for Christmas. He and his office mate spent a whole day looking through pictures in this atlas and when they opened it to the middle Vegas stop. And there was a picture of the two hemispheres of the earth one that has South America on it and one that has Africa on it. And he looked at it very closely. And he saw that the coast of South America and the coast of Africa fit together, like a jigsaw puzzle. But he saw something else. He saw that. If you look at the depth data that was plotted on this map for the Atlantic Ocean that the same outline for the continents are they are two hundred meters down and and four thousand meters down any mmediately thought. So this is not an accident of sea level. This isn't just some odd coincidence. There's something going on here. Fenner sees landmasses that were clearly connected. But somehow pulled apart the scientific community. See something totally different. They were convinced that the continents were moving couldn't move never moved that. At some point. They were connected by giant land bridges that sunk to the bottom of the sea the more he thought about it. The dumber at sounded Cording diviner, a continent could no more sink to the bottom of the ocean than on ice cube could sink to the bottom of a glass of water. So he decides I'm gonna tell the world how the continents came to be. There were one big piece. And then they drifted apart over the course of about three or four months puts together a coherent argument, which he calls, the origin of continents. And then he's out. Mike drops is crazy. New theory is like SIA I'm gonna go explore with my dogs. When he doesn't know is that as soon as it's published he is the laughing stock of the scientific community. He died at just fifty years old pot and blizzard doing what he loved hanging with his dogs sporran Greenland. It would be decades before he was vindicated, but he would be vindicated. The of nineteen scientists Tuesday. He. I'm Jacob Margolis. And this is the big one your survival guide. Episode three. The science is scientists who say. Crazy. If it is quick was to hit right now. How far away is your emergency kit. Preppy wants you to have your supplies within arm's reach when the big one hits not stash deep in the closet or the garage preps. Designed forward kits are attractive enough to be displayed writing this faces. You actually spend time in such as the living room their range of products. Have you covered at home the office or in the car made in Los Angeles. Preppy handsome, canvas and leather bags are so heavy duty come with a lifetime warranty. And for listeners of the big one they are actually giving away three kids for free with any purchase could preppy dot co. That's p r e p p I dot CO slash the big one for free preppy go box with any purchase. That's P R E P P, I dot CO slash the big one. I. Math night, the moon with a bright. If mel. And it wasn't the long when offering charming until my bed room. Actually here in Washington. Why if you use everyday fascist on a dozen time heavy notice? They ever night would prince takes me out for my walk. I always stop whenever each particular spot look over there that way you see the lighted window a neighbor. Mine lives. Yep. Right. Knee is in home a man with the most important job for apple a convenient way to left ground beef, Patty is the places sheet of paper. Likely logic. We want. Okay. So fast forward to the late nineteen fifties debates geologic community have been raging and teenager named Tanya atwater is in high school. She'd always wanted to be an artist and was going after that dream until she saw something that changed her life Sputnik. Or is this guy calls it, Nick? Commands for this fun tier radio signal transmitted by the Soviet splitting the first man-made satellite as fast over New York. Earlier today, one of the places where the progress of the atlas thought a science could do that. So impressively could put something in outer space size? Do anything famines wars could solve anything. And so we all changed whatever we were doing and went into science. So she looks for science school, and I went to Harvard, and they said, oh, we don't take women and she was like, well, that's super sexist. So she talked to guy from Caltech, and he said, well, we don't take women. They just waste their educations get married in waster -cations, so am I had been taking it just a smattering of women for a long time since the beginning. I guess she was one of only twenty women in a class of two thousand men I asked one of my. Professors that my I told him about Caltech, and I asked him, and he said, well, we know that you're gonna raise great children because you'll have a good education read sons. So we think it's worth educating because he'll he'll educate your children will. They were all clueless to be revolutionary. You have to know that you're right. And they're wrong. You have to know it right in your soul. If you doubt, then they can get to you. So I thought about that a lot of gift my parents really gave me let's just to know my own worth. And that. Arbitrary rules. Wouldn't let me do my own thing where arbitrary and stupid. What was the big deal at the time? Was that scientists just figured out that Vagner was actually kinda right? The continents are moving. The way that they do that is completely different than what he thought. Discovery was called plate tectonics enormous pieces of land that have somewhere to be shifting all over. But some of them are in each other's way. And they collide almost like geological bumper cars, the discovery of plate tectonics. Also, help us understand the why why earthquakes happen. At the time. What did they know about the Santa dream? Well, in one thousand nine hundred six huge earthquake in San Francisco, they saw the ground breaks. They could see a big line. Yeah. Move five meters. Activism wooden frame house with big blast windows. And it's it's path coming up to it in the path was offset from the porch way off set like sixteen feet, like suddenly your driveway is someone else's driveway. Then and the house was fine. So once the bigger picture coming into focus. They said, you know, if there's going to be a plate boundary on the land. Antedates? San Andreas is the biggest fault in California. Splitting it from bodice an Francisco insane. And before nineteen o six we didn't know it was there. So what you have to understand is that the continents are not the plates continents sit on top of the plates in facts to these plates me right underneath California, North American and the Pacific when the come together they form the Santa trace, and it was huge to identify this plate boundary. We could see it. We already knew there were a bunch of these things on the ocean floor. But now now we could see one this gave us a chance to figure out a whole bunch of other stuff. How old are these plates? How faster they moving and Tanya wanted to answer those questions specifically about the San Andreas? There's a guy at Stanford. Bill Dickinson who ran these meetings and had a meeting saying, you know, the Senator is we should have a meeting and talk about it so Dickinson, call this meeting, and he always included went of students, and the first thing Bill Dickinson said was be wild. They were looking for evidence at the earth was moving that after years and years of these two plates shifting what used to be over here. This now over there. No joke. LA used to be roughly where San Diego is today. It took like forever, but they did move. They need to evidence of this. So they could figure out how fast the plates are moving. It was when crew these students from Berkeley, and they're wild professors who sit up, and they showed an offset of these very distinct lavas that are in the northern Mojave and on the other side at the pinnacles, which is near Salinas, California, just on the other side of the fault the same rocks. They're they're very distinct rocks. Exactly same age twenty three million years and just it'd be really hard to convince anybody they weren't the same. And we we're sitting in the back. Oh, Tanya was blown away by how far the Roxette moved. How fast the fall was moving. The earthquake problem is a lot worse. If it's fast faster means more earthquakes over the next decade. She answered both questions. How fast is the sanitary? Moving and how old is she wrote about it for a book on the history of plate tectonics. It is wondrous thing to have the random facts in one's head. Suddenly fall into the slots of an orderly framework is like an explosion inside. And that is what I often felt happened to me and to others as we were working out and talking out the geometry of western US. I took my ideas to John cruel at UCSB. When thanks giving day, I crept in feeling very self conscious. And embarrassed that I was trying to tell him about land geology starting from oceans eulogy using paper and scissors. And he was the the God of the Andress at the time. He was very patient with my long bumbling, but near the end yacht terribly excited, and I could feel the explosion in his head. He suddenly stopped me and rest into the other room to show me a map of when and where he had evidence of activity on the Senator is system the predicted pattern was all right there. This woman who wasn't allowed to study science at Harvard or Caltech and was belittled at MIT. She figured out how the landscape of the western US came to be because of Tanya atwater. We know that the San Andreas is young that it's moving fast. What we didn't know was when the next big one would hit. I documented account of quake in southern California's from seventeen sixty nine by Spanish explorer, guests far day Portola he in a bunch of other guys run an expedition walking north through the state nearly a hundred years later in eighteen fifty seven that's when L A had its last big one since the city was so new only two people died then there was nineteen. Oh, six big one that hit San Francisco it lasted about a minute. But the fires that broke out went onto burn nearly five hundred city blocks killing more than three thousand people very well documented, if an earthquake hadn't been documented there was basically no way for us to know about it no way to figure out the pattern of how often they'd happened. Meaning we didn't know if a big one on the San Andreas fault was right around the corner. This is where Kerry C comes in. We are certainly within the window of when that quick is going to happen. I'd be very surprised didn't have with the lifetime of of children in primary school today. This guy figured out the powder. March nineteen seventy I was I was a junior at UC riverside that year that the the local regional meeting of the geological sign America was at UC riverside. And so me and all the other students were asked to be free volunteer labor to help register the fat. Register the professors who are coming Rockstars of the field were there like the guy that invented the Richter scale like the whole magnitude of an earthquake thing. Oh my God. I mean, I just about melted. When he walked up I thought God. Charlie. Rick. You kidding me? I'm signing him up for this meeting. And so so he signs in frumpy with his coat isn't doesn't fit him. And and and so on classic professor see sitting in on the talks, and some the researchers mentioned a problem they run into near San Francisco. The city of Fremont wanted to build a new Civic Center. The Hayward fault runs right through the place. And you really don't want to build a Civic Center right on top of a big fault because when an earthquake hits and the two sides of the fall going opposite directions. They can tear a building in half like the house in one thousand nine six that Tanya mentioned the problem was it couldn't tell exactly where the fault was. So he didn't know where to build the solution. They came up with was today. And they did they knew they'd found the fall when they came across these layers of dirt that had built up over thousands and thousands of years like imagine a layer cake but made a verse, but some of the layers were broken offset like someone interrupted the sheets of cake. Those interruptions worth quakes developers had their answer about where the fault was. But when Kerry hears about this, he takes it to the next level. And as I was sitting there in the audience, I thought, well, that's not all you could do with this. You know, you kidding. Just locate the fault, you could actually use the layers and radiocarbon dating to tell when the earthquakes happened. When he was only in his early twenties. Carrie, see invented the field of paleo seismology. What were you doing? When you were that young. Once you know, how often they happen on a fault. You can figure out how long you have until the next big one hits years later carry makes his way out to the San Andreas fault with the shovel and starts digging for answers. What was exciting was the gel just said that the layers there airbeds of of nice, you know, yellowish tan sans river sand and gravel 's with peat layers black beautiful p players. So it'd be it'd be like a layer cake. So I thought that's exciting. That's just what I'm looking for the peat layers can be dated with carbon. And if it's accumulating the right rate, I can get a slippery on the fault. So I drive down their first chance, I get take. My shovel. I see one of the peat layers. I start scraping it off to expose it all the way along and I make a scrape and it's broken and it's drops down about a half meter. So I collect a sample of Pete from the top family Pete from the ten meter deep gorge down below I send. Him off the radio carbon lab. And and suddenly I realized I've got a site where I can deed earthquakes individuals quakes. When you're when you're a performer musical group. It's often the case that when you do an excellent performance in front of a good crowd. You'd literally feel a chill going up your spine. I've only had that twice in my life as Jolla gist and one of them was when I took that Spade shovel and cut away some of the the sloth the Taylor's on the side. I saw that fault breaking the sediments. So I knew I'd found something extraordinary. So in the late nineteen eighties. We finally had our pattern. We knew how often the monster lashes out the answer is in pretty. It's been a hundred sixty one year since last big one Cording into seize research. They occur every forty five to two hundred thirty years. That means we're in the window. It could hit any second out disaster. Experts have a line they often use all disasters are terrible. It's why they call them disasters. But earthquakes are the least polite. They don't tell you when they're coming to town or just how catastrophic they're going to be. And that's mostly true. Except that we do know a big one is coming. There's just no time in date on the RSVP. So what is a region do when they find out there in the sweet spot for a big one that millions of people's lives could be changed forever by major quake. Pretty much nothing. But Lucie Jones is trying to change that. In your opinion, your expert opinion, we are a hundred and fifty years overdue for a big earthquake in southern California's at true, right? Just the San Andreas fault. Our guest. Joe mexico? We've talked to Dr Lucie Jones here at Caltech this morning. She says we're happy to have Dr Lucie Jones here to discuss this. Thank you so much. Join us again left to see you wonderful to be entering the. Yes. I do. I would like to see us Bill buildings to be used and not just to crawl out alive because we cry three hundred thousand buildings badly damaged. Okay. Good to have you here. Joy. No, I'm I actually think that the more we understand the better off will be. So what are the biggest misconception? Fast forward to two thousand two Lucy gets tapped to serve on California seismic safety commission. The group that's supposed to keep the state safe. When the big one hits it stacked with a bunch of important people for sure sponsors city leaders city officials engineers and Lucy's listening to them talk. And she realizes something that really scares her the her, it seems like many of them don't understand the basics of a big one on the San Andreas when the fault moves. It actually moves at the surface. We can map it is. Because it had comes to the surface in each of the bigger quakes, and therefore everything crossing the fault is broken to. That was not known. It was clear that that was not known. How could you tell it was not known? Well, I mean, they were surprised as I talk about it. And how do you know where the false going to what? Because that's what mapping it. It'll how do you know where where the pipelines going to break because this is where it crosses the fault. Well, so what? You know, and the idea that the fault is the demotion motion on the fault that offsets things that causes the shaking. They they didn't realize that. That was true. They didn't realize that power lines gaslines waterlines all of which run over the fault could break when the shifts. These are the people who are making the decisions at the government level about what should we be doing to get ready for this? And there is information that could be using that wasn't being understood. So there was part for me was just going. There's really basic stuff that we need to get through to them. And how do we do it? And clearly what we've been talking about. So far hadn't been doing. It not long after USGS comes to her NASCAR to write a proposal all about the impact of a big quake on southern California. So says, okay, she puts it together thinks it's going to take years for them to get any money, and then in two thousand five Katrina hits Katrina shouldn't Americans be concerned that their government is prepared to respond to another disaster, even a terrorist attack. Katrina exposed. Serious problems in our response capability at all levels of government. And to the extent that the federal government. Good fully do its job. Right. I take responsibility. I wanna know what went right and what went wrong. I wanna know how to better cooperate with state and local government to be able to answer that very question that you asked are we capable of dealing with a severe attack or another severe storms, and that's a very important question. And it's in our national interest that we find out exactly what went on. And and. So that we can better respond and suddenly Lucy gets her funding. That proposal got funded in the first year that it was put through which was a shock to absolutely everyone. And then I got asked to lead the project for southern California. Oh, so that's the beginning that led to the shakeout. So Lucius symbols a crack team of scientists the necsports over three hundred people to dig into what it could all mean for southern California. Are most important word was plausible. We are not saying this is the earthquake. We are saying this is a plausible or quake if this happens. Nobody will be surprised. Forty five thousand people need to be saved. People will be trapped in elevators. There could be a hundred thousand landslides fifty billion dollars lost in economic activity by the end of the first week when reality sets in. That's when people start seriously drinking. Yes, they counted for that to some of what they found out shocks, even the experts like the fires. We all know that the really big earthquakes urban areas have caused lots of fires. But we we hire this guy. Charlie Scott, who's a professor at the university of Kyoto at that point to do the modeling and say what how many fires will be set off. How will they spread? And his result. Was that the fires double the losses that we causes much economic damage and kill as many people through super conflagrations that form as the fires sweep through the city, and it was really terrifying. And in fact, was so terrifying. One. The lead. Scientists was like can't be true. I don't believe this. This has has ridiculous. Can't be that extreme. And by the time. We got done the fire. Chiefs were saying if anything this is an underestimate. So we the the model is the fires are horrific in the mall, and we got to specify the weather for the shakeup. And we made it a cool comb day, if we have Santa Anna's when the quake actually hits it will be much worse than we mall. So. Do you think that this work will save lives? Yes. I sear -serily believe that what we've done with shakeout is has already led to enough changes that there are people who will not die in the earthquake. Because what we've done. There are buildings that are four thousand buildings already retrofitted in LA. The laws are being passed. Another cities the water systems being repaired, there's a whole different level of planning going on about water and all of those are gonna be reducing lives lost. But also reducing the economic distress, which is owned pain. A lot of people. Ten years after the shakeout report, plenty of the problems highlighted are still major problems sewage for example, five ten million gallons are expected to flood city streets every hour when pipes break the rest of it. We'll probably get sent into creeks. It's going to create a huge biohazard gaslines at might explode. The huge crater that might result. The shakeout report recommended we replace a bunch of the pipes. We haven't the dishes emergency responders. We need to fight the sixteen hundred fires that could break out. We still don't have enough. Do you think we're ready? Oh, no. We're not ready. I'm going to be doing this. The earthquake happens hopefully, live to see that. It's a we are much more ready than we were. But there's a lot more that still needs to be done. There is good news. A lot of the places we talked to including state, federal and local governments have deep comprehensive plans on how to respond. We know. What to do? We've just decided what our priorities are. We're going to dive much deeper into that later on our next episode. We're going to switch back to you our hero. You're gonna wake up to a world. That's not nearly as strong as you were led to believe and you're going to need help. After the credits. Three things you need to notice five. now for my favorite part of the show credits. Michel Yousef is our lead producer are when champion Knicks. Our executive producer. Mary Naf is our assistant producer making garbs editor are music by Andy, Clawson, our engineers. We've got a toy with those levels all day are Shawn Corey Campbell. Valentine rivera. Our work is by Stephanie craft. This episode was written and reported by me, shake goalless as well as our necks. Alex Laughlin handles all things marketing and thank you to Chaim Kim for his stash of forks, thanks to Lynn Sykes. And to the amoeba people for letting us use their Alfred Vagner song go check them out on Spotify. They have a ton of cool scienc- music. I'm your host Jacob Margolis. Hey, big one listener. It's me Nisha. You know, what time it is? When you hear my voice, it's time for some tips. And I know we talked about history and science this episode, but we are not gonna let you get away without some practical tips. So here goes number one. We created this amazing tool and by we I mean, our senior reporter Dana ama- here. She created this tool to show you where you are in relation to known faults. So scientists don't know about all the faults, and like Northridge, there might be some that we won't know about until an earthquake happens on them, but you can find out which ones you're close to number to use that same data tool to find out if you're in a liquefaction zone. Liquefaction sounds really scary. But it's not a literal sinkhole forming beneath your house, it's when the pave streets crack open because of strong, shaking and water starts to. Come up because of the soil. That's underneath your house, it won't necessarily cause a sinkhole or quicksand what you need to know is what kind of soil your house is located on. So find out using this tool if you're in a liquefaction zone, and then confirm with your landlord or look at records of your house. If you own your home number three make a little kit for your car. We've talked a lot about having supplies at home like water and food, but you may be in your car when the earthquake hits or you may need to leave and not have much time to pack things up. So in that case having a flashlight a pair of shoes, some extra food water and a printed out map can be extremely helpful. That's food too. Cbs?

earthquake California San Andreas Tanya atwater Alfred Vagner Caltech Los Angeles professor Dr Lucie Jones San Francisco P R E P KPCC Harvard Jacob Margolis KPCC dot Oregon Charlie Scott Santa Anna Thomas golden
Willem Dafoe's starry, starry turn as Vincent van Gogh

The Frame

16:31 min | 2 years ago

Willem Dafoe's starry, starry turn as Vincent van Gogh

"From the Mon broadcast center at KP. See this is the frame, I'm John horn. And thanks for joining us during our fall. Membership drive today on the show we have a conversation with actor will Afo. He's now starring in a new movie called at attorneys gape to folk plays Vincent Van Gogh toward the end of his life. The movie is directed and co written by the artist and filmmaker Julian Schnabel, and it's not all that interested in Van Gogh's mental health instead at attorneys gate is focused on Van Gogh's painting. How the Dutch artists all light and color and texture. It's also about Van Gogh's friendship with a French painter Paul Gauguin who's played in the film by Oscar Isaac when Willem Dafoe join me in the studio at KPCC early this week, I asked as I always do at the start of an interview if his mobile phone was turned off. I don't carry him for you. Congratulations radical. That's good. You can spend more time talking reading scene. Seen as opposed to looking looking at people. Yeah. Sounds like good training for playing a painter. Yes. I wanna ask you about Willem. Welcome to the show. I should welcome. Thanks. Sure. I wanna ask you about the shooting of this film. Because in watching it, I imagined there are a lot of early mornings and late evenings. Because the way that this. Film captures light is extrordinary. And I wonder what that was like on a given day because the light in this film is without equal. Right. I think that's well observed and light is important one of the first things I had to learn how to paint for this just practically and also as a key to the character. And the first thing I learned was concept of painting, the light, and then from in terms of the DP, and and Julian composing things nature was, you know, a big character in this. It kind of told us what to do it it it played a part in the shooting of this film, where did you shoot this film? And was it. Close to where Van Gogh painted close. It was all the places we really it was like a little roadmap of where he was. I mean, some places literally San Romy we weren't shooting in the very bad because that's like been turned into a museum. But that still functions as as a hospital part of it's a museum part of its hospital. But the trees the grounds then the same some of the landscapes, they're recognizable. You can almost approximate his perspective of where he painted. And then, of course, Paris and then over sir Woz where he's buried and where he was at toward the end of his life actors talk about how maybe putting on a pair of shoes or some piece of word robe or a prop helps them understand a character in this story. Did you start seeing the world differently? Do you start seeing it as a painter which isn't rely? On a prop or a piece of costume? Yes. It's it's related to an activity that you learn, you know, and I learned how to paint and Julian was very good and generous teacher he taught me how to see differently. And of course, I was eager to make that leap to see a new way. And it had a lot to do with white. And also had a lot to do with making marks and thinking of color talking to each other colored defined in relationship to each other. But the marks were very important because you really see when you're painting. A series of marks. They start talking to each other. And then they create something that you never could have supposed. I Van Gogh used to talk about great painting is not painting things as they are. But as you see them, which I thought is interesting when you are learning how to paint are you learning how to paint as Willem Dafoe who is then going to paint Aspen and go I'm I'm not making those distinctions. I mean, that's a perfectly good question. But I'm not that's that's getting that's going down a different road. I'm just trying to -ccomplish the task and the task is yes for Sam getting familiar with the materials, I'm learning how to show hold brush. I'm learning how where to organize my paints, but above all out look at things. I mean, I remember one day Julian we were out and he wanted me to paint a Cyprus tree. And I try to paint the Cyprus straight. And he was like, whoa. Whoa. Whoa. Whoa. Whoa. What look you see that dark spot. You see that yellow? He started pointing these things out to me. And I started see them. He's it. We'll do that something about you. You rush to get not the reality of it. But they almost like the signifier, you know, we're so trained to have to reproduce things or have things function. If we see a tree we wanna tree, but really what he was encouraging mid to do is see everything that that tree is it comes together in the form of a tree. But it's really. Shapes colors in light. And that's what you're dealing with. And when you start to think like that you start to look at everything differently. And of course, I'm not sustaining that all the time. But in the context of our scenarios and being Vincent Van Gogh in making this movie, you're encouraging that kind of thinking, and of course, the you're able to read his letters which are quite sincere and quite clear, and quite inspirational and with the physical practice of painting. Then you have a key into what he's talking about. And before you know, it you're talking and thinking in a way that you've never thought before. So who is that? That's Vincent Van Gogh. That's my Vincent Van Gogh. Does that happen in a moment you wake up one day? And you've you think you've got it. Isn't it a piffle or a process? Listen, I can only talk about that in retrospect, right because it's over. But in the middle of your in the middle of it. But you're also aided by the fact that you go to location. My wife wasn't with me. I was living like a monk. I was in the actual places in our it was brutal cold Lexcen. Yeah. Brutally cold. It's a whole world. You know, I'm leaving myself behind because I have very few things to support who I am normally one of the things that is noticeable about this film is that it feels observed and that the way that Ben wa del home shoots it, it's not only handheld, but it's very close. The camera looks like it's inches away from your face. It is what does that give you that intimacy? The fact that it feels that the camera is observing you as character and not just reciting dialogue could just walk into a field. I'm I'm feeling the camera. But I'm also forgetting the camera. It's with me. It's a part of me. I'm part of him. He's a part of me. We really. Got to a point. And I can say that about Julian too. We were all the same person. And you can't say that about all movies. But I felt like that was true in this. Coming up Willem Dafoe is less concerned with how Van Gogh died than with what he did while he was still alive. KABC podcast supporters include UCLA's center for the art of performance presenting L A's uncaring, celebrating twenty five years with this one time only evening of live comedy music and ever before seeing footage from the vault featuring deathly pitas. Julia swinging Janine Garoppolo Bob Odenkirk her Greg Barron, and Jill Solloway, mostly Maria Bamford, Julie Goldman Byron Bowers and surprise guests tickets at capita, UCLA dot EDU. Welcome back to the frame. I'm John horn. Thanks for joining us today. I'm talking with Willem Dafoe. He plays Vincent Van Gogh in the new movie at attorneys gave it was directed by the filmmaker and artist Julian Schnabel who also taught to fo- how to paint for the movie, unlike some other films about Van Gogh at attorneys gate isn't narrowly focused on the painters, mental health or lack of recognition of his artwork in his lifetime. Instead it explores his painting and how he saw the world in one scene Van Gogh is painting what would turn out to be one of his most famous portrait's. It's of his physician who treated him toward the end of his life. Dr Paul gush. Why do you pay? Parents. Fact to stop thinking. The of meditation. When I paint, I stopped thinking about what? Thinking. Feel. I'm a part of everything outside inside of me. When he says he he likes to paint because he stops thinking that's not sane thinkings bad. But a lot of his thinking is preoccupied with his failures with this social problems with his fear of his mental health. But when he's painting. He's connected to something. He's in movement. He finds what's attornal, and what's you know, temporal. And that is something that I relate to as a performer when you're doing a gesture, and you're not thinking what the gesture means or whether you're doing well, you're really inhabiting. The gesture that's when you're alive, you disappear into something greater than yourself so much modern understanding Van Gogh is kind of drawn along capitalistic lines. He didn't sell a painting when he was alive. He wasn't considered as excess because he didn't sell anything. And there's a great moment in the film where Van Gogh was talking to a. Priest played by Mads Mikkelsen. And he says God may be a painter for people who aren't born yet. The beautiful line. But it's also about the artist judging himself Van Gogh knows he's a good painter. I mean Gauguin tells them the same he knows he's good. He has his doubts. But he knows he has some e feels this vision that he wants to share and he's prolific. He's painting so much. He's connected. And that's not our invention. I mean, that's he painted a painting day toward the end of his life pretty much and also his letters show. How connected he was. So even if he wasn't getting money, even if he wasn't being recognized was there a satisfaction. As an artist that he was getting that may be an actor can understand. Do you start thinking about how we judge our own work as artists today against false metrics box office and awards while you don't because you know, you know, that things shift and in a similar way, we know even in my lifetime are movies that were total. Duds when they came out that have stood the test of time and had I've become important and appreciated later, and the the opposite is true as well things that we're huge success fade. You know, because it's always a convergence of many things that. Conspired to put value on on something as subjective as an entertainment or a piece of art. So is there a early sunflowers in your rear, the painting that nobody wanted to buy and you look why didn't people like that? It was really good work. I mean seriously performance that people like maybe they didn't pay attention to like that was one of my better paintings. But I don't have those kinds of judgments, but I do know listen for the experience there's movies that I enjoy that. I feel like they didn't get their Dane court or they weren't they weren't appreciated and there's other movies where I think and people love them. So good. Yeah. So it's not like I don't have opinions. I do and it's not like I don't have favorites. But I don't I don't lay them because I don't learn anything from those kind of judgment because I'm always trying to think about what I'm doing. And yes yourself critical but not self critical in intimidating the reception yourself critical in what is happening. How present you are how engaged you are whether you're distracted whether you're being corrupted. You know, I'm forever mindful of corruption, you know, I've seen it many times some actors get better some actors get worse, and they get worse because of certain corruptions, and how do you guard against that? Sit yourself down and slap yourself. I don't know just be. There's not a moral judgment. And in when I even hear myself talk. Now when I say batter where it's his I feel a little ridiculous. But I think it's a it's a personality thing, you know, you go to the sweet spot you go to the spot where you feel helpful or useful or turned on. Or you're part of you know, it's not. It's not a game of doing this to get that. It's doing this to do this. That's what I try to keep returning to one of the things that this film seems very intentional about as it ends is not giving the audience, easy answers. This is going to be a mystery. And it does feel that the point of view of this movie is that Van Gogh was really alive and wanted to continue to be alive and wanted to continue to paint. Yes. I think that's true. Whether that's fact who knows? You know, certain events of his life are debatable history does ally. It depends who's writing right? We know that but toward the end of his life. It's generally considered a suicide, but there's evidence that maybe he wasn't. And there are many curious things, including the fact that he started to be recognized. He wrote a very upbeat letter to his brother the day that he was shot or shot himself, depending on your point of view. All that's in the mix. But in a funny way, that's not what the movie's about because the guy died. That's what's essential. And it really doesn't matter in a funny way. At least to me, I can only speak for myself. I guess doesn't matter so much how he died this movie deals more with. His painting and his approach to life and work. Okay. Willem Dafoe plays. Vincent Van Gogh in the new movie at attorneys gate. It opens in theaters on November sixteenth. That's it for the frame for today. You can subscribe to the frame podcast wherever you like to listen can also find some of our stories on Elliot's. That's L A I S T dot com of John Horne. Thanks for listening and thank you for supporting KPCC during our fall membership drive. I'll see you tomorrow.

Vincent Van Gogh Willem Dafoe Julian Schnabel Vincent Van Gogh John horn Paul Gauguin Mon KPCC KPCC Oscar Isaac Mads Mikkelsen San Romy Sam Paris John Horne sir Woz Dr Paul gush Elliot UCLA
Weekly Wrap: TikTok, Climate Change & Fyre Fest

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

36:11 min | 2 years ago

Weekly Wrap: TikTok, Climate Change & Fyre Fest

"This message comes from NPR sponsor. Comcast business. Business has always been driven by innovators. That's why Comcast business is helping you with technology that provides better experiences. Comcast business beyond fast. Actual speeds. Vary and are not guaranteed. Hey, y'all. This is not daddy. Just we on the show from southern California Public radio host of the big one. Jason my goal is and NPR reporter the nessa Romo. All right. Let's not. Uh-huh. From NPR. I'm Sam Sanders. It's been a minute happy weekend. Welcome welcome to my guest Vanessa Romo. Breaking news reporter for NPR to Jake Margolis, my friend in science reporter for KPCC here in LA and especial special guest. Jarrell? Oh, josh. How are we feeling about John right now, I always feel love for job? But he's having a week. I is song. It is a classic. But I'm really in love with called living it up. I am talking about this week. And I've talked about job on the show before because of the catastrophic fire festival, and we know what this is at this point. This was the social media influence for music festival that was supposed to bring big name artists to the Caribbean. But it was one big scam. And so these people that were promised like villas by the ocean showed up to like disaster tents the cheese sandwiches. Yes, they had g sandwich when they got there. It wasn't even a sandwich. Slapped on top of dry bread. Yes. Saddest looking picture ever joh- is involved in this because he was one of the founders of the fire festival along with Billy McFarland. The scammer who was really minded who is now in prison, but Jarrell was promoting it hyping it and these two documentaries came out in the last few weeks about the fire festival, and how it failed one from Netflix, Hulu, and they both paint a picture of a job rule who knew exactly what was going on. And didn't stop at the end of it heat when he says, it's not fraud. We just advertising I said, oh, it's not fraud is just false advertising. And then he was like, it's okay, we're going to build through this buyer festival live on you're like, no. We gotta move forward. I haven't seen them yet. But I followed the fire festival live as it was happening and train this shot and Freud of their. Yes, Lada shot him until you get to the actual people people. Who were fronting money to do the food services and construction for this thing, I've seen months bath up. Yes. Go fund me now to help those people get their money back. They've raised their goal. But big thing about this Giro for months said it wasn't my fault. It wasn't my fault. It wasn't my fault. These documentaries paint a different picture. He responded in a tweet this week and said, and it's luckily, quote, ready. I was hustled scammed bamboozles hoodwinked lettuce stray someone got up this RS for Christmas. Poor job. On that note. We're going to talk about some other news of this week as we always do going to have each of my guest described their week of news. And only three words veteran of the show. But NASA Romo, you know. How this goes you go. I all right. So my three words are normalized fatigued whatevs? So all of us all the time all of us all the time. So these are not they're not using. I'm not saying these words as statements, but they're all kind of questions, and there are all sorts of questions that I've asked myself this week, normalized, fatigued, whatever. Okay. So on Tuesday, the supreme court issued a ruling that essentially opens up the possibility for the Trump administration to finally administer the transgender ban in the military. Right. So on Tuesday the supreme court decision. Basically lifts these injunctions that have been preventing the banned from being implemented across the country throughout the military. And so it's not. Not a decision on the legality of the ban. It's not a decision about whether or not it's going to stay in place permanently. It just says that four now the Trump administration and the Pentagon can if they so choose begin to implement the policy. There's a wrinkle right because the Pentagon said I'm Wednesday that a fourth national injunction from case in Maryland district court remains in effect, right? So there's still confusion about it's still massive confusion about this. And the DOD actually also hasn't said or the Pentagon hasn't said, yes, we're going to go ahead and implement this. Right. It's still pretty there isn't very much clarity about this. And so like the big takeaway with this. It's like this is yet another Trump policy initiative in which there's a big proclamation of big announcement. And then more than a year later, we still don't know if it's happening or what's actually happening. Yeah. And there doesn't seem to be the same sort of public movement. It hasn't. It hasn't prompted like the same outcry and outrage that the initial announcement had. Made right which brings me to my three words is it that it all seems kind of normal. We've been living with the idea of transgender ban now for since two thousand seventeen so for some time. So a new headline about it doesn't seem as shocking or is it that were so fatigued, right? Is it just like there's so much going on? I think what's so weird about not so weird. But like what is a pattern with Donald Trump in these major policy pushes is that on big issue after biggish after big issue his pattern is he makes a big announcement. And then a year later or more than that. It's still in limbo. I'm talking about DACA. Yep. This is the deferred action for childhood arrivals program for immigrants who come to this country as children, I'm talking about Trump's travel ban. I'm even talking about the Paris agreement. You know, Trump announced that he was leaving the Paris climate accord, if you read the fine print, we can't actually leave it until November fourth twenty twenty that is a day after the twenty twenty election. Yeah. But we're going to be dealing with a lot of the the implication of a lot of these decisions possibly far down the line, especially when it comes to climate change, especially when it comes to this agreement. And it'll be interesting to see what happens as we reach that deadline. I'm really curious to see if because who can actually who can actually stop it at that point. It's a lot. I don't envy your job. Breaking news reporter, Vanessa realm. All right. Jake margolis. Do you have three words? Also before you start gotta say I've been binging. Your earthquake podcast. The big one all about how we're not ready for the big quake and its scared. The living Jesus outta me. Every time that I listened to it. My follow up question that first off. Thank you. But of question is do you have earthquakes supplies. I had my birkenstocks next to my bed last night. That is really important because you don't wanna to run over glass that's common injuries. So my three words it's a phrase, I'm gonna say people can change. I wanted it to be optimistic because I've this place of disaster and sadness as science reporter. Yeah. All the time. And the reason I say that is because there's a new survey out came from Yale and George Mason University. And it says that sixty nine percent of Americans are worried about global warming. And there's some other really surprising increases in people being more concerned about. This. So fifty six percent said their family will be hurt by global warming. That is huge because people are starting to apply it to themselves. Forty nine percent believe they'll be personally harmed by global warming. That's a seven percent increase since March. What's so, I don't know California's been on fire an entire town paradise. You know, obviously was lost in the campfire. People's lives were destroyed many people died, and that's been something that's repeated year after year after year. In addition to that, you've had really really awful hurricanes that have been just slamming Florida in the south again, and again, and again in the Gulf, and that, you know, warming oceans are also tied to climate change. Well, I've also noticed the difference in the way the media talks about climate change. I think there was a longtime in which if there was a discussion like on cable news about it there'd be someone who believes in climate change. And then someone who doesn't I I was thinking about that that's stopped. Now. It's just people who say this is real. I mean, talking to all of these different scientists who obviously for years and years or. Our floating all these different scenarios of what things are going to look like in the next fifty years. You know, they were never giving me when I was interviewing them, you know, the both sides ISM on this issue. You know, they said something is going to happen. We don't know how bad it's going to be. But something is happening. We are you know, things that we are doing are impacting this, and I feel like people are finally coming to grips with that. Okay. But so there is there is increasing concern, right? Where more more people are concerned about this very real pressing issue. But what does that mean? I mean, are they? Yeah. Like, I think I might have mold in my garage. But I'm not sure, and I just don't go in there. There is this kind of reality, especially I mean, like you get to this in your earthquake podcasts like people can know disaster is imminent. It doesn't mean that they changed the behavior. It doesn't mean that they changed their world do right? It's a lot to grapple with fear actually doesn't motivate people. So you can give them specific things. Like if you give them a vague thing. Like an earthquake is going to happen sometime in the next thirty years people won't prepare. If you say this earthquake will happen next week. And if you don't prepare x, y and z is going to happen. They are much more likely to go ahead, but it's harder to do that with a thing like climate change. It is X Phil kind of nebulous. You don't know exactly win. What's gonna hit? And we need we to make a change in to make a difference on a grand scale as laid out by the UN, and the US government, we need to have huge institutional change, we need to be able to institute certain laws that regulate certain things you can debate. How stringent they should be. But I'm not mystic about that aspect of it. Okay. Sorry. I started. Sorry. He can change though will the entire system change probably not through words for that. One time will tell. I'm gonna give you three words. Now can do that please. Okay. They are fake, but real and I'm talking this week about the race story that captivated the nation, or at least the news media. This story of these Covington Catholic high school students who were at the March for life in DC who got into a confrontation of sorts with an elder who is there for the ended in his people's marked. Which was also the same day. I'm sure you've seen the video by now. It's it's something, you know, there is this an eight of American elder beating a tribal drum, and he's circled by these white high school students, many of whom are wearing make America, great again hats, and there's one student in particular who's just in his face kind of smirking. And so I say fake, but real because a lot of people said, you know, while the original video. Was fake other folks found out that the first video that came out? It was tweeted by what start to be about account. So the same. Well, this story is fake to which I say it is very real. When I see the way that this young privileged white teenager from a private high school is treated by the media and up on the today show compare that with the way a black teenager caught up in a new cycle might be treated. I also think that we glommed onto these race stories that are big and these flashpoints, but they aren't really the actual race stories that we should care about. I've been fascinated all week with what in my mind is a bigger story of race and class in privilege, and that is the L A teacher strike, you know, there was a six day strike in Los Angeles that just ended public school teachers across the city strike for more wages, more, nurses, more staffing out in the rain for counselors. Yeah. And like LA public schools teach mostly Brown and black children and like. The biggest race story of our time is the way that our schools are- segregated and white kids like the Covington high kids end up in private schools with a lot of the resources they need and black and Brown students end up in schools where teachers have to strike just to get a nurse in the school five days. A week. I came up in L E S D schools, and I have to I went to several different schools in different areas and the disparity between the different schools and the different programs was stark. Yeah. Well, and I just feel like I'm guilty in at fault as well. I was caught up in this Covington story all week. I was obsessed with it. I was angry about it. And like something about social media and the internet. It has a way of dangling these flashy things in front of us to distract us from some of the real stuff. And so I don't know the way forward, but I do know that like a week of this Covent and stuff to sleeves me feeling dismal. Anyway that was. Heavy you guys we all brought them. Heavy news this week, but such is life. I promise you when we return we're gonna talk about something, much, more light and fun. The newest buzzy is social media app of the kids tick tock. Jacob. You're listening to it's been a minute from NPR the show where we kept up on the week that was going to go to break. We'll be right back. Support for this NPR podcast and the following message. Come from Sony Pictures classics presenting stand in Ali, Steve Coogan, and John C Reilly star as laurel and hardy one of the most famous comedy teams of all time with their heyday is Hollywood stars behind them. They embarked on a comeback tour through England in their later years and face an uncertain future. Both personally and professionally directed by John s Bayard, STAN and Ollie is now playing in theaters everywhere. Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from hinge hinge is the dating app that's designed to be deleted. It's for people who want to get off dating apps show off your personality with icebreaker prompts and see who likes you. So you can easily start a conversation on hinge three out of four first dates lead to second dates, and they're the number one dating app mentioned in the New York Times wedding section download hinge in the apple store or Google play. Hey, it's Peter Segal from wait. Wait, don't tell me if you're a normal. Wait, wait, listen, and you shout out the answers to all the questions, and then you get frustrated that no one can tell how smart you are. Here's the solution. Wait, wait quiz vailable. Now on your smart speaker, just ask your smart speaker to open the wait, wait quiz. Finally, your genius Shelby recognized. We are back. You're listening to it's been a minute from NPR the show where we catch up on the week. That was I'm Sam Sanders here with two guests Vanessa Romo. Breaking news reporter for NPR news and Jacob Margolis science reporter for KPCC in host of their earthquake podcast called the big one. There's this moment in the podcast where y'all breakdown how earthquakes feel differently based on their strength and based on their number on the Richter scale. Yeah in you, explain it with like the violin. It's a veal dicamba. The reason I'm that specific is because Dr seismologist, Dr Lucie Jones who is in the podcasts who's kind of the Queen of quakes here in Los Angeles. Yes, she plays the viola Gomba, she composes her own works of art. And she actually played that for us in there to illustrate the different size. So the magnitude to. Magnitude four. And then a magnitude seven point eight. It was. So that was a remarkable moment in the podcast for sure. So all right. I'm I want us to talk about things that aren't earthquakes and sad stories. And how everything is weird. I wanna talk about this social media app called tick tock by the you've heard of tic TAC. Yes, I've been watching a ton of compilation videos since I knew we were going to be talking about this. Yeah. Weird. Right. Like, it is this kind of think of a lip sync app. But with a lot more and a lot of video editing features. Anyways, I bring up tick tock because it is going to be the topic of a new segment that we're trying out for the very first time. It is called drum roll. Yeah. Thank you. I have so many questions. Out with this thing. That is an amazing. Org. Using Sprint's surprise twilight zone. I'm ready for this segment. Brin says it's mysterious down to music because we're solving mysteries. Here this week. We're going to solve the mystery of tick tock, we put a call at to our listeners last week say in what in the culture, confuses you. We heard from a lot of people with a lot of different questions. Here's a little sampling. Have so many questions about the show you when did woke become a thing. Why are we all so into stickers? We got a lot of questions and the one that was the easiest to Manny was tick tock. So I'm going to try right now to explain tick tock to a listener named Sarah from Lubbock, Texas, Sarah Rodas and said, quote, I'm very confused by tick tock, I'm only twenty five but the at makes me feel super out of touch with. What is considered funny right now, actually, so I'm thirty but I have a kid now and. I thought I was just really out of it. But you know, what I watched a an Australian Broadcasting video new story about sock. And I actually realized I had seen tick tock, but didn't know that. Anyway, in that in that news story, they said the most users most people downloading the app are twenty four and under so, Sarah. It's okay or just as down east. So because I don't know everything and tick that worries me as well ahead to get some help to explain this. So I called up a journalist who covers a ton of his stuff. Her name is Taylor. Lauren's. She's a staff writer at the Atlantic covering internet culture. She said first of all you have to know tick tock is more than just a lip sync app. The basic interface is basically you can choose a song or a sound. And then record a video of yourself while the music plays which allows you to kind of lip sync over a song people use it a lot for that. But Taylor says it's more than that. Because tick tock has a bunch of really intense video editing tools. You can just do more. Yeah. You can record a Snapchat. Video of yourself for video on Instagram and put a funny face helter, put some stickers ticks Huck takes that like times a million like when you see a tick tock, it's like ten different versions of emojis and weird video effects in it stopping and starting and like you feel like you're on acid. Like crazy like you can make these works of art on tick tie anyway that you never could do with vine or with Instagram Snapchat. I will argue that tick tock, although I'm sure there are awful things on there is one of the is sums up when the best things that the internet has to offer which is weird ironic things that people kind of all gather around and it took me back to the early two thousands. When I was sitting on forums. And talking about weird stuff and sharing your images. And this is that on steroids so backstory on tick tock, the company it's actually a Chinese company a Chinese app, this big Chinese tech company called bite dance owns tick tock. This company's worth like seventy five billion dollars a big deal. There's also a Chinese version of tic toc in China as well. But so on top of like tick top coming from a place that we might not think as ordinary for news source me to have to come out of the user ship of tick tock is actually not what we think it might be also. So there's this perception that the kids are on the tick tock kids are on the tick, and they are but Taylor ends at the Atlantic. She told me that like it's not just kids that uses thing, it's not just young people. It's like people all over there's a huge amount of people that are like service industry professionals. So it's really popular with nurses. Firefighters police departments a lot of people in the army doing baby shark videos. It's it's basically like anyone that has tons of time to kill. It's so interesting because if you dig hard enough, there's a lot of military personnel on bases doing tick tock as they're just like on shift killing time are their location services on and they're giving away cash. Okay. Yeah. Yeah. So like, it is just like the further you dig into tick tock the more layers at has. And it's a really interesting story on so many levels. I mean on top of that going back to China bike, you'll notice that like tick tock as an app fills very non-political like because you make the videos in you're just lip synching over a song. You really can't rant about politics. And the way that you could on like, I don't know some other platform, that's by design is this your way of telling us Sam Sanders that you're your bell to what do you launch a tick tock? The are we going to do a tic TAC? Are you is this your way of telling us tick tock, I'm scared? I will say to our listeners thinking about doing tick tock, I asked Taylor Laurenz to give some advice for them. She has some really nice advice. Yes, you should get onto talking media and just start making videos. I mean, part of the reason tick tock is so endearing and people stick talks are so great is because they're so cringely. So it's like I do videos on there are going to be like. Probably pretty crazy. But that's what's going to make it amazing. And so she says like onto tot for whatever reason everyone lanes into the weirdness of it and leans into the cringing of it. You can search on YouTube for like, most cringes tick, tock, videos, and people are into it. They like it. It's supposed to be weird. So wait, lame dads are welcome on tick tock. I promise before we leave the studio we're gonna make a cringe tick dot, I don't know what's long we'll use. I don't know how to edit it. We started this journey with Joe ruble into with him to. Yes. So that's it. Sarah, thanks for asking us about tick tock. Hope we explained it kind of. Okay. Taylor ends of the Atlantic. Thanks for your help Jacob Vanessa. Thanks for your health listeners. Keep sending us your questions about things in the culture that make you scratch your head. We'll do our best to explain can Email the show, Sam Sanders, NPR dot ORG. Sam Sanders at NPR dot org. Also, if there are any tick, tock users listening cinders your favorite tic TACs. I want to see him. I don't know how you share a tick. I don't know put it in an envelope and mail. Ben extra ticks to the office. Thanks, guys. All right. It's time for a break when we come back my favorite game who said that. Support for this podcast comes from the William T grant foundation at W T. Grant foundation dot org. Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from better health. Better health offers licensed professional counselors, who specialize in issues such as depression stress, anxiety and more connect with your professional counselor in a safe and private online environments and your convenience get help at your own time and your own pace schedule secure video or phone sessions plus chat and text with your therapist. Visit better help dot com slash NPR. To learn more and get ten percent off your first month before you can start your day you like to know what's happening in the news dots. What up I is four. It's the morning news podcast from NPR. The news you need to take on the day. And just about ten minutes. Listen to up first on the NPR one app or wherever you get your pockets. You're listening to it's been a minute from NPR the show where we catch up on the week. That was I'm Sam Sanders here with two guests Vanessa Romo. Breaking news reporter for NPR covering just about everything currently in studio with a perfectly tied scarf. It's hard to get a scarf to fall that delicately opposed to rise to about eighty degrees today. It was in the fifth. It was also here. Jake Margolis science reporter at KPCC in host of one of their newest podcast called the big one all about the big quake that could hit. So Cal right now. The legitimately any. Could happen. I wanted to strap from that. So we're gonna play a game right now. My favorite game. It is called who said that. You both know at this point how the game is very simple. I share a quote from the week you both have to guess who said that or at least get the story. I'm referring to the winner as you know. It's absolutely nothing except bragging rights which is perfect because I stink at this game zero for however, many times, I just get a tick talk with you. If I win. Cringely tick tock Yesler will ready for the first quote. Yes, I almost feel like that thing you call a whale is a cry or a prayer for freedom. I'm ready to get out of the shallow who said that. Can you give us any hint? It's. It's about an award show nomination that someone got this week for a certain song. That contains a word shallow. I mean. So sorry, lady Gaga, lady Gaga embarrassed. Oscar nominations for her work in a star is born this week won for best. Actress and won for best song for her song. Shallow, which she and Bradley Cooper sing in the movie, the song has become like this co classic since the film came out in large part because of wail kind of in the middle of the song. So it's a typical ballot. But then halfway through lady guy that does this. I have an affinity for lady Gaga. I just I tower. Power of her voice. And I mean, yeah, is it like the dean scream a little? Now, I'm imagining Howard Dean singing sallow. Next, quote, you ready? On behalf of the people of Louisiana and warlords saints fans all across the country. I am writing to you to express our deep disappointment with the outcome of the NFC championship game on Sunday. Who said that was it the the head of the referees. Someone even bigger even bigger Tom Brady. No a government official. Oh my gosh. What does the statewide office a title governor? Yes. Governor of Louisiana governor of Louisiana sent an official complaint to the NFL this week, Louisiana. Governor John Bel Edwards? Democrat of Louisiana issued a formal complaint to the NFL over. No, call by referees in Sunday's game between the New Orleans Saints in the LA Rams saints fan say that no call kept the saints out of the Super Bowl and that it was unfair. It's gotten so bad a few New Orleans. Saints fans have filed a lawsuit against the NFL or their money back. What do they want they want? Vindication. They want him to replay the game. What's that? All right. That was I think though, we have more quote, okay? One more chance. One more chance to tie with one point for. Ready for the last quote here? It is. I totally get why any girl would do it. But when guys do it I go, clearly, they're not scraps. If they were scrubs, they wouldn't sing the song with this type of confidence who said that. I don't know. But is it about weezer? Yes. Both enough. You got. Yes. This is like the football game. Where like the team that wins is this is like a three to zero football game with. No. But this is like you also brought in the high school football team to play against. A college team. I am the high school maybe p so weezer is in the news this week. And this quote is a member of TLC the arm be group reacting to a weezer cover of their song. No, scrubs. We all know that we kind of had a really great run last year off of their cover of the eighties. Classic africa. It was one of the top ten rock songs of the year. According to billboard riding that wave weezer this week release an entire album of covers one of which is a cover of TLC's classic. No, scrubs. So TLC heard it, and then TLC member Chile said I like this. I want to perform it with you either. Here's more of their cover. This. From. I've heard bettering karaoke bars. I'm fine with it. Having said that Pinkerton remains one of my like all time favorite albums. It's as I love it. It's still on constant rotation which. Say it ain't. So that's the first album the blue album say it ain't. So was a perfect rock song that album also completely holds up for me. No. No. You know, what we're we're talking. We're reminiscing about the early to the one thing, I do not miss is the music along with the fashion. Comeback the fashion. Newsflash bootleg genes are coming back in style. Back both of them. According to the New York Times fashion people. Well, there's a thing the same New York Times it wants me to put peas in my guacamole. They can go kick rocks. That's where they lost you. Yes. That's where they lasted me Vanessa Romo. You won the game. I thank you so much. Thank everyone who helped me get where I am today. Oscar except all right. That concludes who said that now it's time to end the show as we do every week. We ask our listeners to share with us. The best thing that happened to them all week. We encourage folks to brag Brent hit the tape. I Sam this is Katie in LA the best part of my week was finally being back with my students in my classroom after week in a day-long teachers strike, my special education preschool students were so happy in excited to be back at school. I hope you had a lovely week. Also, thanks, I Sam this is Tiffany from Idaho. In the best thing that happened to me this week was going is fishing with my dad, and my husband and my two kids. The best thing about my week was seeing a dear friend of mine and her husband and baby girl. The best thing that happened to me this. Week is that I won best in show in a local photography contest. Hey sam. It's Josh from Dallas, Texas, the best part of our week as my husband adamant, I or celebrating one month since welcome in the new baby girl Cameron into our lives. Hey Sam this is Brian from Hanover, Pennsylvania. The best thing that happened to me. This week was I talked my first improv class in an effort to bring my favorite thing to the small town that I love. This is Katie Alison and Elena, and we're from Chicago, Illinois, the best part of our week is that we're on a girls begin to galena, Illinois. We're sitting by the fire relaxing with yoga and facemasks after day of cross country skiing by. Hey, Sam best thing that happened to me all week has to do with a guy who for most of the past year has been standing on the bridge. That's on my way to work with a handwritten carport sign asking for help while he was going through a hard time and this morning. I saw him out there in the pouring rain holding a different sign, and it says my last week out here. I got a job. Thank you to everyone who has helped me during this hard time. Come congratulations an ethical by. And he said, you have no idea how hard it is to climb out of this situation while you're in it, and it's true. I have no idea and a lot of us have no idea, and that is the best part of me week. Thanks for everything have a good week. Oh my goodness. Thanks to all the voices. You heard there. Katie Tiffany, Sarah, Amy, Josh, Brian, Katie, Alison and Elena on their girls weekend, which sounds fun and Talia who is a very special friend of the show. Tyler who you heard last her full name was Talia Schlesinger and she hosts NPR's world cafe. Yeah. So thank you for tonight and Talia and thank you for your show. I'm ready to go into the weekend. Now that was really nice nice listeners. Also, sinned. More of these best things to Sam Sanders at NPR dot ORG record, the sound of your voice, send it to Sam Sanders at NPR dot ORG. We're going to go out on job rule was having quite the week because two documentaries on Netflix. Hulu say that he knew about the disaster that was a fire fest and did nothing I'm still rooting for him. I'm gonna stay. What's? He was the soundtrack to my high school. There's no way. I mean, you know, I love the to use the word bamboozled because it is one of my favorite words. But no, thank you not buying. Thanks to my guests. This week Vanessa Romo. Breaking news reporter for NPR. Jacob Margolis science reporter at KABC in post of their new earthquake podcast called the big one your survival guide this week the show was produced by Brent Bachman and Angelique Sassari with help from Geneva west the show was engineered this week by our friend Marquette Caldwell who as we prepared for the show was planned for us. Now, that's what I come us. Fifty fifty nine was Steve Nelson is director of programming. Our editor is ROY Donna Hopman this week we had editing help from NPR science desk editor Jeff from fill. Our big boss is NPR senior VP of programming on you run men listeners refresher fee Tuesday morning for my chat with the one. The only Titus Burgess. I talked with he's great. Superfund a lot of you know, him from his work on the network show. Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt that show was back with its final season on that right now check for that Tuesday also listeners if you like the show don't just put a ring on it reviews show us some love go to apple podcasts hit that review thing. Will appreciate it. All right till next time. Thank you all for listening. I'm Sam Sanders. Toxin I love I don't care. I don't care if your keep your keep your job.

NPR Sam Sanders reporter Vanessa Romo Los Angeles Jake Margolis Sarah Rodas KPCC California NPR Governor John Bel Edwards Netflix New York Times Taylor Laurenz Comcast fraud Caribbean
The 1A Movie Club Watches 'Quarantine Horror'

1A

35:03 min | 4 months ago

The 1A Movie Club Watches 'Quarantine Horror'

"Now, our feature presentation. This is one a gen widen Washington. Love it or hate it zoom has become a huge part of the way. We stay connected these days from work meetings to dance parties with friends and even virtual seances. Playing out. Sorry sorry. Seven, I'm. I really don't want do you'll see. The woman is a friend of mine. So she's done it a bunch of times remain. She'll kind of guy everybody through it kind of just have to follow her instructions. Please she is a friend of mine's not that I don't think you would please take it seriously though be respectful. That's a scene from host new horror film shot entirely on zoom. It's about a group of friends who get together virtually and summon a spirit during quarantine and yeah, it's not a great idea. I watched over the weekend with a friend and I was terrified we're going to check in now with rob savage the director of the film it's available on the horror streaming shot sight shudder rob savage welcome to the program. Hey, thanks for having me. So for people who haven't seen the film, Give us a brief synopsis. We'll let you say it's a bunch of friends during lockdown here in the UK who like all of us they're doing zoom happy hours and quizzes and Netflix's parties, and they get bored of that. So they decide to do the next logical thing which is to hire a medium to perform at. Johns and One of them doesn't take particularly seriously and ends up unleashing a nasty spirit on them. So. It's a movie that we shot during the lockdown over here in London. Without any of US leaving our houses, we did all remotely. I wouldn't listen to another clip from the film and this is when things really start to escalate during the odds. Cool back now. She's not thinking. What do we do we do? Is a second I know what to? Do the rope thing and you have. To. The Gym. For one second. Imagine a rope. Imagine the rope around your waist broke your waist. Okay. I'm sorry we confused repeat after me. I'm sorry, we confused you. Imagine the rope to your door. Just cut the rope. So I just want to mention for this meeting of the movie club. We're going to review host a little late later and talk more about this emerging genre of quarantine horror. But just so you know we're going to discuss the film in full spoilers in also you have been warned you know rob it was interesting. You shared interviews that the inspiration for this film came from Zoom Prank you played on your friends during quarantine tell us about that. It was an interesting one. I basically advice everyone who we made the film with their all the people I was hanging out with zoom anyway. We you know we were hanging out doing quizzes and stuff like everybody and. An I genuinely been hearing strange noises from my attic and I hadn't checked them out and then suddenly lockdown happened and I was stuck in this flat on my own with these strange footstep sounds from my antics. An axe murderer living above me? So I decided to go and check it out. Unfortunately there wasn't anyone there. But I looked up in my attic and it was really creepy. So I thought okay I can probably prank my friends with this. So I pretended that I had an investigated I got the mall on Zoom for emotional support but little did they know I figured out a way to to go from streaming live zoom footage to something prerecorded I played them a clip from a movie where somebody goes up into the attic an Zombie jumps out to them. So for a second, they thought that is the child to. An eating my face off and they reacted like you'd expect they almost called the police and scream their heads off. So I filmed that cut it together as a little funny prank and put that on twitter and ended up kind of kind of blowing up and becoming this little viral thing. and. It was really off the back of that we started getting interest for a longer a longer feature a fictional feature, but using zoom is the kind of main interface. Now, I have to say I went and found that. That frank you plan on your friend I'm shocked. You're still friends because I would have cut off all ties with you. Toy It was. I had to give the movie roles or else they would never again it was terrified. The film has a lot of supernatural elements because of the virtual seance. It's also this meditation on loneliness and isolation how technology can give us this artificial sense of togetherness. What were you hoping to convey their? That's exactly it I mean we were very conscious of we didn't want to make a pandemic movie. We wanted to make a movie about lockdown on the frustrations of lockdown and I think. One of the things. The characters are always saying throughout the movie when when. deferens are going through these these terrifying ordeals they're saying, you know we're here we're here with you, but they're not and I think part of the. The fear we're trying to tap into this idea that. Video conferencing gives you the impression that you're that you're interacting with people you know socializing with people but really really not really really on your own and I think anyone who's ever gone bad connection on soon and suddenly have the call cutout and just being left on your own staring at your blind computers grade you suddenly get in that sense of. Of Isolation and we really wanted to kind of play into that and We knew that we wanted to get this movie out while people were still in lockdown still feel. Feeling, these these things in still basically in the same situation, the characters we'll talk about the actual filming of hosts especially given that we're gonNA pandemic and and a lot of the standard production practices are off the table. Yeah I mean. This was made. In June. So during the height of the lockdown over here in the UK, in London and. None of us were allowed to leave the house pretty much halfway through the production it kind of east up a little bit. So we were able for a couple of the big stunt scenes. We were able to get fully. Stunt. Stunt coordinators into the houses to kind of oversee a couple of things from a distance but. Basically the whole filming process took place with us all in our individual homes over soon with the actors doing everything themselves doing their makeup during their lighting during the camera. And? We we just had to figure out a way around it and it was it was a real kind of it was a real kind of learning curve but also the great thing about it was everyone in the industry was furloughed everyone was sitting at home. So anyone with an Internet connection could suddenly come and help out and be part of the movie. So it was really it was really going to taking this restriction and turning it into an opportunity. Do you think It was such a specific set of circumstances in which to create this film into come up with the idea for this film I mean, do you think there's any possibility host would exist if? It wasn't happening during pandemic. I mean I think I think it would be a perfectly fine fun horror movie without that context but I think. The thing that we really wanted to tap into is that is that you know. For. The first time in history and hopefully the last time we're all kind of living shed reality. You know it's very weird you on the street and you you pass somebody by and you make sure you're keeping your two meters and you just know that they're thinking exactly the same thing that you are. They've got exactly the same worries as you and it's this amazing time when we're all feeling the same anxieties and being able to tap into that was something we really wanted to. We wanted to do with the movie and wanted to get this movie out. That was still relevant and we roll feeling those things. So it's A good opportunity to tap into what we're all feeling. Well, Bryan tweets host was the most frightfully enjoyable fifty six minutes I've experienced longtime. It's available to stream on shutter which I highly recommend to horror fans. This is not a long film I. Mean It's it's roughly the length of this zoom calls I'm doing free week with family and friends. Would that intentional? Yeah. Yeah. That was it that we thought that it would be really funny if you're getting attacked by a demon and. Presume call cutout. So we kind of we kind of worked with that as a jumping off point we went a little over forty minutes we. came out of fifty six. It was really lovely to be able to just let the movie be the length that it wanted to be an avid dispute this this fund short sharp. Kind of. Roller. Coaster ride, we're talking with rob savage the director of the film host, which is available on the horror streaming site. Shudder coming up we'll review the film with our movie club Panel and talk about this emerging genre of quarantine horror. I'm JEN white you're listening to one eight from WWLTV AMU and NPR? Support for one day and the following message come from indeed indeed is here to help when small businesses have to be more efficient than ever and every higher is critical. Indeed, DOT COM is the number one job site in the world because they get you the best people fast you only pay for what you need can pause your account at any time, and there are no long term contracts try indeed out with a free seventy, five dollars credit at indeed dot com slash one day terms and conditions apply offer valid through September thirtieth. Do you talk about the news with your friends, your family or maybe perfect strangers. You can get all the facts you need to be up to speed on this busy news cycle on the one, A. News Roundup find the podcast in your feet. Every Friday. I'm Lisa Hagen and I'm Chris Axel were the hosts of no compromise. NPR's new podcast exploring one families mission to reconstruct America using too powerful tools, guns, and facebook new episodes. Drop every Tuesday join us for the no compromise podcast from NPR. I'm Jen White. We're talking with Rob Savage Director of the quarantine horror film host. He's joining us from London. No Rob Computer screen horror has grown as sub-genre over the years I'm thinking about a two thousand fourteen friend did twenty thousand searching where do you see host fitting into this legacy? I think for me. I mean I, Love I love those movies and we've been compared to one friend did a lot which I, take a compliment. I, think. I think hopefully. Hopefully we've tapped into. We've tapped into the specificity of of what's going on right now which I think which I think makes us stand apart and also I think my approach was always to make to make the film feel much more visceral and grounded and much less. Polished we didn't want this to feel like a Hollywood movie wanted this to feel. You'd accidentally logged onto to assume call with a bunch of your friends. Needed to feel totally authentic moment to moment and. All the kind of flash at you. You sometimes get in the big budget Hollywood movies, I mean we made this for not very much money at all and we kind of wanted to use that to our advantage. Is there something about the computer screen about that interface that really opens up new opportunities in horror for you? I think the thing that you're always looking to do in horror is some. Is made make the audience feel like they're participating to make them feel that lockstep with the character and I think. The great thing about about screen horror is. Is that that. Even. Even just for a moment if the audience forgets that they're watching a movie or just putting that part of their brain, just just switched off. They can really have an involvement in the scares and involvement in the narrative that I think is impossible in kind of conventionally structured film. And we. Really makes me happy whenever anyone anyone who's watched host has said Oh the bit with a pop up comes up I move my mouse, click it away because I thought I was. I just I. Love that. I think if. If we if we made you forget for a moment. I. Think that's what that's what found footage in particular can do. Well. We reached out to you to ask you to share your review of host and here's what one of US shared using. Our APP, one vox pop either my name is Aaron segers a Brooklyn based journalist who has focused on the paranormal and the intersection with pop culture for more than a decade and currently appear on travel channels paranormal caught on camera. Who's is really good and it's also really chilling. It's also reflective of actual paranormal theory and classic horror movie tropes involving seances and spirit boards spiritualist believed communicating with the dead was a positive. But there's also this notion that if you acknowledge a spirit or entity, you are empowering it. So you figure a group sand gone wrong is scary on its own but when it's a zoom seance. Suddenly. We find ourselves quarantined in a haunted house. We are lockdown with the ghosts and we realized how alone we are. Rob what's your reaction to airs review they're? Great I mean, we really wanted to make this. We really wanted this to not feel like a movie sales. We wanted this to feel really true to. To how these things actually go down and? One of the one of the reasons that we we based it around this idea of a seance is because I've made a lot of horror movies before and there's there's a horror movie that I did a few years ago where as part of my research ended up meeting with a lot of mediums and actually join spiritualist church for about six months and did did weekly seances with these mediums and it really struck me just how different A real life sciences from a move that you see with with. Candles and lightning flashes it. It's a really. Positive kind of affirmative. Thing normally. People people get along our of and. There's a real kind of structured system of belief there. So, one of the things we actually did is we. As research for this, and there's a bit of a rehearsal. We hired a real medium to to zoom call and do a sounds with our cast and crew. Before the before we shot the movie just to see what it was really like and a lot of that ended up in the film. With most Hollywood film production and the AD releases on hold industry experts say this is the perfect time for the work of independent filmmakers to get noticed. especially, projects are low budgeted or don't have a lot of production needs. What did he take to get you from? You know this prank with your friends to eventually having host distributed on Shutter Well. It was really the belief up the people at Shudder I mean this movie wouldn't exist without them we had. After the after the video imply where we had a lot of interest from from all sorts of companies around the industry we had we had studios and all of these places bidding on it. And Shudder, we're really the only place the onboard with just how we wanted to make this. The fact that we're GONNA make it as a bunch of friends figuring out as we went along the fact that we wanted to make this really fast I mean the whole movie from just coming up with the idea of making a tall with no script to releasing the movie it was twelve weeks to the day. So it was a really fast turnaround and shudder. Who I'd be speaking to before exit seen some of my other work. They really just got behind us and they gave us the creative freedom that we needed and. And I don't think it could have happened with any kind of conventional. Film production structure being addicted to we had to really figure it out who went along and how to keep people safe and how to keep people connected and how remote filming would impact the process and. I really had them. For believing in us in supporting off kind of unconventional way of making it, that's rob savage the director of the quarantine horror film host it's available. Now on the streaming site Shudder Robert was great to talk to you and congratulations. Thanks. Much. Let's bring in our movie club panel. Now, joining us from KPCC LA is John Horn. He's the vice president of the one, a movie club. He also covers entertainment for KPCC where he hosts the new podcast. Hollywood the sequel. Great. Have you back Great to be with you also with us from Austin. Texas is Katie Sanchez. She's a film critic and the Editor in Chief of, but why? Though a pop culture website and podcast community Kate Welcome back Okay. First. Order of Business John How do you rate host five out of five stars. I'll give it five out of five. I mean I found it not only really terrifying but also kind of. Diving degree of difficulty to pull off a movie like this during the pandemic when you can't be with the actors you're shooting over video cameras zoom I mean what? He what rob is able to accomplish given the limited technology time and budget I thought was extraordinary. The story on its own terms succeeds incredibly. Well, it scared the heck out of me I watched most of it muted because I didn't want to hear what was going to happen. I thought it was. Completely successful. Okay. What about you? You're eighty Five out of five. I mean I was lucky enough to have for my first experience be our horror movie night in our community discord server. We all watched it together as about ten folks some of them were a little hesitant because they're like, Oh, a zoo movie. You know found footage greenhorn about this and I would say about the first after the first scare happens everybody was. Invested and getting to watch it in a digital space with other people digitally Yeah. I did not want to get into my next morning zoom call at all. I watched with a friend who loves genre and she was kind enough to take a couple of screen grabs of me, which was basically her laughing in me with my face covered with my shirt like ninety percent of them. But I mean when you watching it, it really made me about the way screens make us feel connected but there's also this deep feeling of. Disempowerment where you can't you can't get to the person who needs you can see him but there's nothing you can really do John did you have that that experience? One hundred percent and I think what's really interesting about this film and there's this great scene in the movie airplane years ago where the inflight movies are all these airplane disaster films, all these airplanes crashing, and there's a reason why you don't see disaster films when you're flying generally in that era. Because you don't want to remind yourself of the situation you're in. If you go see draws, you might not be swimming in the ocean, but you're going to be on a zoom call literally as soon as this movie ended I had to get on zoom call. So the idea that you're in this world that is not only familiar but also inescapable i. Think. That's what makes it so successful but the other thing that I did and I don't know if other people did this I kind of washed like there's a pruder film I went frame by frame and that's the advantage of washing it digitally, I would back up because a lot of the little scares just kind of flash by the screen and it. Takes you out of the movie a little bit but then you get to see think a little bit of how brilliantly put together the film is because what flashes goes by so fast it's literally a framer to yeah, my my friend Kim, who I, I watched the movie with she actually tried to access the chat because they were thirteen messages in the. Chat and she? She tried she's like is that a url and dropped out and see if the message isn't some deep cut that I need to do it wasn't but she tried gate what about you did you find yourself having that same sort of frame by frame experience and going back a little bit going forward to see what you might have missed. Yeah did one of the things that I noticed and it one of the issues with screen horn general sometimes when it's done, they don't understand the product but in host they understood zoom the way that it was utilized to one produce scares but also immerse you. There were different moments where I went and I was like, okay, Click this wait. No this is this isn't it and I know I've moved my mouse a few times I had to move it off the screen note that's not me. But I think one of the most beautiful things about the film and the most terrifying things of the film is we've all had a friend mess around with a video input in the back. And so they were just elements that stuck with me because of how it was used. In going, I'm going to I'm going to try to convince myself to go back and watch it again because I want to get some of those fine details scary. The second time is it isn't it though I mean I literally had my face under my shirt half the movie if not if not more but I I again, I think a big part of it was knowing something's coming and not being able to do anything to stop it and I haven't been this scared by movie in a long time John what was your reaction? The the next time you had to jump on his call where you kind of looking over your shoulder a little bit. Well I wa- I was a little bit but one the things this movie reminded me of the Twitter Feed Room Raider that looks at the background people who are doing virtual appearances they might be on TV they might be doing skype resume call because what room reiter zoom teaches you s you kind of tune out a little bit as you look at the background of what is going on with people or colleagues you're talking with and this movie focuses you on the background because so much of what's happening is out of the person's view but it's happening behind. Them and I think that was part of what was really smart about the film because just like Room Raider, you're looking at the background not the person that's where almost all the story is happening. We're talking about the new film host and Quarantine Horror for this meeting of the One, a movie club we're talking to John Horn the host of the podcast Hollywood, the sequel from KPCC and Kate Sanchez, a film critic and the Editor in chief of the pop culture website. But why? Though I'm Jen white we'll hear more from our guests and from you in a moment. The way things are going right now even if you can keep track of what's happening in the news, it's hard to know why it's happening. What it really means. That's why we have created a daily podcast that answers your questions about the news in about ten minutes every weekday it's called consider this new episodes every weekday afternoon from NPR. Now let's get back to our movie club discussion of quarantine horror with John Horn, the host of the podcast Hollywood, the sequel from. And Kate Sanchez film critic and the Editor in chief of the pop culture website. But why? Though we asked you to share your reviews of host this this new quarantine horn four film available on Shudder, and here's what Teresa had to say using at one eight bucks pump. I'd like to highly recommend the movie host, which is now streaming on shudder and it has a great story a great script scary. The directions great. The actors are excellent. It's super creepy has just the right amount of humor and I don't think you have to be a horror fan at all to love this movie everybody I've recommended it to has loved it and talked about how scary it is. You know you talked about how well? Host uses zoom technology, but it also mirrors the experiences of pointing and other ways. There's reference to couples moving in together too early young adults going to stay with their parents at one point. One of the characters makes a break for to leave her, but she grabs her mask. I how well do you think the film reflects what we're all going through right now? I think it reflects it extremely. Well, I'm one of the things for me when I when I watch war, one of the reasons why it's my favorite genre to both review as a critic but also to engage in as a fan is because horror exists on this foundation of empathy, it need you to feel for the characters and when it's done well, enough you feel what the characters are feeling and in host. So much of our connection to them, you're right just because Oh we all use zoom. No, it's because we're all in this situation I have at least two friends I know. Who moved in way too early because a quarantine and I most definitely don't leave anywhere without my mask and it's one of those things where when you look at how this moment in time has impacted is this has become a new latch point for horror to enter because it's a new way of I mean I guess a new way of life and you of US interacting with the medium of or and I'm GonNa I. CAn't wait to see more things in horror and other genres start to take into account. The way we're living now and I think for me one of the most. Important things about. About this film when it comes to representing what it's like to be in quarantine is the fact that even when the friend attempts to leave and go save the friend, you still feel this large disconnect she can't get there in time she. You know and she stays on the zoom call. It it's there's this tether between us and our electronic devices and are in the programs are running the APPs reason to connect to be connected people that I don't think we're ever going to really let go of now especially now that it's become our only lifeline to the people we love and care about where we did some crowd sourcing. We asked what makes a good horror movie and here's what you told us. She said. It has scare the audience with more than just jump scares let the audience figure stuff out for themselves. Always show the monster don't spare the innocent let the quiet your soundtrack limit characters dumb decisions don't give everything away in your trailer John I mean horror movies are sometimes thought of like a recipe. You have the right ingredients you'll have a successful result but to you what are those essential ingredients in how does host stack up? Well I think one of the things that's important in horror is that it has to make sense and obviously it's fiction and obviously a lot of it is imagined but one of the problems I have found with found footage movies. It's like who found it like where was it is sometimes to math has to really make sense and obviously host is like well, this zoom call you can say to yourself well, record it or how do we get it but that doesn't matter because the math of it feels logical. It makes sense. It doesn't require a huge leap even if what happens inside the film is really over the top and I wanna come back to what we were just talking about i. mean the idea that everything outside our door is a real life horror story I think is really important I wake up every morning I, don't check the weather check the air quality index or cast. I am inside a studio at KPCC where we have state of the art air circulation and filtering it smells like a campfire in here. So everything outside our doors is tariff line, and so we get into this place where we can experience somebody else being scared and we know that we're okay I. think that's also really important. I think that's why that's how good horror movies work. They scare the heck out of us but it doesn't feel like we are in danger at the end of the film. Kate, what about for you? What are some of those essential ingredients? For me it's it's kind of leading your your scares breathe trusting your audience to be able to piecing together I think the the main my main gripe with horror movies too much exposition too much explanation of things and just kind of trusting your audience to buy into it and I think one of the larger pieces for. To me is I want it. I'm a little bit of the opposite where not necessarily I don't WanNa feel endangered but I want to feel like I'm impacted by the story like as I'm going on this this ride with this character as much as I'm scared by it as much as I moved I, want to be moved by in in different ways and I think horror especially with the films that have been getting green light and there's this Ri- say rise because there's social horror has always been a thing but for me I think this pivot towards embracing more social horror that's doing a lot more of. Throwing people into the thick of it where you leave and you're like Oh crap am I am I actually could I be villain in this? Could I you know I I think the ability to position yourself in horror both as the antagonists and the protagonist are to really unique things that are coming out of this current wave of horror. That for me is something that I am starting to look for. Well, I'll hundred emailed have yet to see these quarantine horror films but I find myself gravitating towards horror podcasts such as the Magnus Archives or Alice isn't dead something about the feeling of fear and anxiety over something fictional that I could turn off as soon as the podcast was over has felt very calmly weirdly enough. Very calming. Early enough one hundred here you have been listening a lot to the spooked podcasts from the folks over at snap judgment. Now, Kate earlier we asked host director rob savage about how the film fits into the sub genre of computer screen horror and found footage horror, and in your view, how does this film stack up against some of the films in those sub genres that have come before it? Man I think the fact that that is such a short a short run time actually really helps push the genre bet i. think one of the things for me is it's such a well done film. The execution, the acting like there's nothing wrong with us film like at all and critic I try very hard to at least find find something that can improve. But for me, this is probably one of the few perfect or films that I've seen this year and when I think about this against the larger genre is found footage as it stands within the community and outside of the horde community it's kind. Of maligned a lot because there have been some pretty bad ones but there hasn't been gems that a lot of people just don't get there is on what I'm hoping that this is going to do is as one of those gems that is connecting to people in this cultural moment that it's actually going to reinvigorate the found footage honor that is going to reinvigorate screen a screen horror and I mean. Unfortunately. The pandemic isn't going anywhere. So I am hoping that this is going to be the launching pad for more filmmakers to embrace this type of storytelling, and hopefully you know put their own unique twist on it. So when I think about where it sets kind of in this trajectory or in this history of found footage to screen is I think that it's a new. It's a new leg of the journey. If that makes sense, will we're the short films like stay at home and rathe making their way onto you to kind of tell us a PSA to stay safe during the pandemic others also a full length horror anthology film called isolation that's currently wrapping up post production I'm curious John, where do you see quarantine art going from here? Well. I think one of the things that is the bigger issue that we haven't really talked about is what's not happening people aren't going to movie theaters. So they're not seeing the latest fast and furious sequel or the latest James Bond Sequel or wonder woman nineteen eighty-four has been postponed again. So in a way, audiences have this great opportunity to discover films like host on a site shudder that a Lotta people haven't heard of it means relatively news so i. Think. One of the things that's really important is this is a great moment for interesting and creative independent filmmakers to get heard and a movie like this in a normal world maybe it doesn't get noticed as much. I think the same could be said of a movie talked about couple of months ago on one a movie club vast of night from Andrew Patterson on Amazon I. think There's a real opportunity for interesting original filmmakers get heard and with all the noise. Typically would surround the actual releases were at not a pandemic. Those movies wouldn't get hurt and I think that is one of the great things that's happening. It's horrible to say you know in the midst of pandemic when people are dying, but it has allowed some original artists to find a way to get their stories told and I think that's something I'm really optimistic and excited about going forward. Well, a couple of quick messages here when listener tweet time is short. Filmmaker and if made five short films since March thirteenth after a dry spell of three years, I'm seventy six years old and I die in most of them Ashley tweets I very much disagree to always show the monster I think you should rarely if ever show what it is that's so scary. Think hereditary. Lovely, molly let the audience decide what's terrifying. We've got about thirty seconds here John. Wants to you each to recommend some of your favorite horror films Kate quickly. Yeah I to stick with a shudder theme There's a film called. From Guatemala that is currently on shutter that is phenomenal as well as tigers are not afraid and terrified those are three. Latin. American horror films that I need everybody to get more is on John went about you. I'M GONNA. Go with an old one. I'M GONNA, say go watch contagion. If you haven't seen Steven, SODERBERGH's film from nine years ago it is scary as any other movie it's so spot on about what is happening right now it feels like an odd pick but Steven soderbergh contagion is one of the scariest movies you can watch. We'll tweet out all those recommendations at one a John Horn covers entertainment for ABC where he hosts the new podcast Hollywood the sequel he's also the vice-president of the one movie. Club John It was great to have you and Sanchez is the film critic and the Editor in Chief of y though a self-proclaimed Geek community and pop culture website kate thanks. This conversation was produced by Catherine and edited by Matthew Simonsen to learn more about them and the rest of the team visit the one eight dot org. This program comes to us from W. Amu part, of American, university in Washington distributed by NPR I'm Jen white thanks so much for listening and let's talk again tomorrow this is one. Oh.

rob savage Hollywood Kate Sanchez NPR John US Jen White London John Horn Editor in Chief director UK twitter Washington John It KPCC Johns Netflix Director
Wesley Morris And Jenna Wortham Are 'Processing' Again

The Frame

25:42 min | 10 months ago

Wesley Morris And Jenna Wortham Are 'Processing' Again

"From the MON BROADCAST CENTER AT KPCC. This is the frame. I'm John Horn. It is a great time to listen to podcast. We talk with industry expert. Nick Walk even has a new podcast about podcasts. Then Jenna worth them and Wesley. Morris hosts the podcasts still processing where they discuss our relationship with culture at a time when people aren't exactly hanging out together. I've been thinking a lot about like. What do I really like about people in the last couple of weeks when I do? This is the energy of being in spaces with people regardless of whether or not they're getting on my last nerve that's Today on the frame. We'll be right with all of us staying at home these days. The need for entertainment suggestions is growing. If you go on social media there are countless recommendations for things to watch and listen to including podcasts. And for the many people who might not get out of their homes. It's a strangely good time to find. Good podcast joining me now to talk about podcast and the podcast industries nick. Qua- he runs hot pod. It's a trade publication for the PODCAST industry. He also writes about podcasts for Vulture Nick. Welcome back to the show John. It's going okay so I'm curious from your perspective. How has the pandemic? And self distancing impacted the PODCAST industry on one hand folks to the moving more towards like humby homebound and not commuting. Staying indoors has had some impact on overall podcast listening. But it's sort of not particularly evenly distributed newscasts or my understanding have gone up whether it's a virus. Pacific News podcasts Podcasts but a lot of other Jonah's seeing slight dips with some exceptions. I've heard stories about. Trump has fallen off a little bit. I'm hearing stories about sports. Podcast falling off a little bit because it's not sports happening right now and I think the general thinking is is that we don't quite know how the longer term trends are going to look like until Americans are more settled into their sort of like confined at home lives so that's one of the listening perspective and you know basically everybody's like bracing themselves for a hit on the money side. Advertisers are beginning to be a little bit more so titled their belts because they don't quite know what the scope of the economic crisis that we're about to walk into and so there's a lot of pulling back in assessing right now. There's this possible gap moving forward between the advertising many and sort of meaning even right now. And that's the tricky thing to watch where was growth headed in the podcast industry before the crisis emerged. Could it even were early? Accelerate the growth of listeners. Even if they add dollars right now aren't following the theory that podcasting. We'll see an increase as people kind of turn to it to fill up their sort of entertainment gaps and prior to this. This moment the general thinking was at podcasting would continue. Its onward climb. The industry would be returning at this point of bringing more advertisers bringing in more talent creating more shows at a higher level higher audience base. But of course you know we're moving into a period of intense uncertainty of for an unknown period of time. And so you know. Things could look really really weird. Even if it doesn't look comprehensively bad if you go on I tunes some of the trending podcast right now. Are things like. Npr's corona virus daily CNN's corona virus fact versus fiction. You get the drift. There are a lot of corona virus. Podcast right now. Have you checked any of them out by a large? It's it's a lot of established news brands. Creating very specific service. A drove products to help people like just get better information and to keep more on top of the incremental developments of how things are looking like both United States globally on today. However there's also a darker site to trends that have been some instances of really questionable grin avars a podcast. You know not particular. Savory characters providing information that isn't sound or is probably source and so there is this possibility for resumes. Scabs and unreliable mission. There it's a confusing time and so there's always chaos when it comes to something like this and there's going to be super careful about how you're getting information we're talking with Nick. Qua- he runs. Hot pod is a trade publication for the PODCAST industry. So let's talk about the people who may not want to spend all of their waking hours listening to a podcast about the pandemic what kind of new escapist fare might recommend. Are you seeing some growth in certain genres within podcasts? For what I've heard. You know comedy podcasts. Are you know holding strong there? But if you're looking for something a little bit more escapist uplifting little bit got a couple of recommendations. I cannot recommend more highly a recent episode called Case Missing Head Essentially. It's a very low stakes keeper. In which P David who's Coz of all here is about this song that may or may not exist that kind of goes on a rabbit hole and try to figure out if it exists or not and every time I searched something new and found another dead end I was getting increasingly frustrated but also kind of scared like it started to dawn on me that there was something that there was something really bizarre happening. It hasn't sort of like Lightness that that kind of really need right now. the other thing that was sort of that. I I would recommend. Phoebe reads the Stream. If you listen to our criminal which is a true crime podcast by the host. Phoebe judge has a new side project where she reads a novel out loud. One thing that's been making me feel a little. More ease has been reading fiction. I started reading. Agatha Christie's first published novel the mysterious affair at Styles and I thought maybe I could read it to you a chapter a day until we get to the end no ads just a good mystery. I couldn't on background. It's great background stuff. It's a fun thing to have round to broader emotions right now. I'm going to recommend one myself. Podcast is called dead is by the comedian and actor. Connor ratliff and he was cut out of band of brothers. Twenty years ago. Tom Hanks was the director of that series and Tom. Hanks fired him for having dead eyes as an actor is an existential quest about one actors relationship to himself and to his acting career. I would highly recommend it. Let's talk about your upcoming project with our own Elliot's Studios. It's a podcast about podcasts. And it's launching this spring fundamental thinking Vanda shows. It will be your guide to podcasts world. Particularly if you're new to the casual listener the thing about this place instead. It's infinitely more complex and dense than you think. It isn't as always more stuff and more people than you've heard and show hopefully would be sort of a travel guide through this universe. Nick Qua- runs hot Rod. It's a trade publication for the PODCAST industry. He's also developing podcast about podcast for Elliot Studios which is launching this spring. Nick thanks so much for coming back on the show. Thank you coming up next on the frame the host of the podcast still processing who are processing. How Culture has been reshaped by the pandemic? Were talking today about podcasts. In the age of a pandemic one show that is returning today after a break is called still processing. It's a podcast with one of the smartest takes on culture and a favorite of ours here at the frame still processing is hosted by Wesley Morris. And Jenna worth them. They're both staff writers at the New York Times when we reach them by skype this week. Each their respective homes. I ask them how the current crisis is affecting their approach for the new season of still processing. I don't know we're still figuring that out a little bit but it occurred to me today. Gina are trying to figure out how to explain what our goal was the season. I mean I think you knew and I just had to catch up with where you were but I think we really are going to spend this bunch episodes that we're GONNA RELEASE OVER THE NEXT COUPLE OF MONTHS. Just watching listening to in reading lots of things and just enjoying that they got made. We'll do the things that we normally. We would typically do the work culture but I mean we're really just going to look at all this great art and popular culture that we have and talk about it. Well we always see the show as a bomb in some ways. We always wanted to feel like you know virtual happy hour with us but I think now we're really into that and so we want people to feel held. Want people to feel seen. We don't want to add to their anxiety and we also don't want to diminish it and so. I think we feel like our offering is helping people make the most of this extra time they have and hopefully distract them from some of the bigger pressing things For an hour or so week so I'm GONNA come back to that idea of bomb at about some of the pieces of art and culture that you feeling like you want to consume these days. How would you categorize that content? Does it fall into certain niches. What do you think was I mean I don't know we haven't really mapped out? What exactly we're going to be going a lot by by gut instinct in like feeling our way toward things that would be fun to to to think about and watch together and listen to together and read together. We're you know we're GONNA do. We're GONNA do a bunch of different things Wesley you recently wrote. In The Times about rewatching Steven soderbergh movie contagion from Twenty Eleven and the headline was for me. Re watching contagion was fun until it wasn't and I have to say I just watched it too and it was really spot on about. How diseases spread. There's so many close ups have how often people touch things and then the body's really start piling up. So what role does contagion or Wesley. Pandemic novel that I think both of us love emily. St. John Man tells station eleven play in our lives. I mean it depends on what you what you need from. These works of of plague and their aftermaths. I watched contagion because I heard one of the people who worked on at one of the one of science journalist consulted on it on a show called on the media talking about all of the problems with virus movies in the ways in which The what the movies have to say about such things aren't always accurate. But you know the fact that she was consultant and that made me wonder like how she she mentioned how hard she worked how she and the other people who worked on the film as consultants hard they worked to get it right some like okay and Soderbergh is is is one of my top twenty favorite filmmakers but I was really surprised by how there's a point in the movie were just for me. It shifted into be into going from a movie. That sort of winking at you in having a good time with you as a as a as a work of genre science fiction sort of medical science fiction genre filmmaking into something really much more grave and considered about what happens to us in times of uncertainty where we're at war with a thing we can't see and what that does to society and what it does to relationships but really the thing that I love about the movie is it. It's not really really about. It's actually just about keeping your government and the idea that you have these three different women representing these three different. Three different Kate winslet and Jennifer really work both work for the. Cdc But they do different things within the CDC and in Marion coachee are works the WHO but the idea that like you have these three women like saving the world essentially not. Because it's some great thing you know to make themselves look good. But because it's their job right exactly these receptors are found in the sales of both Respiratory tried to end the central nervous system and the virus attaches to the cell like a key slipping into lock somewhere in the world. The wrong tape up with wrong. Pack anything like this before and it's still changing. It's figuring us out faster than we're figuring it out because nobody else do. I don't know it just really moved me. The bet movies belief in in work and in science as a as a real sort of moral. 'cause Geno what about you and the role that plagues stories might play in our in our current lives. He no I'm more anxious prone more prone to anxiety than the average person might be so. I made the mistake of watching twenty days later with some friends right at the beginning of all this 'cause I thought it would be funny and it wasn't that funny. It's not funny but it's a my mom. My Dad tried to kill me too. I wasn't helpful at all every time I go into a grocery store. I just think about that scene when they're in the grocery store and it's like the one moment it's like the reprieve. Ofcom and everything goes to so I don't know but you know I'm a big reader and I've been reading severance filing mob which I had not read before. And it's it's similar it takes it starts in New York City and it's about fever that In billups and encompasses the whole city and about the few survivors. That are left after and kind of how they pick up the pieces but the thing that's interesting about the fever is that it actually makes people really nostalgic and so they get really caught in their own memories and that's what causes them to become unwell like they can't think for themselves anymore. They're trapped in the past and so it's just a really interesting metaphor for. I don't know what yet 'cause I'm only like a third of the way in but the story that's unfolding is really beautiful. And I'm I'm actually enjoying that so I don't know is a pandemic book but it feels like it's a bow something much richer and relevant right now but it has to do with change and accepting new net and not being About being a little bit more wear of the habits that don't service and that feels very appropriate right now. So it's that's actually comforting. Yeah we're talking with Wesley Morris. General WORTH THEM FROM THE NEW York Times. The host of the podcast still processing to ask you about culture. You both right about culture and you cover it on your podcast but in this bizarre place now where shared culture is gone. Movie Theaters Plays Live Music. Stand up comedy. So how much do you? How do you figure out what shared culture means? And how you can talk about something. That can't be shared anymore. I mean obviously can watch stuff on Netflix or something like that. But how much of your own identity and your own awareness of what's going on the in the world is informed by being with other people as you're experiencing something culturally We'll start you know I've been thinking a lot about. What do I really like about people in the last couple of weeks look good? I really like about humanity. People and I was about to say like I love being in the museum like watching looking at paintings with other people around me alley that I like it. I think people out of my way. I don't want you walking in front of me will. I'm trying to trying to try and figure out what this piece is about. Oh I don't want to over here. You Be Dosen when you really don't know what you're talking about. I don't miss that but what I'd do. This is the energy of being in spaces with people regardless of whether or not they're getting on my last nerve. I don't love people but I love humanity and there is something really comforting a bow collective experience and having immediately. You're not even verifying. You're you're part of the collective experiences you know it's happening even when you aren't on board with you know I mean it's rare at a concert. Do not like something that I mean. It's rare for me as non-professional Concert Goer to be at a concert and not really enjoy myself but to be a movie that isn't working and in an audience that is really with it. I don't care like I'm with. I'm with the experience of these people are having even though I am on the other side of that that feeling and one of the things genera thinking about in terms of the way. We're thinking about like how we're GONNA make these episodes coming up is how to not replicate that experience. Because that's impossible. But how Jenna and I can be a conduit between the art and the many many people who are experiencing it separately how to bring us all together just through the two of US having a conversation about some of it. What would you add to that? Especially in terms of how technology might be part of the solution. There is something about this moment. That really is pushing you to go deeper and be more vulnerable and be more open because if you're not then all you're really doing is recycling worry and anxiety and fear and so it's interesting to think about the role that technology does plan and of course there's there's so much of modern life is being shifted to digital spaces but there's also so much of that happening. It's easy to get overwhelmed by that too. And I think there's a little bit of my God I had a term for it instead of foam. Oh it's like fear of not making the most of this time and I worry that that's coming up to that people feel as though you know we have all this extra time in their all these yoga classes online and they're all these virtual raves and dance parties. Like I should be doing all these things. But I think it's also cater remember that we're we're experiencing a a level of trauma on a global scale. That is really unprecedented in. It's also very okay to just be with that too. You don't have to do anything. Even though technology is making it extraordinarily possible to do more things from our computers that we even thought possible. Jenna worth them and Wesley Morris or culture writers at the New York Times. They're the host of the podcast still processing. They'll be back after this short break. You're listening to the frame. Stay with us. Welcome back to the frame. I'm John Horn I'm talking with a host of the podcast still processing New York Times writers. Jenna worth him and Wesley. Morris they have a new episode out today titled Pod for both our houses a new season for a new time. I think the the the amazing thing about this virus is I mean if you are one of the lucky people who hasn't been directly touched by having it or like having a family member or a or a loved one Touched by it Or you know someone who like infected by it. In in the case of the sick it is not like other disasters right We there is a degree to which we are having an experience that you can't quite have a hurricane earthquake You know nuclear incident if not that we necessarily have agreed deal of recent experience with with how awful that can be but are physical infrastructure intact and the threat. We are we. There were basically the threat to ourselves and so I think there's something really just moving about the connections. We all are able to make to each other. Because we're we're what is upon us is is in some ways preventable and we're still undergoing sort of psychological experience of going through a trauma and being able to talk to and communicate with physically see Virtue of the By virtue of technology is really really. I don't know it's it's a kind of natural disaster experience that we've never had before and I think I'm really curious to see who we are on the other side of it. Given how connected is keeping us to each other. Well let me ask this last question which is a follow up to that. I think when we come out of that. There's probably a very slim chance that the Walt Disney Company is going to say you know what? Let's stop the avengers and marvel movies and Star Wars. Let's make movies about real people and stories that matter that ain't GonNa Happen? But if this is a moment for a reset a cultural and artistic reset where institutions both large and small artists. Who are working alone or in front of fifty thousand people can say. I'm changing my priorities. What do you hope that might be? What sorts of things that you would like to see reset after all of this passes. Well I don't know I think you stole my answer. I mean I do think because I wonder if this is not really about the way the movies work right now right like I'm not going to be another person. Who laments the WHO all who decries this sort of prominence in proliferation of what we call Superhero movies? But I do want to. I would love it if if what happens at the other side of this is more low stakes movies about human beings. I'm very here for the people listening. Who Want to argue that? That's what the vendors is about like. I hear that I hear you. I hear you but I also would like to see what you know Steve. Rogers is doing on his downtime and know I think it. I think that there is a type of movie that we you know. We we make few reviewer of now we virtually remake virtually not at all And I wonder if if I mean it's really gonNA come down to what the audiences for it but I think that the the whether that migrates back from streaming into movie theaters is GonNa be interesting question and I wonder whether I wonder how much we are GonNa Hunger for. Lake in really really hunger for live live culture. I mean are we going to? Are we gonNA flood restaurants immediately? Are we GONNA GO BRIN BACK MUSEUMS? Or WE'RE GONNA buy every book on the on. The story of our recently opened bookshelves. I don't know but I definitely know that. I'm going to be excited to get back into the world and and reconnect with strangers around. Jena what about you? I love that answer. I mean they've also yeah. People are going to be like torquing their asses off. Just kidding you re speech is going to be poppin like yes. Everyone is going to be like from corona like. Hopefully we will be but I'm just like yeah like New York especially new. York is going off the rails happened in la too. I mean I think everybody is eager to be on the other side of this. Whenever that arrives Wesley Morris in Genoa worth him right about culture at the New York Times. They host the podcast. Still Processing Wesleyan Jenna. Thanks so much for coming on the show stay safe. Stay healthy and I can't wait to hear what the seasons got in store for us. Thank you John. Thank you for having us. That's the frame for today but a quick note before we go. Your financial support is vital to our ability to provide you with coverage of the Corona Virus Pandemic. So donate now. Kpcc and help us reach our spring member. Dr Goal if you have the means to support. Kpcc at a higher level of giving please consider joining the KPCC leadership circle that our nation of fifteen hundred dollars or more. But how much you can afford. We really appreciate it so please give a KPCC DOT ORG and thanks. I'm John Horn. Call up somebody you care about. Stay well we'll be back here tomorrow at the Broadcast Center.

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Opinion: Good Night Oppy, A Farewell To NASA's Mars Rover

NPR's World Story of the Day

04:05 min | 2 years ago

Opinion: Good Night Oppy, A Farewell To NASA's Mars Rover

"Support for this NPR podcast and the following message. Come from the UPS store, offering services from shredding to printing to mailbox ING and instead of closing this holiday. The UPS store is doing another ING altogether. Opening the UPS store every ING for small business. And of course, shipping probably should not project human traits onto machines. But if you spend a lot of time with a mechanism talk to it, wait to hear from it and worry about it. Even scientists begin to see personality in machinery when the opportunity Mars exploration Rover ended its mission this week after more than five thousand Martian days, NASA, scientists warned this is a hard day opportunities project manager, John Kelly told reporters, even though it's a machine, and we're saying goodbye, it's still very hard and very poignant opportunity in its cousin Rovers spirit both landed on Mars in January of two thousand four they were supposed to carry. On for just three months scratching and scouring for less than a mile over the Martian landscape, but spirit Rome for almost five miles and lasted six years. Oppy scientists began to call the opportunity Rover rolled over Mars for twenty eight miles and stayed on the job for more than fourteen years transmitted, two hundred seventeen five hundred ninety four thousand images, including a selfie spirit an opportunity helped establish that there was once liquid water on Mars is doesn't mean there will soon be beach resorts on Mars, but it does confirm that some of the elements of life may have once existed they're on a world that now looks pretty dry, lifeless and cold. It's a reminder not to judge too much by appearance planets and people have histories Oppy got stuck in a dune in two thousand five but NASA scientists working over a distance of millions of miles were able to free their Rover Oppy also suffered from recurrent wheel. Robotic arm problems for most of his her its life, but kept on rolling searching digging and sending back information a dust storm envelope. Much of Mars last June Oppy foundered in a gully on the western rim of the endeavour crater in a gully, the scientists called perseverance valley. The storm robbed UPI of the solar power to recharge batteries NASA. Scientists Senate more than eight hundred and thirty rescue commands they beamed music to Oppy to try to awaken their Martian explorer, David Bowie's life on Mars, Gloria Gaynor's, I will survive. Here comes the sun by you know, Oppy was too depleted to reply their overdid send a last image of a dark world cloaked in dust. Jacob Margolis a science reporter for KPCC in Pasadena made a poetic translation of the digital burst bites and squeaks up. He sent out before going silent. My battery is low and it's getting dark. I am. I'd all hope for such a gentle in to a useful life. This on. Ziggy stardust, and you're listening to NPR news support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Comcast business having the nation's largest gig speed network was just the start. Now, they're providing gig fueled apps and solutions that exceed expectations and help businesses perform Comcast business beyond fast.

Oppy Oppy NASA Comcast David Bowie NPR NPR NASA endeavour crater Rome Rovers Jacob Margolis Gloria Gaynor project manager John Kelly Pasadena KPCC reporter fourteen years
NPR News: 10-24-2019 11PM ET

NPR News Now

04:59 min | 1 year ago

NPR News: 10-24-2019 11PM ET

"This message comes from NPR sponsor xfinity some things are slow like a snail races other things are fast like xfinity X. by get fast speeds even when everyone is online working to make WIFI simple easy awesome more at xfinity Dot com restrictions apply that game sixty six and the S. and P. Five hundred added five Asian markets are lower at this hour I'm Shay Stevens N._p._R.. News in Washington Vice President Mike Pence is criticizing the NBA over its response to a tweet supporting pro democracy demonstrators in Hong Kong pen says the I evacuate in northern California's Sonoma county you're listening to NPR news of Los Angeles burning dozens of homes and forcing tens of thousands of people to flee KPCC's Jacob moralists reports from an area surrounded by the flames acted bureaucrats waging war on the constitution many of those who have testified are former and current State Department officials pompeo gave a terse defense of his st for NPR news. I'm Steven saw in Wichita an investigation by the VA inspector general's office fines that the office charged with protecting included that especially in its first two years the office failed to push out poor performing senior officials did not conduct accurate or unbiased investigations and whistleblower protection it was meant to make it safer to report waste or abuse inside Va and make it easier to fire bad staff the as inspector general has L. to protect whistleblowers and in some cases may have retaliated against the people reporting waste or harm to veterans at the Va the officials responded that I development event after US diplomat Bill Taylor's testimony in the house impeachment inquiry this week Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham called those testifying radically up on a hill looking down across Santa Clarita Canyon country and I can see just the glow of emergency vehicle lights glow of helicopter Ernie Rudy Giuliani was running a shadow foreign policy in Ukraine Pompeo says the department's Focus in the region is fighting corruption and protecting Ukraine from Russian threats tune in Beijing you health officials say they've confirmed another one hundred twenty five cases of vaping related lung illnesses as NPR's Richard Harris reports in recent months via has moved to address many of the problems highlighted in the report quil Lawrence NPR news two major fires threatening several neighborhoods along the foothills but for the protesters he also accused China of infringing on rights and Liberties in Hong Kong Kansas remarks came amid efforts to negotiate a trade deal between Washington earlier to prevent weather related fires Pacific Gas and electric says it is too soon to determine whether faulty equipment played any role and starting a wind-driven blaze that split looming criticism from the White House for member station K. W. Km UW Stephen Bourgeois has more pompeo's remarks at a department worked thor's flying above trying to fight fires that have popped up all over the area there's also people driving around sitting in traffic trying to get to where they need to go to figure out if NBA is acting like a quote wholly owned subsidiary of China's authoritarian regime by failing to stand up to the government's criticism of rockets manager who tweeted support in every state except Alaska the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says most of the cases are among people especially young men who products containing thc that's a marijuana extract many of the suspicious products come from an informal gray market so health officials urge people to avoid buying off the street or from other informal whistleblowers inside the department has instead put them at risk more from NPR's quil Lawrence one of the trump administration's key accomplishments on veterans affairs was the office of accountability more than sixteen hundred of those cases have been reported so far this year the death count also inched up from thirty three to thirty four nationwide cases have been reported goals that are causing the injuries Richard Harris NPR news on Wall Street stocks closed mixed today with the Dow Jones Industrial Average losing twenty eight points the Nasdaq live from NPR news in Washington I'm Shay Stevens. US Secretary State Mike Pompeo is defending his

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