15 Burst results for "Kpcc Arts Education"

"kpcc arts education" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

11:37 min | 1 year ago

"kpcc arts education" Discussed on KPCC

"Dot com I'm John horn and this is the frame before he wore pants made of stuffed animals before he wore socks in the wrong places even before he played the bass fleet was into jazz and books in his new memoir acid for the children flee writes about his childhood years before there were such a thing as the Red Hot Chili Peppers when he came into the studios last week I asked me to read a short passage from his book can I use your reading glasses they're not reading but are there any reading glasses around I don't know because I always and I was in such a rush to come here that in but say if oh my god look with Jesus put in your pocket the gods want me to read this so it starts on page one forty three then there was Freddy gold then there was Freddy gold his two older sisters were both friends of my sister at Hollywood high Freddie was my first rich friend when I went over to his house I discovered in opulence previously unknown to me a big spread up in the hot in the west Hollywood Hills from the birds streets up above the Sunset Strip including the famous blue Jay way there's a fog upon LA and my friends have lost their way to be awesome a big swimming pool to well stocked refrigerators a Salvadorian housekeeper named Bessie in a white suit and hat everything clean immaculate white **** rugs a massive aquarium that bubbled its modern convex way out of the black tiled wall Freddie always had we'd would smoke it going as pools in the sauna listening to loud music the popular staff which being a jazz nerd I knew very little about Peter Frampton P. funk Led Zeppelin living it up what's interesting about the Freddie gold story is this idea about class and privilege you are essentially a latch key kid you are on your own left to your own devices and you have this friend or these friends who have a different life that you have a glimpse of how do you think that starts to affect the way you see the world in the way you navigate your way around the things that you don't have yeah well one interesting quick aside to that question is that the world was so different than here in the early seventies because now if a parent has any money you're going to a private school but back when I went to LA public schools we had every class of kid that doesn't exist in public school now I had kids who were poor was mothers for street walkers I had kids who'd like Freddie gold we're wealthy and I crazily enough light it was it I'd like you know the Yummy food the swimming pool with your jump in a pool going to Shawna duelists from stuff you always had we but I didn't covet I treasured my connection with with my other friends you know who I had profound relationships with who had nothing so it was really about that for me but it wasn't the nothing that nothing that we had was the nothing because we had no peace or harmony in the home it was a Scott how are home was a scary home to begin you know the things that I wanted to do well at didn't revolve around making money it was never like I'm going to make money I'm gonna get this I'm gonna do that it was more like I'm gonna be a bad **** on this trumpet I'm gonna wear a suit like speed and blow my horn we listened to some music by Dizzy Gillespie we listen to Led Zeppelin our play one more cut this is a story teller that I think is important you this is a tale of a meeting of two lonesome skin a fairly old white man on the planet which was dying fast one of them was a science fiction writer named Kilgore trout he was a nobody at the time and I suppose his life was over he was mistaken as a consequence of the meeting he became one of the most beloved and respected human beings in history as Kurt Vonnegut rating breakfast of champions I've never heard that before we can find everything yeah wow he did a lot of my book is me looking for moral compass and me not having any one as a parent to guide me as a kid to like help me transition from a boy to a man to be there for me to be present to be looking at the things I was going through and pay attention and I found that in my solitude with the books that I loved I always read every day I read all my life I've read every day except my drug days when I was just too damn waste into like for word to not be a blurred best of ants walking around on the page you know and I loved Kurt Vonnegut when I was a kid when I got I guess it was like I was sixth grade seventh grade when I first I read back is the champions and you have one after the other than you know Simes tightened you know slaughterhouse five all of them and he meant so much to me I just like because he put the most profound and beautiful statements in the simplest terms and I really got it when I was a kid is way of being funny the way he drew in a cold little asterisk which ends up being the chili peppers you know sign I just loved him in and he gave me hope that people could be really good okay do great things not because they needed to get to have a look as they wanted something but because it was the best way to be please new book is called acid for the children play thanks so much for coming okay you just say no I'm not recommending the children take LSD this is a poet thing for us cautionary tale yeah thanks so much and and that is it for the frame today thanks for listening both on the radio and on demand I'm John horn and thanks for supporting KPCC and this time I decided I was going to write an open letter to Douglas militancy of Walmart to effectively say to him you have an authentic claim in a way that no other see own country does to address this in to gauge in a conversation about gun violence in America a moral responsibility to try to end this I'm Michael that's coming up on the day from the New York times the daily from The New York Times has that story in five minutes right after a look at the stories we're covering in the KPCC news from at seven thirty lots of end of the year and start of the new year stories for you state lawmakers took a big step in twenty nineteen when they made it legal for college athletes in California to hire agents and earn money from endorsement deals that move ship college athletics to its core but a lot of details still need to be worked out before the law goes into effect in twenty twenty three B. NCAA the governing body for college sports doesn't like it but it plans to debate new rules for athlete compensation when it meets next month in Anaheim preview now from KPCC said awful goes one Lopez cal state Long Beach athletic director Andy fee plans to attend the convention he wants to hear the pros and cons of requiring sports agents to register with the NC double a you've got young people who could be signing agreements with less than savory people who are looking to make a Buck off the student athlete and we want to put more money into student athletes pockets not last under California's law college athletes could make money by endorsing products to their social media followers licensing their image for video games or giving sports lessons whatever the end result fee hopes the endorsements protect the most important goal of the college athlete which is to get a college education covering higher education a model for who's my nope it's one of the awesome sights at the tournament of roses parade and the Rose Bowl football game is the thunderous flyover of the B. two stealth bomber and tomorrow for the first time the pilot at the controls with that new year's day flight will be a woman the story from KPCC is Emily Elena Dugdale last new year's the crowd roared as a mass of B. two glided over the stadium this time lieutenant colonel Nicole pull it or will fly the plane he's a member of the five hundred and ninety bomb wing at Whiteman Air Force base in Missouri Polydor is one of a handful of female B. two pilots but she says she hasn't felt singled out because of her gender I'm just another eighty eight are another a military member and I wanted to do that my whole life B. two is one of the world's most technologically advanced planes holder says it will be a lot of fun to fly over the Rose Bowl or drive down the mountain two thousand feet above the ground and we intend to cross over the stadium right at the finale of the national anthem holder hope she can be a role model for girls who might want to become pilots showing them that women can fly the biggest and most complex planes around covering veterans and the military I'm Emily Elena Dugdale twenty marching bands are ready to strut two and a half miles to Pasadena tomorrow morning in the tournament of roses parade one of those bands comes from Marino valley band director Hong lock had took says they've been not working hard with practice and working hard to raise a hundred fifty thousand dollars to get ready for the parade it was a lot of money with a little small for our school and our kids so the kids work really really hard all year just to make sure they had everything they needed we caught up with the band earlier this week it banned fast right this the first time venture preserving rose parade and the feeling is this so amazing seven is Evelyn pharaoh I am a color guard member the ranch a very prism regiment and I'm a twelfth grade I found it does going to a restaurant last Sunday America's new celebration two nine years I woke up early in the morning to watch the parade and I remember telling my friends like this can be me next year and so going on like my break my school breaks I would practice to practice for the restaurant and I don't regret it at all that's stopping our kids would be the greatest gift you could ever see is just the opportunity at experiences that they should be able to have at our school district in our kids work really really hard so that things like the socio economical issues don't affect our success over the season we have put about seventy eight hundred hours of practice what's Christmas came we were at eight hour days were out were marching the track for three four miles at a time this is really happy that my kids get experience something so wonderful as the as the rose parade and blocking a color blind we'll be in you from three thirty we will see by four thirty and said about the sun coming up on the bed in the morning and our the life of a band starts on the estate our story was recorded by KPCC is public library and produced by KPCC arts education reporter karla hobby year a very happy new year from all of us at KPCC thanks for listening in twenty nineteen it's seven thirty five Hey it's Michael this week the daily is revisiting some of our favorite episodes listening back and.

John horn
"kpcc arts education" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

06:13 min | 1 year ago

"kpcc arts education" Discussed on The Frame

"This is the frame weekend. I'm John Horn. If you watch the NETFLIX series Mr Iglesias with Comedian Gabriel Iglesias. You may not know that there are some true life going on in their. He plays a high school teacher who fights for students who are struggling so many people have turned their backs on these kids. And I don't want to be one of those people. We're not turning our backs on them. It's turning turning our faces to the good students look Hernandez may think that these kids are invisible. But I see them all of them. The show is set at Wilson high in Long Long Beach which happens to be where glaciers attended school in the nineteen nineties. He dedicated the first episode of Mr Lacey as to his real life high school speech teacher feature June Garner writing. Thank you for believing in me when I didn't believe in myself. As part of our ongoing series that reunites nights creative types with teachers who changed their lives. KPCC Arts Education reporter Carla Heavier Tag along with Gabriel Iglesias. When he recently met up with June Gardner I John they want me to walk? Gain all surprised. Okay so you can evaluate my acting. They began with how a glacier has I ended up in June Garner's speech class. I got kicked off the football team for For Vocal I was out and then next thing. I know I'm looking looking ceiling. Well what can I get into speech. I got kicked off. We're talking too much. Maybe maybe maybe it'll be celebrated in this in this area and you were is when you first started doing class. You spoke like a rocket you you do it all really fast and we had to work on you slowing and yeah slow down. But I'll tell you you're the most successful person I can think of. That ever came out of the counselor in High School Speech Association. And you were cutting edge because you were one of the very first people to incorporate Spanish and English and I was so proud of you for that. You know because that that wasn't done I mean and you really started the trend of doing total humor. In that event it was a routine a bunch of characters and thrown into a blender. A lot of the characters and stuff is is what I used the very first time I went onstage and called myself a comic figure from the time that I finished high school ninety. Four I went up on stage April tenth of ninety seven. My Act was my speech from high school and I would only go for like five minutes five minutes at a time and build it up. Build it up build it up build it up and I was fast into people awesome. Dude you slow down. It was all nervous energy. Remember when I I used to always say about nervousness nervousness as just excitement misunderstood. You know people always ask you know. So what is it that you learn. What what did I learn? You've probably the only class that I really focused paid attention. And just because and not that I was a difficult student about. I was easily Distracted or annoyed by most teachers. You're fearless as far as just people walking in you had no problem calling like you saw it. And he's saying hey this is. This is what we're GONNA do and if you're into it you're into it. Wouldn't take them and then this netflix thing. They've only watched your first season probably about twelve times. I needed something to give me joy in my life at this point. Have Not GonNa cry but you know it's just so proud of you gave we are public. School are funding depends on meeting certain standards grades discipline attendance levels and the easiest way to improve. Those averages is the council at the kids who are hurting numbers. What do you call this program? Some children left behind. I don't hate it. This program could make our school the Educational Pearl of the district. Swipe left on a bunch of kids. I thought well this is really good. Believe it or not this is not the first time I dedicate something to you. My first comedy central half hour special show that I did in New York and written dedication to you on it. I know it's there and if you pause it you can catch it. We lost touch and you know it was the least I could do was at least acknowledged the fact that the you you were that influential at your premier. This one man came up to me and he said I just want to thank you for giving Gabriel to the world and said I didn't get Gabriel to the world. He he gave himself to the world. And isn't it great. You know and he said no but I saw the dedication and I said he would have done it anyway. Whether I was there or someone else was lucky enough to walk into the classroom. You know I just always felt so lucky to work with you and I. I feel that way about a lot of people but it's just so extraordinary ordinary known around the whole world scary. You know to get over there to the studio on your names on everything. Parking spot isn't as you pull has got my name on. Its all cool clues a security officer there to toe someone if somebody yeah You're GONNA have services. You're name's all over everything. What do you want whatever you need? We'll get it fun to hear about all this because I you know I'm just just your regular run of the mill retired teacher and but to see him to come to the tapings right. I would love La. I would kill to do that. You don't have to kill us you don't have to now. I know a guy okay up next on the frame weekend. They're funny but they're not famous and they do stand up in front of a live audience. Every day warming up a crowd. That's next on the frame weekend..

Gabriel Iglesias High School Speech Association NETFLIX Wilson high John Horn June Garner Hernandez Mr Lacey Long Long Beach La football KPCC Arts Education Carla Heavier New York
"kpcc arts education" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"kpcc arts education" Discussed on KPCC

"And this is the frame comedian Gabriel Iglesias is currently working on the second season of its net Flix show which is titled Mr a glaze yes he plays a high school teacher who fights for students who are struggling so many people have turned their backs on these kids and I don't want to be one of those people were not turning our backs on them it's turning our faces to the good students look her name is may think that these kids are visible but I see them all of them the show is set at Wilson high in Long Beach which happens to be where a glaze his attended school in the nineties at the end of the first episode of Mr Iglesias there was a dedication to his real life high school speech teacher June Gardner a glaze yes wrote thank you for believing in me when I didn't believe in myself as part of our ongoing series that reunites creative types with the teachers who changed their lives KPCC arts education reporter karla hobby are tagged along when the two got together last month they started off by discussing why Iglesias was in Gardner speech class in the first place I got kicked off the football team for for bill to local yes I was out and the next thing I know look and feel like well what can I get into speech about well I got kicked out for talking too much maybe maybe maybe I'll be celebrated in this in this area and you were when you first started telling class you spoke like a rocket you were sitting you you would do it all war really fast and we had to work on on you slowing down slow line yeah okay you're the most successful person I can think of that ever came out of the California high school speech dosage and you were cutting edge because you're one of the very first people to incorporate Spanish and English and I was so proud of you for that you know because that that wasn't done I mean you really started the trend of doing total humor in that event it was a a routine a bunch of characters and thrown into a blender a lot of the characters and stuff is is what I used the very first time I I went on stage and and call myself a comic you know you gotta figure from the time that I finished high school ninety four I went up on stage April tenth of ninety seven my act was my speech from high school and I would only go there for like five minutes five minutes at a time until I build up building up building up building up and I was fast into before awesome did you just slow down it was all nervous energy remember when I used to always say that nervousness nervousness isn't just excitement misunderstood you know and people always ask and also what is it that you learned but then what what did I learn you probably only class that I really focused and paid attention just because I am not that it was a difficult student about it I was easily distracted or annoyed by most teachers your fearless as far as just people walking and you had no problem calling it like you site and yes saying Hey this is this is what we're gonna do is you're into your into it yeah I would take a look yeah and then there's Netflix thing I've only watched your first season probably about twelve times I needed something to give me joy in my life at this point have not gonna crack but not on you hello it's I'm just so proud of you gave we are a public school our funding depends on meeting certain standards grades discipline attendance levels and the easiest way to improve those averages this call for the kids were hurting the numbers we call this program some children left behind I don't hate it.

Gabriel Iglesias five minutes
"kpcc arts education" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"kpcc arts education" Discussed on KPCC

"We've never really talked about like, you know, seeing like my personal work in like cars. I mean, I just think that I'm I'm the underlying I can't critique your professional work. I mean, it's wonderful. You'll never stop being my. It is unpaid your books are unbelievable, and your your animations are unbelievable to be part of your education and just be a part of your life is just been so wonderful. I always think well. That's my son. So. That was animator illustrator. Sandra tells peaking his art teacher from San Bernardo high. Julie Taylor so Carla what struck you about that student teacher relationship from drawing with these cheap pastels on cardboard that they've pulled out of a dumpster to about twenty years later a short film by about Sunday being nominated for an Oscar. It's quite this ark for Sunday as an artist, and I'm really struck by how much credit he gives to Julie for that. Even after all these years, not just for his success in art, but also for the care packages and the support that she gave him personally to more of these stories, I do, but I'm still looking for more. So folks out there, if you're working in a creative job now, I want to know about the teacher who made a difference in your life. Just head over to our website L, A dot com. I will read every single story that comes in through there. And there you can actually watch this really sweet video we made of Sunday and Julie reuniting here at KABC though warning. It may make you cry. That's KPCC's arts education reporter Carla havi are per project has made possible.

Julie Taylor Carla havi KPCC San Bernardo Sandra reporter Oscar twenty years
"kpcc arts education" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"kpcc arts education" Discussed on KPCC

"In beach tech. There are different languages throughout the Alba m-. Yeah. That's kind of been question for me throughout my career. I've tried to. Should I say educate people through music? I hope not to be too preachy. But I I hope that that people in the US, especially learn that indigenous languages are alive today, and well and being spoken by a lot of people who work here in the kitchens, and the farms, and and have a heritage that that that is quite beautiful poetically for a lot of people language can be a barrier. And certainly there's been a lot of conversation in this country about barriers between the United States and Mexico, particularly in the form of a wall. When you think about the role that art can play music play in challenging those contracts and those barriers where do you see your work fitting in and how can music take down those things that divide us? I really do think that art makes much more of a difference than we think it it can I have seen in my own life that I was very confused. Used and very angry. And and I saw a big difference between us because I have felt discriminated mainly in Mexico curiously. And so on what you know based on my indigenous route on the one side and on the other because I'm young I'm I'm getting. Both ways I lose. That's right. Yeah. So I was I was bitter about that. But but music has really made things come together for me. And I'm so grateful for this enormous gift. Leila downs is new album is called Chee lay. Leila. Thank you so much for coming in. Thank you for having me. Downs album. I'll is available on streaming services. Coming up KPCC arts education reporter, Carla havi are joins me to launch her new project. It's a series. That reunites artists with the teachers who influenced them. For me. I'm very proud Palestinian. I don't shy away from it. But when I say certain things, obviously different layers in there because it's it's rooted in racism, it's rooted in the fact that I'm a Brown era, Muslims saying Palestinians should be free. I'm Michael Varo. That's today on the daily from the New York Times tonight at seven thirty on eighty nine point three KPCC. ABC supporters include son run with a mission to create a planet run by the sun..

Leila downs Carla havi Mexico KPCC New York Times United States Michael Varo ABC reporter Chee
"kpcc arts education" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"kpcc arts education" Discussed on The Frame

"Use. All right. So outside of the plaster room. I have to tell you. There was so many things that you know, we got to share together that were so impactful to me. So the first time I've visited Cal arts which was felt like going to Oz. Real. Excursion that was an excursion maybe two hours away, but for meals a world away. Parents can drive me there, but you could. And so for four years, it was like, we're winning competitions. Everything was going great. I applied to Cal arts. And then disastrous struck. So I'd gotten in. But I couldn't afford it. I was depressed that was walling sadness. Whatever you pulled me out of it. You showed me another option. You're like, okay, you're gonna do some local murals to like earn some money for that summer. So it was doing that. And for whatever reason, I remember you calling me because there was an art school from Cleveland, Ohio that you're like Sunday, you should come in and show them your work. And I'm like, I don't wanna go to Cleveland, Ohio to go to Cleveland institute of the arts, and I showed him my work, and they were they liked it. And they give me a full scholarship loan away. He didn't give up on me. I worried about you every day it was freezing. The I worried all day if you're going to be all right? If you're warm. My mom is mentally ill. So she never was able to play that nurturing mother role, and I've just got so lucky so many times in my life to have so many great, our teachers, but I think you really did more than any other teacher that to also make sure that I had closed on my back teams, you sent me care packages. I remember vividly getting hot chocolate remember vividly, getting jackets from your own son. Like, this is something my mom could never do for me. It was just so natural. I just. I don't think I would have ever had the words to ask for that level of love support and care, but I really did need in that time my life. I did it for six months, and guess what? I learned all these fundamentals that. I would never learned a Cal arts. Good, and that made my portfolio that much better. And I applied the second year, and they gave me more money. Never really talked about like, you know, seeing like my personal work in like when you I mean, I just think that I'm I'm the underling. I can't critique your professional work. I mean, it's wonderful. You'll never stop being my no, it is your books are unbelievable. And your your animations are unbelievable to be part of your education and just be a part of your life is just been so wonderful. And I always think. That's my son. So. That was animator and illustrator. Sandra tells faking art teacher from San Bernardino. Hi, Julie table, so Carla what struck you about that student teacher relationship. It's just they went from drawing with these cheap pastels on cardboard that they pulled out of a dumpster to about twenty years later a short film by about Sunday being nominated for an Oscar. It's quite this ark for Sunday as an artist, and I'm really struck by how much credit he gives to Julie for that. Even after all these years, not just for his success in art, but also for the care packages and the support that she gave him personally to and you've got more of these stories, I do, but I'm still looking for more. So folks out there, if you're working in a creative job now, I want to know about the teacher who made a difference in your life. Just head over to our website L, A dot com. I will read every single story that comes in through there, and all your there, you can actually watch this really sweet video we made of Sunday and Julie reuniting here at KABC, though, warning it may. Make you cry. That's KPCC's arts education reporter, Carla havi are per project has made possible with support from the California arts council Carla thanks so much and that is the frame for today. I'm John horn. Thanks for joining us. We're back here tomorrow.

Cal arts Oz Julie Cleveland Carla havi KPCC Ohio California arts Cleveland institute John horn KABC Oscar reporter Sandra San Bernardino twenty years four years six months two hours
"kpcc arts education" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

07:25 min | 2 years ago

"kpcc arts education" Discussed on The Frame

"Wanted slightly a different version this time around, you know, going to the actual village recording people on site, and that was really exciting for me because I love that kind of natural sound that that bans have. And then, of course, Camilo, you know, did the post production in studio and did a lot of kind of effects, and and these kinds of things or downs about her new record algae lay. I wanna play another song from your album, it's called community, Vida, or I guess paths of my life. And it's a song that you do with your mom who sings tackling. Be nothing. Tell me about the song about your collaboration with your mom. Well, this is an amazing song. I think they're, you know few songs in your life that you say. This is one of the songs, right? And the lyrical so is very specific to to mother one of lyric says. I didn't know that life would be this way. I'm surprised I it's very different from what I envisioned it to be when my mother took care of me, and I was a child, and that's basically the the lyric. And then another part of the Luke says I hope one day to pay back the favor of being raised by my parents, or my mother mainly so it's a mother's day song. Really? And and I asked my mother to translate it in mistake. And so we worked on it together. And she she was very emotional about it. She was like, wow. You know, this lyric really made me cry. But cry about. Just the miracle of life. And it's not just that this song is in beach tech. There are different languages throughout the album. Yeah. That's kind of been question for me throughout my career. I've tried to should I say educate people through music. I hope not to be too preachy. But I I hope that the people in the US, especially learn that indigenous languages are alive today, and well and being spoken by a lot of people who work here in the kitchens, and the farms, and and have a heritage that that that is quite beautiful poetically for a lot of people language can be a barrier. And certainly there's been a lot of conversation and this country about barriers between the United States and Mexico, particularly in the form of a wall. When you think about the role that art can play music play in challenging those contracts and those barriers where do you see your work fitting in and how can music take down those things that divide us? I really do think that art makes much more of a difference than we think it it can I have seen in in my own life that I was very confused. Sd and very angry. And and I saw a big difference between us because I have felt discriminated mainly in Mexico curiously and so hard, you know, based on my indigenous route on the one side and on the other because I my young I'm I'm getting. And you're not. So I was I was bitter about that. But but music has really made things come together for me. And I'm so grateful for this enormous gift relive downs. His new album is called Chee lay. Leila. Thank you so much for coming in. Thank you for having me. Onside. Downs album. Al Chile is available on streaming services. Coming up KPCC arts education reporter, Carla havi are joins me to launch her new project. It's a series. That reunites artists with the teachers who influenced them. Ghana's kometa. Welcome back to the frame. I'm John horn. We're trying something new here on our show. And that is where reuniting people who are working in the arts and entertainment with the teachers and mentors who changed their lives. KPCC's very own arts education reporter, Carla hobby are is bringing us those stories and she's here with me now. Hey, carla. So how did this series come about? Obviously, a really big part of life here in southern California and learning about art is actually written into state education code here. But unfortunately, despite those things not everyone gets to learn about the arts like, for example, in LA county here, lower income students and students of color have less access to arts in their schools. So I wanted to find practicing artists today for whom learning about art really made of big difference in their life personally and professionally and they wanted to reunite them with teachers who really made that difference made that happen. So who story do you have today? Okay. I up his sons. Patel. He's this accomplished animator and illustrator a short film he directed while. He was at Pixar called Sunday super team was nominated for an Oscar in two thousand sixteen but before all of that back in the eighties and early nineties. He was this quiet kid at San Bernardino, high and Julie table was his art teacher. We reunited the two of them here at KABC. Here's what they said. You know, how poor our high school was other high schools had you know, they had money to put into their program. But you I I didn't want you guys to know that we didn't have all the best of the best, you know, to create. So we did the creation on cardboard that. We all we pulled out of the dumpster. Remember that we head chocks? But they're the, you know, poorest of Chuck's that we not liking the show. Over the room. So whenever there was money to be made for you guys. We did it versus like shade this box and do the still life. It was win awards win scholarships. So you can. Keep getting better and better education. Mike concern was to be serious about it that these were kids at that's all you had. I never gotten that much money. And that it afforded me to finally a drafting tables, like the only thing I wanted think cost me a hundred bucks or something the rest of the money. I gave to my parents. But it afforded me like tool that a professional would use.

Mexico reporter United States Camilo Carla havi Downs KPCC Ghana Luke Carla hobby LA county Mike concern San Bernardino Chee Leila California Al Chile John horn Patel
"kpcc arts education" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

06:31 min | 2 years ago

"kpcc arts education" Discussed on The Frame

"You. Coming up on the frame a program that provides mentors from Hollywood for teen girls aspiring to write for a living. There's a mentoring program in Hollywood called right girl. That's right with a w that pairs actors and writers with teen girls. At a recent star studded events if you prominent actors brought some of the teen stories to life KPCC's arts education reporter, Carla heavier takes us there. There's a space off vine street called the Linwood Dunn theater. It's very Hollywood there. These giant like bigger than life sized Oscar statuettes that flank hallways lined with behind the scenes photos of Hollywood hits in one of those hallways. I mean eighteen year old Sam from east LA. I'm right girl. I've been right grow for six seasons. Sam is referring to a free L A based program called right girl. That's w our IT. It's for expiring writers like her ages thirteen to eighteen who are looking for guidance from women writers who volunteered to share their expertise. Write girl pairs hundreds of teen girls with professionals for workshops and one on one mentoring. The teen girls are out of vulnerable stage in their life. So right girl asked us. Not to use their full names every month. Right girl offers sessions focused on different aspects of writing and Sam is here in this glamorous space owned by the academy of Motion Picture Arts and sciences because at the last workshop in character in dialogue, the right girls wrote scripts and now the organization has arranged for actors to take those stories from the page to the stage and SAM's hoping her script gets chosen. That's very exciting fingers crossed. I get something in there. This event helps the organization raise enough money to help the teams, and it's also a chance for them to see their work interpreted by professionals and not just any professionals, but a star studded cast this time actors like Keiko again ah from Gilmore girls Kirby. Hello Baptiste, Wayne Brady and Seth Rogan are bringing the girls writing to life. The actors perform fourteen of the scripts including SAM's. Here's how teased reading a monologue Sam row seriously. How easy does he think this is stab stabber you dead? No, see my job takes precision. I have to track. The jagged down find hide out and grow through this whole process or like this scene written by seventeen year old Rachel where Keiko again plays a student who's excited. She got into her dream college until she notices something on her acceptance letter, my dedication to athleticism and commitment to water polo. We. Water polo. I don't even know how to swim. A panel of female screenwriters give feedback on the scripts like on that last one producer screenwriter Josiane mcgibbon known for runaway bride and desperate. Housewives has this to say one thing. That's so hard to do that. You did is really take us on such a journey. The shows hosted by actor and New York Times bestseller, Lauren Graham, this is her first year as a right girl mentor herself being creative being playful having fun. Finding your voice I I wish I'd had that at a younger age be cut up after the show, and she told me she mentors is right girl because she believes it's important for teen girls in particular to find their voice that can only be positive for the creative world for the political world for the world. Let's talk about that. I second the creative world in TV women writers represented just twenty five percent of the writers on broadcast network shows. According to a twenty eighteen study from the center for the study of women in television and film at San Diego State. Eight in film. The stats are even more dismal women writers represented just fifteen percent of all writers on last year's top one hundred films. It's something Victoria who comes to rate girl from the valley says she thinks about I caught up with her by the red carpet after the show, we have too many of the same stories was, you know, not to invalidate anyone's experiences, but new stories need to be told. She's just fourteen years old. And this is her first year with right girl, her script got chosen to I heard like the names, Alex, Diane, which are the characters and story, and I like freaked out and I turned to hurt. I was like oh my God. Mom like. Listen as like reading out and everything in her seeing the characters are getting ready for a party when Alex played by Rogan has something to get off his chest. I know you don't get it. And you've lived your whole life. Not, you know, having a target your shirt to make sure your stomach wasn't bulging out, and we've never had to wear massive hoodies to hide your hideous body, and you can walk into a mall and not feel the changing room stalls closing in on you taunting you for not fitting in a suit. And I'm glad you don't. And I hope you never do because it's soul-crushing, and I love you, and I wouldn't ever want you to experience something like that. Seth delivered the lines a little bit differently than what I had imagined. But I actually found it to be a lot more like moving the way that it was. So like honest during the panel discussion writer, actor and director Lauren Miller Rogin had this to say about Victoria's work. The bravery that a writer can have inputting some of those really raw emotions in a scene can be so rewarding to the people who are enjoying your material victorious has she was thrilled to get this kind of feedback on her first real script. Oh my goodness. Like, if you're telling me that this is good like, maybe I can actually like make something out of this. That is kind of the point says, right girls, founder and executive director. Karen taylor. They have a lot of potential if you work with them when they're young before they get that idea that it's on a table or they get doors closed on them. She says that's one of the reasons why they host this event with the academy in their building. You just get this feeling like you're part of this whole lineage of film writers. I'm not at school. I'm not at a community center. I'm right here in Hollywood with Hollywood writers that are going to help me do this next month the girls take on creative nonfiction by writing memoir. The

Hollywood Seth Rogan Sam writer Keiko Alex Sam row Linwood Dunn theater SAM KPCC Carla heavier Karen taylor Lauren Graham New York Times founder and executive director reporter LA younger age Josiane mcgibbon
"kpcc arts education" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"kpcc arts education" Discussed on KPCC

"Of staying in one place, and allowing it too steep and boil hand just create this kind of pressure cooker environment, and captain Marvel's composer, shares her early voice member recordings for the movie's theme song all that coming up on today's edition of the frame. From ABC news. I'm Tammy Trujillo. Some of the stories we're following at seven oh one horses started training again this morning on the inner training track at Senator park the main tracks still closed following the deaths of Twenty-one horses at the track. Since late December the parks. Brought in veteran track expert Dennis Moore to examine the surface. He found no issues on the inner track. And now the horses were injured on that track. Santa Anita publicity director, Mike Willman says they decided to let the horses run on the inner track because keeping them off altogether can be bad too. You know, we've got about eighteen hundred horses here. And you have got to do something with these athletes as they walked three consecutive mornings. But you gotta do more with them than walk the tracks restricted jogging and galloping right now the chief operating officer of the tracks owner spoke to the daily racing form. He says jogging and galloping on the main track may start on Monday. And depending on the weather and track inspections racing. Could. Get back in action March twenty first or twenty second more than two dozen soccer players for the US women's national team are suing the US soccer federation, they claim they're the victims of gender discrimination. The players say they're paid less than treated differently than their male counterparts. The suit is seeking equal pay back wages and other damages coming up it's the frame with John horn. Did you know the California education code actually require school districts to teach the arts, I'm Colonel Javier KPCC's arts education reporter now it's time to hear from art teachers how this plays out in the classroom. I'm inviting free of them. And you two are Crawford family forum on March night together. We'll share true stories about how the arts can change students. Lives are AP at key PCC dot org slash inperson. Welcome.

Dennis Moore Tammy Trujillo US soccer federation captain Marvel ABC Colonel Javier KPCC Senator park chief operating officer soccer Mike Willman US Santa Anita Crawford publicity director John horn California reporter twenty second
"kpcc arts education" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

06:11 min | 2 years ago

"kpcc arts education" Discussed on The Frame

"Today is Thursday. And that's the day. Our weekly newsletter goes out. It's perfect one. Stop shopping to stay up to date with our show and with headlines from the wide world of culture. And we always include tips for events happening in southern California over the coming weekend, you can sign up at the frame dot org slash newsletter. But now let's go back in time in March of nineteen sixty eight a little more than fifty years ago thousands of students from five high schools in east LA walked out of their classrooms. They were protesting the unequal education that they were receiving until last year's nationwide. Protests by students concerned about school shootings. LA's walkouts were considered the biggest such event and US history this weekend students from van Nuys high school will revisit that historical event in an oratorio. They wrote with artist from the LA master chorale KPCC arts education reporter, Carla havi air has this preview. It's production week and students from van Nuys high or practicing the opening movement from show that is titled walkout past present repeal. It isn't worth typical high school musical for one thing. It's in or toria as senior Darren Calderon puts it it's less Rhymney and less like show. Tune even a musical is imagine fewer sets and costumes more choral music. Oh, and another thing that makes this one special the students are used to singing music that's put in front of them. That's only master Kraus's Leslie beard, the producer of the project. But to sing music that they wrote it's such a unique experience for them. That's right. The students wrote this forty minute work with help from teaching artists. The process took twenty weeks. They did research personal essays and interviewed participants of the history portraying on stage that informed the lyrics next came the music. Here's the schools, choir director brand outta though we talk about word painting. So that we make the music really sound. Like what the words are then opening song walkout walkout. Walkout wall. It's so percussive v-. And yet they're voices are behind all of this percussion so imitates this whole movement of marching through being strong together. One of the movement's is written from the point of view of one of the real life student organizers of the walkouts Paula Chris Osimo, we got very emotional today. Like every time we saying movement too. Because movement to is about a girl feeling that students deserve better in the song girls teacher has been disrespecting her. So she tells him that she'll become a teacher one day and help her students. The. When I hear Jessica sing that I feel like. She's really expressing what many young teachers go into this field for that. The students deserve more and deserve to be heard on Evelyn who has taught in LA USD for twelve years. Believe studying history through music helps the students understand the events and the people behind them in a different way. It's not just reading it in a book or casually talking about it in discussion, but they are the characters and you can hear that through their singing through their performance through the look in their eyes. Even when they're not singing that they've really embodied the message what they have learned student Aaron Calderon place. How Castro a teacher and key organizer of the nineteen sixty walkouts. I I read about him. And and I saw I saw interviews with him. And the thing that struck me the most in the thing that I wanna portray the most is that he cared so much for students. He didn't let anything get in the way with that. He lost his job because of his students, and he kept on fighting offers students. Problems and. Not. They like to terrorists down we will fight for rights ad moon. If only she gone. After watching and reading and learning so much about this entire movement. I'm honestly a little disappointed in myself that I didn't know a lot about the movement and south Castro. But I am so grateful that I do now. No, it's not just the past that the students are learning about in the later part of the oratorio, we do discuss more current events, and we do discuss the parkland shooting in surge of student activism that's happened since I never thought that working on a piece that involves that she kinda movements can talk about something. So recent teaching artist Alice kirwin Murray says she can't help. But notice how these projects keep relating to current events two years ago. We did the Japanese American internment, and it happened to coincide with the Muslim travel ban last year. The topic was the history of the women's movement. And it was right before me to showed up. And everybody's consciousness for choir director, brand Revo. It's not just about what the students learn about history current events or even about themselves, but also with the audience can learn from them. This oratorio is composed of eighty students who all have different thoughts and feelings than ideas, and they debated and they disagreed and they didn't crumble under disagreement. And I think that's a great demonstration for not just other students, but lots of people in this world, these students are an amazing example for everyone.

LA director van Nuys high school LA master chorale KPCC arts van Nuys California Darren Calderon Paula Chris Osimo Aaron Calderon US LA USD Carla havi Castro Alice kirwin Murray Jessica Kraus Evelyn reporter producer
"kpcc arts education" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"kpcc arts education" Discussed on The Frame

"KPCC podcasts are supported by the Netflix film, the other side of the wind witness the last film from legendary director Orson Welles the other side of the wind the story of a director named Jay Jay, Jay Hannaford who turns to Hollywood from years of semi exile in Europe with plans to complete work on his own innovative comeback movie. Also, entitled the other side of the wind a cinematic event forty years in the making the other side of the wind now streaming only on Netflix. Welcome back to the frame. I'm John horn. Dana Gioia is California. Born and raised a Hawthorne boy who went on to chair the National Endowment for the arts for six years. And now he's wrapping up his term as California's poet laureate during his two year stint his goal was to visit all fifty eight counties in the state and much of that travel has been done via road trip. KPCC's arts education reporter, Carla havi are tagged along for one of the last legs of that journey when I asked in joy up. I could hitch a ride with him. I didn't actually think he'd say. Yes. But on a Thursday afternoon, he pulled into the KBC parking line. Hello, thanks for having me. It'd be fun to drop off. We went me and the California poet laureate on a road trip this afternoon. We're driving from Pasadena to Santa Barbara, California. We're doing it in my ten year old car. Laureate are supposed to make. Poetry more accessible to everyday Californians over the years pass on res have created poetry handbook for kids and a unity poem, using some missions of lines and phrases from folks around the state Joya was appointed by governor Jerry Brown at the end of twenty fifteen and road trips. Like this one are part of his project bringing poetry to audiences in every one of the state's fifty eight counties at this point. He doesn't mean that we're relying on my very unreliable memory. I figure if I can't find Santa Barbara. I have no right to be the California Ponant Lorient got his appearances..

California KPCC Jay Jay Santa Barbara Netflix Jay Hannaford Orson Welles Dana Gioia director Jerry Brown Carla havi Europe KBC National Endowment John horn Hollywood Joya reporter Pasadena forty years
"kpcc arts education" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

05:24 min | 3 years ago

"kpcc arts education" Discussed on The Frame

"Thanks. Niko nineteen eighty eight is in limited release. Starting today coming up. We meet the future generation of mariachi musicians, including one nine year old boy who plays for instruments and sings. And now this week, more than one hundred fifty students from around the country are gathering at self l. Monte high school and it's not for regular summer school as for these seventh mariachi nationals and summer institute. It's an event hosted by mariachi legend, Jose or nana's. Carla havi are KPCC's arts. Education reporter has our story. To to go. So has been playing mariachi music for six years. And in those six years, he's become quite an accomplished musician. He plays the trumpet, the harp and the guitar on which is big bass guitar. He's also learning guitar. And he sings. All that. And he's just nine years old. Pedrito from arena valley in riverside, but he's here at south on Monte highschool for the week to participate in this Mario CI, summer institute in competition, it's run by Jose mandates who's kind of a big deal. A fifth generation muddy Archie who founded the LA based Monday cheese sold the man he go, he's composed and performed on fifteen albums. He's even got nominated for Grammys. He is the reason my students came here. Some are from southern California. Some came from as far away as Washington state, eleven-year-old cloy Petar, say from Placentia is one of them I wanted to come because thought this would be a good opportunity to learn from Jose on this because he is an inspiration to kids and people who want to become somebody important in the muddy achieve business and undis- isn't just there to be important. He really is getting into the details with them. Liberal folks pass. Jewish would have been used to urinary correctly. I don't ever say what who suffers amusing suffers. He compares Mattia chief in Mexico to jazz in the US for one thing, it's an important part of the culture bring money and wearing them. Charles Marie suit is like wearing the Mexican flag. And it's also technically challenging. It's not a music that says, okay, you're gonna play this where you're going to do tocado here. You're gonna do a slur here. Certain phrasing and accents muddy at she is very heartfelt. So the first the lead trumpet player is feeling the music, and please very pretty the second. And the third trumpet player have to follow his lead. They have to feel the music just like him. She'll go so loves that improvisation part of muddy achie- music. Like when he's really feeling song, you can do video, what is that? Like if it's in the middle of the song and you can go like this. Maple, she send your like that. So becomes two programs like this to find other people who like money anti to, as end is puts it. It's a way to learn about and celebrate their culture together. It's very important for us to share our knowledge. You know what these kids in some cases don't have a lot of experience, but it's important for them to know where the music comes from for them to to, to feel proud of their culture through the music. They're also learning important life skills like teamwork. When you think of cheat, don't think of one person you think of a whole group that's eleven year old clue Petar Sagan. She says, she came here because she wants to perform muddy achy for a living. When she grows up. I wanna become a famous singer and I wanna trouble all over the world singing to people and says, yeah, he seen alumni of his programs go on to study music and form their own groups. Some have even joined his, but even if they don't, he still proud. A lot of them have. Have become lawyers that become doctors, you know that have become professional teachers also caters. It's awesome. You know that that's the whole thing behind this. It's not really to create professional matches it just for them to create a love for their music. You know a sense of identity and to have more discipline in what they do. You know anything else they do besides music. There is competition at the end of all of this. The winners will perform at the Orange County fair on Sunday. For the frame. I'm Carla have year. And

Jose Archie Monte high school Carla havi Niko summer institute Petar Sagan reporter cloy Petar Monte highschool Placentia California Charles Marie arena valley Orange County US Mexico Maple Washington undis
"kpcc arts education" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

07:11 min | 3 years ago

"kpcc arts education" Discussed on The Frame

"Like the waves running in and out like the tide. He squeeze your is tight enough. You could almost see the sun. Smell assault. Feel saying, I mean, it's a beautiful scene. She's talking about this kind of magical place as you hear traffic. I mean, it's so removed from the life that she is living, and it's a theme that the film comes back to and revisits in different ways. Was that something that was in the film from its earliest conception? Why was that important to the story? Well, because angel is such a tough character, you know, and again, another main reason why I wanted to make this phone was because I wanted to show that, you know, it's so easy to judge somebody who walks down the street in a tough way and everything like that. And to see this, that the inside of inside of that person is a real beauty in depth and grace and dignity. And and so I, I wanted these kind of poetic elements to be able to allow us into angels experience that there's this real soft, lovely place that lives inside of her. It is fair to say that you come from very different backgrounds. Janna, your white woman who grew up. In the upper east side of New York, Angie your black women who grew up in foster care, where would you say despite those radical differences in the way you grew up, you share the most in common. Where did you find yourselves connecting as people who share the same interests and concerns? Even though you're upbringings were so different for me, I'll say that we both have the heart of storyteller, and I think that this extremely important. I think that by people telling their story, that's how you connect the most. And so even though we were very differently when she tells her story of who she is, and when I tell my story of who I am, there's still many similarities there because we're human, you know, we're human and Hugh most human want the same things, you know in life, we wanna be fulfilled. We want to have a purpose we want to, you know, leave a legacy or something behind. I mean, we we all connected, you know, in in those ways. And so I think that no matter how. How different your background is. We could connect them. Storytelling. I can't add to that. She said that so beautifully. Jordana Spiro is the director and co writer of night comes on and Jellicoe Juan do is the film's co writer, Jordana, Angie. Thanks so much for coming in. Thank you. Thank you. Night comes on is in limited theaters and available through. I tunes this Friday up next on the frame. We meet one of the top jazz musicians around who's just a teenager. Welcome back to the frame. I'm John horn looking forward a bit next week. We'll have an interview with actor John David, Washington. He's the star of spike. Lee's upcoming movie black Klansmen. You're hearing part of that movie score which was composed by the great jazz trumpeter Terence Blanchard. You can find my recent interview with him at the frame dot org and speaking of jazz twenty. Two of the country's best young musicians are currently participating in the first ever n. y. o. jazz program. It's an extension of the national youth orchestra not only are they studying together, but they also perform last week at Carnegie Hall and are now on tour playing some of the greatest venues in Europe on a bone below a recent graduate of crossroads school for arts and sciences, and Santa Monica is one of those young musicians. KPCC's arts, education reporter, Carla havi are brings us her story. At a recent more on the crossroads jazz room. The aband- takes a crack at on a boon Delos newest composition. Let's. It's for third as bassist. When I wrote this tune, I was kind of thinking I wanted a sweet kind of guy, but also kind of nostalgic, emotional and like for all it was like a reflection of what has happened in my life, but also looking into the future a little bit, which is kind of where she is in life right now on just finished her senior year at crossroads, and she's looking forward to studying music at the college level in the fall. It's a fitting trajectory for a talented young musician. The daughter of two professional musicians who's been playing since she was four. Her mom who's if he never Gara is the second principal violinist in the Los Angeles chamber orchestra, in a session musician for TV and movies. We sort of said, well, you know, in this house just like other people brush their teeth, you play piano. 'cause it's the foundation to learning how to read music. So honest started early first PNO next played violin and then cello when she got to eighth grade and it was time to choose an instrument to study in school. There was a bit of a problem. They didn't have an orchestra option. So she picked up a base. It wasn't easy after all the cello and the base or tune differently. And jazz involves a lot more improv than classical, but everyone surprise she liked. It was like, I'm not going mom. I can't do classical. I couldn't. I can't do orchestra. Now. I have to do jazz. I would like cello, but something about jobs like I love. I think I felt a little bit more emotionally connected to improvising playing the bass. That was five years ago since then on his become quite the accomplished bassist, her resume of performances and awards spans pages in patriots. Big names like the Stanford and Berkeley jazz combos and the Monterey jazz festival. She even was named one of the music centers, spotlight award grand prize finalists last year for context. Other grand prize finalists over the years, include misty Copeland and Adam Lambert and in the fall on us headed off to the New England conservatory of music in Boston for college. But before that she's making a pit stop. We're going to perform at Carnegie Hall. Yeah, that Carnegie Hall Carnegie Hall is like one of the biggest venues to perform as a musician. Like it's just a huge venue is pretty historical. It's like a dream come true. Ana was one of twenty two young jazz musicians from around the country were selected for the kinda GI hall. While music institutes I ever and why? Oh, jazz program, which means not only will she and other young musicians get you perform at the famous music hall. They'll also get to study music together for a few weeks and go on tour playing venues across Europe on got in by submitting some tapes of her improvising and playing standards and video essays. The prompt I chose, which is like a musician who inspires you. So I started talking about like one of my favorite musicians, someone I've looked up to her name's s. brought the Spaulding. She's a bass player. Someone I've been listening to since I started playing the bass.

Carnegie Hall Europe Carnegie Hall Carnegie Hall Angie Jordana Spiro writer assault Janna Terence Blanchard KPCC Hugh John horn Spaulding Ana Washington New York John David Lee Jellicoe Juan Carla havi
"kpcc arts education" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"kpcc arts education" Discussed on The Frame

"From the mon broadcast center at kabc see this is the frame happy friday everybody i'm john rabi sitting in for john horn today honey get more women of color into symphony orchestras the colbourne school in l a has a plan then we'll listen back to my conversation with fi writer harlan ellison when he died last week so did he uniquely cranky voice who wants wrote in storefront windows to prove to people that driving is a job of work that has not done by some sort of black cloaked sorcerer on a glass mountain top that it's like tilling a field or repairing toilets a job of work and the nineteen sixty eight beatles film yellow submarine returns to theaters all that coming up on the frame welcome to the frame i'm john rabi in for john horn thanks for joining us the classical music world has diversity problem people of color make up less than fifteen percent of all orchestra musicians women of color even less but as kpcc arts education reporter carla havi tells us a group of young female musicians at the colbourne school in downtown la is trying to change the system has been morales grew up in two different musical worlds she's a classically trained violinist participated in youth orchestra she also played mattie and mexican folk music i eventually became the concert master of the regional youth orchestra where i lived but i was always lacking the sense of empowerment and community that i felt when i would make music with my buddy it peers a decade later she thinks young women of color face similar challenges so it's kind of jarring to go into concert hall where you're watching the musicians that you respect most in the world and not one of them looks like you it makes it feel as if that's not really a space you can enter a spokeswoman says there are thirteen women of color in la fill out of about one hundred musicians but she declined to provide a more specific demographic breakdown even big orchestras with big budgets around the country a twenty sixteen league of american orchestras study says less than three percent of orchestra musicians or black or latino and the study didn't even look at how many or how few of those were women it's one of the biggest challenges facing classical music today league of american orchestras president and ceo jesse rosen says the future of orchestras depends upon your refreshing in reinventing in our context the context of america today as out of a country that is becoming increasingly diverse which brings us back to la and has mean morales who is now the coordinator of community engagement and career development at colbourne she thought of her challenges as a woman of color and classical music and when i sort of came full circle into a career in arts man ment and back in the classical world that i wanted to work to change that for other young women of color in classical music so she created a fellowship for those young women of color in newsweek if you're supposed to play or saying something loudly you write a little app it means forte the word for strong but if you want to kick it up a notch and play really loud and be really strong you write to apps for dc mo rallies wants her first class of fellows to be really strong that's why she calls them the fourteen fellows you're listening to them right now they're already pretty loud six young musicians go to different high schools they're different ages they play different instruments identify differently racially and religiously if they all say they were immediately friends from the very first meeting last october philo jacqueline rigas who plays the cello has a guess as to why sometimes you don't meet musicians especially musicians of color so like knowing that we have those similiarities i think that's exactly what made us like have a really strong bond and the l know what it's like to enter a world with its own very specific rules so they're paired with mentors take private music lessons and together they attended workshops in mindfulness confidence even etiquette rela says she designed those around what she wishes she knew when she was their age that one time that i showed up to this dinner and felt humiliated when i used the wrong fork or when i broke down before a performance and froze on stage because i couldn't control how i was talking to myself and my brain and outside the program they have an active group chat and go to each other's performances and recitals safaniah hartoyo of violet player from san gabriel says having this group of young women to lean on means a.

kabc john rabi twenty sixteen league fifteen percent three percent
"kpcc arts education" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

07:16 min | 3 years ago

"kpcc arts education" Discussed on The Frame

"Pleasure. American animals opens in theaters on June first coming up, we've is it a theater program that caters to teens and young adults who have autism. Welcome back to the frame. Kobe bird may only be sixteen years old, but he already has his Screen Actors Guild card, and some pretty impressive roles, including guest starring part on ABC's the good doctor bird credits a program called the miracle project with his success. The project brings young people with autism like bird together with people of all abilities to write and perform an original musical. Their latest show is called one eighty five Wilshire, and it goes up this weekend. KPCC arts education. Reporter Carla havi are met up with actor. Kobe bird during a rehearsal. Shut listen. He shut the marquee watching. Kobe bragging confidently during rehearsal. You'd have no reason to believe he's any different than any other actor. And that's kind of the point. Hobie has autism. People with autism can sometimes have trouble communicating it being comfortable in social interactions. His mom, Rachel bird remembers when he was diagnosed with developmental disorder. When he was four and a half years old, his language wasn't good. He was tantrum constantly. He was having a really hard time and we didn't know what he'd be able to do when he was eleven. He tried acting for the first time. He was a step together, step together in the background kind of kid, and he was happy doing that. I was happy seeing him just up there. I wasn't sure how he would do, and I didn't know how he was gonna follow direction. That's when things changed for Koby. And when he met Elaine hall hall, founded the miracle project inspired by her experiences as an onset acting coach for young actors, and then as a mom to a son with autism hotels, Kobe, she saw something special in him. In those early days, the I just remember how disciplined you were and focused you were and how hard you try and added things to the role. And I thought this is really an amazing. Mazing kid. So coach e invited Kobe to join a more advanced class which was an anti bullying play at the Wallis. What was your role ably. I was a bully. Yeah, I big like role. How did you feel about playing a bully? I was like, I don't. I don't. I don't want to do this. I wanna be. This is wrong. These. I don't want people to think that I really am ably in the gnarly mean because I don't do that. So I told coach, I told you, I don't want to be bullied all this was really personal for Koby when he was in school kids. Mike boss actually booming me because I am so thousand for me and coach said, Kobe, this is you acting and this is you showing where people shouldn't do. So he thought about it and he did it. He played a bully being a bully was hard for me, but you know, I I use only experience in being bullied in a in. I put it on a show what people did to me this year show is called one eighty five Wilshire, the actors and their mentors started writing it last fall by doing improv and talking. About their experiences looking for love and without spoiling too much Coby plays a character named dean, use the leader of this of this friends and like he's like on lake all the rules, Bob moon, like like, he's just he's so slick by into so complex, so enthusiastic like so like the so cool. And even though and it's free time, Koby prefers to listen to Frank Sinatra, Ray Charles, and j pop in this show, his character wraps without missing a beat were more than story perceptions. We're more than all of your misconceptions. You can generalize, but be lies. I'm a walking and talking exception. Ramona cure more fix. We're the solution. It takes the eyes of an NC Muda still the new revolution. I'm on. People understand that like we don't want. We don't want you to say, oh, except you. We want you. We want you to show like prove it tripped us that that you, except for Koby the miracle project is about more than just the autism that brought them all together. Now only are he and his fellow cast members learning important lessons about the arts, like for singing lake. You can't seeing with your throat like you're like, you'd ever make your stomach. They're also gaining valuable life skills like how to deal with change, which is something that can be difficult for people who have autism. It's a professional theatre group in anybody in theater knows that intact or even different nights of the shows, something in changing. It's, oh, we're not gonna. Put this in. We're gonna put that in and to see them take that change, take the direction and be able to do it and apply. It is pretty brilliant something I never knew my son would be able to do. It doesn't just do all of this for fun. It's actually his job after performing, but the miracle project Coby was noticed by talent managers landed real paying gigs on the good doctor. Her in speechless playing characters with autism. His mom says, even has an agent. Now watching, Kobe go from a kid who watched movies to a kid who is now making movies and making TV shows and onstage and telling stories is amazing. Koby says the support of environment at the miracle project made all of this possible room was so accepting of me not tell me I couldn't do because with that with that, gave me the confidence in it and maybe maybe come on my show. Tell me I can do this. I can talk more I can. I can sing more social more. That's they show me. It's okay to be good to have autism. Next goal landing a role play a character without autism for the frame. I'm Carla heavier. The miracle projects, original production. One eighty five Wilshire runs June first through the third at the Wallis Annenberg center for the performing arts in Beverly Hills, and we close today with this the Fuhrer around Roseanne bar's tweets, and the cancellation of her show continues to rage. And now another firestorm has broken out over a vulgar and sexist comment. Samantha b made last night on her show Trump who works at the White House to post the second most oblivious tweet. We've seen this week, you know if that's a beautiful photo of you and your child, but let me just say one mother to another, do something about your dad's immigration practices. You feckless. Be in her network. TBS have apologized for her comment, but it's unlikely that this controversy will come down anytime soon. Many people are calling for her show to meet the same fate as Roseanne's and some advertisers are dropping their sponsorship of be stay tuned and that is it for today's show. You can keep up with us on Twitter at the frame. You can also find me there at j. g. horn. Thanks for listening. We'll see you back here tomorrow.

Kobe Koby Roseanne bar Coby Carla havi KPCC Reporter Screen Actors Guild Rachel bird developmental disorder Elaine hall hall Twitter ABC Hobie singing lake NC Muda Wallis TBS j. g. horn