35 Burst results for "Koch"

Conversion Killers for Photography Sites with Jan Koch

The WordPress Photography Podcast

04:47 min | 4 months ago

Conversion Killers for Photography Sites with Jan Koch

"My name is scott wine wits. And today i'm joined by my guest. Johncock host the wbz agency summit and consults businesses on hosting their own virtual events. His agency power community driven businesses that serve digital agencies to host virtual event so they can grow their loyal audience and establish thought leadership. When he's not working on the business he loves spending time with his wife and daughter were chasing his silver lab through his backyard. So welcome yon finally. We're connecting And i'm glad to have you in. This is going to be a really good a really good educational discussion for a lot of photographers around the world. Thank you so much. I haven't meets code. It's so everybody where you're from because obviously you've got a different accent than i do. So allow share a little bit. A little bit about your backstory absolutely so. I am from germany so english is not my native language bandwidth we if i mess up. Sometimes i do my best. I started using what press in. Twenty twelve's Originally where. I got in touch with his online marketing digital space and in thousand thirteen. I decided to become seven employed. And i haven't looked back since so it's the best thing ever for me. And as you mentioned we have a small family here that is supported by lend business and virtual events and stuff like that recently acquired vitual summit mastery dot com. which is the leading course for running ritual events. It's actually the cause. I took to run. Majority wants to learn how to do the the right process out to make sure that the events are successful and stuff like that. So excited about this. But i'm also very much looking forward to talk about all the good stuff. We have coming up today for sure. So you started using president who doesn't twelve. I just did a quick. Google search that means you started using wordpress inversion around three point four. Yep that's really interesting. I love hearing that. I love hearing because like every stage of wordpress has a different look in a different function that didn't exist in the past and it's always fun to see a just a date myself a bit. When i first started using wordpress was still version one and there is no gallery system so i started using extra gallery. Whatever your it was version one. that's yeah so so what. What is your your favorite thing about. Wordpress that As helped you stick with it and You know that helps keep you. You intrigued and interested in wanting to recommend it to others. Yeah that's a really good question. And they are two aspects. One is how flexible the system. It's like you can do almost everything with repes- if you know your way around. Php and my sequel pretty much. A lot of things with were president than I'm not a developer by trade. I've learned a business consultant. Study for business consultant so What i needed to rely on especially in the beginning is the community and education from the community and by diving into the community mercy myself into that and sharing what. I'm learning learning from others. That is what really made me. Stick with what press because there are so many tutorials out there. There are so many helpful people that you can just approach on twitter or stack overflow or whatever in any facebook group that you might find your own wordpress people want to help you if you post is somewhat relevant enough on your homework before that so That's the best thing ever now with the virtual events that i'm hosting i'm seeing this to speak from all across the globe just willing to volunteer to speak and to help me get the word out of what i'm doing. I think that is the best thing about many other. Cms can out from for sure. Yeah the community is definitely one of the best aspects of wordpress. The is great. But you don't get the same experience community wise that you do with software In the websites based like yes sure. There's facebook for squarespace or or wicks one up but the interactions are not nearly as as depth as you get in the wordpress based plus these dedicated events. Both what used to be in person basically barely virtual these days I can't wait to get back to the in person stuff. how many can you have any work camps. have you been to. i'm just one. I have to admit workum europan twenty eighteen in berlin. Did you speak at it or

Scott Wine Johncock WBZ YON Germany Google Facebook Twitter Berlin
Germany set to extend hard lockdown as daily deaths mount

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 4 months ago

Germany set to extend hard lockdown as daily deaths mount

"Germany's a disease control center who's announced well over nine hundred more because the nineteen deaths fueling expectations the chancellor Angela Merkel would extend the country's locked down until the end of the month at least Germany's latest lockdown took effect on December sixteenth off to a partial shutdown starting in early November failed to reduce the number of daily new coronavirus infections it was initially set to expire on January ten Merkel's meeting with federal governors would decide how long the lockdown should go on for another topic high on the agenda will be addressing criticism of the country's vaccination program amid frustrations over its gradual stopped the Robert Koch institute says in a nation of eighty three million two hundred to sixty five thousand vaccinations have been reported by Monday I'm Charles the last month

Germany Angela Merkel Merkel Robert Koch Institute Charles
"koch" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

04:24 min | 5 months ago

"koch" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"And we're back. It's dot net rocks. I'm richard campbell. That's carl franklin. Hey man and we're talking to mathias about the new ca- five fly no like four point. Oh okay different. Like one point. Oh like one point only different changing gears a little bit. This approach to building a. There's always this challenge of every build script is unique or every build approaches unique per project. There's not a lot of re-use in building except maybe the initial cut and paste. When i started new project. I grab a build script. I feels like sorta close and start from e d. Do you try to address that with nuke. Yeah definitely so. I remember initially like i said i was always big fan of build automation. That wasn't always something that annoyed me because the usual the usual solution to that was using a sophomore for instance gets put all the reusable functions. There put it in there and then reference in another repository but they kind of come to us. In euch we mean why have like three different strategies. Bill charing the first works a bit like you give a u. a. l. to file It will automatically downloads before the project is compiled. The second is Using a global tool so that could be used if if you work for instance in a more like core project inside your company and you want to implement build and everyone else is just using it. So he can provide a global tool which people that can invoke they would just type built for instance and the ones they one of the most interesting for me because that makes use of Cer was eight. I think eight Interface implementations because those those in the face before implementations. They can't solve the diamond problem. Way don't way contacts in nc sharp. You contact multiple Based classes but you can have. Multiple interface implementations and since now we can provide an implementation in interface. You can easily compose different concerns in interfaces and let you build just inherited that's so for instance for instance I remember there was there was a very nice blockposts from a fill hack nougat signing new good package signing and someone. I think it was nate. Mcmaster of who came up with a with a with a with the with an implementation for that but he said well. It's not really great because you can have those Hundreds of lines of code just to do signing and You also after adapt your your build process of its now with those default interface implementations what i have in my implementation side just inherits a interface which is called assigned packages. And that's Kind of sneaks into the pipeline between pack and publish and takes the patches sense them to signing service. In this case. I'm using sign file which also provides certificates for for open source projects and donald stem again Or gets the the signs versions of the packages and then i can push normally Just just like usual to new gets and that is a matter of implementing an interface and Implementing a property which returns all the patches that you want to sign. Nice nice so for me. It's like an enterprise architect. I could be responsible for this class. That handles package signing for any builds going on inside the organization. Exactly and the only thing you would do. I mean otherwise. It works like any other new package. You would publish that. Maybe internally for your company.

richard campbell carl franklin mathias Mcmaster nate
"koch" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

04:05 min | 5 months ago

"koch" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"New that been up to on my out there so much stuff. Actually yeah Where should i begin. What's interesting i well. I don't know maybe you comment on the cake versus new a question. I mean i think we got it right. Yeah for most part i think. Yeah so Cake has this this guy two separate on not exactly two separate but i mean i would call it flavor so they have the normal cake a thing which is a scripting and which was also the thing that i i tried then and then they also have a project which which is called cake frosting and cake frosting also is based on comments applications as the thing that starts your bills but one thing where nuke is different is that it uses more like the original cakes and texts so How you how you define your execution methods. Which should be executed the dependencies and so on and also what it what its users. What i think also mentioned last time is all of your targets. I mean hell you name them their actual symbols which is a great benefit if you have more complex scripts because he can Properly rename them and get updated all their other occurrences or whether they referenced and cake. Frosting is nothing more based on on types. So if i'm not mistaken every step is a separate type and dependencies are expressed through attributes. It it's almost like you've got to pick your poison. How do you wanna organizes your your the information. You're passing into your build process I usually take the approach that i am. I mean if if a build is is a more complex than what i do because it's a single. It's a single class that i use for for a single for built. But if you let's say for instance. I have a normal pipeline of compiled pack publish end tests etc. But i also have other targets for instance to create to announce a like like Sent send a tweet or make an announcement In the workspace that we have and to kind of all that. I also put a different targets in two different pasha fights or using pasha class for that and otherwise. I mean what's what's really beneficial is because those are all just symbols. The the individual built steps you can also very easily navigate to them. So for instance. If i'm somewhere in my solution and a new project also always sits beside. I mean you don't have to but usually it's sits besides Normal production and you can for instance Used the golden to type feature and then tight build thought and tests for instance and immediately jumps there. That's that's great benefit also of using symbols. as as opposed to strings nice maintainability of a bill. Processes pretty powerful nothing worse than having to edit a magic string. Yeah exactly exactly. I also try in their various various spots in the code where i always try to be More on the type level. So last time we also briefly mentioned the the fluence tax for invoking a command line tools by the way that was. That was very embarrassing. Last time i get that recording to my to my friend and he asked me afterwards men. It's command lines who are.

pasha
David Dinkins, New York City’s Only Black Mayor, Dead At 93

Radio From Hell

01:11 min | 5 months ago

David Dinkins, New York City’s Only Black Mayor, Dead At 93

"New York City Mayor David Dinkins has died. He was New York City's first black mayor. Mr Dinkins passed away Monday at his home in New York of apparent natural causes. He died less than two months after his wife, Joyce had passed away. Dinkins beat long time Mayor Ed Koch. How am I done them all right down. In 1989, but then lost after his first term, too. Rudy Giuliani in 1993. He won the 89 election. With a pledge for racial healing. He was passionate about equality, saying he was the mayor of a very He was the mayor of every New Yorker, adding We are all foot soldiers in the march to freedom. The former mayor referred to The people of his fair city as a gorgeous mosaic. He worked hard to camp down the racial tensions in New York City, especially in multicultural neighborhoods. He fought for better housing, health care and was always available to hear the voices of people. Who traditionally were never heard from

Mayor David Dinkins Mr Dinkins New York City Dinkins Ed Koch Rudy Giuliani Joyce New York
David Dinkins, First Black Mayor of New York City, Dead at 93

Morning Edition

00:42 sec | 5 months ago

David Dinkins, First Black Mayor of New York City, Dead at 93

"City Mayor David Dinkins has died. Dinkins was elected in 1989. He was the city's first and only black mayor only served one term. He took office at a time when the city face to soaring murder rate and stubborn unemployment and helped bring the 1992 Democratic National Convention to New York. His calm demeanor was a dramatic shift from both his predecessor, Adcox and Koch. Excuse me and his successor, Rudy Giuliani, But critics disliked his considered approach and he faced accusations. He failed to act decisively in times of crisis. Dinkins death comes just weeks after the death of his wife, Joyce last month he was 93 years old.

Mayor David Dinkins Dinkins Adcox Koch Rudy Giuliani New York Joyce
Coronavirus cases hit records in Europe, surpassing U.S. numbers

Morning Edition

04:17 min | 7 months ago

Coronavirus cases hit records in Europe, surpassing U.S. numbers

"Americans have looked with envy as Europe's performance against the pandemic. In many European countries, cases were much lower the rate of cases anyway than the United States. Things have not much improved in the U. S. But now Europe overall is worse. Reporting almost twice as many new daily Corona virus cases as the United States and governments are trying to respond. Reporter asked me Nicholson is covering this from Berlin. Hey, there. Good morning. People were so impressed with Europe for a while, which even seemed to be reopening more normally than the United States was able to what changed. Firstly, Steve the weather a zit gets colder, More and more people are meeting indoors Flu season is also upon us on schools and universities are back inside classrooms. Another reason is what the Germans Call the prevention paradox. Countries that previously did well to prevent the virus from spreading are now struggling to do so because people become complacent about it or have a false sense of security. So they're no longer adhering to safety measures. Will Germany where you are is one of the countries that did do well, so how does it look now? Well, as you say, it has fed well and and it has been seen as a bit of a pandemic role model. But just this morning, the CDC equivalent to the Robert Koch Institute reported its highest number of new infections since the start of the pandemic. And in more personal news. I just had My child Steak head teacher has tested positive. So now we're waiting to hear from contact traces about testing, So I have the situation is changing on DH. The Chancellor Angela Merkel is certainly worried. In fact, yesterday she summoned Germany's 16 state governors to Berlin to meet in person for the first time. Since March on it's worth mentioning that medical can't actually make any unilateral decisions about measures because the power lies with the state. Is Merkel getting her country's state governors to agree on what to do? Yes, although I think the better answer there is will see she has managed to get in to agree on a slate of fairly low key measures on she's also warned that more will come if necessary. What is clear is that she and other politicians really want to avoid another lock down. How is another big country? France approaching this where I know cases are already on the also on the rise well that the French approach is much tougher than Germany's, mainly because the infection rate is four times as high but also because President Macron has more powers than Merkel in in what is a much more centralized country, so From Saturday. There's going to be a nighttime curfew in Paris on and eight other cities for at least the next month, meaning that if you refuse to stay home after 9 p.m., you will face fines. But last night's announcement wasn't all about legal measures. Macron also Urged his fellow citizens to be cooperative on DH. His message was conveyed in an interview rather than as a Zanon address, which some believe was an attempt to appeal to people in a less top down way. And what is the UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson doing as cases escalate their Well. First of all, the UK system is different again on although it's a very centralized country like France Healthcare is actually managed separately by ministers and England, Scotland, Wales and northern Islands. With the UK registering around 20,000 cases a day These guys are under pressure to act and yesterday, Northern Ireland's first minister, alien Foster, Announced that a nationwide locked down there will come into effect from tomorrow for the next four weeks Force. Johnson is currently under fire for refusing to do any kind of the lock down. Because of what he says it will do to the economy. But the BBC is reporting that Johnson is actually about to impose restrictions on London, which effectively Bam households from mixing. I'm going to pubs and bars. That's me. Thank you very much. Thank you. ST. That's reporter asked me Nicholson in Berlin.

Germany Boris Johnson Angela Merkel Europe Berlin United States President Macron UK Reporter Nicholson FLU CDC Paris France Steve Robert Koch Institute Chancellor BBC Prime Minister Northern Ireland
Miami - South Florida Red Cross volunteers ramping up relief efforts in the aftermath of Hurricane Laura

WIOD Programming

00:35 sec | 8 months ago

Miami - South Florida Red Cross volunteers ramping up relief efforts in the aftermath of Hurricane Laura

"The call to help those who are left with nothing in the wake of Hurricane Laura. 24 member team of trained Red Cross disaster Workers from South Florida are already in Louisiana, sharing their experience in disaster relief, shelter management, mental health and spiritually care. Greater Miami and Keys. Executive director Debbie Koch says assessment. Volunteers bring food, water and cleaning supplies and we have a special disaster assessment tool we go out with and are able to make sure that people whose home they're unlivable have somewhere to go have connections to the agencies that are going to help them get back on their feet. Aircraft. Amy Ah, black lives matter.

Amy Ah Debbie Koch Executive Director Hurricane Laura. Miami South Florida Louisiana
Kurt Andersen on Evil Geniuses

The Book Review

05:26 min | 8 months ago

Kurt Andersen on Evil Geniuses

"Kurt Anderson joins us. Now he has a new book out. It's called evil geniuses the unmaking of America a recent history. Kurt thanks for being here. Thanks for having me. All right. So your previous spoke to this was fantasy land and I feel like there's a connection where did you leave off in that book and pick up in your new book? There's definitely a connection and they really amount to kind of a two volume history of the screwing up of America the last half century. Fantasyland was about how this chronic condition in America of the weakness for the irrational and magical thinking in entertaining lies. Turned into this acute illness after having been a centuries long chronic illness, the last fifty years, and thus the President United States as the poster boy for that. This is a different story. This is not a spontaneous organic. Problem that I'm talking about here. About the Paradigm. Shift and hijacking of our political economy that happened starting fifty years ago by who what the people I call. Evil Jesus, it's this very rational, very specific, very strategic, long war that had the effect in a hundred different ways of making the majority of Americans worse off. So if fantasy land talked about America has propensity to believe in nonsensical illogical things. It sounds like evil genius is this kind of why the efforts that were made on the part of institutions and individuals that have led to that kind of thinking. No actually not that led to that kind of thinking that. It's a wholly different thing. What would i. have having a Neo Liberal Clinton Centrist Democrat all of my adult life partners may culpa for simply being. Oblivious to what the economic right was doing. So these. Are People of the economic rights. The coax are the most obvious buzzword way of saying that and how they manipulated and used and changed through all of these different means the way we thought society. The economy should be since the new deal they used the fantasies and delusions and. All that of their political allies on the right to enable their real project, which is to make Americans think the government has no role in anything involving the free market when you are working on fantasy land, did you know that you were going to be writing the second kind of companion book? I really didn't know that it was late in the game working were. I realized wait I am kind of telling half the story here. There is this other story that isn't about look at Wacky America. We've always been wacky for four hundred years and believed all kinds of nonsense but I realized that there was this other story about how the economy changed in how politics changed and what technology is doing. That is the other half and it. Really came when I was out talking about fantasy land with people readers, whatever I remember early on a woman rating stood up and said, well, what about climate change? Yes. It's a matter of nonsensical disregarding science in the facts, but it's it's all about people like the Koch Brothers shifting the way people thought in denying science and I said yeah but it wouldn't have happened. To the extent has the United States without this underlying iffy grip on empirical reality. But I realized that it was both of those things you know people all over the world had if he grips on honeybear curiosity but they don't have this massive politicized denial of climate change. For instance, it's the to in concert in so many ways that has led us where we are. Okay I have to time related questions the first about the writing of the book and the second about the time that you cover in the book, and I'm getting very specific about the timing of the writing the book because as you know, things are moving so fast that the second you think that something is the big story. Something else becomes the big story and these are both kind of Sixteen Post Twenty Sixteen Bucks where did you do pick up in writing this book and also when did you stop because you know it probably I'm assuming this was a pre black lives matter but maybe post covid book or am I getting that First of all fantasyland I wrote and finished before Donald Trump was even nominated. So it wasn't like Oh look Donald Trump I'll reverse engineer how that happened over several Hundred Years This I delivered it early February, but then bless random house had the next several months to incorporate, which is a significant INC because it reflects. So much of what I'm talking about the pandemic and the. Horrific. US government trump administration response to the pandemic, which illustrates most of my major themes in this book. So I the whole last chapter is about that and indeed the the black lives matter protest also is in here as well to the degree that relates to what I'm talking about this. This is a book less about race than it is about economics and technology, but it certainly all of the peace and I dress both the pandemic thoroughly,

America United States Fantasyland Kurt Anderson Donald Trump Kurt President United States Koch Brothers Clinton Engineer
Reflections that Awaken our Heart

Tara Brach

05:00 min | 9 months ago

Reflections that Awaken our Heart

"Nama stay in welcome. I was talking with a friend. This week actually a number of people about schools opening not opening and one from was telling me how she was dealing with it and it reminded me of a favorite story that I'll I'll share with you, which is a woman describes how A tired old dog wandered into a yard and she could tell there was no tags but some the collar well-fed belly that the dog had a home but he followed her into her house and he followed her down the hall and fell asleep on her couch and her dogs didn't mind. She felt like, okay. Seems like a nice dog. So she was okay with that and let him nap. After an hour the dog went to the door she let him out and the next day he was back again and he resumed the exact same position on the couch and slept for exactly an hour. So this continued for several weeks and the woman got curious says she pinned a note to the dog's collar and she wrote on the note that every afternoon your dog comes to my house for nap in I don't mind but I wanNA. Make sure it's okay with you. While the next stay she got a note on the caller was returned to her. It was said this it said he lives in a home with three children he's trying to catch up on his sleep. May I come with him tomorrow So. This is the era of Cronan. We have in different situations, but I'd say the one common denominator our dogs are celebrating endless pack time. You know they're loving the wind was there with. and Perfume it is not always that simple. So. That's kind of a little bit of a warm up the title of this talk and perhaps next few I'm not sure how long is reflections on radical love. And radical is radical loves a term that's out there now and radical connotes essence are route actually route and like radical acceptance or radical compassion. Radical love arises from the purity of our away go ramesh. Koch through all delusion of being shepherd and not. Okay. And it really comes from an brings out our basic goodness. Radical includes all flavors of love. Compassion compassion is the feeling of love that arises when we encounter suffering. It's at tenderness of love. And love radical love also includes the. Warm Open feelings of connectedness oneness that come with intimacy with our friends in partnership. Animals, and it also is the feeling of wonder and awe at the sacredness of life. So there are many flavors of radical love. In a way what might understanding really is of spiritual life is that love is the essence of spiritual life in our human domain And all begin in a personal way with this talk that during my. Senior Year of college I became increasingly aware that what was central to me what mattered was this yearning to live my life from love that that became really important and there were several experiences that actually dramatically affected my life course that happened that year. And one was that I had become very politically active is really idealistic in a sense I guess about and I thought it was maybe more around the corner than it was about having an equitable just peaceful world a Compassionate Society? and. So I had plans for law school and I'd go to organizing meetings. With fellow leftist oriented political people and I started noticing how much the vibe was angry in that there's a lot of bad of the ring is what I call it now, and then I go onto my yoga. Class. Where I'd touches inner peace in this open heartedness And I started seeing really clearly that. Our capacity to create this world that I believed in required coming from. A very different state of mind than are sitting around me and one that I felt like I to cultivate myself.

Cronan Koch Compassionate Society
Why Is Carmine, a Dye Made from Bugs, So Popular?

BrainStuff

04:41 min | 11 months ago

Why Is Carmine, a Dye Made from Bugs, So Popular?

"Red Velvet cake and strawberry ice cream aren't only in the. They'll satisfy your sweet tooth. They likely share common ingredient made from a not so common source that gives them their red to pink Hue. That's Carmen a natural Red Dye, also labelled as cockatiel extract, e, One, twenty or natural, red dye four, and it owes its beauty to a teeny tiny bug, the female coach Neil Bug to be precise. In addition to its possible gross out factor, this tasteless FDA approved extract has a history full of. and. Intrigue a Betsy Ross even used this bright red dye to make red stripes on the very first American flag. The Koch Neil is a slate bug that feeds on prickly pear. Plants grown throughout Mexico South America southwestern United States, and the Canary Islands off the coast of Spain. The male Cockatiel plays its own unique role in nature, but it's the wingless legless female that interests dye makers. If you go looking for her, you won't find her vibrant red bounty on display. The female Koch Neal's grey exterior is covered in a white powder that protects her from predators as well as the scorching sun. And since the juice from CACTI her only source of nutrition, she boroughs in his. A bit stubborn about releasing her hold. In order to harvest the Koch Neil, the prickly pear pads are cut and brought to factories so that the bugs can be pulled out and processed, but it takes some serious people power. Approximately seventy thousand continentals are needed to create just one pound of die. That's a little less than half a kilo. Once harvested bugs are dried ground and mixed alcohol, solution or other compounds like borax. They give way to a vibrant long-lasting die that can be used to make colors from scarlet purple to pink to Peach. have been used to color everything from textiles to pottery, since the Neolithic period or New Stone Age with the majority, sourced from vegetables, plants and trees. Bugs have had their place to not only the Koch. Neil, another elusive die associated with wealth enroll status. Tyrian purple was made from the glands of snails. Neil bug is native to Mesoamerica. The AZTECS are believed to be the first to use Carmen to fill their lives with stunning shades of Crimson, when Spanish colonizers arrived in the Americas learned about Carmen and built enormous wealth by monopolizing the cockatiel market Spain kept the source of the color secret, and even made export the die a legal punishable by death. Coveted by the wealthy. The Royal Family is in the artist's crossed Europe. This die created fertile ground for contention. Those cumbersome and secretive production methods certainly made Carmen expensive. The car itself was an explosive part of Carmen's mystery and popularity. We spoke with Amy Butler. Greenfield author of the perfect read via email. She said red is the color of blood fired that end desire, and we can't help it. Respond to it on many levels. It makes her eyes dilate, and our breath come faster, and it's freighted with symbolic meaning. Also there are very few natural dyes that make a lasting bright true read so good ones had the value of rarity. Ounce ounce. Kacha new is the most powerful natural red dye in the world. That's why it was prized. When industrialization arrived in the mid eighteen hundreds, the demand for textiles increased dramatically and created a need for more cost effective dies. Chemists began to use petroleum and coal to formulate synthetic ones ultimately reducing the need for the Cockatiel bug. The shift towards synthetics pushed Carmen to the background, but it didn't disappear, and now it's making a comeback. Showing up on ingredient lists for anything from cake POPs to lipstick. Greenfield said when reports started linking synthetic grads to cancer and hyperactivity, and as people started taking an interest in natural foods in general, the market for catch. Neil began to rebound. So if Carmen is a natural product without the negative long-term effects of why did the coffee giant starbucks along with numerous other companies? Stop using it to add colour to their products. Well Carmen is safe for the majority of people can cause an allergic reaction, and besides that safety concern folks like Vegetarians vegans and people who keep kosher helped advocate for the change, but no matter whether you find eating a bug, appalling, fascinating or dangerous for such a tiny insect. The Koch Neil Bug has certainly left a vivid mark on culture, beating attractions, the beauty and power of red.

Koch Neil Carmen Neil Bug Greenfield Koch Neal Koch Betsy Ross Starbucks Allergic South America Spain Europe Canary Islands United States Amy Butler Mexico Americas
"koch" Discussed on Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"koch" Discussed on Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

"Me and bill asking you questions only the comfort of your home. It's just like human contact at least as far as we remember. Hi you're on wait wait. Don't tell me hey. Peter is adequate for Minneapolis Minnesota. Hey how are things in Minneapolis? One of my favorite places. It is absolutely wonderful. There is sometimes sunshine their sparkling lakes. Everybody's in their garden. We are actually practicing physical distancing. Well you're MINNESOTANS you've been minnesotans traditionally very good or like staying away from each other. Yeah people say this whole thing. That's kind of a little too close for comfort and welcome to the show. Alex Bill Curtis is going to read you three news related limericks with the last word or phrase missing from each if you can fill in that last word or phrase correctly in to actually be a winner. Here is your first limerick though Reptilian coolness of Fens at my parties a core group attends we find it a bliss to just gossip and hiss. Yes we snakes ever. Few long term friends yes friends. Scientists put a bunch of snakes in a room when the researchers weren't too busy screaming they notice. Snakes would continue to gravitate to the same other snakes suggesting they preferred some snakes company over others and they can be friends now because they could never hug anyway so they're not missing anything fact. Many of them seem to bond over how bad they felt about. Causing original sin will the females formed friendships by sharing their old skin? You should totally wear this. I'm not using it anymore. All right very good here is your next limerick for hybrids. The business is booming. Though some mythic creatures bring doumen there's the Harvey and Sphinx and for current hijinks. There's a mouse that is four percents humid. Yes indeed using it. Advance stencil transfer. Scientists created a mouse that has four percent human cells. Depart human congratulations mouse now. You can get corona virus. We all know how this movie ends. Right it starts off. You know their partly human mice and we use them for experiments and then finally they become sentient and they rebel and they get like will lead to lead them on. Its revenge rampage through our lives. I just some saying I'm not very comfortable with this. All Right Alec here is your last Limerick. You dumped me once. You've had your fun but you and I are not quite done. Son Rub these bulbs on your eye. And you'll learn how I cry. I have sent you a truckload of onions yes. Women got revenge on her ex boyfriend by sending him one ton of onions in the hopes. She said he would.

Minneapolis Alex Bill Curtis Alec Minnesota Limerick Peter
"koch" Discussed on Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"koch" Discussed on Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

"Thanks bill in just a minute. Bill takes a big dose of rhyme. Drac see caloric win in our listener limerick challenge. If you'd like to play give us a call at one. Triple eight wait. That's one eight eight eight nine two four eight nine two four right now panel some questions for you from the week's News Mas Anderson Cooper the singer pink and your friend. Ron Are all going through the same experience this week. What is it does have anything to with Ron Virus? A little bit because we're all stuck inside and can't go anywhere so they had to do this all they have to do this. They're stuck inside at. Oh how about cleaning. No you think Anderson Cooper cleans now. He likes himself clean. Give you a hand so a me. A little off the top please. So what Oh cutting cutting cutting s giving themselves haircut salons are open in the dumb states. But they're closed everywhere else. People are left to cut their own hair. Which is not something any of should be doing. If you've seen examples online at people baking their own bread imagine something that messed up. But it's a human head this lockdown where bald people have been able to excel this man. We are taking over the world. I don't need a haircut shower. Well what my my hair is. Digressing the nineteen eighty five. It's GonNa be a mullet in about three weeks seriously. I cut my kids here. I I actually. My wife had to cut my answer and it was a little daunting but thank God for Youtube and thank God for a Gullible Kid who who believes. You know what you're doing so you can you. Can Google like how to cut hair and Youtube and it will tell you. That's how I learned and I also I learned. Start WITH THE BACK. Because you're GonNa make your all your big mistakes at the beginning. And and he has he. It's grown out now. But three or four weeks ago if he'd have found a mere away to look at the back of his head I would have been I would have been toast drowned here. Yeah the back of his head is very much Picasso. Cubis cut my. I should cut my hair but I haven't been brushing it because there's no reason and I tried the other day and it sound like someone was grooming a golden retriever. It was just so loud so bad too long pieces. Did you find yourself as you were doing a winding like a dog? I had to put myself on a leash. The Bathtub Alison a popular airline in. Europe is now requiring to adopt. What new safety precaution? When they need to use the restroom. I WANNA say wearing gloves because I want to wear gloves in every airline bathroom that I've ever used so I wanna say wearing gloves gnome. Luas does have something to do with the hand now. I guess you have to do what if you want to. Use the bathroom during raise. Your hand have.

Mas Anderson Cooper Youtube Bill Ron Google Europe Alison
"koch" Discussed on Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

11:21 min | 1 year ago

"koch" Discussed on Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

"People have found a way to hold their work meetings. An actual video games said author and artist. Vivian Schwartz Zoom Sucks. We started having editorial meetings in red dead redemption instead. It's nice to sit at the campfire discuss projects with the wolves howling out in the night. There have been problems. I in order to get to the level where you can have meetings. You have to complete an hour of in game tasks like last showing a horse that was not part of MBA school other problems. Anyone else in the world playing the game can wander into your meetings and shoot you and the button you press the sit down as the same button used strangle someone. Sorry Tim. Schwartz said the response of meeting on Video Games has been overwhelming as people discover that they can quote. Hang out with their friends and go for walks together. End Quote again. We would like to just point out. That's a virtual walk so no actual physical activity still desperate times call for desperate measures and the fact that you can have your meetings. A fictional world surrounded by fictional animals and go on fictional walks does seem like a much better option than boring gold. Zoo where the most exciting thing that could happen. Is If you're meeting get zoom Bob Strangers Genitalia. Up Stages Tim in accounting picking his nose. All right Craig here your choices one of these things was created to make working from home just a little bit more bearable was it from Tombo. Debt a VR rig that engages you with the virtual experience of the misery of commuting from Allison Limi- the Home Office party kits. That you can have those sad birthday parties in your own house with yourself or from Mazda. Brawny away to hold your meetings not in zoom or Google hangouts but in the video game. Red Dead Redemption. You'll can all be cowboys. Which of these is a real story about an improvement in working from home? I'm going to go with the last one Video game Meeting meeting in red dead redemption. That's the that's the one you're choosing all right well. We spoke to somebody familiar with the real story. Once the meetings before and red dead redemption to you can break up and go often do crimes that was made Crowley from rock paper SHOTGUN DOT COM and gaming website talking about the red dead redemption meetings which apparently had been very successful for the company. That started them. Congratulations you got it right here. At the point for Monster Brownie for being truthful you'd want our prize. The Voice of your choice in your voicemail. Congratulations thank you so much. Thanks for playing today. Thanks bye bye. And now the game where people who have flown very high dragged back to Earth with the rest of us. We call it. Not My job Christina. College is a space pioneer. She holds the record for the longest time. A woman has been an orbit and she was part of the first three all women spacewalks which coincidentally were also the first base walks in which one of the astronauts did not explain to the other. Something that person already knew Christina. Cook Welcome to wait wait. Don't tell me how great debate there. It's great to be with you now. You did in fact set a bunch of Records. You did the first half of the first all woman spacewalk and you also set the record for a woman Staying in space right. Yeah that's correct or android. Twenty eight days three hundred twenty eight days and you came back just in February yet the beginning of February right so about your timing did you really nailed it. It occurs to me though that as unlucky as your timing might be in coming back to the planet you probably are the greatest living expert along with one or two other astronauts with how to survive for a long time being stuck in the same place. So do you have any tips for us? The rest of us were new to this particular challenge. You know I definitely got through with a lot of You know kind of mental strategies focusing on what you have rather than what you don't have and you know all the things the unique things that you're going to be missing one day but I think in the end I've sort of learned since I've been back that the actual way to get through it is just to inherently be a homebody. Yeah that turns out to be the best way to get through an astronaut and during stay at home on earth do so. Where are you now your home at? Houston who are you quarantining with My husband and our dog. Oh Wow and this. You're away from your husband for almost a year and now you're stuck inside with him. Twenty four seven. That's that's an interesting transition. And then of course the year and training before my flight whereas living in Russia almost constantly so yeah about two years apart to twenty four seven together. It has been interesting. It's good good opportunity to you. Know reintegrate and your home life and and With people you love so I feel like I want relationship advice from you just because of that but also because like. I don't know if you've been in space. You know what it's like to be with something like unwelcoming and cold and distant and I could use the well. We try to stay out of the. Nfl vacuous vacuum part. We try to stay in the habitable areas as much as we can so from that I was reading about the fact that when they did the first astronaut the first space program they actually put some women through the same kind of tests and they found out that women were better able to handle the stress associated with spaceflight than men. Do you think that the mercury thirteen? Yeah I've read a lot about those women they're some of my heroes and You know I I would say that I. I didn't notice any differences up there. Guess Fly with men and women and I think everyone handles it about the same. I will tell you where we get asked a lot where things are up there to not really. I'm sorry I didn't want to indulge in any terrible types but I mean is it like at my house where I don't know where anything is it. My wife knows where everything is absolutely like that and I did get a call from my husband asking him where things were in our house in Houston and usually knew the answer. So you're you're in space for almost a year and he still calling me because he can't find his car keys printer. Paper was a big one. Right away yeah wow you. Did you participated in the first of all as all women? Both women's spacewalker hadn't been done before and famously You tried it. But it didn't work because they didn't have a spacesuit that fit one of you correctly is that right yes It it but it was kind of not the best sides ever and we decided it'd be better to to do it with Someone who had a space that was Kinda just the right bit. How would we? You went all the way out there and they gave you the wrong size outfit. Also shopping is even hard. When you're an astronaut this is not making me feel good as a woman had actually get a spacesuit just to get some pockets and in the pants how one thing I've learned about Nasr's they check and double check everything. It's all about checklists and safety precautions. How could they send up the wrong size spacesuit for your space walk well all the spaces are already up there so it was just a matter of configuring it kind of getting it ready and that times always of the essence there you know? And there's there's never enough time to do everything that you WANNA do. So unfortunately yeah just didn't get configured in time been with just wasn't a question of Christina. What was the most beautiful thing you saw? I know the the Blue Ball of earth. Definitely the earth is beautiful. Some of my favorite scenes were one looking down at my home That's an incredible thing just to see where you're from and where you live kind of on that backdrop of the universe and then the other for me was seen the northern lights and the southern lights on the earth from above. I used to work in Antarctica so I saw Tun from below and so just to see that kind of on a planetary scale was pretty amazing. Did you ever look out and go? What is that? I don't like is the guys come here. Do you ever have that one of those moments. I know sadly I'm GONNA have to come up with a better story for that but no nothing was out the window Kristina Cook. I don't know if you're glad you came back but we're glad you did so we could talk to you and we have invited you here to play a game this time. We're calling suit up for a walk in cyberspace. You've been to space so we thought we'd ask You about cyberspace. Which is what we used to call the Internet. Get Two out of three questions about the very earliest days of the web correct and you'll win a prize for one of our listeners. Voice they might like from our show. We'll who is Christina. Cook playing for Carol Mitchell of Memphis Tennessee. So here's your first question. You ready for this. Yeah okay though. Online shopping has pretty much become universal. It had to start somewhere. Which of these was the first known instance of a use of ECOMMERCE had happened back in? Nineteen seventy two. Was it a an internet? Boliden board user offering candid photos of President Nixon or as they called them. Dick pics being advertisement for a quote aura cleaning service or see Stanford students using it to buy weed from kids at MIT. All of the dancers are tough I'm going to go with just be you're GONNA go with be an advertisement for a quote aura cleaning service because it was nineteen seventy two and that's what we did back then. You know now that you mentioned mail yes. It wasn't fact see Christina. They arranged this extraordinary futuristic computer network in one of the first things the kids at Stanford did. Is the Rangers shipment of POT FROM BOSTON? You gotTa love that kind of initiative. All right second question. You've probably heard that Ebay was started in nineteen ninety five to sell the founders collection of Pez dispensers. That is not true. It's an urban legend. What was really the very first thing. The founder of ebay on his brand new site was at a collage made entirely of Dryer. Lint be four pounds of Lard or see a broken laser pointer. Wow that's quite a way to launch a business. Let's go with a a collage made entirely of dryer lint. I meant be four pounds of Lord. No it was actually see the broken laser pointer. The first thing Pierre Roma Jarre sold on the auction site he founded. Ebay was broken laser pointer for fourteen dollars and eighty three cents to a guy who said he collects broken laser pointers and he still has it. The Guy Okay last question if you get this right you win at all. The Internet is ubiquitous today but early in its history. People weren't entirely impressed in fact the internet lost out on the. Uk's prestigious Queen's Award for technical achievement to.

Christina Tim Ebay Houston Vivian Schwartz Mazda Google Home Office Stanford Kristina Cook Allison Limi Uk Pierre Roma Jarre Craig founder Tombo Carol Mitchell
"koch" Discussed on Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"koch" Discussed on Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

"Positive. All three -gratulations the pay well done by now a special message for the class of twenty twenty graduates. We know you didn't have the commencement. You wanted. Even with Oprah and Barack Obama so who better to send you off into your adult life then Bill Kurtis Sir last of twenty twenty today. You're smarter wiser and you have a brand new. At what a dumb hat I look. How in an old year smiling faces and I can't help but think isn't the mouth weird you kiss with it and you eat with it so go out part. Diem. That's Latin for slide into my deums. Now go and reach for the stars. Hey Stars are tiny sons. That's hot don't reach for the stars. You're setting off on a magical journey of adulthood. You can eat ice cream whenever you want even for breakfast. So congratulations class of twenty twenty. You may now kiss the Brian. Thank you bill. Congratulations graduates. I'm still Kinda misted up from that. Hang on a second together time coming up. Our panelists shelter in place in bluff. The listener game called one.

Bill Kurtis Sir twenty twenty Barack Obama Oprah Brian
"koch" Discussed on Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

07:49 min | 1 year ago

"koch" Discussed on Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

"I am fear I quote here is Neil Cavuto of Fox News. It will kill you. He was talking about a drug called hydroxy chloroquine which the nation was told to take by whom I our President Donald Trump yes by president trump. Very good while ago. The president started trying to push drug called hydroxy. Clark is a cure for coronavirus. Even though patients who took the drug had worse outcomes than both patients who didn't and patients who got out of their hospital beds said watch this and put a lit firecracker in their mouths so the president announced that an unrelated this week that he himself was taking it and then later said that it had kept him healthy. This is a real quote from the president of the United States quote. I tested positively toward negative right so no. I tested perfectly this morning. Meaning I tested negative. But that's a way of saying it positively toward the negative unquote so we can say that the drug at least does not seem to affect the patient's mental capacity. He he blows your mind. Listen I personally think he watches a lot of TV. I think he gets his ideas from infomercials so I think he's watching commercials in his doctor. Saying how Jackson chloroquine is like. That's a good idea. Then there was the the UV lights and then the the disinfectant. Give it a week. He'll be undergoing you. WanNa clean up the corona virus. Try Chamois how you just wash it off and throw to the wash. That's it's also crazy to take treatment drug before you have the disease like when. I take advil before I go out to a bar into the thank. You know it's not going to go. Well it's not GonNa Save you look at. You've never gotten corona virus so clearly prevents corona virus. Yes it's all. It's all preventative right. So as you were saying Alison. It's like I drink before the evening starts just so i. I'm not going to get depressed and I'm going to be in a party mood all night long. That's what drinking does your all right very good Jennifer. Here is your next quote. He was a jerk. That was a talking head in a hit new. Espn documentary series that wrapped up last Sunday describing the film's subject. Who is this documentary about? Oh now espn you said yes. It's a sport thing I could give you. I'll get I'll give you this. His nickname was air. Jerk or jerk Jordan I mean he s Michael Jordan was Michael Jordan. You've got the last dance on. Espn it was a documentary about Jordan's career in Chicago. City loved him was loyal to until the very minute he was allowed to leave. The dock finally settled one of basketball fans biggest question. Who was the biggest sociopath ever to play the game? Did you guys watch this? Yeah I I watched all ten episodes. I was saying that might thing about it. Is The guys Michael. Jordan is the best basketball player ever but as someone who watches. I'm forty eight years old whenever I watch really good athletes and listening and he's talking about his commitment was there and he put in the time somewhere in the back of my head. I'm going you know if I put in the time. Do this really. You think that's the only difference between you and Michael Jordan is just nation time. I didn't put enough time. That's it. That's the problem. That's the problem now. A lot of people criticize the documentary. They said Jordan himself was a producer so wasn't going to be like an honest look at his life but was amazing is even so it still makes him look terrible. I mean the big question. The series raises is. Do you have to be a jerk to win? Mas maybe that's I I try to be a jerk and it's just not working out you haven't put in the time and you're jerking the problem I got. I gotta work on that a little bit. I will tell you I. I didn't like when I watched it because when I hear other athletes say you guys like Horace Grant Talking. You had guys like Scotty pippin talking. And even Steve Kerr says that you know Michael would talk a lot of trash and I'm thinking to myself. Isn't that what SP ATHLETES DO? Talk Trash Jerks to one another. But in the end they're like were battle together so I didn't leave going. Michael is a absolute jerk more than any other athlete. I think they're really sought wasn't I mean but wasn't it true that during the documentary twenty years after these things happened Jordan is sitting there being interviewed and he still dissing his competitors from back. Then I mean it's amazing. It just shows what an extraordinary athletes because even at the age of fifty seven he can still carry eight grudges in one hand. I've never related to somebody more. I feel like I carry grudges for decades. I feel like I get I get sports morning now. I I'm excited. I haven't watched it yet. I'm the Michael Jordan of waiting too long to watch something important. South I'll get to. It is to ever greatest there ever was. But it's seeing all distills little clips that I have of like. It's just him by himself on a couch looking at an IPAD. And I'm like at least even Michael Jordan is in quarantine the way the rest of us are just alone watching something all right. Jennifer here is your last quote. It's from the Honorable Governor of Mississippi who was honoring a group of impressive. Young people broadcasting live on facebook Gavin. Christopher Davis DOES HARRY AS CRACK YOUNG MR as one of the many teenagers in Mississippi and across the country who had to celebrate. What virtually his graduation. Yes commencement all over. The country have been canceled because of the pandemic robbing seniors. The chance to sit in the Sun. Listen to an old guy drove out a list of names and complain about commencement so everything went virtual and in Mississippi as you heard the governor went on facebook live to read out the names of graduating seniors across the state and somebody slipped in a little joke. You can watch the governor's reaction as he realizes. Just a second too late. Would he had done I? He's embarrassed then. He gets really mad and yells. I demand to see Harry as crack right. Now I gotta go down the Hall of fame of Senior Pranks Right. Yeah I mean it's a common one. It's funny when if you can get the vice principal to say it during morning announcements. Or maybe even the school board president asked and actual graduation in the gym but to get the governor of your state to do it. That's really the highest achievement. You can hope for because getting the president to do it. These days would be just too easy. He'd be like I know that Guy Great Guy I feel so bad for all of these seniors but like also a graduation gallon is perfect. Quarantine clothing it's no waste of questions like exactly what you would want to wear at home. And you're like I just WANNA wear this out of the house Exactly there have been these virtual commandments. All last weekend all over the country including some nationally televised events. A lot of people were talking of course about President Obama's two speeches but the only talked about the parts where he seemed to criticize president trump. But it's a shame because they missed the rest of his speech which was very in his fashion poignant and interesting the perhaps the most meaningful line was when President Obama said graduates go positively toward the negative because the negative is a positive in a certain positive sense. That one's stuck with me diagram of that sentence is just a complete circle bill to Jennifer doing our quiz. She was positively.

Michael Jordan president Jennifer President Obama chloroquine Donald Trump Neil Cavuto Espn United States Mississippi Fox News basketball Clark facebook Scotty pippin Horace Grant Steve Kerr advil Alison Jackson
Fighting COVID-19 From the Frontlines of NYC's Immigrant Neighborhoods

Latino Rebels Radio

06:02 min | 1 year ago

Fighting COVID-19 From the Frontlines of NYC's Immigrant Neighborhoods

"You know? He's being Donna. Ready we are the most people who die now. The the picture is different now but this sunny taty crash. We're going you gotta crises but did you. Let's talk for the beginning soon by a team. We've talked testing people with eating. My ourself and quiz area would find seventy percent of the people were positive which has been alarming. Sensing happened two days after when we went to the Bronx Sixty five to seventy percent positive. And they have to come back. Those buildings apartments small crowded woody international and resources. What we've seen today but dot day so many people seek now. We got different faces knowing that through so much pain now leaving now in the position that people had no money to like food doing pro. Two thousand meals a day in different areas to seeking the congestion with Were sent to teaching Our company nightstalkers because we know now fifty percent our people how the only there are less in their pocket derived. That's gone long ago now. We're GONNA do help we all today now. Jobs people lost fifty percent does agents. Yano joins US your job to Gatien. You're gone plus you act to other people without insurance and without papers circumstance. Afraid they had a lot of the with speeding difficult to find their family member. Who die because freight something could happen today. Where was the disconnect in terms of the testing? Why did the did the city miss? I mean how when you say a month ago you were. Testing would not be expecting this given the conditions. And giving the fact that if you were in a multigenerational house if you were an essential worker if you might have more health conditions of pre existing conditions it just seems that everything that was aimed at. Latino community was happening with this so where was the disconnect they nick was already disconnection that we have to stop paying attention on the socially health or their people live in crowded buildings with Russia. You Sam by the person was sick to the building worse than that those you know within minority note and then nobody was prepared for these. Because who has bundy we said life. Nobody deporting arouse went after we know because we knew people were were crying for giving us good. We bets. You May and building anywhere with Alone Hotel Room because we knew we were sending by millions invisible killer buyers. Plus building knows why this happened. So what did you do besides testing? What what did people you. What we're we're some of the people who are getting tested where we're told me some of the stories of the last month that you heard or your fellow doctors have heard or people in your organization of her for so many ways. But let's start with my pommie. How might keep who say's Saudi got Arresting and when when he got sick he was alone leaving apartment. He was long. He bustled hole. Fifteen days buddy They went back to work do market later. Now that's privilege. Let's go in different direction. Somebody call you. We put tele-medicine from the beginning. That medicine by the end of variety was pulling in Muslims. We plus three three songs and Y to educate our people dialing low. We doctors taking ghetto. Anybody who called even. Where did you. Summer's on the Summer Spacey Betty Portent. That's we knew what was going on right now. You has started like a lady who can out after liberty combat home to hold on is dead John No way whereas it wasn't that she even how the way to have a very often favor baber commission if you find your body and you have to make a seventeen donate. He changed now. He's getting better. But at some point with seventy twenty days cremation you. How the money? So it has the city I mean so where we talk about where we are now. What how is this improved? I mean besides the situation of people with the economic situation has this. Has the health situation improved it in in the community or are there still challenges Geno? I called allergy matching POCAR. What we're sending people city to the billing. Does Ron Koch it. Because what they do every day to work beginning in today the subway on they wouldn't papa. Papa Auditing Kidding that he sees inside those building her but up still coming out just two days ago. What am I secretary? Sister DIE evolving into aided by. Nali what he knows now. Ninety percent of the people going to endorse you die. I mean there is a very difficult thing game. Nobody knew well. Now we know now. We know what happened there? Now we're not to find solutions together. Find a way to test. That's what I've been saying is nine sixteen. That would best. Everybody does we do our you know. We went ahead of the game. Also when we decide to why are they meet a March Test immunological tests for whatever in the world? You these are the time this is

United States Bundy Ron Koch Donna Betty Portent Nightstalkers Alone Hotel Room Yano Russia Gatien SAM Nick Baber Commission Secretary Geno John
Tom Preston-Werner: Building Full-Stack JS Apps with Redwood.js

Full Stack Radio

05:58 min | 1 year ago

Tom Preston-Werner: Building Full-Stack JS Apps with Redwood.js

"Jaaz is indeed an attempt to build a full stack framework for Java script and to really deploy it in a service way. So that's one of the primary tenants that we have is build it end to end with Javascript and deployed to server list environment. To give you the advantages of the scale that that can bring as well as the global distribution that that can bring so one thing that we say about redwood is that its edges ready and by that we mean all of the different parts of redwood should be able to operate on the edge once technology plays out a little bit more. This is not entirely true today. But really we're building redwood today with an eye to the future so redwood is not yet fully realized but the idea is that if we start today with the idea that some of these technologies will exist in the way that we want them to in say a year. Then we'll be there when the technology is ready instead of technology existing first and then coming in and saying Oh let's take advantage of this and then it takes another year or more to built for it. It's like the way that game. Programmers build their games for the hardware that will exist. Yeah when they release. We're doing the same thing but with web technologies supplying some bets that Some of the tooling that you kind of need to kind of make this thing work the way you you believe has. The potential to work are going to exist You know in the near Ish Future. Yeah absolutely and so I. I can dive into those just real quick to go over them. So as hard as the edge readiness goes so the whole point redwood really is to take advantage of GM stack architecture. And so you start with the client which ends up being a react based javascript client that can be delivered statically so before we even like go even further there. I think it'd be interesting to kind of touch on some of these kind of different layers of the stack because he get through and figure out what the opinions are I think even before he talking about the react client. I'm I think a lot of people have sort of a different definition of Jim Stack or different picture in their head of what it means so when you say stack like how do you define that. And what is what is it. And what is it not in your mind? Yeah so I use the term jam stack. Maybe a little bit more loosely than most people today. But it's a bit on purpose. Purposefully trying to push the boundaries of what would be considered gem stack while still being true to the definition so jam stack javascript. Api's markup that's can cover a lot of territory but it really comes with the deployment strategy as well so a big part of the jam stack is the idea that you can push your code to a git repository and that will trigger deploy. And you're basically done and so that's part of Redwood that same idea the same way that you would build a traditionally considered jam stack application today where it's content faced and maybe you're you have a built step and then you push that aesthetic content to a cdn and with Netla fi and others you can have functions. That'll be spun. Up for you redwood operates in exactly that that space and so by Jim Stack. I mean you have Java script that is your primary it flips a little bit. Maybe the J. M. in in aesthetic content based site you're probably going to have mostly static markup and then you're gonNA sprinkle in Java script to interact with Third Party. Api is or maybe an API that you've written yourself in the redwood version of Jam Stack. Which is really the same tall just jam. Stack. You might have more or less of each one of those components so in Redwood you have more javascript so your your front ends up being all react. So it's page APP and you're mark probably ends up being minimal. Though the idea is that you can do pre rendering and have pages. So let's say you're marketing pages or other content pages that are that are suitable for pre rendering that you have a bill phase to do that and then you can push those out like you would in a more traditional jam stack APP Today and the. Api is baked in as part of this stack in that. You're you're going to write your API it would be. It would be a reason that you would choose to use. Redwood is the full integration throughout the stack to use the all of the fancy stuff really nicely integrated really great developer experience that we're producing four the back end as well and this is. This is another difference from a more of a content related. Jim Koch So in my mind what I'm hearing is it sounds like it's like a Jam Saqi framework designed for People Building Bespoke web applications where they need to write a lot of their own custom backend code and they need a place to do that. That hopefully has some opinions and conventions that let's do it in a more productive way maybe like we typically been used to something like rails. Yeah exactly so. We see it as a rails replacement. Yeah Very Cool. Anything you would normally do with rails. We hope that you'll be able to do with redwood the that's the competitor. Is that really the full end to end? Full stack tightly. Integrated includes everything testing like all like the whole database access. Like the whole thing end to end is just use. This stuff used these sorts of technologies together. We've integrated them beautifully. We've created a deployment paradigm that scales very easily and requires almost no intervention and is Java scripts and

Redwood Jim Stack Jaaz Jim Koch GM Third Party People Building Developer
Washington, DC - Former Arlington County board member dies after battle with brain cancer

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

Washington, DC - Former Arlington County board member dies after battle with brain cancer

"News former Arlington County Board member Erik Koch all has died after a battle with brain cancer Arlington now notes that got shots passing comes a month and a half after the initial word that he was hospitalized in ten days after his sudden resignation from the board gosh I was first elected to the board in November twenty seventeen after serving on the county's Planning Commission and transportation

Erik Koch Brain Cancer Planning Commission Arlington County Board
FOLLOWUP: First day of mayor's order closing major Seattle parks

News, Traffic and Weather

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

FOLLOWUP: First day of mayor's order closing major Seattle parks

"A beautiful weather this weekend would normally bring out crowds to to area area beaches beaches in in city city parks parks but but not not this this Easter Easter commerce's commerce's and and Fonsi's Fonsi's fifteen fifteen of of those those popular popular spots spots are are closed closed until until Monday Monday to to slow slow the the spread spread of of covert covert nineteen nineteen for weeks now leaders have asked people to stick to social distancing guidelines in public the city leaders say people are still packing into places and that's concerning we still have people who are getting sick and people who are dying we checked out al Qaeda beach Linton Koch live nearby and walk the sidewalk here daily very very low this this is almost nothing yeah this is empty so I think people are are fighting that the regulations they say their turnout here's dramatically different than normal and they see the city did the right thing by closing the beach on Easter Sunday would just be crazy out here normally Suzanne fonts yes

Fonsi Linton Koch Suzanne
"koch" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"koch" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

"Fucking out. It's not surprising so many while he was talking and now I know what that was. Megan people off. That is a that was very weak. Given how much carbonated water you drink in order for that to come out. It's difficult under the pressure of the lights in a gentleman's toil item. We like billy. Oh I was talking about Charlie Brooker back during the last three minutes if I had to get up and we on the floor right now. I wouldn't be out of joy. Try that contest. Did he ever done that? Because they've they're a moment from school days where you did something. That was transgressed. All the decency of society can. We asked another one. That was my tablet. Your Deputy Prime Minister that is you know that is in a similar position so difficult thing. It's scarred me. Do you think that's it's interesting? I love Comedians. Have like an authority figure. Father I think that is that is a again. There's all these theories about different reasons. People come to beans but do seem to have comedians sons of vicar. Bishops Teachers. Headmasters politicians sometimes do you think. That's what drove you into comedy. All I can think about is a burp brewing. I definitely think so. Just be I feel. I don't I don't necessarily know if I can make that connection but there is definitely a pattern is was it. Was there any way living in? How old were you at the time? He was the deputy prime minister. I barely remember. It was like four or five okay so there wasn't any people school and your Dad's pretty three minutes to go to bullying would understand that if they'd said in English if I'd come in is a twenty five year old man. Yeah your pets for you. Idiot could work on me. I'M GONNA DO. This is what's come up. Is it better to have loved and lost than to have to eat nothing but pop tarts per year? Yes yeah it is bad than that. You'd prefer to have loved and lost. Do you think they could content? Yeah well so you can eat cake. Could make a boyfriend on a pop tart that I could use my toaster. Robots do them too funky. We walk in his previous together. Let's bring it again so I think it but you know I think lut loving and I think it's important to lose before we can love properly as well. I think you need to go through that kind of..

Prime Minister Charlie Brooker Megan Bishops Teachers billy
"koch" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"koch" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

"But they're all for people these these thanks for coming to the show and all the years of support but try and be less sexist. So if you're less sexist more we would work with you and you wouldn't be ads. But let's carry on being sexist for now. I'm Grayson Perry coming on very shortly and as we're recording this and not now a. He's his books about the descent of man sort of about how very good bull. Yeah huge fan. Have you read? The book is really good looking on the whale goods. Well look so you told coming up new show coming up. Is there anything else in the pipeline in terms of radio or TV has really instagram stories? Dropping the next couple of days and keep your eyes peeled okay. I lost couple more questions and then we will see what we will see people coming up. I don't WANNA ask. What's the Burp one is about me? It's about when I was at school. I was a minute silence at the ascension day surface and I did. My Dad was the headmaster this it's a he said. Let's have a minute silence. And that joined the minute silence. I did a massive BURP. That was like I thought it'd be funny but it was the loudest book that's Ever Been Done. Cuban history and then my dad had to deal with that is the is a pivotal moment in one of my shows about how my dad will react looked in. I think he suspected it was so he didn't do anything because he would have been would have been kind of weird for him right for you to hold me out for burping essentially service. I can't remember what the actual story is. What was the minute of Science for you? Know for the probably the war dead or something for Jesus or something like that. It was telling me. Do you WanNa have a burping contest right now I can. I don't need I don't need to really think you don't need it. Bill last time. I had to do this though I did. There was a rouse way spill. Seen this one where I had fought on station was unable to do so I was going. Yeah I can find. It will couldn't again I've been. I've been arrogant in Hubris with my effluent fucking out. It's not surprising so many while he was.

Grayson Perry Bill instagram
"koch" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"koch" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

"To be as true magic rat. That is really a beguiling story. There's so much myth that comes out of that Russian history which I think is interesting which respite and comes Bob. None of this stuff. That really rather talk about recipes in very little could logically have happened but but you think he cured hemophilia definitely did something that stopped this prince having bleeding which might have just been as simple as the doctors were giving him aspirin. Which is the wrong thing to do for hemophilia? So if he went in and said Stop the get rid of the doctors then he wouldn't take an aspirin and then it makes you bleed more few aspirin so the doctors got it wrong there or you might just calmed everyone down or you might be magic. I don't think he is magic and he and his penis. We wasn't big. I don't necessarily that but we're that rumor. Come from well. That's why everyone wants. Everyone stood by you. Know he had sex with loads of people against such zarina. But it's been meant to be on display in one of the museums and but it's the sea cucumber. Dad was. His Penis is autopsy mentioned. Nothing ABOUT HAVING. His penis cut off on all about recipes and we can talk about him all day. I feel like my childhood has been. I think it's it's interesting. I mean the kind of fell apart in during the night in sixteen and the wealth.

aspirin Bob Dad
"koch" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"koch" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

"You can see here. There's a microphone everything everything Hello Hello Olga. How you doing? That's an excellent credits. Have chosen so all right. Tell us about. I've watched it. I've watched you wrote you might be in. I was at the very end. The only women not wearing stretch okay. So what's the premise? Behind the women wearing strap bombs to work. I mean it's pretty straightforward. I mean women are into getting the respect. They deserve at the Office. In order to get the respect they deserve they just wear strap on to work is pretty good. I mean the best part of it was to get getting the BBC to buy strap on and then the producer being like. I had to give this to my bath boss boss and it said like hot. Pink naturalistic is about to give the receipts into accounts. That would that would have been one of the Cox gets cut off with a young those papers slice of things. A lot of people in the Commons believed that this was a real thing that happened in an office and it brings me so much joy. So what's life story you've had? I don't WANNA I don't WanNa hear about it. Let's just be will just for people? You might not be aware of you aboard in Russia. All of you also can say that you okay so. I was in a final of comedy competition a couple of years ago. And you hosted. This is such a beautiful full circle moment for me. I'm so honored. I'm so blessed. Thank you so much. It's okay it's love to have you. You're a fantastic. Stand up comedian. And I remember that I was probably.

Russia BBC producer
Extreme market volatility is here to stay

Monocle 24: The Globalist

06:44 min | 1 year ago

Extreme market volatility is here to stay

"It's time to business now with the financial analysts Lewis Kipah. Good morning to you. Louise Good Morning. Gene Wilder volatility in the stock market. Yesterday tell us more about that. Yeah seems extraordinarily stock markets in the US. Close fool percent lower yesterday yet. Another crazy day. They were up six percent Monday. Tuesday Wednesday over Monday was a huge day. Oh she's a with a huge day down when staying with another huge out says they know the huge day down extreme volatility the likes of which we haven't seen since the great financial crisis so the question is what is this telling us what it's telling us is no one has a clue how the virus pays out we just don't know we know that the virus is spreading incredibly quickly. Just look at the number of people infected. Just look how quick pit spreading around the world but this sort of financial and economic data is taking. You know we'll take a long time to catch up having said that we all seen companies. You know warn about profits and Goldman and J. P. Morgan the two massive American banks this week And we have You know we know some sectors you know we talk about transportation and travel and Alan Industry the U. The US transport index shows. You quite how much you know airline stocks etc Phoolan. That's bound a twenty cent. We have a An airline industry expert record. This is GonNa hit the Allen Industry something like global industry something much of a hundred billion dollars office than starting to get the secondary and tertiary effects. You know we had TV the big UK booed cost yesterday saying but not suppo- unsurprisingly This thing in advertising and And in eight pool that thing advertising down ten percent so we know the Allens all flying though share prices are being hit but like I said we're starting to see the ripple effects through the economy. I'm not yesterday was a big shock to walk his shelves in it. For example percents. So you know in a way. The extreme volatility of the stock market's tells us the everybody doesn't know how important how significant is far. It's GONNA be And McConnell the governor of the Bank of England has been assessing how it will hit the UK economy. Yes and it was really interesting about this scene. The Federal Reserve in states emergency rate cut earlier this week. Also percentage point if you look at what the markets are expecting best adjusting. Federalists make next week as well for home. One percent interest rate cup in literally a week. Now you know and I and you're seeing central banks. Whoever the world solar that lead and yet bizarrely the Bank of England were you kind of like no no. We'll wait wait to see what the data says. Well to be honest. It's GonNa take quite some time for the economic data to catch up with the you know the very fast spreading corona virus. I mean to be fair. Connie is on his way out and we won't have any bank having the governor very very soon so maybe you know that's the point we see The Right Cup but it is quite strange that he's he's not following. What central bankers all around the world to doing Let's have a look at OPEC because announced a large production cut to support oil prices but But if a problem there with Russia soon so so oil is like a folksy for the global economy right okay. Oil used in so many ways. It's the all twice is sort of like a prop demand for oil is approx proxy the economy. So what if I told you I told you the lines? Cutting flights people are flying around the world. I'm surprisingly well. What planes us? Hey Ben jet failed. You know what we know about. You know people working from home and not getting mad cows or they're not driving to work that means less Petuous using 'cause all be things oil demand. Okay so you see the oil price cops twenty percent OPEC meeting yesterday and today. Down desperate to cools the oil price to go up heads. The Production Co. Quite a big production. Koch One and a half million barrels of oil a day but Russia thought ice came to go to to be on board. So you've got the internal politics of OPEC. The Saudis versus the Russians desperately trying to force a production Co. on Russia solace about it because they are profitable Russian oil businesses profitable as much oil price. And so so you in sort of in the background. Everything that's going on can economically. You've got this political squabble inside OPEC which could mean though I'm no production cuts a tool and not contain oil price guys. That for many of us may fill our cars. After the country pub dot would be a really good thing but It just shows a fan the ramifications of the corona virus geopolitically as well as economically Yup and finally though there is one hedge fund boss who is trying to keep the oil market going by putting his His employees into cars. Oh honestly I would swear I'm program but I don't want you to so I would just say who wrote some okay. So millions of people use the cheap everyday public transport. You do I do Georgina. I'm washing my hands. All these more regularly but you know. I'm still grazing with sheep. I think I'll be fine. You Know Corona virus spreads very quickly. It's not like the current events ties about three percent of people get the hardest is. Many people even have the virus with very very mild if no symptoms tool so even if you get a rotavirus it's not necessarily GONNA make you extreme meal. Everybody types of flus every so you know. I think we'll start to be using the Chew House. No one hedge fund manager. Who frankly they're the people that traveled the world all the time and the people he probably bought by Roy Device to the rest of us because what family skiing trips to northern Italy is to bring it up for the rest of us but no they can no longer that you use the youtube this toll victims because if the miniscule risk that they might get great advice and they don't want it to be brought into the office it's like it's like a little spurning the great. Tom Washed everybody else. All the other millions of ordinary Londoners. Who's the Champ Frank? What company refused to diffuse to take trab? Keep going on the cheap pretty short to do that. Without referring doubt it's written in the contract. Louise thank you very much

Opec Louise Good United States Bank Of England Russia UK Gene Wilder Lewis Kipah Federal Reserve Fund Manager Rotavirus Allen Industry
"I feel great": Texas Astronaut Christina Koch on record stay in space

Sean Hannity

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

"I feel great": Texas Astronaut Christina Koch on record stay in space

"A Texas astronauts adjusting well to life back on earth falling almost a year at the international space station I feel great I'm really fortunate a lot of people because of the different nervous similar system things then changes that go on for micro gravity when you're reacting to one G. into earth you might experience a motion sickness and things like that Christina cook return to earth after setting the record for the longest single space flight by a woman at three hundred twenty eight

Texas Christina Cook
Astronaut Christina Koch looks to the future after record space mission

AP 24 Hour News

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Astronaut Christina Koch looks to the future after record space mission

"The astronaut who set a record for women in space is talking after a thorough examination A. P.'s at Jackie Quinn reports she says overall she's feeling well after her mission about a week after coming back to earth after three hundred twenty eight days on the international space station forty one year old astronaut Christina cook says my balance is taking a little while to get used to so the physical act of walking with something to get used to but I'm feeling great she says she has some muscle aches but not the skin problems that others have reported and says it is an adjustment learning to live again with gravity but she's on her way the first thing that I did after I went home was to reunite with my dog which was wonderful it was she was very excited and then we took a family trip to the beach cooks ten plus months in space was the longest mission ever completed by a

A. P. Jackie Quinn Christina Cook
"I feel great": Astronaut Christina Koch on record stay in space

AP 24 Hour News

00:19 sec | 1 year ago

"I feel great": Astronaut Christina Koch on record stay in space

"Yes his new record setting astronaut says she's got some sore muscles in trouble with balance but otherwise Christina coke says she's feeling fine balance is taking a little while to get used to so the physical act of walking with something to get used to but I'm feeling great three hundred twenty eight days on the international space

Christina Coke
Christina Koch back on Earth after record stay on space station

All Of It

00:19 sec | 1 year ago

Christina Koch back on Earth after record stay on space station

"American national Christina cope is back on earth after spending nearly eleven months in orbit coklat the first few all female space walk in twenty nineteen and set the record for the longest stay in space by a woman our mission will provide data on how weightlessness and space radiation affect the female body this is

Christina Cope
"koch" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"koch" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"And arguably here's the thing though here's the thing that some of his critics will point out and that I have to admit has some sand a people who people who argue that coke industries business business practices have raised the rates of cancer in their communities Ray people who've never smoked never drank gay lung cancer left and right they he say you know. Why is if this guy really wants to fight cancer? Why doesn't he changed what his company is doing? Why is he was he donating after the fact you know what I mean? That's quite a good point I was I I thought it was a thought. It was a good point additionally. He cites. It's a close call. He had an aircraft accident with inspiring him to become a philanthropist but also if you look at the specific acts of philanthropy that he's responsible for a lot of them do center on cancer and again then he was diagnosed in one thousand nine hundred two he certainly has a personal reason to be very interested in that a personal identification with it so so again objectively in arguably good things but you can see why people would criticize even that part of this person's life and that's not even talking about the other huge category of donations for the Coke Industries for David himself for his brother as well and all their a related name brands and that is the realm of politics and we're GONNA get into that right after a quick word from our sponsor in this episode of stuff they don't want you to know is brought to you by. Adt Real protection from a D is personalized home security with a system that fits your unique needs the HD video doorbell..

cancer Coke Industries Ray David
"koch" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

14:56 min | 1 year ago

"koch" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"This was CO CO founded by Fred C coke in nineteen sixty seven in honor of Fred Coke. It was renamed coke industries since then that's has been the shorthand way to refer to this enormous conglomerate and when we say enormous conglomerate we're talking about AH disquiet number of things yeah yeah according to the Securities and Exchange Commission Coke Industries is what you would call a private private conglomerate. They've got all kinds of different things the companies that they control and everything from Petroleum Petroleum and chemicals the production of that in the the distribution of those chemicals through pipelines. There's some ranching going involved there some Chemical Chemical Chemical Tech occurring here. There's all kinds of commodity training minerals. How do you get them? Where do you find them? What do you do with those minerals capital capital markets and fibers fibers in everything you guys financial services you got paper the pulp that you need to build the paper as well as business this development which is interesting in its own right because that's how you get a lot of the other companies to become or come to fruition right exactly today Kook Luke Industries is the second largest private company in the United States? What's number one? You may ask it's a company called cargill which we can save for a different episode. Coke Industries has an annual revenue of one hundred ten billion dollars has around one hundred and twenty thousand employees so two things about those numbers that one ten billion dollars is indicates a growth trend because in two thousand sixteen it was one hundred billions so they went up by ten bill those one hundred twenty employees those that number may not factor in contractors contractors freelancers so on so depending on how we define employees that number could be a little bit higher. It's also active in sixty countries. He's which means that it is probably selling something to you. You have almost certainly bought or used a product adopt created by coke industries because in short they sell a ton of stuff co.. You certainly encountered them. I remember ages ago. We were doing the show we did a a checkup to see what Coke Industries owned and we listened off some things including things like like if you're just walked through a grocery store. Let's say if you're in the United States or maybe in another country you Mesa you may see things like quilted northern or soft and gentle brawny. Maybe Angel Soft sparkle any of those catch catch your ear because it's probably a paper products that used to clean something something or wipe your hands on there's a lot of those Mardi gras and other one Dixie cups from Dixie they also own Georgia the Pacific which is the largest manufacturer of plywood and corrugated boxes and containers in the US the produce all sorts of textiles and plastics the world's largest producer of Lycra the produce stain master solar Max all polly Ali Shield oxy clear they make a gasoline diesel jet fuel asphalt fracking chemicals ethylene. I just like to point out here that they own a lot of the raw materials that end up becoming a lot of the other products. That's kind of what Coke Industries does here when you're talking about you know getting getting crude oil to the process for a whole bunch of different kinds of textiles and plastics right or you're talking about Georgia Pacific getting all the wood that you need to create all of the other uh-huh paper products and other things like that it's it's smart business. I guess like essentially controlling controlling the the processes which you need to make an an end thing right own end products that production yeah owning thanks owning the means of production they own the means of production. Yes got it but yeah it you can really see it illustrated here and it's no secret that after a certain threshold hold of scale whether we're talking or whether we're talking fame infamy or just finance right after the certain threshold any entity becomes inherently controversial so it's it's true right it follows logically that coke industries has had a troubled legal legal history congressional investigations. Doj Consent decrees civil lawsuits felony convictions and so on one of the biggest controversies. That's getting a lot of attention now especially from politicians on the left side of US politics will be the active role that Coke Luke Industries plays in pollution and climate change denial yeah again like you said that what's good for business versus. What's bad for business? snus gives a Louis and in the end there's there are so many prophets to protect for the people that run this massive industry or it's not even industry as conglomerate there's so many moving parts you have to or you're at least incentivized to deregulate as much as you possibly can and and do what you have to make sure that those profits go up by three percent each year but they've had as part of their legal troubles in the past. If you go back to nineteen eighty eighty eight you get a really interesting look into a specific thing that they were accused of doing and then found out they were doing where they were apparently apparently stealing oil from native American reservations within the United States yeah yeah this comes from excellent book called Coke Land by an author named Christopher Leonard in which she traces the twist and turns of this nefarious tail so as you said this stuff hits the fan in nineteen eighty eight in November and it's the result of an investigation that was launched in October of nineteen eighty seven by the Senate Select Committee on Indian Affairs. They were inspired by a series of articles in the paper of the Arizona Republic that said Hey big league. Oil is stealing oil from native Americans who own these various oil wells. Here's how the scam worked companies would pick up crude oil from the wells and they will take it to the quote unquote marketplace but when they did this they falsified their receipts invoices to make it look like a picked up less oil than actually did so they were getting a big there were skimming off the top or be that the oil was of a lower quality than it actually was therefore worth less on the marketplace therefore we're paying less mile that throughout this whole controversy because because it was a controversy for for the cokes and for Coke Industries this is when David really becomes in the coke brothers I guess as a whole all were as a duo it gets them enmeshed within the politics the forward facing politics right this is a big stage age for them yeah so the company later admits in court that it collects about ten million dollars worth of crude oil each year without paying for it over the the course of the scam and this is just one illustration of what what big businesses do do. It's important to say that coke industries by no means unique in this sort of thing and that's why countries in state actors have legislative sleep mechanisms in place that are in theory meant to prevent these kind of shenanigans but despite the ongoing controversies this family family business may David Kokin even wealthier man and we have some. We have some stats about his about his his position in financial society at the time of his passing yes according to Forbes he was number eleven on the list of wealthiest men on the planet a he had a total asset amount of forty two point two billion dollars again according to Forbes and he had an estimated net worth of did the fifty point five billion dollars and let's pause here for a second Matt because that is a huge number yeah we're throwing a lot of huge. It's number out here and that makes it a very easy number to glide over without fully understanding or rocking it. There's a guy named Sam par writing for website called the hustle soul and he did a great walk through I've combined a couple of different things here to make it to help us. Imagine just one billion dollars. Let's start with a one hundred dollar bill pretty cool. Imagine it's a crisp new and straight from the mets love it now stack one hundred of those together. This makes a stack about an inch high at ten thousand dollars and when you look at it it's just a stack. It's not that impressive. If you add enough stack together you'll get a million dollars also weirdly enough not as impressive as it may seem in film because when you stack it that way when you add it up that way it's it's not enough to fill up an average briefcase. I mean like a carry on for a plane. It's still a lot of money and a billion is much different. A billion gets us into into the the realm of imaginary scenarios right so let's say you save one hundred dollars a day. That's awesome great job doing that. It will take you ten million days around the little over twenty seven thousand years to save up the one billion dollars wow and will also if you try and visualize. I remember seeing videos with this before. Retrying visualize is what a billion dollars looks like so if you were going to do that if you're going to look at it will be a four square mile area or what would be the equivalent of in two thousand five hundred fifty five acres of just money if you put if you took that billion me at one dollar bills Yep Yep Yep you would also have more money than several entire countries you would be you would have more than their. GDP for for instance Yeah Oh and by let's talk about what you can buy with billion bucks okay yeah with just one billion dollars per the AJC. You can buy six point seven F thirty five a fighter jets. Oh yeah you can also if you bargain a little bit getting into Sports Oh yeah you can get an NFL team for a billion bucks. Oh for sure you could almost almost by. Let's say I duNno palace yeah. Buckingham Palace is just one point point four billion dollars after all. These are all crazy things to buy right so that's a billion dollars. David Coke as an individual vigil as one guy directly controlled enough wealth to do this fifty times over yeah and remember that's assets and end money and cash money counts all those things are all of it together. in property in particular becomes very important so what to do with all this scratch all this Cheddar all these gains this real superpower genuine superpower this very real version of time time travel which is a nice Easter egg there for some are longtime listeners wealth on the David Coke is a man of principle and seesaw aw and he his most well known spending fits into two broad categories first philanthropy and second politics in terms of philanthropy. we see a s well yeah well intentioned butts imperfect the person he's been on the chronicle of philanthropy list of the world's top fifty philanthropist consistently since two thousand six in two thousand thirteen interview interview with the Wall Street Journal. He called himself a sugar daddy for charity we his words not ours. He said he had a moral obligation to help. He said he preferred for to donate his money to outstanding institutions rather than use it on buying a bigger house or a one hundred and fifty million dollar painting that again is a direct quote from him. I get it that feels like the right thing to do. He conducted most of his visible philanthropy. Through his foundation named the David H Coke Charitable Foundation they save the money on creative names and pass those savings do you. I guess you've probably heard that mentioned a couple of times in passing from you know this is brought to you. Thanks thanks to impart by foundation and they're doing good work. They're giving they're giving to institutions and causes that are making pioneering breakthroughs especially in the medical space yes and sometimes it is difficult to square these things when depending on what you think about David Coke or the coke brothers knowing that this is a real side of him and his spending and his wealth and his family's wealth this charitable side it is real in its. You can't deny it well. I have some let WANNA call them. Hot takes some observations on that. We'll get to him in a second right. It's your right objectively not bad so he gave over a billion dollars to charity throughout his life so over or right around one fiftieth of his assets I he donated needed to things like the Lincoln Center the American Museum of Natural History A in terms of medical causes he started the Coke Institute for Integrative of cancer research at Mit New York Presbyterian Hospital MD Anderson Cancer Center Johns Hopkins Stanford University Hospital Mount Sinai the hospital for special surgery good stuff great stuff saved lives right yeah.

coke industries United States David Coke Coke Industries Fred Coke Coke Luke Industries David H Coke Charitable Founda Coke Institute for Integrative Petroleum Petroleum cargill CO CO Kook Luke Industries Fred C mets Buckingham Palace AJC Mit New York Presbyterian Hosp Forbes NFL
"koch" Discussed on The Interchange

The Interchange

41:48 min | 1 year ago

"koch" Discussed on The Interchange

"This is the interchange conversations on the future of energy from green tech media. I'm stephen lacey. I'm a contributing editor at g._t._m. I'm in boston welcome to the show. She alcon away this week. I can remember the first first time i heard about the coke brothers it. Maybe it wasn't the first time but it was. I think the first time it stuck in my mind. I was actually very late to the party in thinking about the coke folks it was the spring of twenty eleven and just gone to write for climate progress lee fong a reporter for the parent publication think progress had just dropped his video a few months earlier on youtube of him interviewing david koch on the street outside the capitol building in d._c. It wasn't a formal interview. It was just him seeing coke on the street three after this inauguration for congressional candidates and he pinned him down and started peppering him with questions doing expecting new congress well shut the hell out of spending and balance the budget and reduce regulations enough enough support business coke is you're standing there kind of polite smiling at first almost smug and then he starts looking erc that these young guys with a video camera. They won't stop talking to him. He keeps fiddling with cell phone putting it up and putting it down. He's looking away standing between him and lee fong. Is this guy named. Tim phillips president of americans kinds per prosperity who keeps trying to shut down the interviews. Come on we've done the interview up very focused so much on the the science of climate change league. We're not doing it or us doing it or do. You were not the way that denies because of five of the league we're not doing. We're not this is not doing this. I think it's a regular glenn c._o. Two excessively is going to put up <hes> really damage the economy but you believe in climate change yourself. Li li li li the doc. David of the climate change is here. I climbing fluctuate dosa hot coal. We have ice ages. Whichever liner the league in retrospect these short videos don't reveal all that much but at the time they were a pretty big deal. It was one of the only times that david coke had talked to someone outside of a very controlled interview and i remember thinking. Why is everyone so obsessed with these guys. It was around this time. The coax started getting villain is in this very cartoonish way and it was so outlandish. I just couldn't quite grasp how influential they were. Compared pared to the image that people were projecting in the year sense though so much good journalism has been devoted to understanding how the coke brothers charles and david created the most influential fluential political machine in history and it started decades before i or most of the public had ever heard of these guys it's become clear that without their money and devotion to climate denial starting all the way back in the nineteen nineties we would be in a much different place today. When it comes to climate policy a few days ago david coke passed away and it suddenly suddenly got everyone talking about the cokes again and it got me thinking about them to not just their role in politics but about this company coke industries it's one of the most influential energy energy and industrial firms in the world but not many people have heard of it the way the cokes have run. Their company tells us a lot about their approach to conservative politics so this week. I've got an interview with a journalist who spent the last six years covering coke industries. His name is christopher leonard in a few weeks back he released a new book is massive new book. It's called coke land. The secret history of coke industries in corporate power in america now that david charles coke are back in the zeitgeist i wanted to he used this opportunity to talk with christopher about their influence christopher leonard welcome to the show. Thanks for being here. Thanks for having me coke land. Is this this seven hundred page book on the coke machine and the influence of corporate power on politics. It took you if i understand correctly six years to write and research so many people have written about the cokes over the years. What were you trying to do differently with this book while the one thing i wanted to do do that i didn't feel has been done at all was to explore this corporate empire the private corporation that made charles and david koch so rich in the first place i mean david and charles coke when you combine their fortune which i think is the appropriate thing to do because their fortune is based on the value of this company they are richer than bill gates or warren buffett and that really raises a question of how did they get so rich. How did they amass. One of the largest private fortunes in the united states but even beyond that what what drew me to write about. This corporation is as a business reporter. I realized this was such an important story. I mean you can explore the entire american in political and economic system by telling the story of this one corporation just because it's so diversified i mean this is an institution that includes blue collar manufacturing workers and labor unions it includes high flying financiers who are trading derivatives it includes private equity dealmakers who are buying other companies and in a you know crucially it includes one of the largest corporate lobbying shops and political influence operations in the united states so taken together. You can really use the story of this company to explore the history of american capitalism over the last fifty years so you you point this out that coke industries is bigger than facebook <hes> u._s. Steel and goldman sachs combined so americans know of the big industrial giants in history general electric nick ford dupont why have so few people heard of coke industries. Okay this is by design and it's very intentional and it really traces back to the root of what this company isn't what it does so first of all coke industries specializes in the kinds of businesses that underpin in modern civilization i mean this is the kind of stuff you couldn't boycott if you wanted to coke industries sells the fuel people use to drive to work it sells the building materials. The office building is made out of from the insulated wall panels to the windows to the carpet. It makes materials in our clothing like nile nylon and spandex stuff in baby. Diapers burs an exercise clothes. It makes nitrogen fertilizer. Which is one of those products that nobody thinks they buy but it's literally the bedrock of our modern food system mm-hmm so coke is quietly involved in all of these vitally important businesses that everybody uses every day but that never has coaxed brand name name on it if you will and what i discovered in reporting on this company is that from the very beginning secrecy has been baked in to coax corporate strategy and there are a lot of reasons for that but i think the basic reason is that at heart even those involved in all of these businesses coke is what i would describe as a trading company they've been trading energy supplies fertilizer-fuel and the the way to really succeed at that business is to outsmart your competitors to know more about what's going on in the world than anybody else and when you're operating in that environment you don't want other people people to know what you know and you don't want other people to know what you're about to do so this is a corporation that has been private and has prized used secrecy since the very beginning and how did they grow. <hes> was it mostly through acquisition. I mean what were some of their big moves moves that allow them to grow so fast <hes> under charles and david under mostly charles of if i'm correct you're you're absolutely correct and it might be helpful apple to to start from the beginning a little bit because you know this is a privately held firm. That's intentional and it's owned by the coke family. The company was started headed by fred coke really in the nineteen thirties fred coke died of a heart attack in one thousand nine hundred sixty seven and his thirty two year old son charles took over the company company and basically split ownership with david but charles coke has been c._e._o. Of this institution since one thousand nine hundred sixty seven he's been and c._e._o. Since lyndon johnson was president. I don't know of any other corporation. That's had a single leader for that long. So what you see is an institution inc that really reflects the strategy of one person and that's charles coke and to understand his business philosophy helps us understand how they got so big and i and it is through acquisition but a very particular type from the very beginning charles coke has fought very hard hard to keep this company privately held and the reason for that is that you know the the the c._e._o. And the board is not answerable to wall street shareholders so coke industries doesn't have to think about their profits and revenue on a quarterly basis. They're not obsessed and worried about what's going to happen in the next three months or three months after that. This is a company whose lose leadership can think on a horizon of two five or ten years out out and this has allowed them to be remarkably nimble and i would say the playbook for coke is that they plow their profits back into the firm firm. They don't pay out huge rich dividends so they have a lot of money on hand to make moves and they can make moves when publicly traded companies companies are not willing to do so okay. Cokes strategy is to buy companies that are distressed. You buy on the downside if you will you buy when when the economics of the business don't look great and then you hold onto that asset whether that asset is a bunch of nitrogen fertilizer plants or a giant publicly. Luckily traded firm like georgia pacific. Coke industries keeps itself in a position to buy these companies and hold them for the long term and i think a lot oughta this traces back to the firm that co two to the concept that coke has been in energy markets from the beginning so this is a company. That's very accustomed to volatility ability. They know that when there's downcycle there's going to be an upcycle later so they've gotten so big through long term strategic thinking about plowing allowing the prophets back into the company and having the nimble in the ability to buy assets and other companies when the markets are down one of the things things that has always puzzled me about coke industries is how different it is from many other similar companies when faced with this environmental transition this environmental pressure so you look at any other company three m johnson controls general electric siemens this exxon even some of the oil majors. They're all investing pretty heavily in or at least paying lip service to clean technologies and they're saying okay. Here's how we can restructure our businesses. We can do what we've always done but we can make it cleaner again. Invest in renewable energy. We can try to make our products better because because they actually you know the people who are leading these companies believe in it or at least believe in it enough because there's enough pressure on them that they needed start talking about it. Publicly coke industries mysteries is so different and i think it's kind of rare in that respect a can you just talk about why they made the businesses decisions decisions they did and ultimately how that influences their political work in the way they see the world as a great question and okay the first of all we have to consider the momentum and the inertia how this institution had its beginning when charles coke coke took over the company in nineteen sixty seven coke industries was deeply enmeshed and deeply embedded in the fossil fuel energy system <hes> at the time coke industries was the largest crude oil gathering company in the united states. What that means is coke was the company that would show up to an oil well pick up the oil and take get to market and it was the largest company like that in the in the united states. Secondly coke was one of the largest global energy traders in the world buying and selling super supertankers of oil trading futures contracts and things like that and finally coke was deep in the refining business. One of the first moves charles coke made was to buy a massive oil refinery in minneapolis which is a really remarkable story in itself. It's been a stunningly only profitable refinery for decades. So what you see is that the company didn't start from neutral. The company started with a deep investment in the fossil fuel system system and the coke method if you will the coke theory is that you build on what you know when you branch out into new businesses you don't just arbitrarily go into different segments of the economy you go into industries where you can leverage your expertise where you really know what you're doing and when you know the business better than any of your competitors so what that means over time is that coke has naturally gravitated to fossil fuel based businesses the energy energy sector. I mean whether that's you know. Operating natural gas pipeline networks a natural gas refineries. <hes> coke is huge today. Hey in in the crude oil supplies that have been unearthed in texas from the fracking revolution that is a major business for coke now so what all all this points to is a company that in two thousand and nineteen is deeply invested in the fossil fuels business and it's sort of hard to overstate the economic inertia of that decision and i mean i i what i feel like you're going at with this question is is this issue of you know why not just diversify into renewable energies and why has coke expended so much political capital on the issue of global warming and not putting in a price on carbon emissions and i think the reason is think about the investment in fossil fuels and what that really looks like i mean coke has billions of dollars sunk into the little the literal physical infrastructure of the of the fossil fuels business to massive oil refineries in the united states. It's massive pipeline networks a global trading system of energy supplies. If the fossil fuels business starts to decline klein if we limit greenhouse gas emissions and we stoke renewable energy sources like wind and solar <hes> think about the depreciation of those assets over twenty thirty years about the declining revenue with the lack of oil processing that would happen. I estimated and based on talking with people inside the coke network losses from that transition could be measured in the trillions of dollars over thirty forty years. There's and incidentally this is a company that thinks on a thirty year horizon so you know while it is true. That coke is adaptable. Coke makes lots lots of acquisitions. You can't ignore the economic reality that it has its roots in the fossil fuel industry. There's a story read that you tell about reporting this book that i think encapsulates that approach you were talking to <hes> a former coke employees and and you asked him what got him up in the morning and he said one simple thing carbon. When did he mean by that. Well you know this individual was a senior former senior. Lobbyists lobbyists to coke industries and this was a few years ago and i really wanted to understand cokes political influence operation because you know as i said at the beginning i really wanted to kind of paint a portrait of corporate power in america in our political in the economic system works and you know corporate influence policies just a huge part of that story so i've been spending years interviewing coke lobbyists and political operatives and i wanted to know how they do their the job at how they do what they do why they do it better than other people and so i did pose the question <hes> to this guy what got you up. What was your front burner issue issue and when he said carbon what he means is the very large public policy fight over what i would call just simply putting a price on carbon. One of the key things about this business is that the carbon emissions free <hes>. I interviewed another guy who was a conservative republican congressman who described it as being able to go to the trash dump and dump all of your refuse for free without paying a price. This is bob inglis. That indeed is bob inglis. <hes> a fascinating and important story about what happens when republicans wake up to the reality of climate change of short answer is coke helped dr bob inglis out of office but what bob english saw was that you know this is a classic <hes> externally issue of markets when you can pollute for free. It helps your business so you know starting in nineteen ninety. There's been a public policy debate in this country about putting a price on those carbon emissions and coke industries has been extremely aggressive in making sure politically that no price is put on carbon and no limit is put on carbon emissions because doing so would dramatically change the economics of the fossil fuels business. I don't wanna be naive here. Because many of the biggest fossil fuel companies have played a very strong role <hes> over the last few decades doc aids and sowing doubt about climate change but at the same time a lot of these companies particularly in recent years the biggest oil majors for example the biggest industrial the giants have said yeah well. We do support a price on carbon. If he brings predictability for business we think we can support these clean energy technologies and we can also start to you know we can. We can continue to serve our legacy business while reducing emissions and try to build other businesses and the cokes what makes them what makes them so unique. Is this day said absolutely not this. This is the way the world needs to be in. It seems to go back to their special brand of libertarian politics and the fact this company itself self is so tied to charles and david koch particularly charles coke and their special brand of politics so can you just unpack that a little bit for me what what about their politics and their way of seeing the world makes them unique when some other companies are starting to make this transition and who are in the same areas of business coke industries has truly been unique has truly been unique in it's utterly uncompromising position shen on this issue and you're exactly right that it traces back to charles coke and let's talk about that vision that you just referenced. You know charles this coq. I've i interviewed him about this. In two thousand fifteen he released a book about his view of the world called good profit and you know charles coke. I described him as an engineer. I think that's the most important thing to maybe understand about his mindset. This is a guy who got multiple engineering graduate degrees from m._i._t. Mitee and ever since he was young charles coke has been steeped in political theory. His dad fred was one of the co founders of the john birch society <hes> literally a secret society that believes the federal government was sort of a front group for communist <hes> tyranny and oppression so charles coke was really steeped in i think conservative -servative thinking and far right thinking from a young age but charles coke augmented that belief system with the teachings of these austrian economists ludwig von mises and friedrich hayek and ultimately the view you come to is that in in charles cokes mind the not only the superior way but truly the only effective way to organize humane society is as a voluntary market exchange system that that means everything is private. Everything is determined by price. There's no social security. There's no medicare. There aren't public roads. All of this is done by corporations all of this. This is done by the private market and in his view. That's the only way to do it because if you start intervening in markets you distort prices you create create distortions. Essentially taxes and government programs only create more problems than they solve and the reason i bring up the engineering. Is that this this view is unmovable. I mean charles coke sees it as like a blueprint for society and you can't argue argue with a blueprint if you tried to cut corners <hes> and change the laws of physics on a blueprint that building is going to collapse so since at least the nineteen seventies charles coke has been patiently trying to reshape america's american society to reflect view and i mean he's very clear about it in his in ah in the his correspondents in his letters in the speeches he gives to the think tanks that he has <hes> himself founded and created that he wants american society to be more of a libertarian utopia and i think that's why you don't see this sort of retreat. That may be exxon. Mobil is publicly talking about that. They will accept a carbon tax or they will accept something like that. At route you're getting down to an ideological fight <hes> in terms of the coke network and they are not gonna back town. I mean the prologue of the book is called the fighter and a kind of walks through charles cokes fifty year career and what you see is that this guy has a spine line of steel and he does not back down on what he considers to be key principles. We are going to take a quick pause here from a somewhat dark our conversation to talk about a very uplifting trend and company happening in the utility space that trend is all about utilities using analytics to engage their customers more and embrace the energy transition and it's being fostered by up light a utility software and analytics leader that you once knew as tendrils and simple energy energy. That's right these companies have come together some of the most influential companies in the energy efficiency and customer engagement space tendrils simple energy merged and they acquired i fuel energy savvy and eimi and they became up plight and they now offer an end to end product utility customer engagement that transcends. He's he's silos. He's very difficult. Silos within power companies and helps improve interactions across every channel so utilities can become more energy efficient. They can engage their customers customers in new areas. They can get distributed energy. They're trying to do it all they are doing it. All this enables personalized experiences that the customers have now come to expect from any other product and utilities really need to catch up this transformation happening in the energy sectors happening within utilities and and up light is there to help them embrace it. They also produced this new five-part podcast on how utilities can learn from disruptive change in other industries. It's called illuminate and in explorers all kinds of stories and other areas and then applies that to utilities go check out eliminators anywhere you get your podcast and go up light dot com slash g._t._m. Into learn more about up light services so the book centers on charles coke obviously a lot lot of people are talking about david koch as well because he just passed away last week. I'm wondering what his role is. In this establishment of the libertarian philosophy guide the company in its political activities who is david coke in relationship to charles cook well so there were four coke brothers charles david bill and freddie freddie and bill have nothing to do with the company and they haven't since the nineteen eighties. There was a bitter fight between the brothers for control that i don't think we necessarily need to get into into and at the end of the day. David and charles ended up owning eighty percent of coke industries but david coke has been described grabbed to me as a as a silent partner when it comes to the business charles coke stayed in wichita ran this company <hes> <hes> really with an iron hand he developed a strategy he developed the operational tactics and david koch was a full throated endorser verster and partner who you know green lighted charles cokes activity but didn't run the machine. David coke moved out to new york. He lived a very public look life. He gave a lot of money to philanthropy. Put his name on museum wings and cancer research centers charles coke never did things like that and and and when it came to the political network i think it's very fair to say the charles coke set the vision charles coke developed. The strategy and david koch was there as a full partner who who went along with it <hes> but but wasn't necessarily the driving force. I i mean david coke through his acquiescence and you know threw his support allowed the the money to flow from the coke fortune <hes> david coke would give speeches at at these americans for prosperity events which is sort of his grassroots group that coke formed so david koch was a full partner and more of a public public face in in fact it was david koch who ran as the vice presidential nominee for the libertarian party back in nineteen eighty but interestingly it was charles cocoa in background was sort of writing letters to the head of the libertarian party and controlling the money flow and doing that kind of back room operation so david cooke has been more four of the public face of this political and economic machine but charles coke has been the the sort of strategic driver behind it. All you know i familiarize myself itself with the cokes very late in the game by journalistic standards it wasn't until a couple years into the obama administration when they became a household household name and it became apparent how much they were spending to counter the obama agenda and responding on climate change in particular <hes> i was is business journalist and in science journals focus on climate and in clean energy and so they've been doing this for a long time though i mean americans for prosperity have been founded. Did i think in two thousand four many years before and <hes> they there's a revelation in your book that charles and david koch had actually been funding in supporting climate scepticism climate denial all the way back in the early nineteen nineties and a lot of people were surprised by that revelation because <hes> they knew that they had been funding <hes> anti climate change groups the small cadre of <hes> you know fringe conspiracy theorists and climate skeptics optics for you know a decade a couple decades but to go all the way back to nineteen ninety-one was kind of surprised to folks talk about how they got involved in climate skepticism and deniel gal and it's how far it stretches back well yes and if i could please rewind the clock. Even further in nineteen seventy four <hes> <unk> as charles coke was just emerging as the c._e._o. Of coke industries he founded a think tank in texas called the institute for humane studies and he gave davis speech to this think tank in nineteen seventy four in which he laid out a political vision that was breathtakingly radical and i hate. I hate the word radical article because it's just so charge but i mean let's put it this way. Nineteen seventy four in this speech charles coca saying that republicans in c._e._o.'s are basically socialists okay they've bought into this idea that that government should intervene and markets and business leaders have sacrificed their own principles by i agree into stuff like the public highways and things like that okay and he says we need to execute a patient project to reshape shape american society and it's going to have these different components we are going to fund the raw material of ideas by creating think tanks like the cato institute and by funding university research centers like the mercatus center at george mason. We're gonna start lobbying in washington winton d._c. And use corporate lobbyists. We're going to use litigation. He laid out a plan to reshape american society and that's how that's how you saw the creation of this multi-facetted political influence machine and so let's fast forward up to the year you're nineteen ninety. <hes> which is when we see some of the first evidence that coke is casting doubt on the science of climate change by this time cokes machine is <hes> fully operational. It's starting to get more money and it's well integrated and i think the most important parts of it are the corporate put lobbying shop in dc. It's one of the biggest america right now. It's about a block from the white house. Then you've got this network of campaign donors charles coke has put together that can that that can put more money into a campaign cycle than a political party during some cycles and then finally you've got this boots on the ground activists network of americans for prosperity verity can really activate real people to knock on doors to come protest in washington d._c. And as i've stated one of the key targets targets of this political machine has been the issue of climate change and in one thousand nine hundred ninety there was a real threat to the fossil fuels business in in the sense that george h w bush and other republicans were very clear that wow the science behind climate change is terrifying. This is a huge problem and if i could please state here the science behind climate change is not complicated. The confusion comes in in predicting these exact consequences you know when is when do we reach a tipping point. How many how many parts per million of carbon is the tipping point and scientists are very cautious and full of caveats when they talk about this stuff so they use words like uncertainty and in nineteen ninety one the cato cato institute. One of these think tanks cokes created held a conference talking about the uncertainty and doubt around climate science. It's and they helped push the republican party back off the plate and to politicize this issue l. Let's fast forward another twenty years two thousand ten. <hes> you know coke a we talked about bob inglis earlier i mean this is a conservative republican. From south carolina who's alarmed by the science of climate change and coke helped organize tea party rallies in english his district to who <hes> protest him they stopped giving him money and they gave money to a primary opponent named trey goudy. They put him out of office. Coke burned down the moderate wing of the republican party that wanted to do something about climate change and the and they've been patiently early working on this project for decades well. There's an interesting addition to that story and i think speaks to the power of the cokes. Bob inglis eventually went to go start. This group called republic e. n. and they're a small group of conservatives who are trying to raise awareness about climate change and they've been trying to rally the <hes> the small climate caucus in congress and they've been at this for years and they're doing some really good work in espousing conservative climate solutions but they just they can't really get that many republicans to talk about this issue <hes> it's hard to create a safe space for them partly because of a lot of the money that the folks have put into campaigns to try to silence folks in and essentially politically threatened them if they talk about climate change well i mean i do and you're exactly right. I mean this is maybe one of the biggest impact and one of the biggest legacies that david and charles coke will leave leave behind. Is that how they have reshaped the republican party you know recently john cornyn a senior senator from texas sort of dismissively the tweeted that you know the hottest summer on record but hey it's summer summers are warm. It's this kind of dismissive attitude that the that the cokes have engendered that if you even acknowledge the reality of climate change your crossing a line and you're breaking orthodoxy and bob inglis is a guy away from travelers rest south carolina. I would describe him. These are my words as conservative who who believes in gods and god religion capitalism and markets and he has been trying to steadily promote this idea that markets have a role to play ah in solving the climate change problem and stoking the new energy sources that are going to be the foundation of our system <hes> in thirty years or so <hes> coke has in in in english view. They continue to hound him. <hes> englisg list attended a debate <hes> at hosted by the libertarian reason foundation that coke funds and you know there were anti english placards and buttons that have been imprinted and put it in the seats and you know that stuff doesn't happen without money and it just seems like this network is continuing to hound the skies even even after he retired from congress. I have over the years ben to a number of these climate denial events <hes> they're put on by the heartland an institute <hes> in a group that's affiliated with the cato institute and some of these other libertarian groups and they're not serious events. They just are not <hes>. It's it's a pretty fringe group there. It's a very <hes> insulated group of folks who have been at this for decades now. They're communication. Efforts are not very good good if you read their work. It's fairly shoddy. <hes> it's just not a very well organized group without a lot of external money and and i'm wondering how do you take an unserious group of folks like that and turn them into a serious political machine that can influence almost almost all of the republican party is it because charles and david are particularly good at what they do or is it just because they have a lot of money well well. I i look my honest answer. Is it's a confluence of the two first of all an ample supply of money. He helps elevate voices. That would not be taken seriously otherwise you know it's kind of ironic you hear a lot of this idea about crony capitalism and how destructive it is for the government intervene in markets but the coke network has intervened in the market of ideas in a way that has created a bubble or artificially inflated the impact of voices that are not serious as you say <hes> and not rigorous so money helps money plays a role money can rent the ballroom at the hotel can fly people in to hold a conference in that really matters but there is another very very very important element of strategy and expertise that has made this effective and you know. I'm not gonna say that. The coke network invented wanted this playbook per. Se you know big tobacco for decades has been very adept and very smart at <hes> influencing the public debate without leaving leaving a lot of fingerprints but i think coke industries has taken that strategy to a true true science. <hes> let me let me please give you an example and first of paul as we said earlier coke industries involved in commodities trading and very opaque dark markets where the strategy is to to execute trades without letting anybody else know what you're up to. I interviewed traders for years to kind of learn how they do this and it is striking to me how similar the political influence operation is to to have an impact to have an effect without leaving a fingerprint. I'll give you one example. During two thousand ten congress was debating cap and trade while i remember that moment and folks who are following this issue at the time of remember commercial commercial with newt gingrich on a couch with nancy pelosi talking about supporting a climate bill and a lot of republicans were behind this idea of cap and trade at that time that's right and as coke's folks own political operatives told me the key was back the republicans off make it clear to republicans that this is not supportable supportable and that they cannot support this option so to do that coke leveraged its expertise to make it appear that there was you know broad public opposition to this bill even when there wasn't so so this is why at the time coke industries secretly funded think-tank study by a group called the american council for capital capital formation are a._c._c. f- coke secretly funded a study by a._c._c. app that found that if the cap and trade bill was imposed the american can economy would be absolutely devastated and you know experts at the time said wow a lotta. The assumptions in this report are pretty extreme and this is a super a big outlier but what coke was able to do with this report was to amplify its message through the network or the constellation of think tanks and political groups oops that coke had started that also didn't carry cokes name like the institute for energy research or the american energy alliance and that a._t. Group by the away was headed by a former coke lobbyist. So these think tanks took the study that didn't have cokes name on it created political ads based on the nightmarish marriage statistics from that study and then ran those ads in the home districts of key legislators like lindsey graham to make it politically impossible awesome to support a cap and trade bill by saying that it was going to destroy the energy system reduce americans to poverty essentially and so you can see the way the coke makes its own ideas appear that they have far more support than they really have if the cokes didn't decide decide to take on this issue of climate change so early on would things be different today so it's very difficult to talk about hypothetical <hes> climate change. There's never been an easy issue. I'm sure you read that book by nathaniel rich losing earth absolutely yeah you know i mean he's talking about a lot of these early. Debates is not like this thing was going gonna be a no brainer and it might be a little too glib to say that we would have put a price on carbon by now. Were it not for the coke network <hes> i it is absolutely fair to say that they've played an unparalleled role in delaying action and even derailing action on this front and and <hes> it's delayed the effort for sure and you know it's hard to say categorically. We'd have a cap and trade system or price on carbon now but they they have definitely played a role in making sure that we have with that. We do not at this point. We know the coax these cartoon villains. Is there any widely held perception. Shen of the coakes or the coke network or coke industries that you think is wrong. We'll there sure is an am really glad you brought that up you. You know i i i'm i'm i'm very critical of of the coq actions in politics but a big part of the reason and i wrote this book was to try to d. Cartoon is the coke brothers if you will here's one of the surprising things okay you see the picture of david and charles coke on on protest signs and when i went into this i pictured these kind of billionaires who are just sitting on top of a of oil refining system that was belching pollution into skied and they're just sort of quietly collecting their billions but you know this organization coke industries is is truly impressive of and i would say even admirable in many ways charles coke.

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"koch" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"koch" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"Bill koch in the providence journal bill koch twentyfive on twitter give him a give him a follow one quick thing here we see here graduated bishop fiene that's correct but here we go dateline dateline and attleboro eight two thousand sixteen north attleboro native and bishop fee and high school graduate mark schmidt has become the atlantic ten conference coach of the year wow says on his wiki pedia graduated from bishop thin and attleborough and eighty one which is correct he's in the bishop fee and hall of fame so correct for a nine minute and fifty two seconds steeplechase i don't doubt that for a second he stills the schools second all time leading scorer with a total of one thousand four hundred and fifty points i do believe the all time leading scorer if you have the list there in front of you know i was just joking that's a good one though although bishoff ian has its own we all time leading score might be my good friend melissa traversee who went on to play the university of maine and is now a college coach in her own right but i'm not one hundred percent on that wow shulamit has been there for a long time yes yes i didn't even realize he's been there since oh seven good run that is a hell and he was a robert morris to enjoy pittsburgh time yeah maybe fifty five i don't want to sound like ages but agent via coach job needs a whippersnapper does it what are you talking about the road the road job.

Bill koch bill koch mark schmidt ian melissa traversee providence journal twitter bishop thin university of maine robert morris pittsburgh one hundred percent fifty two seconds nine minute
"koch" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"koch" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"To do with it you don't have to repair porter to anybody germany do whatever you want with it so now what do you do with it but in a roth ira while unfortunately you can't do that because the first requirement for opening a roth ira is do you have earned income and the only time you can piggyback off of a spouses income as if you file a joint return for that year so if you file a joint return they're just looking at the community income basically is there enough income on that returned to support the ira contribution the roth ira koch which in this case if you're filing a separate return they're still gonna look for is their enough earned income on this return to support their contribution if you don't have any earned income you can't do a roth contribution now depending upon what your other incomes may or may not be the roth ira may not be that advantages of all you're doing if the can we have is the ss the eye then you probably not paying much in the way of tackling anyway so you could get away with just investing it personally just open a brokerage account invested four whatever gold you have set in mind just like you would have invested it in a roth ira taxes are going to be that much of an issue now if you have lots of other income from other sources maybe you probably not gonna have any choice but you're gonna invested personally anyway because you can't put it into a roth ira so unfortunately we have to identify the goal what is it that you want to say for its if you're going to look at raf iras that is probably something in the future so you're probably going to be looking for some type of growth investment and you just not gonna put it into a roth you're not going to have the tax deferred ultimately tax reach sheltering of the money that's inside the rothfield just have to do it.

ira koch germany ira
"koch" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"koch" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"Down like you're on your your in your laptop here like minimizing different sites and everything else is still taking up space in a and attention and such like that so i be that would be very mindful of that on so as well when it comes to scripts actually mobile do this is a total brain hack and i'm not saying that this works and every occasion but we definitely see a lift is this what do you think is a strong this sense in terms of tied to your memory smell momoh right and so you know this so the term brain hacks that will say that when your stunning anything whether it's music or words or anything for your meetings or anything that people need to at home is to introduce a new sent there because when you introduce that sent and actually need to recall it had that same sent because are all these studies where the environment unconsciously gets linked to the information and they they proven this word in multiple times or even though the example use in past compensation where they put people this emerging underwater give him works to memorize take him out of the water see how they memorize if recall back onto the water cmsa recall which win what environment to they remember more in the water right because he got unconsciously linked right and so in a perfect world people will be studying the music or studying the the script or whatever where they need to perform it rate or likes let's say they're staying for tests studying lecture center was not being used because it on koch the get anchor there but that's not practical for the most part so then you bring the environment in with it so you chew gum with unique flavor and essential oil cologne perfume or whatever it is that unique because that that's like on.

koch