6 Burst results for "Ko University"

"ko university" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

05:21 min | Last week

"ko university" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"This week has been if you've been paying attention kind of a Central Bank rate hike palooza. The fed here yesterday, of course, we told you about that, the Bank of England, central banks in Sweden, Switzerland, and Norway, everybody is raising rates. The European Central Bank almost surely will when it meets in a couple of weeks. The notable exception, though, is the bank of Japan. It has decided to keep its rates near zero and it says it expects that to be the case for some time to come. Japan is dealing with inflation just like everybody else, yes, but as marketplace is Justin Ho reports, the BOJ has got more than rising prices on its mind. Compared to the dollar, the Jens value has fallen by more than 20% this year. That's in large part because the bank of Japan is kept interest rates low, while the Federal Reserve has been raising them. And that makes Japanese government bonds, less attractive to investors. So they sell Japanese yen and buy U.S. dollars. So that leads to the depreciation. Is an economics professor at KO university in Tokyo, and a former member of the bank of Japan's policy board. She says the bank is keeping interest rates low to prop up Japan's economy after the pandemic. By helping people with mortgages and business loans. There are still many small medium enterprises. They are suffering. And so there needs to be money from commercial banks. So if the interest is just to go up, that's very bad for them. A weekend can be a good thing, especially for Japanese manufacturers, since it makes their exports cheaper. But takatoshi Ito, an economics professor at Columbia, says Japanese exports have been slow. Meanwhile, the weekend is making imports more expensive for Japanese consumers. So the benefit seems to be less than before while the costs from the imported inflation especially energy and food seems to be high. The Japanese government is trying to boost its currency by buying yet and selling off reserves of other currencies. But Christopher vecchio at daily FX says Japan can only do that for so long. As those FX reserves wind down, they have less ammunition moving forward to try to prop up the value

BOJ Japanese government Justin Ho fed KO university European Central Bank Bank of England Central Bank Japan Norway Sweden Switzerland takatoshi Ito Tokyo U.S. Columbia Christopher vecchio
"ko university" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:47 min | 2 months ago

"ko university" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"This is the foreign desk on monocle 24. Neutrality is not pacifism, at least not necessarily. Sweden and Japan have observed policies of relative neutrality for different reasons, but both have been generally recognized allies of the west and have maintained formidable militaries. Will joining me now from Tokyo is tomohiko toguchi, a professor at the KO university graduate school of system design and management. Tomohiko is a foreign policy specialist who formally served as special adviser to the cabinet of the late prime minister Shinzo Abe. And joining us from Washington, D.C., is Elizabeth brough, a resident fellow at the American enterprise institute, and a columnist for foreign policy magazine. Regular listeners will know that Elizabeth is also a Swedish native. And Elizabeth, let's start with you. Why has this been the moment that Sweden has changed its mind as opposed to all the other conflicts it has sat out or risen above? Well, what's different Andrew is Finland, so as you know and as your listeners know, since the end of World War II and really during World War II, Sweden has had a policy of not joining a military line during World War II, it was neutral, then after World War II, we decided not to join NATO and indeed to be militarily non aligned. Then clearly joined the European Union together with Finland and the European Union has a sort of collective defense class that nobody ever takes seriously. It's there. It's a Sweden and Finland. We're no longer neutral or relinquished neutrality on joining the European Union. But they never wanted to join NATO. Finland really had very strong public opinion against joining NATO. They didn't see the need for it. And Sweden had us about a moral stance on NATO, the ruling social Democrats, I should say. And NASA results, other parties as well. And this mentality really was that Sweden is not like those other countries. We are something special and we should maintain the independent styles on the international stage. Then came this really extraordinary moment when Russia invaded Ukraine and the Finns who had been so skeptical of Nate all along, the public opinion changed in Finland to massive support in favor of NATO. And for Sweden, once again, ruled by the social Democrats, they were taken by surprise because they had always said, well, we might think about it if the friends are willing knowing the Finns would never be willing. And so now they sort of had no choice but to apply to join. I've never seen an application as reluctant as that of Sweden and Sweden just got extremely lucky that the defense decided to change our mind and sort of open the door for Sweden to join the social Democrats didn't like it, of course, but now Sweden will benefit and it will benefit. Tom Mexico, Japan's situation is obviously very different. Japan's situation was imposed upon it by the post World

Sweden Finland NATO tomohiko toguchi KO university graduate school Tomohiko Washington, D.C. Elizabeth brough foreign policy magazine European Union Shinzo Abe Elizabeth American enterprise institute Tokyo Japan cabinet Andrew NASA Nate Ukraine
"ko university" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

04:37 min | 7 months ago

"ko university" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific Americans 62nd science. I'm Karen hockey. You're probably familiar with the concept of evolution. Living things evolve by accumulating genetic changes, which are then weeded out or preserved through a process of natural selection. Well, it turns out, the same thing happens in music. And by using the same software that's used to track mutations in genes, researchers have mapped out those sorts of changes that shape the evolution of songs. The findings appear in the journal current biology. I've always loved music since I was a child. Patrick savage. An ethno musicologist at KO university in fujisawa Japan. I grew up singing English folk songs, my dad really likes folk music and often has his friends come over and do jam sessions at home. And then when I moved to Japan about 11 years ago, I started studying Japanese, folk songs, and I really liked that repertoire too. The style was very different from the music he grew up with. It's like. Yet the way the songs are learned by trying to imitate a recording or a teacher is pretty much the same. So it kind of made sense to test these ideas about how these general evolutionary rules that we find in music, especially in these folk songs repertoire that I know that we kind of parallel what we find in genetics and allow us to get a more sort of general unifying theory about music and evolution across different cultures. At first, he and his colleagues hope to tackle a huge reconstruction of the family tree of all folk music. But kind of quickly realized that it would be quite challenging to do, because when you do when you build these phylogenies, these family trees, you kind of have to make a lot of assumptions about how the process works. So for example, geneticists know what kinds of mutations crop up in DNA. And with what frequency. Information they can then use to assemble and calibrate their gene based phylogenetic trees. But savage says they didn't have the same level of knowledge for music. So we decided that the first step rather than trying to do these big reconstructions, we would first focus on the simplest case, which is the pairs. Savage and his team combed through enormous catalogs of English and Japanese folk songs to identify pairs of melodies that were clearly related, like two different versions of the song Scarborough fair, which is actually based on a traditional English ballad about an elfin knight. With the English ones, people had been going out there and noting things by ear since at least the early 1900s. And by the mid 1900s, a similar process had begun in Japan. And so they just kind of sent teams of scholars out throughout all of Japan said, you know, we need to collect all the folk songs before they disappear. So savage had a pool of some 10,000 tunes to work with. So I just had to go through and just look at the notations in the anthologies and just kind of sing them to myself as I kind of converted them into these sequences of text season D's and using things like that. So we could run the sequence alignment algorithms on them. So what did team savage learn? Well, a few things. One was that more functional notes, the notes that had stronger rhythm functions would be more stable. So notes that are key to the melody. We listen to and discover a fair, the end, she once was a true love of mine, I said this final note is very strong downbeat, and it's also the last note where you're kind of always expect to end on with closure on the tonic, the most stable note. You would very rarely end on was a true love of mine. It feels very unfinished and likewise, but you would never expect that note to this easily that you wouldn't expect to see once was a true lover. It'll just be very strange. Next, they found that when one note mutates to another note, that changes tend to be small. So like one or two semitones above or below where it would have been rather than 6 or 7 semitones, which would be different between la la versus like here, for example, savage sing snippets of a Japanese lullaby. These ones have different lyrics, but almost the same melody. The first one was notated from the singing of tansui kikuchi,.

Patrick savage KO university fujisawa Japan hockey savage Savage la la tansui kikuchi
"ko university" Discussed on Wow In the World

Wow In the World

02:24 min | 8 months ago

"ko university" Discussed on Wow In the World

"Or was it C? Trained pigeons can tell the difference between paintings by Pablo Picasso and Claude Monet. And to answer today's question, joining us by phone, it's Nelly from California. Nelly, what's the wow? Did you know that trained pigeons can tell the difference between quad lunette and Pablo Picasso? Winner winner, oil, paintings for dinner. If you guessed C that trained pigeons can tell the difference between paintings by Pablo Picasso and Claude Monet, congratulations. You found the winning wow. Scientists at KO university in Tokyo, Japan, trained 8 pigeons to tell the difference between the paintings of two of the world's most famous artists. Monet and Picasso. These pigeons were so good at telling the difference, they correctly guessed which artist created the painting 90% of the time. Poker balls. Now, if you guessed a while tigers can not pick locks, some cockatoos can. Researchers at Oxford University challenged a group of cockatoos by placing a nut inside of a lockbox. The birds had to remove a pin, screw and bolt, and then turn a wheel to release a latch. Most of the time, these birds were able to do this with just a little bit of guidance. And if you guessed C well, ostriches can not identify musical artists, but goldfish can. In fact, goldfish have been trained to eat from a specific food filled ball each time they heard music from the famous composer, Johann Sebastian Bach. But when the researchers played a song from another composer, Igor Stravinsky, the goldfish did not go for the food filled ball. This suggests that they could tell the difference between the two artists. Now Mindy, why don't you tell our winning wowzers what they've won? Tyros, all of our winning wowzers will be taking home their very own invisible trained carrier pigeon. Oh, that actually sounds like an amazing prize, Mindy. Do these pigeons send messages or? Nope. Even better. These carrier pigeons carry you anywhere you wanna go..

"ko university" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

04:27 min | 3 years ago

"ko university" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Kingdom well I'll just continue the story a good he quotes Suzanne leclair quote a she was told by the hospital she's gonna have cancer surgery right she's told by the hospital yes we your insurance is good here she said I paid my three hundred dollar copay after the surgery I started receiving always invoices and came to find out that the only thing covered was my bad because I hospital was out of network my bills were hundreds of thousands of dollars so I had no choice but to file bankruptcy and then they they they're quoting you know other people she's got it isn't on my medical bills are fifty two thousand dollars I've done everything from credit cards to consolidation loans like just keep simply pain one credit card with another interest free until I can pay the next one is the site a cancer most people don't understand or know about and it's never ending and it keeps adding up and adding up and before you know it you're back in debt so bad you can't believe it again I get on the way to work today I walked past two cars parked on the side of the street in which people were sleeping and one of the clearly this guy had everything he owned in his car and and it was just a it was a beater I mean it was just a a record when wanted the at one of the other ones was a fairly nice car and and the people living in their cars and I don't live in a poor part of town in this in this the it it's just this is the United States of America we're supposed to be the middle class beacon for the world we're supposed to be the kind of the you know the country this sort of invented this of Franklin Roosevelt during the worldwide Great Depression of the thirties we raise drop the middle class in the forties fifties sixties and seventies you can go to college for free pretty much anywhere in the United States are so cheap that you can work your way through college not on a part time job my wife worked her way through college she actually completed her education I didn't but she worked in OSHA as as a waitress at Howard Johnson's and I think that you know is like a Buck fifty an hour something back in the day and and die in does it in the short time that I was in college I paid for it by by pumping pumping gas and and replacing tires and an Exxon station and SO station was called then and washing dishes a Bob's Big Boy you can't do that now you end up massively in debt wait and and and where is all that money going it's going to the top one percent period full stop and and in a huge huge way and it in fact this is this is from meteor blades over daily kos university California Berkeley cal a condom is Gabriel's Lachman says the total wealth of the four hundred richest Americans jump from one point two seven trillion two two point nine six trillion dollars over the last ten years the tax rate fell from twenty seven percent to twenty three percent now I pay more than twenty three percent taxes but I'm not a billionaire or a millionaire or trillion or whatever I mean you know it's really it's it's just this is mind boggling the top income tax rates for slash six times since nineteen eighty this all began with the Reagan and we're still in Reaganomics we've had you know three or four Republican presidents in two democratic presidents who have all said yeah okay Reaganomics will stay with that and we have a small chance a very small chance that this will all change when the selection and I sure hope so because frankly people's lives are at stake your vet in Elsa project California Hey about what's up I wondered if you could clarify with me why Rochester and gets could go home so he gets sent that in February this is a rich white guy I mean seriously about it's it's a white collar crime you know I see I a and and and and you know I mean if if I if a if a a poor person of color you know this steals a candy bar the end up in jail but if a rich white guys you know a bit conspires to take down the United States of America and destroy our reputation around the world yeah you can go home for a couple of months while you while we figure out if you're gonna be sentenced it's it's crazy but but that's that's our that's our system.

Suzanne leclair twenty three percent fifty two thousand dollars nine six trillion dollars three hundred dollar twenty seven percent one percent ten years
"ko university" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

07:20 min | 3 years ago

"ko university" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"The billionaire's as Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders have tried to do and and do you know are so are struggling to break through the media to do in order to distract us they turn us against each other they told us that the problem as it were the clause of our ills was brown people come in from Mexico what black people who wanted he wanted a white people's jobs or immigrants who you know or Muslims or I mean it fell and fill in the blanks right that has been with the Republican Party has been telling us ever since nineteen eighty one back to you absolutely absolutely I swear Sudesh other our schools and all these other things go ahead I think that it all when you get down to it they are rushing and just just about all of the ills and like I said earlier you know I mean I grew up in a very bad neighborhood of Washington DC that their neighborhood mail is is totally change but there the reality is that we only small very small amounts of people coming into those neighborhoods buying drugs drugs are so poorly prolific male in our society you know what let the illegal or legal and I think if people do is they'll working there simply third billing the things that they're going through everything from drugs the school shootings the obesity you can go on and on and on and told me to start about we we are the the lady that we fight the wars we send people you know over there to fight for four years and then we bring it back here and expect people who were taught to kill you know won't have issues when they come back all of that is through corporate implored income inequality in the tax structure we face the destruction of the middle class yep absolutely absolutely and massive medical debt and massive educational dead things that used to be no big deal yeah people people my age remember the fifties the sixties the seventies when in getting sick didn't cause you to become bankrupt now it does and the lack of education yeah I'm going to college didn't didn't didn't leave you with you know to just two decades worth of debt so that you couldn't buy a house or get married or have kids or anything John spot on thank you very very well said in fact Michael's sighing sighing not so I'm not sure how to pronounce his last name road this brilliant piece in this in the guardian this morning it's call I live on the street this is the headline I live on the street now how Americans fall into medical bankruptcy they see starts out with the story of this woman from west Palm Beach Florida her name is Suzanne leclair and he says what she was first diagnosed with cancer and before her first cancer related surgery what Claire was told by the hospital that they accepted her employer based health insurance and this is the scam this this this private health insurance thing that trump once a you know a bit Boris Johnson to inflict on the United Kingdom well I'll just continue the story a good he quotes Suzanne leclair quote a she was told by the hospital she's gonna have cancer surgery right she's told by the hospital yes we your insurance is good here she said I paid my three hundred dollar copay after the surgery I started receiving all these invoices and came to find out that the only thing covered was my bad because I hospital was out of network my bills were hundreds of thousands of dollars so I had no choice but to file bankruptcy and then they they they're quoting you know other people she's got it isn't on my medical bills are fifty two thousand dollars I've done everything from credit cards to consolidation loans like just keep simply pain one credit card with another interest free until I can pay the next one is the site a cancer most people don't understand or know about and it's never ending and it keeps adding up and adding up and before you know it you're back in debt so bad you can't believe it again I get on the way to work today I walked past two cars parked on the side of the street in which people were sleeping and one of the clearly this guy had everything he owned in his car and and it was just a it was a beater I mean it was just a a record when one of the a one of the other ones was a fairly nice car and and the people living in their cars and I don't live in a poor part of town I mean this this the it it's just this is the United States of America we're supposed to be the middle class beacon for the world we're supposed to be the kind of that you know the country this sort of invented this of Franklin Roosevelt during the worldwide Great Depression of the thirties we raise drop the middle class in the forties fifties sixties and seventies you can go to college for free pretty much anywhere in the United States are so cheap that you can work your way through college not on a part time job my wife worked her way through college she actually completed her education I didn't but she worked in OSHA as as a waitress at Howard Johnson's and I think that you know is like a Buck fifty an hour something back in the day and and I invested in the short time that I was in college I paid for it by by pumping pumping gas and and replacing tires and an Exxon station and SO station was called then and washing dishes a Bob's Big Boy you can't do that now you end up massively in debt wait and and and where is all that money going it's going to the top one percent full stop and and in a huge huge way and it in fact this is this the from meteor blades over daily kos university of California Berkeley cal a condom is Gabriel's Aikman says the total wealth of the four hundred richest Americans jump from one point two seven trillion two two point nine six trillion dollars over the last ten years the tax rate fell from twenty seven percent to twenty three percent now I pay more than twenty three percent taxes but I'm not a billionaire or a millionaire or trillion or whatever I mean you know it's really it's just this is mind boggling the top income tax rates for slash six times since nineteen eighty this all began with the Reagan and we're still in Reaganomics we've had you know three or four Republican presidents in two democratic presidents who have all said yeah okay Reaganomics will stay with that and we have a small chance a very small chance that this will all change with the selection and I sure hope so because frankly people's lives are at stake your vet in L. sobriety California hazy about what's up I wondered if you could clarify with me why Rochester and get could go home so he gets sent that in February this is a rich white guy I mean seriously about it's it's a white collar crime you know I see I a and and and and you know I mean if if if a if a approve person of color you know this steals a candy bar the end up in jail but if a rich white guys you know a bit conspires to take down the United States of America and destroy our reputation around the world yeah you can go home for a couple of months while you while we figure out if you're gonna be sentenced it's it's crazy but but that's that's our that's our system in and frankly.

Elizabeth Warren Bernie Sanders twenty three percent fifty two thousand dollars nine six trillion dollars three hundred dollar twenty seven percent one percent two decades four years ten years